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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 21, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, it's wednesday, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire and here are your headlines. a top police officer is to lead a new drive to tackle violence against women and girls in england and wales — including £5 million to combat trouble in public places at night. as a woman, what's your experience? have you been harassed, abused or assualted? what would make you feel safer? we will talk to the safeguarding minister in 15 minutes and let me know before then. contact me at @vicderbyshire on instagram and twitter or email me victoria@bbc.co.uk. as record numbers of migrants cross the channel, the uk reaches a deal with france for it to double police patrols on its beaches. the uk is expected to warn the eu it's prepared to override the brexit agreement for northern ireland that mps voted for, if a simplified agreement cannot be reached.
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torrential rain causes severe flooding in parts of central china. at least 12 people died in one city after its subway system was almosst submerged. scientists from the natural history museum unearth tens of thousands of fossils from a secret site in the cotswolds after a dsciovery by a couple of amateur paleantologistss. and a shake—up for english cricket starts tonight. the hundred — a new 100—ball competition which the england and wales cricket board say will mean shorter and faster games. a top police officer will be put in charge of tackling violence against women and girls in england and wales, the home secretary,
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priti patel, is to announce. the creation of the role was recommended in a report after 33—year—old sarah everard was murdered in march. her death sparked huge protests and a public debate about women's safety. the government will also reveal plans for a new 24—hour rape and sexual assault helpline. there will be £5 million of funding to tackle violence in public places at night and an online tool will be created so women and girls can log areas where they have felt unsafe. it comes as rape conviction rates fell to a record low in the year tojuly 2020. police recorded more than 55,000 rapes in england and wales. police recorded more than 55,000 reports of rapes in england and wales. but this led to just over 1,400 convictions. we will talk to the safeguarding minister in 15 minutes. let's cross to our special correspondent lucy manning
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who has more on this. these kind of measures, will there be enough to make sure women are safe in public places? let’s be enough to make sure women are safe in public places?— safe in public places? let's start with the good — safe in public places? let's start with the good points _ safe in public places? let's start with the good points on - safe in public places? let's start with the good points on it, - safe in public places? let's start with the good points on it, what| safe in public places? let's start - with the good points on it, what the government are trying to do, they are promising a radical change to protect women against violence. they are trying to cover all the different areas, notjust policing, but the justice system, how you manage offenders, transport, education and across the whole board. they are trying to do a joined up strategy. that is why you have a lead on policing, who will take charge of violence against women and you have money for education in schools and a campaign to try and teach people not to use misogynistic language and behaviour. they are going to ban virginity testing. and they are going to look in universities at the use of nondisclosure agreements, when there is sexual harassment. there is a long list of things across a lot of government departments. that is the
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good news. ithink government departments. that is the good news. i think the issue is that the problem is so vast, there are so many offences against women and so few are brought to court and then so few are brought to court and then so few are brought to court and then so few are actually found guilty that you need some big strategies, you need grander plans. and i think this is possibly a bit too incremental. will it stop women feeling unsafe on the streets tonight? no. will it stop women feeling unsafe on the streets in the next months and weeks? possibly not. there has also been some criticism from women's groups. they have wanted a law against street harassment. if you are to go out on the street and someone starts harassing you, they wanted a specific law for that. the government says it will look carefully at that. but it hasn't committed to that. i think there might already be laws to take that into account. but what it does want is the government wants women to start reporting even those things that are classed as low level. but
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are quite serious. so, indecent exposure, flashing that some people think well, i won't bother reporting. the government wants to encourage people to do that. the other big issue is funding. women's charities don't think there is enough money to get the streets are safe to protect women.— safe to protect women. lucy, thank ou. lu safe to protect women. lucy, thank you. lucy manning. _ i can now speak to parm sandu, former chief superintendent at the metropolitan police and crime commentator. what is your reaction, does it sound like when we'll be safe as a reaction to these plans? it is a ste in reaction to these plans? it is a step in the _ reaction to these plans? it is a step in the right _ reaction to these plans? it is a step in the right direction - reaction to these plans? it is a step in the right direction and | reaction to these plans? it is a i step in the right direction and as your correspondence said, it is just not enough. when you start looking at will women be safe tonight? no, they won't be. it is another strategy and another report and another... committee who are going to talk about what to do and how to make people safer, make women safer. when we are talking about 24—hour helplines and logging when you feel unsafe on the street, that should already exist. that is the 999
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system. that is 211—7. people should be able to ring in and say i am feeling unsafe and walking through the streets. a lot of this, in my view, is smoke and mirrors. we need to have action, we need to have extra patrols, we need extra police officers actually making women and everybody feel safer on the streets. in addition to that, we need to have those stronger penalties. you mention to the charities. charities are the supportive network that police officers rely on. the charities have been woefully funded up charities have been woefully funded up until now. there are lots of strands that need to be looked at. is that the main thing you would change, extra police officers patrolling, what, late at night? this patrolling, what, late at night? as i patrolling, what, late at night? sis i woman patrolling, what, late at night? is i woman myself, if i am walking down the street, i personally would feel safer knowing that there are extra patrols in that area. especially if it's been logged as an area where women feel unsafe. 0n it's been logged as an area where women feel unsafe. on a personal basis and on a professional basis,
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yes i would say that. do basis and on a professional basis, yes i would say that.— basis and on a professional basis, yes i would say that. do you think, is a former— yes i would say that. do you think, is a former chief— yes i would say that. do you think, is a former chief superintendent, l yes i would say that. do you think, l is a former chief superintendent, we need a new law against street harassment? 0rto need a new law against street harassment? or to the police already have enough armoury in their pockets, so to speak, to charge people with that? the pockets, so to speak, to charge people with that?— people with that? the laws are already there. _ people with that? the laws are already there. i'm _ people with that? the laws are already there. i'm not - people with that? the laws are already there. i'm not sure - people with that? the laws are | already there. i'm not sure that people with that? the laws are - already there. i'm not sure that we need extra laws. wejust need people to actually enact them and actually take offences to court. where the police service has been so stretched with the resources, they don't always respond or there a delay to responding. that is where i think we should be looking. also looking at funding the charities properly so they support the victims so they do go to court. he they support the victims so they do go to court-— go to court. he very much for talkin: go to court. he very much for talking to _ go to court. he very much for talking to us, _ go to court. he very much for talking to us, thank - go to court. he very much for talking to us, thank you. -- l go to court. he very much for - talking to us, thank you. -- thank talking to us, thank you. —— thank you very much. former metropolitan police officer. and i'll be speaking to victoria atkins, the minister for safeguarding,
