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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 21, 2021 9:00pm-10:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm rebecca jones. our top stories: a year's rainfall in just three days as china's henen province — is hit by some of its worst ever flooding. at least 25 people have died — many caught on the subway — as water poured in — submerging trains and platforms. life expectancy in the united states dropped by one and a half years in 2020, the biggest decline since the second world war. the british home secretary agrees to give france millions more pounds in funding to stem the rising number of migrants crossing the english channel. plus, liverpool is stripped of its unesco world heritage status, we'll get local reaction to the news.
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hello and welcome to the programme. the heaviest rain since records began has caused devastation in the central chinese province of henan. the city ofjung—joe has been hardest hit — at least 25 people have died — mostly on the subway system, where passengers were submerged in waist deep waters. chinese scientists say global warming has made china's annual flood season much more dangerous. our correspondent stephen mcdonell has the latest. floodwaters rose around commuters stuck on board underground train carriages. they stood on seats as the level kept rising. hundreds of passengers
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were rescued but there were also those who didn't make it, when the system was flooded at a frightening speed. translation: the water was at shoulder level. . a child and i both nearly gave up. we were worn out. but i used my arm to hang on, and that's why i am bruised. in zhengzhou, the hardest—hit city, footage of dramatic rescues, one after another, has spread across social media. throughout henan province, streets have become surging brown rivers, swallowing traffic in their wake. a year's worth of rain has fallen in the region within days. china's leader xijinping has described the situation as "extremely severe". soldiers were mobilised to blast around a dam. by diverting rising flood waters, they say they stopped it collapsing. rescuers have also rushed
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to save children, in some cases floating them out of harm's way. this is a rainy time of year in china, and floods are an annual occurrence, but it's the record—breaking nature of this rainfall which has people worried, and these extreme weather events seem to be happening much more frequently, leading to a lot of discussion about climate change, and the need to do something about it, urgently. in the meantime, the people of henan just have to get through the next few days, because the rain hasn't stopped, and the weather forecasts are saying that there's more to come. stephen mcdonnell, bbc news, beijing. and these floods in china are a part of a series of extreme climate events around the world — in places like the us. more than 80 major fires are now raging across 13 us states. in oregon, the nation's largest active wildfire being called the bootleg fire has burned around
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965 square kilometres, prompting thousands of evacuations. the effects of the fires are now seen thousands of miles away as smoke clouds the skies of cities like new york. meanwhile, people in parts of germany and belgium have also been affected by severe flooding in recent weeks. it's germany's worst natural disaster in more than half a century and more than 200 people have died. life expectancy in the united states dropped by one and a half years more now on the extreme impact of these climate events.
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i'm joined now by nasa's senior climate adviser, gavin schmidt. welcome to the bbc. good to happy with us. we have three needs floods in china, germany, belgium. we have seen this intense heat in north america and is this normal, or is this part of a wider pattern? it’s this part of a wider pattern? it's both. this part of a wider pattern? it's both- there _ this part of a wider pattern? it�*s both. there are wider patterns. as we know, climate change is warming up we know, climate change is warming up the planet, it's warmed up 1.2 degrees since the end of the 19th century. that is continuing apace, and as a function of that, we are seeing greater extremes and greater intensity of heat waves. record temperatures, intense rainfall, and thatis temperatures, intense rainfall, and that is leading to some of these events that we have already seen. let's talk about the flooding in china. we are use to rainfall in that part of the world, but the amount that has fallen is absolutely staggering. why is that, in your
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view? ., ., , view? so, there are always local weather conditions _ view? so, there are always local weather conditions that - view? so, there are always local weather conditions that have - view? so, there are always localj weather conditions that have led view? so, there are always local i weather conditions that have led to that particular situation, but what we find is because of climate change, when there is intense precipitation, that precipitation is falling harder. so we are seeing greater, intense rainfall. that's happening notjust in china, but the us, europe, pretty much everywhere where we have got enough data to see this, we are seeing that same pattern, which has been predicted by climate models for many years. truth? climate models for many years. why is it so hot in — climate models for many years. why is it so hot in north america, and why are the fires so intense there? well, it's the same kind of idea. we are warming the planet, so normal weather variations, and sometimes you have extreme weather variations, but now, with that extra juicing of the climax from carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, the temperature is that you are getting to when these things happen are now
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much greater than they would have been. so we are seeing much greater probability of passing you know, 30 degrees, 35 degrees. 50 it probability of passing you know, 30 degrees, 35 degrees.— probability of passing you know, 30 degrees, 35 degrees. so it sounds as if ou are degrees, 35 degrees. so it sounds as if you are saying _ degrees, 35 degrees. so it sounds as if you are saying more _ degrees, 35 degrees. so it sounds as if you are saying more events - degrees, 35 degrees. so it sounds as if you are saying more events like - if you are saying more events like this are inevitable. i’m if you are saying more events like this are inevitable.— this are inevitable. i'm afraid so, es. we this are inevitable. i'm afraid so, yes- we have _ this are inevitable. i'm afraid so, yes. we have moved, _ this are inevitable. i'm afraid so, yes. we have moved, and - this are inevitable. i'm afraid so, yes. we have moved, and we - this are inevitable. i'm afraid so, | yes. we have moved, and we are continuing to warm the planet. in the extremes we see, what they are going to shift with that. not every location, not every year, but we are going to see more and more of these kind of intense rainfall events, intense heat waves, and that is going to continue, it's going to get worse, unless we start to reduce emissions and get down to a more stable climate.— stable climate. nasa's senior climate adviser _ stable climate. nasa's senior climate adviser connected to | stable climate. nasa's senior- climate adviser connected to happy with us. many thanks. life expectancy in the united states dropped by one and a half years in 2020, the biggest decline since the second world war. for black and hispanic americans,
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the drop was even greater — three years. health officials say the decline was mainly due to the pandemic. the data comes as there's now a resurgence of coronavirus cases across the united states, with the delta variant accounting for more than 80% of new cases. i'm joined now by infectious disease physican and icu director dr tyson bill in charlottesville, virginia. good to have you with us. thank you. let's talk about these life expectancy figures, first of all. this drop by one and a half years in 2020, how surprised where you buy that figure? 2020, how surprised where you buy that fiuure? ~ 2020, how surprised where you buy that figure?— that figure? well, certainly i wasn't surprised _ that figure? well, certainly i wasn't surprised by - that figure? well, certainly i - wasn't surprised by the number, but it does underscore that that sheer tall of the pandemic. as he pointed out, the disproportionate tall was taken by the black and brown communities in the united states.
