Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC News  July 22, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

1:00 am
welcome to newsday reporting live from singapore. i am correction of the swami. the headlines. 25 dead but also dramatic rescues in the central chinese province after the heaviest rainfall ever recorded. some fourth their way out of trains on the subway. we broke half _ out of trains on the subway. - broke half of a window so air could get in otherwise we would have choked. the threat of climate change is all too real for many other countries, above all — low—lying ones. i'll be discussing this with david panuelo, president of the federated states of micronesia. i'm sarah mulkerrins live in tokyo. and with the action finally underway, we'll bring you some of the stories of how athletes
1:01 am
from all around the world have been getting inventive with their training for the delayed olympics. and unearthing archaeological treasure. scientists discover extraordinary fossils from more than 150 million years ago. live from our studio in singapore welcome to newsday — broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the world. it's eight in the morning here in singapore and henan in central china where the heaviest rains since records began have caused devastation in the province and affected dozens of other cities.
1:02 am
more than 200,000 people have been displaced and at least 25 people have died. the worst flooding is in the city of zhengzhou which has a population of 12 million and sits on the banks of the yellow river. the military have warned that a major dam could collapse at any time, and soldiers have been mobilised to try to divert rivers which have burst their banks. chinese scientists say global warming has made china's annual flood season much more dangerous. 0ur china correspondent robin brant sent this report. passengers on an underground train trying to escape the approaching floodwater. instead, though, they found themselves standing still, silent, holding on as the levels rose around them. translation: the water was at shoulder level. . a child and i both nearly gave up. we were worn out. but i used my arm to hang on,
1:03 am
and that's why i am bruised. others in the carriage said air was the problem. translation: we broke half of a window so air could get l in, otherwise we would have choked. at least a dozen people lost their lives as the water overran the tunnels and then the trains. above ground, others faced a terrifying torrent. the muddy, brown waters of the yellow river trying to sweep them away. this was just one example of an impromptu rescue effort that succeeded. the impact of the floods has been widespread, the city of zhengzhou was the worst hit, at one point it had almost a year's worth of rain fall in just three days. over a million people have been affected. in the last few days, hundreds of thousands of people were evacuated from in or around this city and millions
1:04 am
more warned about the impending floods, but the most troubling question that remains amidst the stench of dirty water here is how was it that a station on this line, on an underground metro system that's less than ten years old, came to be overwhelmed by rainwater and passengers left to die on the platform? china has mobilised its army, but not its leader. in a brief statement, president xijinping called for improvements to the system for early warnings. measures that are likely to be needed more as chinese scientists admit these once in a millennia rains could become more frequent as global warming makes for more dangerous weather. robin brand, bbc news, zhengzhou in eastern china. still to come a bit later in the programme: we get a view from one of the world's most vulnerable regions on the impacts of global warming — the federated states of micronesia — a group of some 600 small islands in the western pacific ocean. but first, in other
1:05 am
news at this hour: america's top general has acknowledged that the taliban have strategic momentum in afghanistan. general mark milley said the afghan army was consolidating its forces and trying to make sure the militants didn't take control of any major population centres. but he said with the us withdrawal now 95% complete, the taliban control half the districts in the country. a significant amount of territory has been seized over the course of ten months by the taliban so momentum, strategic momentum appears to be with the telegram. smoke from the huge wildfires burning on the west coast of america has drifted all the way across the continent, to cast a haze over the east coast. officials in new york issued warnings for pregnant women and the elderly, due to the poor air quality, with cities as far apart as washington and toronto also affected.
1:06 am
the disgraced former hollywood movie producer harvey weinstein has appeared in court in los angeles, where he pleaded not guilty to eleven charges of sexual assault. he had been extradited to california from new york, where he's serving a 23—year prison sentence for rape. greek police have fired tear gas and used water cannons against anti—vaccination protesters in athens. about 1,500 people gathered in opposition of the government's proposal to order the mandatory vaccination of health care workers. a rally last week drew more than 5,000 protesters. to the olympics now, where we've seen the start of the competition injapan ahead of the opening ceremony on friday. it began with women's softball — japan taking on australia in the opening event — and women's football — where there has already been an upset.