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about this at 9:15am. please get in contact with your thoughts. the number of migrants crossing the english channel to britain in small boats this year has now surpassed the total for the whole of 2020. a group of migrants arriving at dover this morning has taken the figure past last year's total of nearly 8,500 people. france is to double the number of police patrolling its beaches, as part of an agreement with britain aimed at stemming the flow. the uk will pay a further £54 million to support the french efforts. simonjones reports. crossing one of the world's busiest shipping lanes in a small inflatable is dangerous, whatever the weather but calm seas and long warm days mean migrants are trying to get across the english channel in record numbers. border force uk officials intercepted 430 people as they tried to enter the uk on monday alone, the largest number recorded on a single day. a further 287 arrived yesterday, meaning there already be
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meaning there's already been more than 8,400 arrivals this year, that's matched the total for the whole of last year. yesterday, the uk announced more than £50 million of new funding to help france double the number of police patrolling its beaches. and a bill to make crossing the channel without permission a criminal offence, punishable by up to four years in prison, passed a parliamentary vote. those plans have met opposition. putting people injail, who have come here because of the terrible things that have happened to them in their lives is really draconian, punitive and all that it will do is fill up ourjails without resolving the issue. with more than five months of the year still to go, its reasonable to predict the total for arrivals in 2021 will be the highest by some margin. simon jones, bbc news. our correspondent, simonjones, is in dover. what did you see happening this morning, simon? it’s what did you see happening this morning, simon?— what did you see happening this morning, simon? it's been another busy morning _ morning, simon? it's been another busy morning for— morning, simon? it's been another busy morning for the _ morning, simon? it's been another busy morning for the border- morning, simon? it's been another busy morning for the border force | busy morning for the border force and hardly surprising when you look
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at the conditions. it's a really warm, once again, here in dover and in the channel mic, it is incredibly calm. a short while ago, we saw a border force boat coming to the port of dover —— in the channel. they were taken to shore to begin the process of being processed where they have their picture taken and after that, they are taken to reception centres and people will be dispersed around the country. the home secretary, priti patel, says the british public is rightly angry and upset at seeing such seems pretty much on a daily basis. that is why she called an emergency meeting with her french counterpart yesterday evening. the big idea, now, is that britain is going to give france another £54 million. that's going to be used partly to double the number of police officers patrolling the beaches and northern france and also to increase surveillance along the coast. it can
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be seen more quickly, where exactly migrants are launching from to get police officers and authorities more quickly there to prevent that. if you are thinking the sounds rather familiar, back in november, britain and france announced a similar deal where they said the number of police officers in france was going to be doubled, there was going to be increased surveillance but the numbers arriving by boat have continued to grow. although just for context, the numbers arriving by other means, such as people stowing away in lorries, has fallen dramatically.— away in lorries, has fallen dramatically. away in lorries, has fallen dramaticall . ., ,, , . dramatically. thank you very much, simon. the government is to explain how it wants to overhaul trading arrangements between britain and northern ireland which came into force after brexit. ministers are expected to warn the european union that they could override the current agreement, known as the northern ireland protocol, which the pm helped draw up and which a majority of mps voted for — if brussels won't agree to change it. although bbc news understands the government won't take such action in the short term. the arrangements have led to challenges and in some cases shortages of goods.
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0ur chief political correspondent is at westminster. what are they going to warn the eu they might do?— they might do? good morning, victoria will _ they might do? good morning, victoria will stop _ they might do? good morning, victoria will stop the _ they might do? good morning, victoria will stop the nuclear i victoria will stop the nuclear option in the uk has its article 16, the clause in the northern ireland breaks a deal which says if there is a serious diversion of trade within the uk or in the eu, then parts of the uk or in the eu, then parts of the brexit deal relating to northern ireland could be suspended. the uk is going to war that they think the circumstances exist in the uk that would justify the use of that. they say there has been such a change in trade between great britain and northern ireland that the uk could use article 16 if it wanted to but they are not going to use it in the short—term. they are going to keep it in the locker for if things go wrong. it's a bit of a kind of pressure move to try and encourage the eu to change how the northern ireland protocol is operating, so it is a little bit less owner is for the traders who are having to operate it. the traders who are having to operate it—
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operate it. and the way it is operating--- _ operate it. and the way it is operating... -- _ operate it. and the way it is operating... -- little - operate it. and the way it is operating... -- little less i operate it. and the way it is - operating... -- little less onerous. operating... —— little less onerous. it is what borisjohnson drew up and what mps voted for not that long ago. what mps voted for not that long a . o. ., ., what mps voted for not that long auo. ., ., , ., ago. the northern ireland protocol means that — ago. the northern ireland protocol means that eu _ ago. the northern ireland protocol means that eu law _ ago. the northern ireland protocol means that eu law applies - ago. the northern ireland protocol means that eu law applies in - means that eu law applies in northern ireland when it comes to things like trade in goods and the trade in plants and animal products across the irish sea. also, there is across the irish sea. also, there is a role for the european court of justice there if there is any disputes. that is in the brexit deal that both sides signed up to. there is a difference of interpretation, which means that cheques that are actually happening are a lot more than the uk government expected. —— the checks. you can have a debate about whether they have realistic expectations or not but we are where we are and where we are is that there is a process of negotiation going on. and the eu has made its move already. it has tweaked some aspects of the protocol, bits of it relating to the movement of guide dogs, yes, guide dogs. and also, just how medicine is registered in great britain can still be administered in northern ireland from next year. the eu has made
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their move to try to be more flexible but it is not nearly flexible but it is not nearly flexible enough for the uk government. my prediction is that this paper and the statement will get made today. there will be quite a lot of bombast from the uk. the eu will probably be a bit neutral about it. and then there will be some under the radar discussions over the summer when the true sides —— two sides try to reach an agreement. they won't reach an agreement and deadlines will expire in september and then we will have a crisis then and then we will have a crisis then and we will find out whether the two sides can reach a compromise. i suspect we will talk about this northern ireland protocol for years and years to come. it will be a semipermanent feature of life. thank ou for semipermanent feature of life. thank you for your— semipermanent feature of life. thank you for your predictions. _ semipermanent feature of life. thank you for your predictions. we - semipermanent feature of life. thank you for your predictions. we will- you for your predictions. we will see! thank you very much, adam, thank you. the headlines on bbc news... new measures to tackle violence against women in england and wales — including £5 million to combat trouble in public places at night. as record numbers of migrants cross the english channel, france is to double police patrols on its beaches in a deal with the uk.