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when you look across the globe, 4.1 million infections, 4.1 million deaths, vaccinations are the good protection against death from coronavirus, but we have very two—tiered pandemic, and since high income countries have... so we can see how this can continue to play out with the new variant that is more transmissible, more easily spread, and we can have another devastating toll on, and afraid he could be a really tough year for a lot of places around the country. i lot of places around the country. i want to come back to the virus, and indeed vaccinations. just a final thought about that drop in life that inspects and see. is it on the down to coronavirus?— to coronavirus? well, the report said that to coronavirus? well, the report| said that around 7596 was directly said that around 75% was directly attributable to the coronavirus. what we know is that there are under counts because some hospital systems are underwhelmed, so they aren't
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able to report —— overwhelmed, so they aren't able to report the true amount of coronavirus debts. it may have been regular medical conditions, but because the hospital was overwhelmed, the hospital is not able to take care of that patient. so if you look at the true tall of coronavirus, it has been substantially larger than the additional accounts that have been reported. but remember, when hospital systems are overwhelmed, it's both patients with coronavirus and those who come in for other reasons that suffer. understood. tell us a little _ reasons that suffer. understood. tell us a little bit more _ reasons that suffer. understood. tell us a little bit more about. reasons that suffer. understood. | tell us a little bit more about the situation in america but the delta variant that you mentioned earlier. why is that spreading so fast? is it just down to people not taking up the vaccination?— just down to people not taking up the vaccination? well, a combination of thin . s. the vaccination? well, a combination of things- so — the vaccination? well, a combination of things- so we _ the vaccination? well, a combination of things. so we do _ the vaccination? well, a combination of things. so we do know— the vaccination? well, a combination of things. so we do know vaccination| of things. so we do know vaccination offers good protection against the delta variant, but unfortunately, similar to what happened in the uk, we now have 83% of infections being driven by the delta variant. now if you look at where these infections are happening, they are by and large
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the vast majority occurring in areas that are under vaccinated. so we have in our country about 60% of adults probably vaccinated. we have pockets where that's very low, in the 30s in some cases, and in these can see that they are very vulnerable to infections from covid—19, and we are seeing hospital systems in these areas being overwhelmed, and in some cases taking care of more covid—19 patients than they have at any point prior to the pandemic. it's very concerning to me and underscores the need to really bump up the rate of vaccination, particularly in these low vaccination uptake communities. my low vaccination uptake communities. my understanding is that a new survey has shown that thejohnson & johnson vaccine is perhaps less effective in protecting against the delta variant. have you heard back, and are you able to give us any more detail? ~ , ., , ., ., detail? well, this was one of the newer studies _ detail? well, this was one of the newer studies that _ detail? well, this was one of the newer studies that came - detail? well, this was one of the newer studies that came out - detail? well, this was one of the - newer studies that came out looking at thejohnson newer studies that came out looking at the johnson & newer studies that came out looking at thejohnson &johnson vaccine. i do think it does conflict with some
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other evidence that shows that the vaccine does seem to be pretty effective of preventing severe covid—19. we know that in general the delta variant while fall vaccination does offer protection, it has some ability to poke holes in the armour, so to speak. but if you look at the people that are coming in with infections and to hospitals with coronavirus, by and large committees are people who are not vaccinated. so about 13 million americans have been vaccinated with the johnson & americans have been vaccinated with thejohnson &johnson, and we haven't seen a rash of patients have been vaccinated with thej&j vaccine compared to the other vaccines coming in with severe infection. qm. coming in with severe infection. 0k, doctor tyson. _ coming in with severe infection. 0k, doctor tyson. we — coming in with severe infection. 0k, doctor tyson, we must leave it there. really good to talk to. thank you. there. really good to talk to. thank ou. . ~ , ., nurses, consultants, paramedics and other nhs staff in england have been offered a 3% pay rise by the uk government. it's three times higher than the government's initial 1% offer which had sparked fury among front line workers. however, after months and months of working through the pandemic,
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one union said its members were on their knees and that the revised offer was "frankly appalling". we're joined now by pat cullen, acting general secretary and chief executive of the royal college of nursing. good to have you with us, packed. i know your union had asked for a rise of 12.5%, the government had initially offered a rise of 1%, and now, this rise has been offered of 3%. what is your reaction?- 3%. what is your reaction? well, leavin: 3%. what is your reaction? well, leaving aside _ 3%. what is your reaction? well, leaving aside that _ leaving aside that the announcement today was handled in a shambolic manner, the award for earners is the 500,000 wonderful nurses that i represent in the royal college of nursing havejust been represent in the royal college of nursing have just been given the biggest insults that any political leader in governments could get them this evening. when we really need to steal this down and look at it in
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the clear facts of the day, our nurses have been given £2 extra per day in their pay packets, so that is what the government believe that they are worth after what they had been through and that's pandemic and long before it. and they say to them, well, just continue on, continue on and let us keep on going whilst we pull that shutter is down today and had to offer summer recess. there is no nurse able to take their annual leave, and owners able to head out for the summer. they have continued to treat their patients, and that's what the government's message has said to them today. it's disdainful and they are treating those nurses with total contempt. are treating those nurses with total contem t. ~ 1, , are treating those nurses with total contemt. ~ 1, _ ., ,., are treating those nurses with total contemt. ~ 1, _ ., ., contempt. when boris johnson made the oriainal contempt. when boris johnson made the original 196 _ contempt. when boris johnson made the original 1% offer, _ contempt. when boris johnson made the original 1% offer, he _ the original 1% offer, he said it had been made on the basis of affordability because we are in pretty tough times. he is at least right about that, isn't he?- right about that, isn't he? well, there is nothing _ right about that, isn't he? well, there is nothing tougher - right about that, isn't he? well, there is nothing tougher than i right about that, isn't he? -ii there is nothing tougher than being a nurse at this moment in time. there is nothing tougher than being a nurse for these past 16 months.