1:07 am
organisers say there are now more than 80 confirmed covid cases related to the games and two competitors have been ruled out after testing positive. we can go live now to our sports presenter in tokyo. sarah, you look like you are having so much fun for i am envious. what is going on for you right now? let envious. what is going on for you right now?— envious. what is going on for you right now? let me 'ust take ou you right now? let me 'ust take you through * you right now? let me 'ust take you through the h you right now? let me 'ust take you through the venue _ you right now? let me just take you through the venue and - you right now? let me just take you through the venue and this | you through the venue and this wonderful backdrop that we have because we're high above tokyo bay. this is one of the areas will host many of the events and so write down below me over the left—hand side is where the triathlon is and right across the bay you can potentially see some of the tops of the olympic village which is where the athletes are staying and then you have a wonderful big and expensive rainbow bridge bringing this part of the city
1:08 am
into the centre and that is where a lot of the heritage part of the games, a lot of the infrastructure from the 1964 olympics is in there and that will be one of the other sections of these tokyo games. you mentioned that these games have been delayed by a year because they are happening admit the coronavirus pandemic and it has been a fraud anxious and it has been a fraud anxious and panicked buildup at times. of and panicked buildup at times. of course, when tokyo was awarded the games back in 2013 it was so different. the landscape for athletes and media, fans around the world but also for businesses. many of those local businesses here all around us in tokyo bay and beyond were looking to get a bounce from these games. let's speak to ray fuji from tokyo. hejoins us on speak to ray fuji from tokyo. he joins us on the speak to ray fuji from tokyo. hejoins us on the programme. lovely to talk to you. firstly, i mentioned the is all those
1:09 am
years ago when tokyo was awarded the games. how different is the outlook now forjapanese businesses from for japanese businesses from having forjapanese businesses from having the games in this pandemic?— having the games in this pandemic? having the games in this andemic? , ., _ ~ ., pandemic? obviously, you know, the name pandemic? obviously, you know, the game has _ pandemic? obviously, you know, the game has been _ pandemic? obviously, you know, the game has been postponed i pandemic? obviously, you know, l the game has been postponed and that was— the game has been postponed and that was a — the game has been postponed and that was a disappointment for many— that was a disappointment for many people because of covid—19 it was— many people because of covid—19 it was unavoidable. obviously the economic impact that we were — the economic impact that we were expecting has been reduced much _ were expecting has been reduced much more and, also, by not having — much more and, also, by not having spectators. so the expectation for the economic boost — expectation for the economic boost and excitement for that particular segment of the olympic games has been tainted. you know. — olympic games has been tainted. you know, in the last 16 months _ you know, in the last 16 month-— you know, in the last 16
1:10 am
months. , . , months. even small things, if ou months. even small things, if you think _ months. even small things, if you think about _ months. even small things, if you think about it, _ months. even small things, if you think about it, such - months. even small things, if you think about it, such as i you think about it, such as tourism. even local tourism. you think about it, such as tourism. even localtourism. if internationalfans tourism. even localtourism. if international fans were not allowed but having locals allowed but having locals allowed to go to venues or businesses around, the days off, i think we have a couple off, i think we have a couple of bank holidays here in tokyo and around it all. how significant is it to internal business here as well? it significant is it to internal business here as well? if you look at this _ business here as well? if you look at this as _ business here as well? if you look at this as an _ business here as well? if you look at this as an absolute i look at this as an absolute number a huge number has been reduced. the economic impact i think has been estimated to be half— one third of what we were expecting this year. that being said, much of the economic impact and this is something that many economists have been talking about, it happened in the last three years. so that part of the economic impact has happened already and has been taken into account. in the economy and the stop market.
1:11 am
the proportion of economic impact in tourism and inbound tourism has been devastated and completely gone for this game and that is a huge impact. the hotels injapan, in tokyo were all booked even a couple of years ago when i was hosting an event for a client and we were having a hard time booking ourselves. but now many of the hotels are available and rooms are vacant because we do not have anyone coming from overseas. in have anyone coming from overseen-— have anyone coming from overseas. ., ., , overseas. in one word, is it worth it _ overseas. in one word, is it worth it or— overseas. in one word, is it worth it or not? _ overseas. in one word, is it worth it or not? you - overseas. in one word, is it worth it or not? you mean| overseas. in one word, is it| worth it or not? you mean if overseas. in one word, is it i worth it or not? you mean if i look at this? _
1:12 am
worth it or not? you mean if i look at this? the _ worth it or not? you mean if i look at this? the pandemic i worth it or not? you mean if i i look at this? the pandemic and everything _ look at this? the pandemic and everything involved, _ look at this? the pandemic and everything involved, yes - look at this? the pandemic and everything involved, yes or- look at this? the pandemic and j everything involved, yes or no? it was lovely to get your thoughts here on the programme. oh, not really. fantastic and appreciate your time. thank you forjoining us. that is, of course, sport will take over in the coming days with the opening ceremony on friday. some of the group games are already under way and the action is starting properly on saturday. it has been a tough buildup for the athletes and many of us know what it is like to stay home during this pandemic, it has been tough on all of us. but what about athletes who have made it here to tokyo. we looked at how some of the top competitors themselves in shape, if you are little more seriously than others. bathtubs, balconies and kitchens. here is how some olympic
