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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 21, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: the government has said it wants to redraw post—brexit trade arrangements between great britain and northern ireland: it's now the time to work to establish a new balance, which both the uk and eu can invest in, to provide a platform of peace and prosperity in northern ireland. as record numbers of migrants cross the channel, france pledges to double police patrols of its beaches — in a bid to deter the crossings a neo—nazi who created two banned terrorist groups has been jailed for seven years. anger in liverpool as the city is stripped of its coveted world heritage status — due to overdevelopment of its waterfront new data for england shows that care homes in the north west had the most coronavirus deaths
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in the first wave of the pandemic — while the south east was hardest hit in the second wave the heatwave across the uk has been continuing and this afternoon northern ireland has broken it's all—time temperature record for the second time in 5 days. the gb women's football team off to a flying start at the tokyo olympics — with a 2—nil win over chile good afternoon. �*we cannot go on as we are�* — the words today of the brexit minister lord frost, demanding a rethink from the european union on britain's post brexit trading arrangements with northern ireland.
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the government has called for "significant" changes to the deal negotiated only last year — but it's held back, for now, from the dramatic step of effectively suspending parts of the deal. the european commission vice president has flatly rejected the uk demand for a renegotiation of the northern ireland protocol — a protocol which requires checks on goods coming in from mainland britain. chris page reports. northern ireland has always been on the brexit front line. and this is the new frontier. there is a trade border at ports like belfast for goods arriving here from great britain. the inspections and bureaucracy are affecting a number of businesses, like this pet food wholesaler in county tyrone. there's a lot more paperwork, it's taking me a lot more time. we are also finding that suppliers are limiting the amount of products for us. so it means we're having to look more at suppliers in europe. under the arrangement, known
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as the northern ireland protocol, a range of products, particularly food, need to be checked to ensure they are in line with eu rules. that's because northern ireland has an open land border with an eu state, the republic of ireland. the eu wants to prevent goods which don't match its standards from entering its single market. big supermarkets believe there needs to be a more flexible approach, or else consumers in this part of the uk will lose out. the effects in northern ireland are practical and political, because unionists regard the new trade border as being an unacceptable barrier between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. there have been a series of street protests by demonstrators, who say the protocol diminishes their british identity. in parliament this morning, the leader of unionism argued the protocol went against the peace deal, which ended the conflict in northern ireland, because people hadn't voted for it.
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any new arrangements entered into with the eu that involve northern ireland must respect the principle of consent that is at the heart of the belfast agreement. and that means that any new arrangements must protect the constitutional integrity of the united kingdom and northern ireland's place within the uk. the northern ireland secretary set out his proposals, saying the protocol wasn't working. we see an opportunity to proceed differently, to find a new path, to seek to agree with the eu, through negotiations, a new balance in our arrangements covering northern ireland, to the benefit of all. whether the government's latest ideas go anywhere depends on the continuing talks between london and brussels. the irish government says it is willing to consider any creative solutions, but the protocol can't be renegotiated. resolving the stalemate matters hugely for northern ireland, but also for future relations between the uk and the eu. chris page, bbc news, belfast.
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let's get the thoughts of our political correspondent iain watson in westminster. and in belfast, our correspondent danjohnson, amd in brussels we have our europe correspondent, nick beake. it is the normal run of politics it is the normal run of politics with a current government seeing all its problems are geared to its previous essays. bake get the plane but it is more rare and you get a government minister denouncing an international treaty that he himself negotiated. that is a strange situation we are in today with lloyd frost. the brexit minister. he negotiated his post about which he now says... so they shot northern ireland secretary posed a very unpalatable multiple—choice question of ministers. she said it's all down
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to bad faith? or down to incompetence? she suggested reputation of the uk government had taken a hit by trying to renegotiate the international treaty so soon after it was put together back in 2019. and we have heard also from jeffrey donaldson who was speaking in the commons, leader of the democratic union party and he urging government to go further and the eu does not play ball with the negotiations then the uk government he believes should take unilateral action and with the reaction from northern ireland, here is my colleague danjohnson. the northern ireland, here is my colleague dan johnson. the british government _ colleague dan johnson. the british government perhaps _ colleague dan johnson. the british government perhaps came - colleague dan johnson. the british government perhaps came as - colleague dan johnson. the british| government perhaps came as close colleague dan johnson. the british . government perhaps came as close as it ever has two outlining the real scale of the impact of the northern ireland protocol happening on the life and on business here. let me read you 19 from that document. he says that protocol is clear that northern ireland is part of the customs territory but this principle does not apply in practice it to the burdens of paperwork facing our trade moving from great britain to northern ireland and due to the
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absence of entirely tariff free trade. that is the sort of thing that unionists have been saying in their complaint and their opposition to the protocol. that's whyjeffrey donaldson, the dup leader is welcoming this move today, he said it's a welcome first step but he wanted assurances that negotiations would not be dragged out and it will be triggered if the negotiations failed. that will be the uk government putting the plug and suspending the ports of call altogether. there has been opposition from nationalists here, sinn fein said in a statement it wanted to see you protocol implemented and it could not accept an a la carte approach towards the political from the british government that was wanting to rewrite history and now attempt a negotiation after there had been so many discussions over so many years about this. there has been a hard line from the european union but a slightly softer statement from the irish government seeing it live in to find flexibility in trying to find a solution to these practical problems on trade on business in
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northern ireland. for more on the position from brussels we can cross to make. we position from brussels we can cross to make. ~ ., ~ ., ., , ., to make. we all know that parts of the brexit deal, _ to make. we all know that parts of the brexit deal, they _ to make. we all know that parts of the brexit deal, they are _ to make. we all know that parts ofi the brexit deal, they are fiendishly complicated and technical and for months liars and trade experts have been poring over them but the message today coming from brussels was very clear. we will not renegotiate this agreement. why is this? people behind the scenes in brussels and openly by making the point that ian was talking about that labour were making. the fact that labour were making. the fact that boris johnson that labour were making. the fact that borisjohnson and lloyd frost are the people who negotiated the steel at the tail end of 2019 and now they are not happy with it. i think if you look at what brussels has set today in their statement, they said it's been flexible and point to the fact that three weeks ago it was putting forward solutions as it time to deal with some of the problems that have come up on the border. they are not being hugely vocalin border. they are not being hugely vocal in their response to this but