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each and every one of us and the people of england recognise that. that people went out and clapped for their nurses and health care workers every thursday night. that was their respect. they delivered food prices to the hospitals, but those nurses continue to work 14 hour shifts in intensive care wards. they continue to move out from their families to make sure that patients are cared for. they made so much sacrifice. they watched their families having to depart. they've seen their own colleagues die. they've seen themselves getting infected with covid—19. they kept on going, yet the government say it's ok to come out and say to them, actually, you don't matter that much, we really don't matter that much, we really don't care that much. that's the message that's been given to our half a million members today. what half a million members today. what will our half a million members today. what will your members, _ half a million members today. what will your members, or _ half a million members today. what will your members, or what can your members do next?— members do next? well, we as a colleue members do next? well, we as a college will _ members do next? well, we as a college will take _ members do next? well, we as a college will take the _ members do next? well, we as a college will take the lead - members do next? well, we as a college will take the lead from i college will take the lead from our wonderful nurses, our half a million nurses, we will now consult with
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them over the measly 3% that has been offered today to them, and then we will be guided by those nurses, we will be guided by those nurses, we will be guided by those nurses, we will walk alongside them as their leaders and asked them what are the next steps. we all know what happened in northern ireland when the voice of nursing let's tried to be dampened down, and we went through a period of industrial action. i was proud and privileged to lead our nurses through the industrial action in northern ireland, i'm not sure if the same will happen in england, but i while —— what i will say is that if you ignore the place of nursing to me at 90 —— ignore the voice of patients. in the nurses won't allow the voices of the patient to be ignored, they never have come and they never well. packs from the royal college of nursing, many thanks. the city of liverpool loses its position as a world heritage site, unesco says it had to, locals are angry, we'll explore all the angles, next.
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the number of deaths from covid—19 for each care home in england has been published. the bbc�*s michael buchanan has more. what this data shows is that the home of the highest number of deaths, 44 deaths in the year, but the data was calculated for a care home. it shows that there were 21 care homes that had 30 or more residents who died of covid—19, and in almost all cases with the exception of one committees where large care homes. these are care homes that could accommodate more than 50 residents. so the greatest link you can make between the number of deaths from this data is the size of deaths from this data is the size of the care home, essentially, that they get a care home, the larger the number of deaths. as you say at the beginning is welcome if you look at the maps of where these deaths occur in the first wave of the pandemic,
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the northwest of england the care homes in the northwest of england where hardest hit. injanuary and february commit was undoubtedly in the southeast. the number of migrants who've crossed the english channel to the uk, so far this year, has now exceeded the total for all of 2020. the trend has led to the british government's decision, to give the french authorities an extra 54 million pounds, that's 74 million dollars, to double the number of police patrolling the beaches of northern france. it's also meant to improve intelligence sharing, and introduce better technology to target the gangs who organise the crossings. the british home secretary priti patel denied that this was �*throwing good money after bad', after a deal last year failed to bring results. our home editor mark easton has the latest. despite the home office throwing
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millions at the problem of migrants arriving on small boats, the numbers this year have already eclipsed the whole of last. it is an embarrassment for a government which promised to control the uk's borders and make the cross—channel smuggling route unavailable. now, the home secretary's being accused of failing the unaccompanied child migrants, who arrived at dover's tug haven. unable to find enough local authority places in england to take the children, the home office has resorted to holding them in this local immigration centre, patrolled by guards. we understand that between 15 and 20 unaccompanied migrant children are currently accommodated in this government office building, in sleeping bags, on camp beds, and reportedly without proper washing facilities or medical support. 0ne agency has said that the children's welfare is deteriorating. the bbc has obtained photographs of conditions in one holding centre, young boys sleeping on the floor, with cushions for pillows,
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and military—style camp beds, trying to get some rest in what looks like an office waiting room. how long have you been staying here? the home office has also taken over this holiday hotel in hythe, paying the owner more than £340,000 for a block booking until september. inside, teenage migrants from iran. 0ne told me he had been there for ten days already. i bumped into paula, who had been due to celebrate her birthday with a stay at the hotel, until the home office turned up. we drove down here to be told, "we're taking in children". and i said, "i need an explanation. "taking in children?", and they explained that we've got asylum seekers in here for two months. government ministers were warned last year by the prisons inspectorate and the children's commissioner that the welfare of vulnerable children was at risk, without urgent action, but the home office has refused to force local authorities to take
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child migrants, and with kent county council unable to take any more, the backlog building up in the county has seen a number of children waiting for over 100 hours for a place in care. the home office has 14— and 15—year—olds sleeping on canvas beds. today, the home secretary was questioned by mps, demanding to know why warnings of a child welfare crisis were not heeded. there are many authorities around the country that quite frankly have written to us and said - that they will not take asylum seekers or children, - and have been very, very firm in their resistance, so it's _ important that we continue to engage and work in a collaborative manner on this. _ the government insists its controversial nationality and borders bill will stop the people smugglers and the economic migrants, but campaigners say the vulnerable children on the camp beds cannot wait for that law to have any effect. mark easton, bbc news, kent. the city of liverpool has been
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stripped of its world heritage status after a un committee found developments threatened the value of the city's waterfront. the decision was made following a secret ballot by the unesco committee at a meeting in china. unesco had said that the developments, including the planned new everton fc stadium, had resulted in a "serious deterioration" of the historic site. liverpool becomes only the third site to lose its world heritage status since the list began in 1978, the other two being 0man's arabian 0ryx sanctuary in 2007 because the size of the reserve which is home to rare antelope was to be cut by 90%, and the dresden elbe valley in germany in 2009. well let's talk to liverpool icon pete price and pete i can't imagine you're too happy about all this? are you sad about this because? 0r are you sad about this because? or are you just shrugging your shoulders?—