1:13 am
athletes have trained for tokyo during lockdowns around the world. no treadmill was no problem for the 5000 metre runner paul chelimo. the us athlete took this jokey approach to indoor training. anouk verge—depre made use of her sister and nearby balcony to keep her beach volleyball skills sharp. at least the swiss player won't have to worry about trees in tokyo. the philippines' hidilyn diaz swept the gym for the kitchen allowing her to a live stream her weightlifting sessions. she also helped raise money for food parcels for hundreds of families. boxer ginny fuchs made her own gym outside — breaking rocks on a hillside with her us training team. while up on the roof, cuban wrestler daniel gregoric
1:14 am
worked out with a little help from his coach. he went to his coach's home to train and it was just enough for the indian ten metre shooter to practise in. and ray also trained inside heading to a parking garage but packing a shotgun rather than an air rifle meant the lebanese athlete did not pull the trigger. some very inventive ways for many of those athletes who will be arriving into tokyo full just to let you know, the action to look at today is probably the men's foot all that gets under way and there will be a rematch of the final backin will be a rematch of the final back in 2016. brazil won then in rio against germany, beating them on penalties and the pair meet again a little later. that
1:15 am
sounds extremely _ meet again a little later. that sounds extremely exciting. i meet again a little later. that sounds extremely exciting. we will hear more from you tomorrow. i am looking forward tomorrow. i am looking forward to it. meanwhile, if you want to it. meanwhile, if you want to get in touch with me on any of the stories that you have heard sarah talking about or anything else you have seen on the programme, i am on twitter. you are watching newsday. still to come, the remote islands of micronesia are some of the most vulnerable places on the planet to the effects of climate change. i have been talking to the president about what the world can do to help. coming down the ladder now. that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed tonight for the first crash in the 30 year history of concorde, the world's only supersonic airliner.
1:16 am
it was one of the most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred to that tore apart the state of yugoslavia. but now a decade later, it has been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease in sperm quantity, _ and an increase in _ malfunctioning sperm unable to swim properly. thousands of households across the country are suspiciously quiet this lunchtime as children bury their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. this is newsday on the bbc. 25 dead, but also dramatic
1:17 am
rescues and the chinese province of oman after heaviest rainfalls ever recorded. —— china has had record rains and flooding, and last week's floods killed over 200 people in europe. we have seen record heat waves and wildfires in the united states, some of the latest examples of some of the immense atmospheric challenges the world is facing. one of the most vulnerable places to the impacts of bible warming are the federated states of micronesia, a group of some 600 islands in the western pacific ocean. earlier, ispoke islands in the western pacific ocean. earlier, i spoke to the president of the federated states of micronesia, states of david president of the federated states of david w panuelo. we saw germany, belgium, and other european countries severely affected by, you know,
1:18 am
storms and heavy rains, flooding. we saw what happened in china. our sympathies to the citizens of these countries. climate change is already here. we have been saying that. it is just not in the future, it is already happening today. even our dead are not safe from these rising sea waters. they are washing away graveyards because of the rising ocean. the storms, they pull down our banana trees. a real challenge. ijust want tojump in here and ask, the united states has been saying countries aren't doing enough, pointing a finger at china saying it could do more. do you agree? we have said it many times over that we are calling on the bigger countries, the united
1:19 am
states, china, india, the european union, just the bigger countries which are the major emissions contributing to the carbon footprint, and that we need to take action now, and they need to champion the movement of reversing climate change, because it is affecting our small island countries, all of the pacific island countries after threatened by climate change. and so, this is something we were ready for. we can advance what we have been saying over the years. this is very important for our populations in the pacific countries.— populations in the pacific countries. . ., ., , ., countries. what do smaller nations like _ countries. what do smaller nations like yours - countries. what do smaller nations like yours play - countries. what do smaller nations like yours play in i countries. what do smaller| nations like yours play in all of this. ~ .
1:20 am
nations like yours play in all of this. . . .., , of this. we are the countries without any _ of this. we are the countries without any footprint, - of this. we are the countries without any footprint, any i without any footprint, any carbon footprint, we don't have any omissions, but you see that we have been championing these efforts that we are talking about here. what we can do is solution is readily assessed, help countries with their super polluted emissions of methane, black carbon, also hfcs. our country asks all countries to rally by the agreement, the montreal protocol. our country helped to champion this movement and we are calling on a bigger countries to ratify the amendment, and we are taking this matter forward, the amendment, and we are taking this matterforward, to work with countries so that we can understand that this is a matter that requires urgency and action today, right now. but even within your own
1:21 am
backyard, president, there is a lot of political infighting thatis lot of political infighting that is holding up progress on climate change. what responsibility do countries like yours have in this particular battle? we are not divided at all in terms of climate change. we are super united on it. in the last pacific islands foreign, we asked that they speak to this existential threat to our livelihood —— forum. i hear you are talking about the united states. we have engaged recently president biden's special point on climate change, john kerry, and he is talking to pacific island countries to be together, united, and at this decade of action. this must be done.