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knowing people here i think there are two things which the british government put forward which will really go down like a lead balloon to be frank. first of all, the idea that in the future, eu inspectors no longer would have a role in the checks that takes place in northern ireland on goods and also the idea that lloyd frost talked about today that lloyd frost talked about today that the european court ofjustice, the ecg would no longer have a role in northern ireland. people here would just not accept that and if you go back a few months when there is the big row between the eu and the uk over vaccines and astrazeneca and people in brussels were saying they simply weren't getting their fair share, they started here in brussels to go down the route of asking the ecj to adjudicate and look into this. so i think what we will probably see here in this city for the next few weeks agent local a bit and come september, some of the extensions to on my paperwork, more checks, they will be coming to a head and i think after this summer sun has faded away and may be the
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temperature rises once again on some of these familiar arguments and these contentions they may be arguing about them once again. thank ou ve arguing about them once again. thank you very much- _ france will double the number of police patrolling its beaches as part of a deal with the uk to stem the number of migrants crossing the english channel. the british government will pay france more than £54 million as a part of a new agreement between the two countries. the number of people crossing the channel so far this year has already overtaken the total for the whole of last year — almost 8500. simonjones reports from dover. their destination is dover. the latest group of migrants brought to shore this morning by the border force after being picked up in the channel, the world's busiest shipping lane.
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the home secretary says the public has had enough of seeing scenes like these on an almost daily basis. she told mps that things must change. we want to create a deterrent. we cannot continue to support. what we are seeing now, effectively people travelling, smugglers, criminal gangs exploiting our asylum system to bring economic migrants and people that quite frankly are circumventing our legal migration routes, coming into our country illegally. in the past three days, almost a thousand migrants have reached the uk by boat. that brings the total number for this year to more than 8,400 people, surpassing the figure for the whole of 2020. but there has been a dramatic fall in migrants arriving in the back of lorries, just over 500 in the first five months of this year. and, last year, asylum claims in the uk fell. but britain is now giving france more than £50 million to try to stop the boat arrivals. that will be used to double the number of police officers on the beaches in northern france, and on cutting—edge technology
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to monitor the coastline. if this all sounds rather familiar, back in november the british government gave the french millions of pounds to increase police patrols and surveillance, but the numbers arriving by boat have continued to grow, although the home office points out that the number of migrants prevented from making the crossing by the french authorities has also grown too. groups supporting migrants and refugees once they arrive in the uk say a whole new approach is needed. the reason they come here is because they have been through a lot of hardship. so they are still going to try and make the crossing, unless you give them an option before getting in the water to claim asylum. police! stand back from the door! the government says it is determined to tackle the smugglers organising illegal crossings. seven people have been arrested this week in a series of raids as part of an operation dismantling an organised crime group, allegedly transporting hundreds of albanians to the uk illegally in lorries and vans. but on the channel, the boats are getting bigger, packed with more and more people, with the inherent dangers that brings. simonjones, bbc news, dover.
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the headlines on bbc news — the government is calling for a renegotiation of the northern ireland protocol which was agreed as part of the eu withdrawal agreement. the dup and sammy wilson joins part of the eu withdrawal agreement. the dup and sammy wilsonjoins me now. he said the protocol is being used and abused. thank you very much for being with us. lloyd frost today is saying he wants this to be negotiated but he is the man who negotiated but he is the man who negotiated this. it's extraordinary. as somebody said it is like buying a house, signing all the paperwork and saying you don't like the price. hat saying you don't like the price. not reall . saying you don't like the price. iirrt really. because of course the protocol and the political agreement which accompanies it indicated that there would be opportunities to revise and review the situation and to look for alternative arrangements. unfortunately during the negotiations, those alternative arrangements were refused and
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rejected by the eu. they were not pursued by the government which was in a hurry to get an agreement and acting put —— what lowered —— lloyd frost is doing now is acknowledging that the protocol is not working and is being abused by the eu and he needs to be replaced. haw is being abused by the eu and he needs to be replaced.— is being abused by the eu and he needs to be replaced. how are they abusin: needs to be replaced. how are they abusing it? — needs to be replaced. how are they abusing it? explain _ needs to be replaced. how are they abusing it? explain how— needs to be replaced. how are they abusing it? explain how you - abusing it? explain how you think thatis abusing it? explain how you think that is happening. let me give you some examples. the agreement always was that those goods which were not at risk of going into the eu, in other words through the northern ireland from gp to northern ireland and the irish republic would not be subject to checks. qe’s and the irish republic would not be subject to checks.— and the irish republic would not be subject to checks. 9596 of the goods which coming _ subject to checks. 9596 of the goods which coming to _ subject to checks. 9596 of the goods which coming to northern _ subject to checks. 9596 of the goods which coming to northern ireland i which coming to northern ireland come in fealty for consumption in northern ireland. yet the eu has insisted that they are all at risk. and in the —— i could give you lots
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of examples that constituency, and building firm which brought machinery back from scotland, which had but soil from machinery back from scotland, which had but soilfrom scotland on its wheels were turned back because there was a danger that machines which recommend that to northern ireland and staying in northern ireland and staying in northern ireland would contaminate the single market of the eu. bre ireland would contaminate the single market of the eu.— ireland would contaminate the single market of the eu. are you seeing the eu is doinu market of the eu. are you seeing the eu is doing this _ market of the eu. are you seeing the eu is doing this to _ market of the eu. are you seeing the eu is doing this to punish _ market of the eu. are you seeing the eu is doing this to punish britain - eu is doing this to punish britain for brexit? i eu is doing this to punish britain for brexit? ~ , . ., for brexit? i think it is much more sinister than _ for brexit? i think it is much more sinister than that. _ for brexit? i think it is much more sinister than that. what _ for brexit? i think it is much more sinister than that. what they - for brexit? i think it is much more sinister than that. what they are i sinister than that. what they are doing is creating a problem and then suggesting a solution to that problem. namely that the uk would adopt the eu rules on plant and animal health and processing foods etc and in other words joining the single market again and accept single market again and accept single market again and accept single market regulations than they would stop all of this nonsense. and