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are you just shrugging your shoulders? �* , , . shoulders? i'm very sad they are takin: it shoulders? i'm very sad they are taking it off— shoulders? i'm very sad they are taking it off us, very, _ shoulders? i'm very sad they are taking it off us, very, very i taking it off us, very, very sad about that, but i am flabbergasted. you know, liverpool has got to come back to life. we have been in a pandemic. it is a wasteland, it's a piece of wasteland. it's unreal. everton have bent over backwards to try and help. our city is thriving tomatoes on the biggest role ever before the pandemic, and these people, these mindless people who live in this ivory tower that don't come to liverpool have no idea what is going on. we are a vibrant city trying to get back to the way we were, and it's great that the road infrastructure is being put in place, ready for this to open, and to bring jobs and food to the city, because people forget there has been a pandemic. we are in a terrible state, like the rest of the world famous of these —— 20 speed by doing, i haven't a clue. famous of these -- 20 speed by doing, i haven't a clue. stripping liverool doing, i haven't a clue. stripping liverpool of _ doing, i haven't a clue. stripping liverpool of world _ doing, i haven't a clue. stripping liverpool of world heritage i doing, i haven't a clue. stripping |
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liverpool of world heritage status make any difference? p by going to come to liverpool anyway, aren't they, for the beatles, for the pope —— football? they, for the beatles, for the pope -- football?— -- football? they are indeed. without any _ -- football? they are indeed. without any shadow - -- football? they are indeed. without any shadow of - -- football? they are indeed. without any shadow of a i -- football? they are indeed. l without any shadow of a doubt, -- football? they are indeed. i without any shadow of a doubt, but sad that they've done it at this time. it makes a bit of a mockery, and allow for a lot of businesses didn't come to liverpool because of the paperwork and because of all the restrictions commit because of this organisation. so, yes, we will be on the biggest role ever. we have the cruise ships coming back, we've got the straight shops opening up again too many trains coming. we are ready too many trains coming. we are ready to go, and bring people here, but it is sad they have taken our badge away, especially as they haven't been here. that's what makes me really cross. they live in a different world. do they not know there has been a pandemic? today not know people have got to eat and put food on the table. it is not a museum, it is a living city with living people and it.— museum, it is a living city with living people and it. what do you make of unesco's _ living people and it. what do you make of unesco's argument i living people and it. what do you make of unesco's argument that | living people and it. what do you i make of unesco's argument that there has been serious deterioration to
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the waterfront is not even you must admit some of the architecture is, to put it politely, a bitjagged. yes, it is a bitjagged. but i'm a 75—year—old man, i have lived through the bad times. i remember what it was like in liverpool. i know what we have got now to what we had. you know, it is bringing people into the city. people from all over the world, hong kong in particular, buying apartments here and moving over here. yes, it's a bitjagged, and we will probably be a bit more jagged and we will probably be a bit more jagged on the other side of the water when it peel holdings start doing all the development there, but this is the real world we're living in. hey, they want to see jagged, go to singapore and see how exciting they are over there? this is a fabulous city. we've got the unesco music awards, so i think we are still recognised musically perfect, but we've got to have everything. i
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but we've got to have everything. i have got to interrupt you there, we are out of time to motivate your passion does come through. thank you forjoining us. stay with us here in bbc news, plenty more to come on the programme. good evening. it's been another hot day across most parts of the uk, and in northern ireland, it looks like records have been broken once again. 31.3 degrees recorded at castlederg in county tyrone this afternoon. that is a new provisional all—time record for northern ireland. the previous record, well, that was only set last saturday. things are set to change over the coming days because to this swirl of cloud here, an area of low pressure out in the atlantic. that'll be moving in our direction in time for the weekend, but in the shorter—term, it's just going to nudge up against this area of high pressure, strengthening the easterly wind. it is that that is pushing the heat westwards, so these areas still covered by a met office amber extreme heat warning — the south west of england,
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parts of the midlands, the southern half of wales and also northern ireland. high temperatures by day, but also those temperatures staying pretty high at night. those temperatures not dropping quickly at all through the evening. any daytime thunderstorms should tend to fade, but have a look at the temperatures at 11pm. we're looking at values around 22—23 degrees in places, and those temperatures won't fall an awful lot further as we head through the rest of the night. we're also going to see more of this low cloud, mist and murk pushing in towards northern and eastern scotland, parts of eastern england. so, quite a grey, misty start to the day here. a lot of that low cloud and fog and mist will tend to burn back towards the coast, so it should brighten up inland. and for most, tomorrow is another hot and mostly sunny day with just a scattering of isolated afternoon thunderstorms. but there is evidence of the easterly wind, not a particularly strong wind, but enough to push the heat westwards. so, in northern ireland tomorrow, we could be looking at a high of 32 degrees. it is possible we could break that record once again.
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will be cooler across eastern parts of the uk. and here on friday, again, we'll see some mist and murk and low cloud. also down to the south west, notice this heavy, thundery rain drifting into the picture. this is the first sign of our change for the weekend. temperatures also a little bit lower on friday, but as we head into the weekend, this area of low pressure is going to slide across the uk, particularly england and wales, giving some heavy, thundery downpours, possibly enough rain to cause some disruption. across northern ireland and scotland, it should stay mostly dry, but temperatures much lower than they have been.
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this is bbc news. our top stories: at least 25 people have died in china's henan province after record—breaking rainfall. underground railway tunnels were flooded, leaving passengers trapped in rising waters. as the number of covid—19 cases soars in france, the government makes it compulsory to show proof of vaccination or a negative test to visit most museums, cinemas and theme parks. from selling tourist knick—knacks on the streets of athens to helping the milwaukee bucks to win their first nba title in 50 years. we'll have the extraordinary story of basketball player giannis. and we'll talk to comedian julian clary about going back to his cabaret roots in a new production as theatres
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across the uk reopen. the eu is being asked to change the way that trade between great britain and northern ireland is regulated. the protocol signed last year, as part of the brexit outcome, was aimed at preventing checks on the border, between the republic of ireland and the north. the uk government is worried in particular about chilled meat products, including burgers and sausages, no longer being exportable from britain to northern ireland. lord frost, the man who negotiated the brexit dealfor the uk, said the eu should look again at the proposals, as our correspondent emma vardy reports.