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the government's to explain how it wants to overhaul trading arrangements between britain and northern ireland which came into force after brexit. torrential rain has caused severe flooding in parts of central china. at least 12 people have died in the city of zhengzhou after its subway system was inundated with rushing water. more than 10,000 people in henan province have been evacuated to shelters — but there are fears a dam near there could collapse at any time. mark lobel reports. shouting floodwater spreading fear. the partly—submerged city of zhengzhou, its subway system now an underground river. commuters standing for air. rescuers bravely reacting to unprecedented scenes.
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though not everyone made it. large parts of the train system shutdown. rip currents seemingly running along roads. the amount of rain over the last three days in this provincial capital usually falls in an entire year. bringing traffic to a standstill. many homes were no place for refuge. 0ver10,000 residents in the region relocated. more than a dozen cities in this central part of china affected with henan's population close to 100 million. with10,000 lost hectares of crops, the flooding causing an estimated $11 million worth of damage and counting. rescuers worked all hours, battling floods caused by many factors, including that a warming
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atmosphere caused by climate change makes extreme rainfall like this more likely. with downpours here forecast to continue for many hours. mark lobel, bbc news. a three—year—old girl has been left with life—changing injuries from a collision with an e—scooter in south london. she was in myatt�*s field park, in lambeth, with herfamily when she was struck at about 8.30pm on monday night. the met police said the young man on the e—scooter stopped to say sorry. police were alerted on tuesday when the girl's condition deteriorated. riding privately—owned scooters in public is illegal in the uk. france is rolling out new rules on accessing public places, in a bid to curb what it says is a fourth wave of covid infections. from today, only those with proof of vaccination or a negative test will be able to visit most museums,
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cinemas and theme parks. the rules will apply to bars and restaurants next month. 18,000 new coronavirus cases were recorded in france in the last 24 hours. 0ur paris correspondent, hugh schofield, says there has been opposition to the new rules. the today is the first day of the roll—out of what they are calling the pass sanitaire, the health pass. we're at the louvre, as you can see, and in an hour orso, that'll be opening, and, for the first time, people who are arriving will have to produce this pass. it'll mainly be on people's mobile phones, and it's a sign that you had either a full vaccination or that you had a recent, negative test, or you recovered recently from covid, and an id card, so that it's not a fake pass, so that you can go in. the same will apply to galleries, museums, sports centres, gyms and so on across the country, effectively creating two categories of people, people with a pass, people without a pass, and, of course, there's the rub.
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there are people who are very angry about this, especially because, two weeks from now, the measure is extended to cafes, restaurants, everyday life, shopping centres. and there, again, you will see people having to show their passes to get access to these daily amenities. there is opposition, and the government is very mindful that it needs to tread very carefully as it pushes ahead with this measure to stop the fourth wave. let's get more now on the measures the government is due to announce to tackle violence against women and girls. a top police officer is to be put in charge of the issue, a 24—hour rape and sexual assault helpline will be launched and money will spent on making public places feel safer. victoria atkins, the minister for safeguarding, joins me now. £5 million. good morning. how will women be safe as a result of those measures?— women be safe as a result of those measures? . , ., , ., , measures? well, the strategy really sees this as — measures? well, the strategy really
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sees this as a _ measures? well, the strategy really sees this as a decade _ measures? well, the strategy really sees this as a decade of _ measures? well, the strategy really sees this as a decade of change. -- | sees this as a decade of change. -- women sees this as a decade of change. —— women be safer. sees this as a decade of change. -- women be safer. we _ sees this as a decade of change. -- women be safer. we want - sees this as a decade of change. -- women be safer. we want the - sees this as a decade of change. -- l women be safer. we want the almost inevitability of — women be safer. we want the almost inevitability of these _ women be safer. we want the almost inevitability of these crimes - women be safer. we want the almost inevitability of these crimes to - women be safer. we want the almost inevitability of these crimes to be - inevitability of these crimes to be completely removed. these crimes are unacceptable, they are against the law and we really should be working together as a society to challenge them. i would describe it as having immediate, mid—term and longer term consequences. things like educating our young people, as i saw yesterday for my self at a primary school, through relationships education. —— for myself. that will have long—term, beneficial consequences for those young people as they grow up for those young people as they grow up into adulthood. but in the short term, measures such as, as you said, the helpline to help victims who have suffered from rape and sexual assault, the national policing lead who will really drive change through police forces to ensure that they are treating these crimes properly. and also measures such as what works fund, that we are setting up to help
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drive academic research into what perpetrators are doing and why they are doing it which will in turn help local councils and other commissioners that will reinvest in programmes in their local areas. these are all part of the strategy. we reach across government departments. we have work on public transport for example because we know that can be an area that we know that can be an area that we know people are touched and abused. we are driving change through that. we are driving change through that. we are driving change through that. we are even going to look at street design. we are challenging, through our guidance, local councils and others to plan better so that our streets are safer for women and girls at all times of the day and night. i girls at all times of the day and niuht. ., ., ~ girls at all times of the day and niht. ., girls at all times of the day and niuht. ., ., ~ ., ., , girls at all times of the day and niuht. ., ., ~ . ., , ., girls at all times of the day and niuht. . ., , ., night. i look at the money that your boss, the home _ night. i look at the money that your boss, the home secretary, - night. i look at the money that your boss, the home secretary, is - night. i look at the money that your boss, the home secretary, is given| boss, the home secretary, is given to france to stop people crossing the channel. it is £54 million. and i look at the money your boss, the home secretary, is giving to tackle male violence against women and girls. it is £5 million. doesn't that tell us how seriously the home