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that's the real intent behind the eu's use of the protocol at present to try and draw back some of the influences gets lost in the united kingdom as a result of brexit. in northern ireland unfortunately and consumers and in the business in northern ireland are being disadvantaged by us. one of the reasons i think lloyd frost that night i think it significant that all of the players who are on the eu site at present i recommended one solution in one solution alone. that is the uk as a whole should follow eu rules and therefore the protocols of the northern ireland would disappear. of the northern ireland would disappear-— of the northern ireland would disappear. of the northern ireland would disauear. ~ ., �* disappear. the mp for belfast south said havin: disappear. the mp for belfast south said having a _ disappear. the mp for belfast south said having a hard _ disappear. the mp for belfast south said having a hard brexit _ disappear. the mp for belfast south said having a hard brexit and - said having a hard brexit and frictionless trade are regrettably
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not both possible and they never have been and it's dishonest to pretend otherwise. that is the truth, isn't it? ihla pretend otherwise. that is the truth, isn't it?— truth, isn't it? no it is not. because — truth, isn't it? no it is not. because of— truth, isn't it? no it is not. because of course - truth, isn't it? no it is not. because of course the - truth, isn't it? no it is not. - because of course the problem on truth, isn't it? no it is not. _ because of course the problem on the irish border could have been resolved with and i hope this is one of the solutions which has gone with my pursuit of the eu with adopting the regulations. whereby the very small number of firms in northern ireland exploit into the irish republic would be subject and would have to be subject to the eu rules, regulations, that those rules and regulations, that those rules and regulations would be enforced, not just by the authorities and the republic but also by the authorities in northern ireland. so is severe sanctions if they broke those rules, that would avoid any hard border between and the aryan —— ireland republic and 95% of firms in northern ireland don't do any trade with the irish republic to continue on as they are at present under uk rules and regulations and the small percentage that you exploit within
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the subject and there are solutions and the question is is the eu prepared to look at the solutions and leverage continuing to use the protocol as a trojan horse in the united kingdom as a whole. bud protocol as a trojan horse in the united kingdom as a whole. and the government — united kingdom as a whole. and the government has _ united kingdom as a whole. and the government has made _ united kingdom as a whole. and the government has made their - united kingdom as a whole. and the government has made their stand i government has made their stand today, the common enough, can they go further? i think i lit back to see them he was more because what they suggest is that they will not intervene unilaterally until they've had a chance to see if they are prepared to negotiate with them. they stated less foot in the door for the eu and so far as certain you would still apply in northern ireland. i would like to see that removed. but, ithink ireland. i would like to see that removed. but, i think it will start with identifying the problems. they have suggested solutions to those problems and now it really will be a
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case to see whether the eu and the eu negotiators are serious and genuine in the comments that they do not waste to see disruption in northern ireland and they simply want to see a single market protected because they proposal rich lloyd frost has been forward would actually enjoy the protection of the eu single market from northern ireland while at the same time would reduce the in northern ireland and also dealing with the issue of the way in which the integrity
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the number of deaths from covid—i9 for each care home in england has been published for the first time. the data shows that care homes in the north west had the most deaths during the first wave, while the south east was hardest hit in the second wave. our social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan told us more about the figures. these relate to a period of time since the 10th of april of last year, 2020. this is when the care quality commission in england asked care homes to register with them where a resident had died of coronavirus, or suspected coronavirus, and. what this data showed is that the homes with the highest number of deaths had 44 deaths in the year, the data was collated for that as a care home in wigan. it shows that there war 21 care homes that had 30 or more residents who died of covid—i9, and in almost all cases,
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labour have announced that leader sir keir starmer is self—isolating after one of his children tested positive of coronavirus. earlier today — before the positive result — he took part in prime minister's questions in the house of commons. in a statement, his office said, "keir was already doing daily tests and tested negative this morning. he will continue to take daily tests." it means that the prime minister, chancellor, health secretary and leader of the opposition are all currently in isolation. the heatwave across the uk has been continuing, and this afternoon, northern ireland has broken its all—time temperature record for the second time in five days. our weather presenter ben rich is here. northern ireland are bearing the brunt of the file.— northern ireland are bearing the brunt of the file. absolutely. the interesting _ brunt of the file. absolutely. the interesting thing _ brunt of the file. absolutely. the interesting thing about _ brunt of the file. absolutely. the interesting thing about this - brunt of the file. absolutely. the interesting thing about this heat| interesting thing about this heat wave is most parts of the uk, actual temperatures he had been seeing have not been that extraordinary. we have
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not broken any records, this afternoon in northern ireland, we got up to 31.3 degrees. in the context of the rest of the uk, that does not sound especially high, but until saturday, northern ireland never got above 30 degrees. it broke the record on saturday and it appears probationary to have broken the record again today. just several days later. this record is still provisionalfrom days later. this record is still provisional from the met office and needs to be quality controlled and checked but it looks as if we are on for a new record in northern ireland. this set of hot weather has been quite long lasting and that is one of the main reasons why the met office issued this amber extreme heat warning. northern ireland is covered in that. it's more about it until friday and there is a warning for the southwest of england, southwest mittens, as you can see because this hot weather is going to continue for another couple of days. one of the big problems, we have these hot days but the nights don't really cool down. for vulnerable people, for the problems with transport infrastructure for example