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all is not rosy with northern ireland still at the heart of the deadlock between the uk and eu over brexit. added costs and suppliers either refusing to ship to northern ireland, or only agreeing to send large orders, have been some of the issues for garden centres, just one of many sectors affected. i think the reality of brexit to us was such a shock. we thought we had got ahead of brexit, we had been on every single zoom call with local councils, local governments, we took all the advice we could. even after all that, we still cannot get the paperwork to work. what difference would it make if the eu were to simplify things? if we could get it simple, it would just mean we could get back to our old ways ofjust ordering as and when we need. it has had a dramatic effect on our cash flow, on our workload. today, the uk government laid down new demands for the eu, saying the burdens on business will get worse, unless major alterations are made. these proposals will require significant change to the northern ireland protocol. we do not shy away from that. we believe such change
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is necessary to deal with the situation we now face. we look to open a discussion on these proposals urgently. the protocol means there are thousands of new checks on goods crossing the irish sea to avoid checks over the irish land border. the uk wants the eu to remove the need for checks and paperwork on many goods, which are staying in northern ireland, with customs documents only needed for those that are being sold on to the republic. another demand is for a complete standstill on the protocol while these new negotiations take place. what we expected at the time - was that we would be able to operate the protocol in a light—touch way, taking account of the delicate i politics and the peace process in northern ireland, _ and honestly that's not how it's turned out. i so that's why we need to move forward in a different way. i the arrangements continue to be divisive in northern ireland, with protests and loyalist communities, who see it as undermining british identity,
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while nationalist politicians and the irish government and are urging the uk to operate the protocol, as was already agreed. whether it is issues to do with plants orfood or animal we are still examining what they are saying with respect with the british government has said but we are being clear that how a renegotiation has said. we've seen years of negotiations. whether it is issues to do with plants orfood or animal products, the two sides are supposed to resolve any differences in something called the joint committee, but the uk already angered the eu by acting unilaterally of its own accord in all of those areas, and there is a legal action for that still ongoing. the eu says it will not renegotiate the protocol, and if the uk deviates further from the original agreement, it could have wider implications for the overall trade deal, affecting millions more consumers. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast.
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violence in darfur persists despite the peace truce many hoped would finally end decades of conflict. more than 200 people have died in clashes this year and hundreds of thousands are homeless. un peacekeepers pulled out of the region after 13 years on the ground, with some 20,000 sudanese troops promised to replace them. but they have not yet arrived, leaving people feel afraid and hopeless. 0ur africa correspondent reha kansara sent this report from el geneina in west darfur. the sound of a hard—earned peace falling apart. in the after maths and micro and's suppose a new era of calm. and it is not a pile of rubble —— darfur. calm. and it is not a pile of rubble -- darfur-— -- darfur. they burned all the houses and — -- darfur. they burned all the houses and when _ -- darfur. they burned all the houses and when we - -- darfur. they burned all the houses and when we tried i -- darfur. they burned all the houses and when we tried to i -- darfur. they burned all the i houses and when we tried to flee into the street, they shot my brother and he fell down. we tried
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to stand up, they shot him again. they killed him in front of me. i covered his body with a cloth and stayed with him.— covered his body with a cloth and stayed with him. locals thought the worst years — stayed with him. locals thought the worst years of _ stayed with him. locals thought the worst years of violence _ stayed with him. locals thought the worst years of violence were - stayed with him. locals thought the worst years of violence were over i worst years of violence were over but darfur bloodied legacy continues. in 2019, he was ousted from power and a year later, the government signed a peace agreement assuming responsibility for security and darfur. international peacekeepers with true, but nobody replace them. now, the violence has returned. many blame the rapid support forces for the attacks. paramilitaries tasked by the government to protect civilians. but they have not yet commented on these claims. every attack heightens food insecurity here.— insecurity here. there disrupted or dela ed. insecurity here. there disrupted or delayed- this _ insecurity here. there disrupted or delayed. this means _
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insecurity here. there disrupted or delayed. this means that we i insecurity here. there disrupted or. delayed. this means that we cannot actually— delayed. this means that we cannot actually distribute aid to the 1.2 million — actually distribute aid to the 1.2 million people who are most in need within the area. is now a tent city. eve one within the area. is now a tent city. everyone living — within the area. is now a tent city. everyone living here _ within the area. is now a tent city. everyone living here has _ within the area. is now a tent city. everyone living here has been i everyone living here has been displaced twice, not for the first time, for the second. there living in cramped conditions wherever they can to feel safe. some are starting to return to settlements they fled from. he was shot in the arm. no afraid, he is rebuilding his home saying that life in a camp was unbearable. if you needed the bathroom. — unbearable. if you needed the bathroom, you would - unbearable. if you needed the bathroom, you would have i unbearable. if you needed the bathroom, you would have to| unbearable. if you needed the i bathroom, you would have to walk unbearable. if you needed the - bathroom, you would have to walk for two or— bathroom, you would have to walk for two or three _ bathroom, you would have to walk for two or three hours with _ bathroom, you would have to walk for two or three hours with over - two or three hours with over a thousand _ two or three hours with over a thousand people. _ two or three hours with over a thousand people. the - two or three hours with over a j thousand people. the children two or three hours with over a - thousand people. the children wanted to wash _ thousand people. the children wanted to wash themselves _ thousand people. the children wanted to wash themselves and _ thousand people. the children wanted to wash themselves and use - thousand people. the children wanted to wash themselves and use the i to wash themselves and use the bathroom, — to wash themselves and use the bathroom, but _ to wash themselves and use the bathroom, but they— to wash themselves and use the bathroom, but they did - to wash themselves and use the bathroom, but they did not i to wash themselves and use the bathroom, but they did not feell bathroom, but they did not feel comfortable. _ bathroom, but they did not feel comfortable. that _ bathroom, but they did not feel comfortable. that is— bathroom, but they did not feel comfortable. that is why - bathroom, but they did not feel comfortable. that is why we i bathroom, but they did not feel| comfortable. that is why we are bathroom, but they did not feel- comfortable. that is why we are back here now _ comfortable. that is why we are back here now and — comfortable. that is why we are back here now and will _ comfortable. that is why we are back here now and will stay, _ comfortable. that is why we are back here now and will stay, as _ comfortable. that is why we are back here now and will stay, as we - comfortable. that is why we are back here now and will stay, as we don't l here now and will stay, as we don't have _ here now and will stay, as we don't have any— here now and will stay, as we don't
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have any other _ here now and will stay, as we don't have any other option. _ here now and will stay, as we don't have any other option. heinr- have any other option. new government _ have any other option. government checkpoints have any other option— government checkpoints promised protection, but do little to allay fears. ., ., , fears. the un withdrawal is so awful, life _ fears. the un withdrawal is so awful, life is _ fears. the un withdrawal is so awful, life is difficult. - fears. the un withdrawal is so j awful, life is difficult. conflicts have _ awful, life is difficult. conflicts have risen _ awful, life is difficult. conflicts have risen-— have risen. for now, darfur residents— have risen. for now, darfur residents remain _ have risen. for now, darfur residents remain caught i have risen. for now, darfur residents remain caught in| have risen. for now, darfur| residents remain caught in a decades—old conflict and long—lasting peace seems far off. french cinemas, museums and sports venues began asking visitors today to provide proof of covid—19 vaccination or a negative test as the country, which is in the throes of a fourth wave of infections, rolled out a controversial vaccine passport system. the so—called "health pass" is required for all events or places with more than 50 people, before being extended to restaurants, cafes and shopping centres in august. the move has sparked protests with tens of thousands vaccine sceptics took to the streets over