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secretary takes this issue? in fairness, victoria, i must correct you, please come on that. the £54 million, absolutely, the home secretary has secured an agreement with french authorities to help police at the borders of france. in terms of the funding that we put into tackling violence against women and girls, the 5 million you refer to is a specific fund to help ensure that our streets are safer at night for women. that our streets are safer at night for women-— that our streets are safer at night for women. . , , ., ., for women. yeah, but is that all? 5 million? forgive _ for women. yeah, but is that all? 5 million? forgive me, _ for women. yeah, but is that all? 5 million? forgive me, that- for women. yeah, but is that all? 5 million? forgive me, that is- for women. yeah, but is that all? 5 million? forgive me, that is but. for women. yeah, but is that all? 5| million? forgive me, that is but one fund, one action _ million? forgive me, that is but one fund, one action in _ million? forgive me, that is but one fund, one action in this _ million? forgive me, that is but one fund, one action in this strategy. - fund, one action in this strategy. what is the total, then? we have already announced _ what is the total, then? we have already announced the _ what is the total, then? we have already announced the £25 - what is the total, then? we have | already announced the £25 million fund, again, on safer streets that was launched a few weeks ago to help ensure that we are setting up street lighting, cctv, etc, to make people feel safer. we have crossed government work. for example, the health service running alongside this the women's health strategy and in that strategy they are going to
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be looking at improving mental health services for victims of sexual violence in particular because we know these crimes can have a devastating impact. this because we know these crimes can have a devastating impact.- because we know these crimes can have a devastating impact. this is a massive problem, _ have a devastating impact. this is a massive problem, you _ have a devastating impact. this is a massive problem, you know- have a devastating impact. this is a massive problem, you know that i massive problem, you know that because you had 180,000 messages from women up and down the country when you call for evidence. this is a massive problem and it still less than the money you are giving to france to stop people crossing the channel. ., , ., ., channel. forgive me, you have focused on _ channel. forgive me, you have focused on one _ channel. forgive me, you have focused on one measure - channel. forgive me, you have focused on one measure in - channel. forgive me, you have focused on one measure in thej focused on one measure in the strategy and you haven't referenced, for example, the £125 million we have announced previously to support specialist services under the domestic abuse act earlier this year to ensure that victims who are living in safer accommodation have the special services and therapies they desperately need. it is across government- _ they desperately need. it is across government. that _ they desperately need. it is across government. that is _ they desperately need. it is across government. that is fair— they desperately need. it is across government. that is fair enough. i government. that is fair enough. those of the supporter services, thatis those of the supporter services, that is after the woman has been abused, stalked, harassed, etc. if you hadn't cut 20,000 police
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officers, perhaps women wouldn't be in this position in britain in 2021 right now. in this position in britain in 2021 riaht now. �* ., in this position in britain in 2021 riaht now. �* . ._ ,, right now. again, ifi may, ithink that's... right now. again, ifi may, ithink that's. .. that's _ right now. again, ifi may, ithink that's. .. that's not _ right now. again, ifi may, ithink that's. .. that's not a _ right now. again, ifi may, ithink that's. .. that's not a fair- right now. again, ifi may, ithink that's. .. that's not a fair analysis j that's... that's not a fair analysis of the problem. one of the things... why not? 0ut of the problem. one of the things... why not? out of the 180,000 responses is that we have a job of work to do to empower and encourage women and girls to report these offences when they happen. but i've just spoken to a former metropolitan chief intended to set if there was more police officers on the street, people would feel safer. —— metropolitan chief superintendent. we know from the intensive work with victims and survivors, but was another form of information gathering that we conducted as part of this. and our work in focus groups with specialist organisations, expert organisations. we know that the public understanding that some of these offences, these behaviours are criminal offences already. and
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giving people the confidence to report these to police... that giving people the confidence to report these to police... that is a sli . htl report these to police... that is a slightly different _ report these to police... that is a slightly different issue, _ report these to police. .. that is a slightly different issue, if- report these to police... that is a slightly different issue, if i - report these to police... that is a slightly different issue, if i may, | slightly different issue, if i may, victoria atkins. it is just a fact, is it not, that if your government hadn't cut 20,000 police officers, there might be more police officers patrolling the streets. that might lead to people feeling safer. that's just a fact, isn't it?— just a fact, isn't it? well, it is also about— just a fact, isn't it? well, it is also about us _ just a fact, isn't it? well, it is also about us understanding i just a fact, isn't it? well, it is i also about us understanding that just a fact, isn't it? well, it is - also about us understanding that we can go to the police to report some of these offences. but can go to the police to report some of these offences.— of these offences. but there are 20,000 fewer — of these offences. but there are 20,000 fewer of _ of these offences. but there are 20,000 fewer of them! - of these offences. but there are 20,000 fewer of them! one - of these offences. but there are 20,000 fewer of them! one ofl of these offences. but there are i 20,000 fewer of them! one of the thins that 20,000 fewer of them! one of the things that has _ 20,000 fewer of them! one of the things that has emerged _ 20,000 fewer of them! one of the things that has emerged from - 20,000 fewer of them! one of the i things that has emerged from recent, very high profile cases is that the... there is a link or there is something that should be looked into in terms of escalating behaviours of offenders. so, noncontact sexual offences, escalating into ever more serious offences. that is a key part of our strategy. we are investing... i understand and that does make sense for stop you avoiding the question about cuts to police
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officers. ., ~ , question about cuts to police officers. . ~ , , , question about cuts to police officers-_ iti question about cuts to police l officers._ it is question about cuts to police - officers._ it is more officers. -- makes sense. it is more comp located _ officers. -- makes sense. it is more comp located than _ officers. -- makes sense. it is more comp located than that, _ officers. -- makes sense. it is more comp located than that, i _ officers. -- makes sense. it is more comp located than that, i am - officers. -- makes sense. it is more comp located than that, i am trying | comp located than that, i am trying to explain to you that we have got to explain to you that we have got to bring the public with —— it is more complicated than we have invested and we are securing more police officers on our streets and we recruited a further 8771 in the last year. but i really want to get a message out that we want to support women and girls in understanding what they can do if they feel able to, to tackle some of these behaviours. that is what the public communications that we will be running, both to help victims but also to tackle these behaviours. you are absolutely right, with some of these behaviours, it is very much about education and people being aware that these behaviours simply are not acceptable. so the public communications campaign that we will be running will be very much focusing on perpetrator behaviours. at the academic and research that we are, again, investing in, these programmes will be rolled out. —— and the academic. we want to help local commissioners make the right