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there is no real time to cool down at night. it's one of the reasons we have this amber warning. the heatwave is going on for a couple of days, let it get harder? it heatwave is going on for a couple of days, let it get harder?— days, let it get harder? it may get harder. tomorrow _ days, let it get harder? it may get harder. tomorrow what _ days, let it get harder? it may get harder. tomorrow what we - days, let it get harder? it may get harder. tomorrow what we have i days, let it get harder? it may get i harder. tomorrow what we have got days, let it get harder? it may get - harder. tomorrow what we have got at the moment is the heat is being pushed west and developing an easton breeze and some of the eastern coast tomorrow are cloudy and murky had a lit at northern ireland and the temperature we are expecting. yes, thatis temperature we are expecting. yes, that is 32 degrees, potentially in western counties of northern ireland tomorrow. and, if that happens, that would be the record broken for the first time so whichever way you slice it, a hot day and hot because of weather for all but for northern ireland, pretty extraordinary week. when the heat wave breaks, let it break with a bang with a lot of rain? it break with a bang with a lot of rain? . ., ,., break with a bang with a lot of rain? _, ,., ., break with a bang with a lot of rain? _, ., , ., , rain? it could, some of us have seen some thunderstorms. _ rain? it could, some of us have seen some thunderstorms. northern - rain? it could, some of us have seen i some thunderstorms. northern ireland is seeing thunderstorms. very isolated but as we go into the weekend we have got low pressure pushing him. this is what will break things down. running into that warm air so we will see heavy and thunder
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rain breaking up across parts of the uk although northern ireland and scotland are likely to stay dry for the most part but there are lots of changes. the most part but there are lots of chances. . ~ the most part but there are lots of chances. ., ,, i. , the most part but there are lots of chances. . ~ ,, , . liverpool has been stripped of its world heritage status by unesco, the un's cultural body, because of concern about developments on the city's waterfront. it's only the third time a site has lost the status. henrietta billings is the director of save britain's heritage. thank you for being with us. is that the correct decision, do you think? as absolutely not. today is a sad day and it's a decision we really regret. we really feel as though that is now the moment with the newly elected mayor in the report and also the new government appointed commissioner that there is appointed commissioner that there is a real change in heart about the heritage status in liverpool and base is the moment where we were
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asking unesco and also oliver dowden, the secretary of state for heritage to make the case that there is time for another 12 months and to save liverpool's unique global world heritage status. thea;r save liverpool's unique global world heritage status.— heritage status. they have been developing _ heritage status. they have been developing the _ heritage status. they have been developing the waterfront. - heritage status. they have been developing the waterfront. they heritage status. they have been - developing the waterfront. they put a football stadium there, what did he expect? in a football stadium there, what did he exect? ., ,, , ., he expect? in fairness, the stadium is not built vet. _ is not built yet, but yes it definitely is consented and the real problem is not only the stadium but also a scheme known as liverpool water which is a huge 60 hectare development across the waterfront which is being built out in piecemeal already with tall buildings which are really detracting from that special, unique and what they call outstanding universal value of world heritage sites. ,, ., universal value of world heritage sites. . ., ., sites. should liverpool ever have been a world _
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sites. should liverpool ever have been a world heritage _ sites. should liverpool ever have been a world heritage site? - been a world heritage site? alongside the great wall of china and the taj mahal it is not quite compare, with all due respect to a city which i love very much indeed. i completely think it should have and it should still be. the reason it was listed as this world heritage site which don't forget liverpool city council signed up and applied for the state party which is the british government who signed that treaty pledging to uphold the protections for the world heritage site and it's all about that very special and unique mercantile history and maritime history of the docks and don't forget 40% of mobile trade pass—through liverpool docs during that time and it really is an incredibly special place and i think what is really important to us to be clear that just what is really important to us to be clear thatjust because you have unesco world heritage site it does not mean you cannot develop. what it means is that development does come forward and next meek mill claims
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about it it does mean we development and sensitive development but the building coming forward should be respectful and sympathetic to the history of the place.— respectful and sympathetic to the history of the place. the police watchdog has criticised regulations as confusing for police officers and the public, often leaving both unable to tell what was guidance and what was law. sir thomas winsor�*s annual report on the state of policing said the response of the police was "exemplary" apart from a few isolated incidents. but he said ministers "stood at their podiums" and gave "instructions" to the british people which weren't backed by laws. he's been speaking to our home affairs correspondent tom symonds, whojoins me now. this is the police report card for the year and it's a year that's been dominated by the pandemic and he said he was positive about the
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police and the way they dealt with the pressure they had been put on there. but he said i think i got the impression he felt he had been let down in a number of different ways. in particular this point about what is guidance and what is regulation. we had to get used to that and some of us still have not quite tweaked most of the rules now that most of the rules have gone. what is guidance and what is regulation. i also think who is to in question were something we'd never seen before. that was inevitable because of the pandemic and the health emergency that we faced. there were also considerable difficulties in the way in which police officers, front—line police officers were told what was the law and what was guidance. and inevitably there were mistakes made. and the leadership of the police tried their best, but they did need to improve their explanation of the distinction
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between government guidance and the criminal law. he says that really left police on the front line facing a hard time having to enforce something that they did not actually have the powers to enforce. i suppose early on in the pandemic there were different interpretations of the rules and restrictions by different police forces and some, derbyshire came under criticism for being slightly overzealous potentially. suddenly they found himself at the centre of the police investigation almost. you had 25 pages of regulations that became about a hundred pages of regulations by the end of it. he had 90,000 fixed penalty notice is issued by police voices in some places issuing hardly any and some voices issuing quite a few. a big difference in the way that was done. given that we are
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unlikely to be free of this kind of policing in future, the pandemic may continue in some form. we may need to see some regulations in the winter. i think he felt it was important to try and get across the differences the police forces had felt and the need for the government to be clear about this. we've even seen this week and that is to say that it seen this week and that is to say thatitis seen this week and that is to say that it is not actually a law that if you are paying the you have to go away and the government saying it's something you should be doing. so this is pretty much a live issue. i will be back with a reminder of the latest headlines. you are watching bbc means.