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the last week. let's talk to anne elisabeth moutet, paris based columnist for the daily telegraph. welcome to bbc news and it is good to have you with us. they have been these vociferous protests over the policy, but how typical is that resistance? it policy, but how typical is that resistance?— resistance? it is a minority. but first of all. _ resistance? it is a minority. but first of all. it — resistance? it is a minority. but first of all, it is _ resistance? it is a minority. but first of all, it is typical - first of all, it is typical because there have been so many u—turns on policy that nobody trust the government to be either consistent or effective and second, you have people who are not anti—vaccine were not against the idea vaccination but while raising problems of civil liberties and they say that since 2015, the time of the assassination, we have lived under one type of
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anti—terrorism emergency law and we now have the pandemic of urgency law and that more and more decisions are being taken with no transparency or oversight from parliament and we are in a climate where civil not being respected. you have no well—known priestess that do not demonstrate with people in the streets and the vaccines don't exist and that this is big pharma with some sort of grandiose conspiracy but all of this feeds in a minority again of sentiment of defiance. the french government _ sentiment of defiance. the french government has _ sentiment of defiance. the french government has given _ sentiment of defiance. the french government has given some i sentiment of defiance. the french i government has given some ground because there has been a suggestion that cafe owners would also have to check id and they backed down on that, haven't they?— that, haven't they? they have not back down. _ that, haven't they? they have not back down, but _ that, haven't they? they have not back down, but they back - that, haven't they? they have not back down, but they back down i that, haven't they? they have not i back down, but they back down on the amount of the fine. the fine was something that we had never seen in
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france. it was like the equivalent of £40,000 for an infraction and they said look, we are not policeman, this is disproportionate and the notion that punishment must not be disproportionate is actually written in french loss of the government backed down on the sun. the government has also increased measures and for a couple weeks, they would only be gatherings of 1000 people nuts and a gathering of more than 50 people where you need the pass. more than 50 people where you need the ass. . ~ more than 50 people where you need the ass. ., ~ i. more than 50 people where you need the ass. . ~' ,, . last night, the milwaukee bucks won theirfirst nba title for half a century. the man behind their
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success is one yannis who scored a remarkable fifty points in his team's final victory over the phoenix suns. and what's even more remarkable is the story behind the star. giannis grew up selling sunglasses and souvenirs on the streets of athens to make ends meet. he didn't touch a basketball until he was 13. but since then he's come a long way in a short period of time. here to tell us more about his meteoric rise is mirin fader, staff writer at the ringer and author of giannis: the improbable rise of an nba mvp. your book is due next month and he could not be a better time, could it? i could not be a better time, could it? ., ., . , , it? i did not anticipate this. it is incredible _ it? i did not anticipate this. it is incredible and thank— it? i did not anticipate this. it is incredible and thank you - it? i did not anticipate this. it is incredible and thank you for i it? i did not anticipate this. it is i incredible and thank you for having me. do incredible and thank you for having me. y ., ., me. do you need to rewrite the ending before _ me. do you need to rewrite the ending before publication? i i me. do you need to rewrite the i ending before publication? i thinki need to write _ ending before publication? i thinki need to write a _ ending before publication? ithinki need to write a new— ending before publication? i thinki need to write a new epilogue, i ending before publication? i think i| need to write a new epilogue, which i'm happy to do. tell need to write a new epilogue, which i'm happy to do-_ i'm happy to do. tell us about giannis antetokounmpo i i'm happy to do. tell us about giannis antetokounmpo and l i'm happy to do. tell us about i giannis antetokounmpo and this incredible story. start with where he came from. his
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incredible story. start with where he came from-— he came from. his parents are from nigeria and times are really - nigeria and times are really tough there and economically, politically, they were looking for a place to go and one of the things i revealed is that they did not intend to come to greece, they went to germany first. it was a soccer player and he had an injury that caused him to stop playing and they decided to go to greece. and they went to a pretty heavy migrant neighbourhood of many different cultures and life is tough, giannis antetokounmpo did not have a lot of money growing up. they sold trinkets to survive, but life is even more challenging because he was undocumented and he was a black person and a majority white country and so he did face a lot of challenges in that regard. hour challenges in that regard. how did he come to _ challenges in that regard. how did he come to be _ challenges in that regard. how did he come to be this huge star? i i he come to be this huge star? 1 know, it's crazy, right? you he come to be this huge star? i know, it's crazy, right? you don't know, it's crazy, right? you don't know your next meal is coming from to one of the best basketball players of all time. he was 13 years old, he was spotted by a man and
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they saw him on the street playing tag and said hey, this kid is pretty athletic, maybe he could play basketball. he was introduced to a team and even though he was playing in the lotus division increase, the a2 division, he was still pretty good. he had natural instincts, but he did not have citizenship so they can play for the top two teams, mostly because a video of them surfaced that all of them greece to scout him. so this kid from the lowest division was skinnier than all the other prospects and had never played on the big stage before miraculously gets draughted by the milwaukee bucks and he transforms his body into his game. bucks and he transforms his body into his game-— into his game. overnight success stories, there's _ into his game. overnight success stories, there's often _ into his game. overnight success stories, there's often more i into his game. overnight success stories, there's often more to i into his game. overnight success stories, there's often more to it | stories, there's often more to it than that. i know you have spoke to him and his family and what sort of person is he? i notice he doesn't post much on social media. giannis
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is a very down to — post much on social media. giannis is a very down to earth _ post much on social media. giannis is a very down to earth relatable i is a very down to earth relatable person and he is charismatic, he is funny, is thoughtful, he is very smart and nurturing. funny, is thoughtful, he is very smartand nurturing. he funny, is thoughtful, he is very smart and nurturing. he cares about his brothers, he was almost like a father figure for them for many years. so, ithink father figure for them for many years. so, i think people love giannis because he goes from being a complete goofball to someone who is incredibly prophetic and i'm sure your viewers have seen this during the finals and he is to somebody that doesn't seem to drink his own kool—aid. and he is not fazed by the fame and has remained the same person that he was.— fame and has remained the same person that he was. good to have you with this and — person that he was. good to have you with this and thank _ person that he was. good to have you with this and thank you _ person that he was. good to have you with this and thank you for your i with this and thank you for your thought and insight. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: king of innuendojulian clary will be showering us with golden wit a little later. the opening events of the tokyo 2020 olympic games have taken place.