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decisions in terms of supporting victims locally in their areas. we are doing something similar with serious violence and we want to do the same with violence against women and girls. i the same with violence against women and uirls. ~ ., i. ., and girls. i know you are considering _ and girls. i know you are considering whether i and girls. i know you are. considering whether there and girls. i know you are - considering whether there should and girls. i know you are _ considering whether there should be a new offensive street harassment. is the reason you are considering it and haven't already done it because you believe there is already legislation out there is already legislation out there is already legislation available. however, we are very much _ legislation available. however, we are very much in _ legislation available. however, we are very much in listening - legislation available. however, we are very much in listening mode . legislation available. however, we| are very much in listening mode on this. from the responses, we picked up this. from the responses, we picked up that women and the police may not know, may not be quite applying offences correctly for the police to behaviours that already are criminalised. it is really important we are going through this very, very methodically to see where there are gaps, if there are gaps in the legislation and how best to address those gaps. as i say, this strategy is ic beginning of our work on this in the next decade. it is really
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significant —— i see it as the beginning. we want to see this as a journey of work to improve the safety of women and girls across the country. safety of women and girls across the count . ~ , safety of women and girls across the count . . , ., safety of women and girls across the count .~ , ., i. safety of women and girls across the count . ~ , ., ,, ~' safety of women and girls across the count . . , ., ,, country. why do you think some men do harass, stalk, _ country. why do you think some men do harass, stalk, abuse, _ country. why do you think some men do harass, stalk, abuse, assault- do harass, stalk, abuse, assault some women in this country? there are a range — some women in this country? there are a range of _ some women in this country? there are a range of reasons. _ some women in this country? there are a range of reasons. and - some women in this country? there are a range of reasons. and it i some women in this country? there are a range of reasons. and it was l are a range of reasons. and it was interesting, actually, in the survey responses. we know, for example, that children growing up, boys growing up, in abusive households may not always, but may replicate some of that, when they grow into adulthood. it is why our emphasis on education in schools is so important. and it is why we want people to be growing up into healthy and respectful adults. there is a role here, i think, and certainly survey responses touched upon this, in relation to internet pornography. and the work of the 0nline safety bill, which sits alongside this,
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this isn't the only document that is helping to tackle violence against women and girls in government. at the 0nline safety bill will be very significant in addressing some of these behaviours. —— but the. and these behaviours. —— but the. and the comms campaign. we have some reason to believe from the survey responses that there are small groups of men, no means all men, please let's not fall into thinking that, but they can the banter and egging on and peer pressure to behave in a certain way —— there can behave in a certain way —— there can be banter. we want the public comms campaign to give confidence and reassurance to those men who stand up reassurance to those men who stand up and say this is not acceptable behaviour, please don't speak, please don't do that, that's not appropriate. we want to give confidence to those meant to be able to do that, as well. we need to work together as a society that make those men be able. this document says violence against women and girls is violence against all of us. —— we need to work together as a society. we need to tackle this. we are half the population. haee society. we need to tackle this. we are half the population.— are half the population. have you experienced _ are half the population. have you experienced a — are half the population. have you experienced a harassment - are half the population. have you i
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experienced a harassment yourself? yes. ., experienced a harassment yourself? yes. . . , ~' experienced a harassment yourself? yes. . . ., ., , , | yes. can i asked what happened? i mean, i yes. can i asked what happened? i mean. i have _ yes. can i asked what happened? i mean, i have had _ yes. can i asked what happened? i mean, i have had a _ yes. can i asked what happened? i mean, i have had a range - yes. can i asked what happened? i mean, i have had a range of - mean, i have had a range of experiences.— mean, i have had a range of experiences.- i - mean, i have had a range of i experiences.- i remember, mean, i have had a range of experiences. like? i remember, even now, and experiences. like? i remember, even now. and it — experiences. like? i remember, even now. and it was _ experiences. like? i remember, even now, and it was some _ experiences. like? i remember, even now, and it was some time _ experiences. like? i remember, even now, and it was some time ago, i remember... being followed, one night, as i got of the night bus. and it was a terrifying experience. he was... i hid behind a van to try to lose him. and he hid behind the other part of the van and was clearly waiting for me. it was an absolutely terrifying experience. even now, i can feel... the fear rising. and i don't want any woman or girl to have to ensure that or indeed even worse. that might have to endure. we are determined from the prime minister down, we are determined to make a change to these
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behaviours this decade. thank determined to make a change to these behaviours this decade.— behaviours this decade. thank you for sharin: behaviours this decade. thank you for sharing that _ behaviours this decade. thank you for sharing that with _ behaviours this decade. thank you for sharing that with us _ behaviours this decade. thank you for sharing that with us and - behaviours this decade. thank you for sharing that with us and thank| for sharing that with us and thank you for talking to us. victoria atkins, the safeguarding minister. your views are welcome. contact me. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. hello, if you're a fan of the hot sunshine, you'll be pleased to hear that there is more of it on the cards for the next few days, but it's not everyone's cup of tea. and the met office have got two amber extreme heat warnings out for parts of the south—west of england, wales and northern ireland, too. across these zones and in fact elsewhere, there could be some health impacts because of the heat over the next few days, particularly for anybody vulnerable to extreme heat. so, lots of blue sky, lots of sunshine. a little bit cloudier on the far north—east, where temperatures will be around 20 celsius, in aberdeen, but up to about 29, 30, quite widely, we could see 31 in northern ireland.