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hello, this is bbc news with me, ben brown. the headlines — arrangements between great britain and northern ireland. it's now the time to work to establish a new balance, which both the uk and eu can invest in, to provide a platform of peace and prosperity in northern ireland. as record numbers of migrants cross the channel, france pledges to double police patrols of its beaches in a bid to deter the crossings. a neo—nazi who created two banned terrorist groups has been jailed for seven years. anger in liverpool as the city is stripped of its coveted world heritage status due to overdevelopment of its waterfront.
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new data for england shows that care homes in the north west had the most coronavirus deaths in the first wave of the pandemic, while the south east was hardest hit in the second wave. the heatwave across the uk has been continuing, and this afternoon, northern ireland has broken its all—time temperature record for the second time in five days. the gb women's football team off to a flying start at the tokyo olympics with a 2—0 win over chile. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. good evening. british shooter amber hill has withdrawn from the tokyo olympics after testing positive for coronavirus before her depature for the games. hill is ranked number one in women's skeet shooting and joins chilean taekwondo athlete fernanda aguirre and dutch skateboarder candy jacobs in having to pull out because of positive covid tests. the british olympic association said there would be no
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replacement for hill, who won silver at the commonwealth games in 2018. in a statement, hill has said that she's "devastated" to be missing out on the tokyo olympics. she said... despite the opening ceremony taking place on friday, team gb have already got their competition under way in women's football, and they got off to a winning start, beating chile 2—0 in sapporo. manchester city striker ellen white scored both goals, the first from close range in the first half before this flying volley in the second half made sure of the points from great britain. their next game is against hosts japan on saturday. well, there was a big win in one of this morning's other games. sweden beat four—time women's football olympic champions usa 3—0 in tokyo, the result ending the usa's alt—game unbeaten run.
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the scottish football association have announced that pedro martinez losa has been appointed the new women's national team head coach. he replaces shelley kerr, who stepped down at the end of last year. the 45—year—old spaniard was the arsenal women's manager from 2014 for three seasons, winning the fa cup and wsl cup during his time in charge. he has signed a three—year contract with the sfa and will take charge ahead of the 2023 women's world cup qualifying campaign. alun wynjones will captain the british and irish lions for the first test against south africa on saturday. the welshman's tour looked to be over less than a month ago after suffering a dislocated shoulder, but his remarkable recovery means he'll become the first player in the professional era to win ten successive test caps for the lions. it's a side that has three scottish players for the first time in 2a years. head coach warren gatland said picking the starting lineup was "incredibly difficult".
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we feel we are in a good place and some players that coaches would have had in there starting xv didn't make the 23 because looking at the combinations on the bench and the experience, ijust need to reiterate how important, it's notjust the starting xv but the guys coming off the bench will have a significant impact and they need to have an impact for us. in just under half an hour, cricket's new hundred format gets under way. it's a brand new form of the game, designed to be faster and more entertaining. some of the world's top names will be involved in eight city—based teams. they will be batting for 100 balls and attempting to score as many runs as possible, with london's oval invincibles hosting manchester originals in the women's competition to kick things off. our reporterjo currie gave us a flavour of what to expect. essentially, this is a shorter versioned new format of the game so matches are only lasted two and half hours so not only is it
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being targeted as a younger audience but also they are targeting... targeting families. they can hopefully get the children home quicker as well. the people who are curious but i it quite as much but the hope is that we get to the younger audiences brought to the sport of cricket as a and the hundred gets underway at 6pm live on bbc two. that's all the sport for now. thank you very much indeed. we will see you a little bit later on. back to our top story as the northern ireland secretary has requested the northern ireland protocol to be renegotiated with the european union which requires checks upon goods coming in from which requires checks upon goods coming infrom mainland which requires checks upon goods coming in from mainland britain. johnjoins us now. maybe you can explain it for us now from a business point of view in northern ireland how they see this working or
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not working at the moment, how many problems it is causing them and what it means to their businesses. certainly. anybody who is trying to bring food products in from britain to anywhere on the island of ireland is facing because of northern ireland and the republic of ireland... bringing in products across the i receipt so you have to abide by the strict rules on how you get those products into the single market. a lot of form of in some suppliers in great britain don't want to send any more. there could be delays and food can be wasted and spoiled while it is going through all these processes. the fact these issues have arisen is no real surprise. fact these issues have arisen is no realsurprise. it fact these issues have arisen is no real surprise. it was well protected but without some sort of special agri— food agreement, there is not a very easy way to solve these problems. today we have had sir