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thousands of athletes have arrived injapan for the games — as cases of coronavirus continue to rise. 0ur sports correspondent natalie pirks has been catching up with some of the british athletes. the wait has been a long one, but today tokyo finally welcomed the start of an 0lympics that many thought would never happen. the joy of a home run was still there forjapan in the softball this morning, despite the empty stadium. that will be a recurring theme. great britain's women were also off to a 2—0 winning start in the football. and white! yes! brilliant. but with only staff to cheer them on. the pandemic has changed everything. tokyo is in a state of emergency. this has been the longest thing ever. athletes like british sprinter, asha philip, faced huge waits at the airport. konichiwa. tracking and health apps had to be installed onto phones and a negative test returned before they could leave hours later. covid has already caused chaos. one british shooter pulled out today
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after a positive test back home and for others, there's the threat of being deemed close contact. this is the olympic games, i've worked my whole life for this. hurdler, jessie knight, was pinged after her flight to tokyo. she is now one of a number already having to isolate. my heart dropped and to be honest, i thought i'd tested positive. but it was just that i was a close contact, i was really relieved. you don't want to miss 14 days of training, going into the biggest race of your life. so i was panicking, but to be honest, it was communicated so quickly that i would be able to train as long as we were providing those negative tests. if athletes were allowed to mingle with locals, the new olympic motto for tokyo is, "faster, higher, stronger, together." sport's unique ability to deliver a feel—good factor has never been more needed. natalie pirks, bbc news, tokyo.
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scientists from london's natural history museum have started excavating one of the most importantjurassic sites in the uk. it's believed to hold fossils of tens of thousands of small sea creatures from more than 150 million years ago, when much of modern day britain was nothing more than shallow tropical sea. rebecca morelle has more. a race against time to reveal our ancient past. the team from the natural history museum has just three days to excavate this unique site. the cotswold quarry holds a treasure trove of sea creatures that lived during thejurassic period. what's here is so extraordinary, the location is being kept secret. we have another really nice specimen. this is a brittle star. it's likely to be a new species.
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it's the quality of preservation, it's the number of fossils we are finding but it's also the diversity. it's unprecedented in geological sites of this age across the world. this place must have been teeming with life you see the starfish, you can see the delicate detail on its arms. animals like stars fish and sea urchins, and crinoids, storks and others swim freely, putting stars and sea cucumbers added to this abundance of ancient marine life.
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this site was discovered by local hobbyists nev and sally. but at first, the quarry didn't look too promising. we were finding very small fragments of sea urchins, i but just tiny fragments, i nothing really spectacular. when we got it home and cleaned it up, he was like, _ "oh my god, you've got to come and see this!" _ and it was this - beautifuljurassic sea creature coming to lfe. they're amazing. just as if they were alive yesterday. i every single discovery is emerging on how the animals lived and died. that is why the preservation is so amazing — that is why the preservation is so amazing we _ that is why the preservation is so amazing we can— that is why the preservation is so amazing. we can see _ that is why the preservation is so amazing. we can see them - that is why the preservation is so amazing. we can see them as. that is why the preservation is so. amazing. we can see them as they were _ amazing. we can see them as they were all— amazing. we can see them as they were all those _ amazing. we can see them as they were all those millions _ amazing. we can see them as they were all those millions of - amazing. we can see them as they were all those millions of years i were all those millions of years ago _ were all those millions of years auo. �* were all those millions of years auo. ~ 1: z: were all those millions of years auo.~ ::::y ., , y�* were all those millions of years auo.�* iiii, .,, y�* ., , ago. and 200 years, they've only collected a _ ago. and 200 years, they've only
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collected a few _ ago. and 200 years, they've only collected a few dozen _ ago. and 200 years, they've only collected a few dozen fossils i ago. and 200 years, they've only collected a few dozen fossils like | collected a few dozen fossils like these in the uk and now, more than a thousand will be added to the collection. it is the discovery of a lifetime. rebecca morelle, bbc news, at a secret location in the cotswolds. the king of campjulian clary has been entertaining audiences since the 80s with his innuendos, saucyjokes, and whip smart humour. but now he's going back to his roots — cabaret! he's appearing as the emcee at proud cabaret on london's embankement, and just before another weekend of performancesjulian joined me a little earlier to talk cabaret, comedy and cheesy balls. the proud cabaret on the embankment is very glamourous and it is a burlesque club, so i am doing my thing, which you can guess what i'm doing. but i'm introducing all these different burlesque acts who, it is a rather wonderful world that i have not been that aware of in the past
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and so, there are people doing all sorts of clever fantastic things. you will do your best to lower the tone, give us more detail about that. ~ �* ~' ., tone, give us more detail about that. ~ �* ~ ., ., , ~ that. well, i'm known for being kind of vulaar that. well, i'm known for being kind of vulgar and _ that. well, i'm known for being kind of vulgar and it _ that. well, i'm known for being kind of vulgar and it is _ that. well, i'm known for being kind of vulgar and it is what _ that. well, i'm known for being kind of vulgar and it is what i _ that. well, i'm known for being kind of vulgar and it is what i do. - of vulgar and it is what i do. i'm not going to analyse it myself, but it fits in very well with the nightclub burlesque world. people get really dressed up and they drink champagne and it gets quite raucous, but there are acts doing sword swallowing and fire and so, i come on between each act and join things along. and anecdotes, that i tell you all you need to know? is along. and anecdotes, that i tell you all you need to know? is an old sa in: you all you need to know? is an old saying that —