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hit and miss heavy showers and thunderstorms almost anywhere into the evening hours, but they'll fade away overnight. temperatures staying pretty warm, in the mid to high teens, so an uncomfortable night for sleeping. into thursday, pretty similar to today. lots of blue sky, lots of sunshine around. cloudier across the north—east of the uk, but in that sunshine we are likely to see temperatures once again close to 30 degrees. bye— bye. hello this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. the headlines... a top police officer is to lead a new drive to tackle violence against women and girls in england and wales — including £5 million to improve safety in public places at night. as record numbers of migrants cross the channel, france is to double police patrols on its beaches in a deal with the uk. the government is to explain how it wants to overhaul trading arrangements between britain and northern ireland which came into force after brexit. torrential rain causes severe flooding in parts of central china. at least 12 people died in one city after its subway system was almost submerged. a shake—up for english
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cricket starts tonight. the hundred — a new 100—ball per side format — which the england and wales cricket board says will mean shorter and faster games. and coming up: scientists from the natural history museum unearth tens of thousands of fossils from a secret site in the cotswolds — after a discovery by a couple of amateur paleontologists. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougal. the 2032 olympics will be held in brisbane australia, they have won the bid and the ioc german has brisbane australia, they have won the bid and the ioc german hasjust announced it. it was widely expected. it will be held in brisbane. the england women's football team are currently playing chile, and ellen white scored the
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opening goal at the sapporo dome, after 18 minutes with this close range effort. a deserved lead for great britain and the second half has got under way. still 1—0. the official opening ceremony for the games takes place on friday. this morning two athletes have become the first to become completely ruled out of the olympics after testing positive for coronavirus. chilean taekwondo athlete fernanda aguirre and dutch skateboarder candy jacobs are out. jacobs had tested positive in the athletes�* village and told dutch media she was devastated. she said, "i feel fit and now it's over." team gb haven't yet had a positive case. they did have six athletes and two staff isolate earlier in the week, but they're now back in training. we have our own environment. we have our own living environment, which we have secured.
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it's got a big footprint, around it so british athletes can enjoy that in a really, really positive way. you look out across tokyo bay and we've got this big footprint of fresh air, which the athletes can go out and enjoy, so it's a very, very relaxed environment. arsenal have pulled out of their preseason tour to florida because of a number of coronairus case within their travelling party. the squad were due to fly out tomorrow to compete in the florida cup, which everton and inter milan are also involved in. the club did not specify how many members of their touring group tested positive, nor if any were players. it was a thrilling end to england's third t20 against pakistan with a three wicket victory at old trafford, to make it a 2—1 series win. adam wild has more. this is the noise cricket has longed for. 22,000 inside old trafford. raising those levels yet further, pakistan with the bat.
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but, such blows come with a warning. get it wrong, miss it, and you miss out. that was adil rashid's first of four wickets. pakistan made it to 154. celebrations and noise, naturally. but they might just have wanted more. whether they needed more, well, that would be up to england's batsmen and, in truth, almost any target looks achievable whenjason roy takes aim. he passed 50 in a flash, but one mistimed blow for him, for england, terrible timing, and a massive blow. england in bother, and it was getting worse. this the drama, the crowd, the atmosphere deserved. two needed now from three balls. they didn't need them all. chrisjordan scrambling the winning runs. the celebrations at old trafford, just, belonging to england. adam wild, bbc news. a new format of cricket will make its debut tonight,
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the first ever match of the "hundred" competition will take place — a year later than expected because of the pandemic. the tournament begins with "0val invincibles" against "manchester 0riginals" in the women's competition in london, before the same two teams open the men's competition tomorrow. some big names are involved, including the likes of eoin morgan, jason roy and heather knight. eoin morgan, trevor bayliss, a few years ago when he was the england white ball coach they change the philosophy of the way that we think about white ball cricket, now we are world champions in both the men's and women's and we have groups of players in both the men's and women's that are right up there with the best in the world. that's why i believe over the next few weeks were going to see some drama, skills, last fall finishes, we will also see a bit of fun along the which is the shorter —— which is what the shorter format of the game is all about. just to repeat the breaking news in the last few minutes, the 2032 olympics will be held in brisbane,
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australia. the chief executive of the ioc has just announced it. that's all the sport for now. we can hear the international olympic committee president making that announcement. here it is. the international _ that announcement. here it is. tie: international olympic that announcement. here it is. tti: international olympic committee that announcement. here it is. t"ti: international olympic committee can announce that the games of the 2032 olympiad will go to brisbane. applause you could just about hear that, under the mask, couldn't you? if you're in england, how are the easing of restrictions this week affecting your life? for some, the easing of measures has brought with it anxiety. charlotte and tom hardwick are two of 70,000 people in the uk living with muscle—wasting conditions and say they have now increased the restrictions on their day—to—day lives in order to protect themselves. today muscular dystrophy uk will present evidence to an all—party parliamentary group.