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archie norman the chairman of marks and spencer talking about how this is affecting his business in the republic of ireland but he is also saying it could spread to stores in northern ireland because the moment supermarkets in northern ireland are what is in a grace period. they don't have to apply for those eu checks and controls but that is due to end in october as her archie norman said marks and spencer is at the moment is planninguk not to sell some of its normal products and shops in northern ireland come christmas because it is going to be too difficult to get them across the irish sea. let's have a quick listen to what he has been saying today. every northern ireland or it's going to see _ every northern ireland or it's going to see very— every northern ireland or it's going to see very visibly the impact of brexil— to see very visibly the impact of brexit in— to see very visibly the impact of brexit in the protocol because there will be _ brexit in the protocol because there will be gaps on shelves. this christmas i can tell you already we are having to make decisions with this product for northern ireland because — this product for northern ireland because it is simply not worth the risk of— because it is simply not worth the risk of trying to get it through. 30 risk of trying to get it through. sc what risk of trying to get it through. what are risk of trying to get it through. sr what are businesses in northern ireland and particularly seeing as a
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solution to this? many people say the actually the eu are being a bit overzealous in the amount of checks they are carrying out. something like 20% of all the checks at eu borders are in northern ireland at the moment, and is that a case that some people are saying maybe just a lighter touch would help? zg�*s lighter touch would help? 2096 is interestin: lighter touch would help? 2096 is interesting but _ lighter touch would help? 2096 is interesting but not _ lighter touch would help? 2096 is interesting but not a surprising l interesting but not a surprising figure because nobody else in the eu is stopping single market supermarkets from warehouses outside the eu so those checks are not very surprising. if pole and suddenly decided to stock all is supermarkets from belarus than the number of checks on its borders with food products would go through the roof. that is a situation we are in at the moment. it is that the eu is being overzealous in its rules, it supplying its normal rules for products entering the single market. what businesses in northern ireland and most political party say is number one solution to this is for the uk in the eu to do an egg or
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food agreement, what is known as a swiss style deal. under this arrangement the uk continue to fall —— follow eu rules on food standards and that would illuminate all the need for any checks or controls or paperwork. however, lord frost says there is no way the uk is going to do that sort of deal. he does not want to cede control over its food standards so it has been suggesting different ideas like a trusted trader scheme which we heard about today. but certainly i think the food industry in northern ireland and most little parties would still say that brought agri— food agreement is the best way and it's her archie norman talked about that as well. although again he said he understands what the government does not want to do that sort of deal. and the eu making it clear they are not up for renegotiation of the deal, of the protocol, so are we in a stalemate unless some sort of terrace can be found? i think so. the eu has _ terrace can be found? i think so. the eu has said _ terrace can be found? i think so. the eu has said they _ terrace can be found? i think so. the eu has said they will- terrace can be found? i think so. the eu has said they will listen l terrace can be found? i think so. | the eu has said they will listen to creative ideas and if you talk to
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the uk about what you suggested today but they are saying that anything which is being proposed can only be implement it within the context of what has already been agreed in terms of the northern ireland protocol. so i suppose her but it will go away for couple of weeks and think about what has been set and we may get some sort of intensive talks during the early part of the autumn. ultimately if the two sides cannot reach a compromise, there is a possibility that the uk could say it is going to set aside parts of the protocol and that could put us on the road to the trade war, though that sort of dramatic development is a very long way off for now. dramatic development is a very long way off for now-— way off for now. think you so much for explaining all— way off for now. think you so much for explaining all of _ way off for now. think you so much for explaining all of that. that - way off for now. think you so much for explaining all of that. that is i for explaining all of that. that is john campbell, our northern ireland business editor. a top police officer will be put in charge of tackling violence against women and girls in england and wales. the creation of the role was recommended in a report after 33—year—old sarah everard was murdered in march. her death sparked huge protests and a public debate about women's safety.