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you all you need to know? is an old saying that this _ you all you need to know? is an old saying that this show _ you all you need to know? is an old saying that this show must - you all you need to know? is an old saying that this show must go i you all you need to know? is an old saying that this show must go on, | saying that this show must go on, but there's been so much description of the coronavirus and i wonder have the special measures been put in place so these can go ahead safely? yes, of course. it is very beautifully air—conditioned and so, i think the air is changed every few minutes in there. everyone is tested and all the people working there are tested every day, the audiences are being kept at home for so long and so many experiences, there is a celebratory atmosphere and people are out to have a good time. hagar are out to have a good time. how confident are _ are out to have a good time. how confident are you _ are out to have a good time. how confident are you that _ are out to have a good time. how confident are you that these industries will come back? will industries will come back? will we will s-urin industries will come back? will we will spring back — industries will come back? will we will spring back and _ industries will come back? will we will spring back and you never- industries will come back? will we | will spring back and you never quite know what's going to happen. and starting rehearsals in august, hopefully, it is all going to be fine, but we are in uncharted
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territory, aren't we? to fine, but we are in uncharted territory, aren't we? to come back to the show. _ territory, aren't we? to come back to the show. to — territory, aren't we? to come back to the show, to bring _ territory, aren't we? to come back to the show, to bring this - territory, aren't we? to come back to the show, to bring this to i territory, aren't we? to come back to the show, to bring this to a - to the show, to bring this to a close, you have a lot of audience interaction, safely from a safe distance. tell me a bit more about what that involves. you distance. tell me a bit more about what that involves.— what that involves. you find a way for us to things _ what that involves. you find a way for us to things like, _ what that involves. you find a way for us to things like, i _ what that involves. you find a way for us to things like, i checked - what that involves. you find a way| for us to things like, i checked the people in the audience, do that from a safe distance and traditionally, i've giving people a pack of cheesy balls to enhance their enjoyment. now, i have an assistant becomes over the cheesy balls and i take the cheesy balls back and given to another person, they come out and they sprayed them. it is a way of making it a comedy routine and i just use the whole covid—i9 situation and in comedic fashion. do stick with us — for viewers in the uk
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we have the bbc news at 10 with huw edwards —— and for viewers on bbc world news, jane o brien is here with world news america. thanks for watching. hello there. last saturday, northern ireland provisionally broke its all—time temperature record injust four days later on wednesday afternoon, it looks like again. 31.3 degrees recorded at castle bergen county, the hot spell not over just yet castle bergen county, the hot spell not overjust yet but on the satellite picture, you can see the swirl of cloud that will eventually bring about a change in an area of low pressure which are two things were unsettled by the weekend in the short term, this is up against her area of high pressure which will strengthen the easterly flow and push the heart weather towards the western side of the uk and so extreme heat warnings are still in force across the southwest of england in the southwest midlands
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and across northern ireland, the warning is valid and part of the reason for these warnings as the temperatures at night isn't dropping far, these are the temperatures to start thursday morning and promises to be another hot day for most. we have the slow cloud with mist and fog in north eastern parts of eastern england, much of that will burn towards the coast and with some sunshine, the odd isolated thunderstorms as we have seen. this pushing the heat westwards and temperatures thursday afternoon, perhaps 32 and in northern ireland, this could be broken once again. we had through thursday night and into the early hours of friday. we'll see clear skies for many but more of the low cloud rolling in from northeast england and another very, very warm night indeed with temperatures in some spots no lower than 70 degrees and is one of friday, another hot and sunny day
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for most, but still this pleading eastern areas needs to be quite stubborn and down to the south, we could see some heavy thunder rain pushing into the picture and this the start of our change and temperatures lower on friday in most places but, into saturday, we see the area of low pressure finally making its move and pushing northwards with longest falls of rain in the room will be heavy and possibly foundry and across parts of england and wales, north ireland and scotland, he could betray her with slender conditions and still quite murky for eastern scotland, temperatures lower than they have been with temperatures of four or 5 degrees. more spots of rain across eastern scotland, but for much of scotland and northern ireland, it stays dry and temperatures remain significantly lower than they have been the 21—22 . the city of low pressure will still be with us as we
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head toward sunday into monday, late will be drifting northwards and weakening but still, with the potential to bring some pretty heavy showers on monday, once again, it looks like england and wales will be most prone with fewer showers and indeed for scotland, this temperatures again, below the possibly the mid—20s but not the 30s as we have been seeing over recent days. through next week, the area of low pressure will be close by, still bringing showers or longer spots of rain, but it may be that high pressure builds back later in the week but that is a long way off. we'll have to keep an eye on that one. but in summary, next week will be much cooler and will see some rain at times and so this hot weather is set to end but notjust yet.
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tonight at ten: a revised pay award of 3% will now be put in place for most health workers in england. after an exceptionally challenging year, some staff warn that it might not be enough to reward the immense efforts made. morale is extremely low. there's a lot of people leaving the nhs. leaving the health sector more widely, and i think that is a direct consequence of years of being undervalued. we'll be considering reaction to the offer, which comes just a few months after an offer of i%. also tonight: more migrants have crossed the english channel to the uk so far this year than for the whole of 2020. horrifying conditions in china, following the heaviest rain in the country since records began.

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