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its report looks at pandemic experiences, the impact of shielding and disruption to vital clinical appointments. the charity is now calling for more to be done to help support people return their lives to normal and get them the treatment they need. we can speak now to charlotte and tom hardwick and also to rob burley, director of campaigns, care and support at muscular dystrophy. charlotte and tom, hello to you, and for the audience who always want to learn more, explain what muscular dystrophy is and what it is like living with it.— dystrophy is and what it is like living with it. yes, so, muscular dystrophy _ living with it. yes, so, muscular dystrophy is _ living with it. yes, so, muscular dystrophy is a — living with it. yes, so, muscular dystrophy is a life _ living with it. yes, so, muscular dystrophy is a life limiting i living with it. yes, so, muscular. dystrophy is a life limiting muscle wasting condition so that means that all of the muscles in the body gradually weaken over time and it affects vital organs, such as the heart and lungs as well, so it has a massive impact upon the lives of
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those that live with the condition. charlotte, explain why you are more at risk now that the restrictions have been aged. —— eased. at risk now that the restrictions have been aged. -- eased. initially when the pandemic— have been aged. -- eased. initially when the pandemic happened, i have been aged. -- eased. initially when the pandemic happened, it i have been aged. -- eased. initially l when the pandemic happened, it was kind of— when the pandemic happened, it was kind of like _ when the pandemic happened, it was kind of like life was normal for us, because _ kind of like life was normal for us, because every single common cold is potentially _ because every single common cold is potentially life—threatening for people — potentially life—threatening for people like tom and myself, because we have _ people like tom and myself, because we have very weak respiratory muscles — we have very weak respiratory muscles and heart muscles, so, yeah, 'ust muscles and heart muscles, so, yeah, just a _ muscles and heart muscles, so, yeah, just a simple _ muscles and heart muscles, so, yeah, just a simple cold can put us in hospital. — just a simple cold can put us in hospital, so this kind of like running _ hospital, so this kind of like running a _ hospital, so this kind of like running a gauntlet every winter, but when _ running a gauntlet every winter, but when the _ running a gauntlet every winter, but when the pandemic kind of got worse, it is really— when the pandemic kind of got worse, it is really a _ when the pandemic kind of got worse, it is really a life—and—death situation _ it is really a life—and—death situation for us. we are dependent on a team — situation for us. we are dependent on a team of amazing carers that look— on a team of amazing carers that look after— on a team of amazing carers that look after us in our homes, and obviously— look after us in our homes, and obviously we have no control over them _ obviously we have no control over
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them coming in. we have to have that care, _ them coming in. we have to have that care, because — them coming in. we have to have that care, because that is vital to us, so it— care, because that is vital to us, so it is— care, because that is vital to us, so it is constant the level of anxiety _ so it is constant the level of anxiety. there are kind of other issues — anxiety. there are kind of other issues and _ anxiety. there are kind of other issues and how it affected us, in terms _ issues and how it affected us, in terms of— issues and how it affected us, in terms of losing services that were vital to _ terms of losing services that were vital to us, — terms of losing services that were vital to us, and kind of our care being— vital to us, and kind of our care being threatened, really. what vitalto us, and kind of our care being threatened, really. what is at the heart of — being threatened, really. what is at the heart of your _ being threatened, really. what is at the heart of your concerns - being threatened, really. what is at the heart of your concerns now, i being threatened, really. what is at l the heart of your concerns now, tom, with restrictions easing? loss of sound. , ., , , with restrictions easing? loss of sound. , ., _ ~ ., ., , sound. obviously we know that cases are risin: of sound. obviously we know that cases are rising of the _ sound. obviously we know that cases are rising of the virus _ sound. obviously we know that cases are rising of the virus at _ sound. obviously we know that cases are rising of the virus at the _ are rising of the virus at the moment. what we are worried with the lifting of the restrictions that more people are going to come into contact with the virus, and we particularly feel concerned about our own carers, like, they may take
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precautions, but if other people are not, there is the possibility of them picking something up and then passing that on to us, so we are quite alarmed with what is taking place now, with the changing of the rules. ., , ,., place now, with the changing of the rules. ., , ., rules. the lowest point of the pandemic _ rules. the lowest point of the pandemic was _ rules. the lowest point of the pandemic was hearing - rules. the lowest point of the pandemic was hearing that, l rules. the lowest point of the l pandemic was hearing that, for rules. the lowest point of the i pandemic was hearing that, for me, because _ pandemic was hearing that, for me, because we — pandemic was hearing that, for me, because we had been quite well looked — because we had been quite well looked after by the government's precautions and shielding and stuff like that— precautions and shielding and stuff like that and it seems like that has been _ like that and it seems like that has been taken away, really. what would our been taken away, really. what would your alternative _ been taken away, really. what would your alternative have _ been taken away, really. what would your alternative have been, - your alternative have been, charlotte?— your alternative have been, charlotte? . , ., ., your alternative have been, charlotte? . , . ., , charlotte? we understand that things do ou have charlotte? we understand that things do you have to _ charlotte? we understand that things do you have to go _ charlotte? we understand that things do you have to go back _ charlotte? we understand that things do you have to go back to _ charlotte? we understand that things do you have to go back to normal- do you have to go back to normal eventually — do you have to go back to normal eventually. we would have liked to have seen — eventually. we would have liked to have seen a little bit more gradual. ithink— have seen a little bit more gradual. i think that — have seen a little bit more gradual. i think that is why this report from muscular— i think that is why this report from muscular dystrophy uk is really important, because the easing of
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restrictions is going to affect people — restrictions is going to affect people who are clinically vulnerable, and there needs to be specialist — vulnerable, and there needs to be specialist care in place. therefore the pandemic we were aware that —— before _ the pandemic we were aware that —— before the _ the pandemic we were aware that —— before the pandemic we were aware that there _ before the pandemic we were aware that there was not consistently good specialised care for people with neuromuscular conditions and the pandemic— neuromuscular conditions and the pandemic has really magnified that and brought that lead to the forefront of our attention, so we were _ forefront of our attention, so we were excited that the government were excited that the government were kind — were excited that the government were kind of willing to listen, and that must— were kind of willing to listen, and that must religiously uk can make that must religiously uk can make that work— that must religiously uk can make that work this time.— that work this time. let's talk to rob iturley _ that work this time. let's talk to rob burley from _ that work this time. let's talk to rob burley from the _ that work this time. let's talk to rob burley from the charity. i that work this time. let's talk to i rob burley from the charity. what do you need for people like tom and charlotte right now? that you need for people like tom and charlotte right now?— you need for people like tom and charlotte right now? at the start of the pandemic— charlotte right now? at the start of the pandemic our _ charlotte right now? at the start of the pandemic our helpline - the pandemic our helpline experienced _ the pandemic our helpline experienced a _ the pandemic our helpline experienced a 35% - the pandemic our helplinei experienced a 35% increase the pandemic our helpline i experienced a 35% increase in the pandemic our helpline - experienced a 35% increase in calls and e-mails — experienced a 35% increase in calls and e-mails and _ experienced a 35% increase in calls and e—mails and that— experienced a 35% increase in calls and e—mails and that is— experienced a 35% increase in calls and e—mails and that is because i experienced a 35% increase in calls and e—mails and that is because of| and e—mails and that is because of the reasons—