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the government will also reveal plans for a new 24—hour rape and sexual assault helpline, and there will be £5 million of funding to tackle violence in public places at night. i'm nowjoined by andrea simon, the director of end violence against women. thank you very much for being with us. are you impressed by what has been announced on this? i think it's really important if there has been this recognition in the strategy we have seen today that we need radical and transfer would have changed when it comes to prevention and tackling violence against women and girls that covers everything from harassment in the street and online and public spaces to sexual violence as well and domestic abuse. we do need the going to go across policing, health, education, transport. so whilst there are good sentiments expressed in the strategy, the actions that follow also need to have the right
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level of funding to them. i think the strategy _ level of funding to them. i think the strategy comes _ level of funding to them. i think the strategy comes with - level of funding to them. i think the strategy comes with little i the strategy comes with little resource behind it, which is somewhat of a disappointment. it is also i think somewhat of a disappointment. it is also i think i'm _ somewhat of a disappointment. it is also i think i'm right in saying the third violence against women and girls strategy since 2010. so there have been quite a lot of these. have the other ones made much difference? i think you are right, we have had a strategy since 2010, we have not had one for the last years. the last one expired in 2020. so this has been a long awaited. and given the batch above what the national conversation we are having about women's safety and public, it is really needed. i think the thing that eight strategy can do is it can ensure government departments because this is not something that can just be solved through the criminaljustice measures and policing. we are to look at things like education, we need to have buy—in from health in order for it not to be
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need to have buy—in from health in orderfor it not to be paper strategy, it needs to deliver whole system changes which it the government says it wants. that means every part of government and every agency needs to step up and make it agency needs to step up and make it a priority. agency needs to step up and make it a riori . �* . agency needs to step up and make it ariori .~., , ., , a priority. also a promise here to deal with street _ a priority. also a promise here to deal with street harassment. - a priority. also a promise here to deal with street harassment. for| deal with street harassment. for example wolf whistling of women in the street could become a crime. how important is that?— important is that? there are some thins that important is that? there are some things that happen _ important is that? there are some things that happen that _ important is that? there are some things that happen that come - important is that? there are some l things that happen that come under the umbrella of public street harassment. that can be dealt with through existing laws but we don't deal with them very well currently. lots of women would be sort of unsure about what is covered by the law and what is not. so i think there is work to be done around publicising what is a crime and then there is a lot of work to do in terms of what happens next after reporting takes place because there is not much visibility of the impact that reporting can have. it's also really hard to distinguish between what is going on in public and what
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is happening online now. we seek huge growth in things like cyber flashing that women can be harassed by being sent explicit images to their phone. so as not enough just to look at things like street lighting and cctv but also there is a whole raft of measures needs to be included in an online harms by which we know is coming down the road. and crucially we have to be targeting perpetrators behaviour and not talking about what women need to do in order to keep safe. women are fed up in order to keep safe. women are fed up with having to make those calculations and those considerations and we now need to be looking towards the vast majority of perpetrators that this behaviour and tackling that. irate perpetrators that this behaviour and tackling that-— tackling that. we heard a lot of voices saying that _ tackling that. we heard a lot of voices saying that after - tackling that. we heard a lot of voices saying that after the - tackling that. we heard a lot of. voices saying that after the sarah everard murder of course. one of the consequences is that this top police officer is now going to be put in charge of tackling violence against women. is that a gimmick or is that something that is really going to make a difference? this something that is really going to make a difference?— something that is really going to make a difference? this should be a olicin: make a difference? this should be a policing priority _ make a difference? this should be a policing priority because this - policing priority because this is a significant proportion of what is
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all crime. the appointment of this new police lead needs to be supported by a national policing strategic prioritisation of a sexual violence and a metric abuse but it also requires a massive culture shift. we have seen that policing responses on sexual violence and rape are really poor and the government recently apologising for the failure in prosecutions in rate cases. so it is not quite clear currently how this new role is going to ensure that those improvements are driven across the board in all the different police forces across the country. but the accountability really needs to be there and when the police do perform badly and there are not improvements we need to see that there is a consequence for that. �* . . to see that there is a consequence for that. �* ., ., ,, ., ,, for that. andrea and simon, think ou ve for that. andrea and simon, think you very much — for that. andrea and simon, think you very much indeed. _ the headlines on bbc news — the uk has demanded "significant" changes to northern ireland's post—brexit trading arrangements, but the european commission says it will not agree to renegotiating the measures.
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as record numbers of migrants cross the channel, france pledges to double police patrols of its beaches in a bid to deter the crossings. new data for england shows that care homes in the north west had the most coronavirus deaths in the first wave of the pandemic, while the south east was hardest hit in the second wave. more than 80 raging fires are now going in 13 states in the us. over 2000 firefighters are tackling the so—called bootleg fire, one of the biggest blazes in the history of the state of oregon. you can see a time lapse from a nasa satellite showing the smoke moving from the west coast and travelling across the country. smoke is in the great while the
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clouds are white. and the fires are so intense that health agencies on the us east coast are now warning that poor air quality from the smoke poses a health hazard. and our north american correspondent has this report. people with breathing problems should avoid being outside during the middle of the day. this is a monstrous fire and is partly to blame. spreading rapidly through forest land about 500 km southeast of portland in oregon. this is driven by extreme heat, strong winds and years of drought,
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the fire is reverent in the forest with an intensity rarely seen before. the air is so hot and the blade so large that it is creating its own weather system and includes fire tornadoes. over 2000 firefighters are tackling this place but the flames are so intense they are often forced to retreat from the front lines. this fire is spreading out of control near the california — nevada border. it was started by lightning and is rapidly believing in size. so far this year, five times as many acres have burned in california compared with the same period in 2020. lester would our correspondent in new york and as i was saying earlier on there are concerns about air quality on the east coast. it concerns about air quality on the east coast-— east coast. it is really incredible and ou east coast. it is really incredible and you see _ east coast. it is really incredible and you see the _