1:22 am
existential threat is not something that affects only pacific island countries. look at the recent news. canada is reporting. the united states are hurting. live stocks and food security is also threatened in the united states. you look around the rest of the world, everywhere will be impacted by climate change. it is a win—win situation. i have stated to the nations, it will take a greater challenge than the global community dead and it confronting the second world war, because this means an extinction of life—support system that we have on the planet, both on land and at sea. david w panuelo there, the president of the federated
1:23 am
states of micronesia, talking about the impacts of crime a change. let's round up other news this hour. several us states have unveiled a proposed settlement under which pharmaceutical companies accused of fuelling the opioid academic would pay compensation. the agreement would need the support of all states. the us says it has reached a deal with germany to allow completion of the controversial $11 billion nordstrom to gas pipeline. they had been concern of my scout using the energy as leverage to exert political control in europe. experts from the national history museum in london have started excavating one of the most important jurassic sites in the uk. it is at a secret location and is believed to hold tens of thousands of fossils from 167 million years ago. ourscience
1:24 am
fossils from 167 million years ago. our science correspondent joined a deck. this is what she found. —— dig. a race against time to reveal our ancient past. the team from the natural history museum has just three days to excavate this unique site. look how long they are. that's really cool! this cotswolds quarry holds a lot of secrets trove of sea creatures that lived during thejurassic period. what's here is so extraordinary, he location is being kept secret. we have got another really nice, exceptionalspecimen here. this is a brittle star, likely to be a new species. it's quality of preservation, it's the number of fossils that we are finding but it's also the diversity. it is really unprecedented at geological sites of this age across the world. usually, on an excavation, you may get a handful of finds but here it is different. scientists think there are tens of thousands of fossils lying in the mud.
1:25 am
this place must have been teeming with life 167—million years ago. this area was once covered by a shallow tropical sea. living there were animals like starfish, sea urchins, brittle stars and its sea cucumbers. quite heavy old piece, isn't it? the site was discovered by local fossil hobbyists, nev and sally. seeing a slab of life. at first, the quarry didn't look too promising. we were finding very small fragments of plates of sea urchins — just tiny, tiny fragments, though, nothing spectacular. when we got home and cleaned it up, he was like, "oh, my god, sally. "you've got to come and see this." it was this beautifuljurassic sea creature coming to life. they are amazing! just like they were alive yesterday. with so many fossils here, the challenge is working out which ones to keep. the very best are now heading to the natural history museum. the team says it's the discovery of a lifetime.
1:26 am
rebecca morelle, bbc news, at a secret location in the cotswolds. that is all we have time for, thank you for watching. good evening. it's been another day of hot sunshine for most parts of the uk, and in northern ireland, it looks like we have broken a record once again. 31.3 degrees at castlederg in county tyrone, provisionally the highest temperatures on record in northern ireland. the previous record was only sent last saturday. so, still a met office amber extreme heat warning in force here. also one for southern wales, parts of the midlands, down into the south—west of england. and part of the reason for that heat warning is that temperatures really aren't falling far overnight. 11pm bringing temperatures still up into the 20s for some.
1:27 am
as we head through the night, those temperatures won't fall an awful lot further. we will see some low cloud rolling in across northern and eastern scotland, parts of north—east england. that'll retreat to the coasts through the day tomorrow. a few thunderstorms popping up, but for most, it's dry with hot sunshine. and in northern ireland tomorrow, well, we could be looking at temperatures up to 32 degrees. we may break that record once again. temperatures will come down through friday, and particularly into the weekend, which will bring some heavy downpours or some. notice, a very high easterly. temperatures on thursday could be in northern ireland, we could be another record, that remains to be seen, up to 32? almost, up to the mid—to high
1:28 am
20s. stilla almost, up to the mid—to high 20s. still a very warm day, wouldn't class it as a very hot day, warm enough temperatures into the mid— —ite 20s. notice some rain here. storms bring to the south—west of us, and this is an area of low pressure that will drag in pressure, atla ntica re, will drag in pressure, atlanticare, and push the hot was more eastern parts of europe. they could be slow—moving thunderstorms, and they can bring an awful lot of rain ina they can bring an awful lot of rain in a short space of time. that is to come this weekend — saturday and sunday, especially across the southern part of the uk. bearthat in across the southern part of the uk. bear that in mind.
1:29 am
1:30 am
this hangar is bbc news. we will have the headlines and the main news stories for you at the top of the hours straight after this programme. few people could be said to personify any of the vast new forces shaping the 21st century, let alone more than one. but perhaps the ceo of google,
1:31 am
sundar pichai, can be said to embody two.

34 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on