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and you see the pictures that peter had a net package, and that is 3000 miles away from where i am here in new york. that is almost a800 km away. you can see outside that there is a haze that has come over new york city. in fact i went up onto my roof here in brooklyn to take a look, and it was very clear that the visibility was much poorer. the canvas, that i would normally be able to seat was not really very visible and you are right to mention the air quality. it is rare for the air quality to become this bad in new york and if you look at the air quality index, it is actually in the red zone. one of the worst areas right now in the country. so how worried people _ right now in the country. so how worried people there _ in air quality and the threat that poses? it in air quality and the threat that oses? . . , in air quality and the threat that oses? . ., , ,., in air quality and the threat that oses? . ., _., ,., in air quality and the threat that oses? . ., _., ., poses? it certainly poses a risk for children and _ poses? it certainly poses a risk for children and it _ poses? it certainly poses a risk for children and it also _ poses? it certainly poses a risk for children and it also poses - poses? it certainly poses a risk for children and it also poses a - poses? it certainly poses a risk for children and it also poses a risk. children and it also poses a risk for the elderly, especially those who have any respiratory problems. so i think there is a lot of care
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thatis so i think there is a lot of care that is being taken by people. but i think what many people in new york are really blown away by is the kinds of fiery sunsets that they saw on tuesday evening and that hazy kind of sunrise. it is not something you are used to seeing here in new york. and i thinkjust the impact of what is happening so far away really hitting here, it's really driving home the issue of climate change for a lot of people in new york. i was auoin to a lot of people in new york. i was going to i — a lot of people in new york. i was going to i was _ a lot of people in new york. i was going to i was going _ a lot of people in new york. i was going to i was going to _ a lot of people in new york. i was going to i was going to ask- a lot of people in new york. i was going to i was going to ask that the nunnally in new york but are in the country there are plenty of climate change sceptics in the us what you think is changing minds? the extraordinary number of fires and also we are seeing the increasing frequency every year. it also we are seeing the increasing frequency every year.— frequency every year. it is hard to assess whether _ frequency every year. it is hard to assess whether or _ frequency every year. it is hard to assess whether or not _ frequency every year. it is hard to assess whether or not these - frequency every year. it is hard to l assess whether or not these issues are actually going to change the minds of sceptics because if you are a sceptic with regards to climate change, you can find a myriad of
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reasons for why these fires are happening. is it that we are just a lot more aware, a lot marketed as a country or in the world? so there is a whole bunch of different reasons why. i think for the people who do firmly believe in climate change, i think the urgency is certainly becoming much more clear. goad think the urgency is certainly becoming much more clear. good to see ou, becoming much more clear. good to see you. thank _ becoming much more clear. good to see you, thank you _ becoming much more clear. good to see you, thank you very _ becoming much more clear. good to see you, thank you very much - becoming much more clear. good to i see you, thank you very much indeed. scientists from london's natural history museum have started excavating one of the most important jurassic sites in the uk. it's believed to hold fossils of tens of thousands of small sea creatures from more than 150 million year ago, when much of modern day britain was nothing more than shallow tropical sea. rebecca morelle has more. a race against time to reveal our ancient past. the team from the natural history museum has just three days to excavate this unique site. the cotswold quarry holds a treasure
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trove of sea creatures that lived during the jurassic period. what's here is so extraordinary, the location is being kept secret. we've got another really nice specimen. this is a brittle star. it's likely to be a new species. it's the quality of preservation, it's the number of fossils we're finding, but it's also the diversity. it's really unprecedented in geological sites of this age across the world. usually on an excavation, you might get a handful of finds, but here it's different. scientists think there are tens of thousands of fossils lying in the mud. this place must have been teeming with life 167 million years ago. this area was once covered by shallow tropical sea. living there were animals like starfish, brittle stars and sea cucumbers. the site was discovered by local
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fossil hobbyists nev and sally. but at first, the quarry didn't look too promising. we were finding very small fragments of sea urchins, butjust tiny fragments, nothing really spectacular. when we got it home and cleaned it up, he was like, "oh my god, you've got to come and see this!" and it was this beautifuljurassic sea creature coming to lfe. they're amazing. just as if they were alive yesterday. with so many fossils here, the challenge is working out which ones to keep. the very best are now heading to the natural history museum. the team says it's the discovery of a lifetime. rebecca morelle, bbc news, at a secret location in the cotswolds. hugh everett will be here in a moment with the weather at six p:m..
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now look at the weather. if the heat is getting too much for you, well, there are some changes on the way. but only slow changes. on the satellite picture you can see this curl of cloud. this is an area of low pressure that will be with us in time for the weekend. but in the shorter term it's going to move quite slowly and the low is going to bump into this area of high pressure and what that will do is provide more of an easterly wind, which will push the hottest weather towards the western side of the uk. that is where we still have extreme heat warnings, amber warnings, from the met office. across the south—west of england, parts of wales, the south west midlands and also northern ireland. heat that could cause problems for health and infrastructure. lots of sunshine to go with it through the afternoon. a bit of extra cloud for some northern and eastern coasts of scotland. and a few isolated thunderstorms popping up. the highest temperatures likely to be across the south—west midlands, south east wales and into the west country. highs of around 31 degrees. we will see scattered showers and thunderstorms rumbling on into the evening. most places will be dry. and it's another one of those nights
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where you will head off to bed with temperatures still up in the 20s in most places. it will be very uncomfortable for sleeping. temperatures won't fall much further through the rest of the night either. some more of this low cloud will come in across northern eastern scotland and parts of eastern england as well. much of that will retreat back towards the coast as we go through the day tomorrow. for many spots, it's another fine day. one or two thunderstorms popping up once again, especially across western areas i suspect. that is also where we will have the highest temperatures because of this easterly wind will be pushing the hot air a little further west. so northern ireland for example could get a 31 degrees. that would challenge the new temperature record that was set just last weekend. whereas temperatures will be a little lower across eastern coastal areas. and here we will see more cloud again on friday. low cloud with some mist and murk. much of that retreating to the coast. a lot of sunshine again. one or two showers but notice this rain towards the south—west. temperatures will be starting to drop back in many areas by this stage. as we head into the weekend,
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our area of low pressure finally makes its move. it's going to bring some very heavy downpours and thunderstorms, particularly across parts of england and wales. that could cause a little bit of disruption. it should be mainly dry both scotland and northern ireland, but with lower temperatures for all of us.
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today at six. more migrants have crossed the english channel to the uk so far this year, than for the whole of 2020. the arrivals in kent have led to the home secretary's decision to pay the french authorities to increase their patrols to prevent the crossings. we want to create a deterrent. we cannot continue to support what is... what we're seeing right now, effectively, people trafficking, but there's concern about the conditions in which young migrants are being held when they make it to the uk. we'll have more on the government's decision to give the french authorities an extra £5a million to tackle the gangs who organise the crossings. also today... in england's care homes,
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more than 39,000 people died

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