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and e—mails and that is because of the reasons charlotte _ and e—mails and that is because of the reasons charlotte and - and e—mails and that is because of the reasons charlotte and tom i the reasons charlotte and tom explain, — the reasons charlotte and tom explain. people— the reasons charlotte and tom explain, people worried - the reasons charlotte and tom explain, people worried about| the reasons charlotte and tom i explain, people worried about the impact _ explain, people worried about the impact that— explain, people worried about the impact that covid—19 _ explain, people worried about the impact that covid—19 could - explain, people worried about the impact that covid—19 could have i explain, people worried about thel impact that covid—19 could have on their health. — impact that covid—19 could have on their health, the _ impact that covid—19 could have on their health, the impact _ impact that covid—19 could have on their health, the impact on - impact that covid—19 could have on their health, the impact on the i their health, the impact on the respiratory— their health, the impact on the respiratory and _ their health, the impact on the respiratory and heart _ their health, the impact on the respiratory and heart muscles, j their health, the impact on the i respiratory and heart muscles, but also because — respiratory and heart muscles, but also because of— respiratory and heart muscles, but also because of the _ respiratory and heart muscles, but also because of the impact- respiratory and heart muscles, but also because of the impact it - respiratory and heart muscles, but| also because of the impact it would have on— also because of the impact it would have on the — also because of the impact it would have on the services _ also because of the impact it would have on the services they _ also because of the impact it would have on the services they relied i have on the services they relied upon, _ have on the services they relied upon, so — have on the services they relied upon. so tom _ have on the services they relied upon, so tom explained - have on the services they relied upon, so tom explained very. have on the services they relied i upon, so tom explained very well, for someone — upon, so tom explained very well, for someone living _ upon, so tom explained very well, for someone living with _ upon, so tom explained very well, for someone living with a - upon, so tom explained very well, for someone living with a muscle l for someone living with a muscle wasting — for someone living with a muscle wasting condition, _ for someone living with a muscle wasting condition, they- for someone living with a muscle wasting condition, they mean- for someone living with a muscle| wasting condition, they mean me for someone living with a muscle - wasting condition, they mean me need regular— wasting condition, they mean me need regular appointments— wasting condition, they mean me need regular appointments with _ regular appointments with physiotherapists, - regular appointments with physiotherapists, and i regular appointments with physiotherapists, and with regular appointments with i physiotherapists, and with care advisers. — physiotherapists, and with care advisers. and _ physiotherapists, and with care advisers, and we _ physiotherapists, and with care advisers, and we want - physiotherapists, and with care advisers, and we want to - physiotherapists, and with care advisers, and we want to find i physiotherapists, and with care i advisers, and we want to find out what _ advisers, and we want to find out what the — advisers, and we want to find out what the impact _ advisers, and we want to find out what the impact had _ advisers, and we want to find out what the impact had been - advisers, and we want to find out what the impact had been so i advisers, and we want to find out what the impact had been so far, j what the impact had been so far, and we have _ what the impact had been so far, and we have heard — what the impact had been so far, and we have heard hundreds— what the impact had been so far, and we have heard hundreds of— what the impact had been so far, and we have heard hundreds of stories i we have heard hundreds of stories like those — we have heard hundreds of stories like those from _ we have heard hundreds of stories like those from tom _ we have heard hundreds of stories like those from tom and _ we have heard hundreds of storiesi like those from tom and charlotte, we conducted — like those from tom and charlotte, we conducted a _ like those from tom and charlotte, we conducted a survey— like those from tom and charlotte, we conducted a survey of— like those from tom and charlotte, we conducted a survey of 400 i like those from tom and charlotte, i we conducted a survey of 400 people livin- we conducted a survey of 400 people living with _ we conducted a survey of 400 people living with the — we conducted a survey of 400 people living with the conditions, _ we conducted a survey of 400 people living with the conditions, who - we conducted a survey of 400 people living with the conditions, who took. living with the conditions, who took part. _ living with the conditions, who took part. and _ living with the conditions, who took part. and they— living with the conditions, who took part, and they echoed _ living with the conditions, who took part, and they echoed what - living with the conditions, who took part, and they echoed what tom i living with the conditions, who tooki part, and they echoed what tom just told us _ part, and they echoed what tom just told us 86% — part, and they echoed what tom just told us 86% of— part, and they echoed what tom just told us. 86% of people _ part, and they echoed what tom just told us. 86% of people shielded i part, and they echoed what tom just told us. 86% of people shielded at i told us. 86% of people shielded at some _ told us. 86% of people shielded at some point— told us. 86% of people shielded at some point and _ told us. 86% of people shielded at some point and 68% _ told us. 86% of people shielded at some point and 68% think- told us. 86% of people shielded at some point and 68% think it - told us. 86% of people shielded at some point and 68% think it had i told us. 86% of people shielded at some point and 68% think it had a | some point and 68% think it had a physical— some point and 68% think it had a physical effect _ some point and 68% think it had a physical effect on— some point and 68% think it had a physical effect on the _ some point and 68% think it had a physical effect on the health - physical effect on the health and safety— physical effect on the health and safety 2%, — physical effect on the health and safety 2%, an _ physical effect on the health and safety 2%, an effect _ physical effect on the health and safety 2%, an effect on - physical effect on the health and safety 2%, an effect on their- physical effect on the health and i safety 2%, an effect on their mental health. _ safety 2%, an effect on their mental health. and — safety 2%, an effect on their mental health, and worryingly _ safety 2%, an effect on their mental health, and worryingly 75% - safety 2%, an effect on their mental health, and worryingly 75% have i health, and worryingly 75% have experienced _ health, and worryingly 75% have experienced disruption - health, and worryingly 75% have experienced disruption in - health, and worryingly 75% have experienced disruption in the i experienced disruption in the appointments _ experienced disruption in the appointments they— experienced disruption in the appointments they rely- experienced disruption in the appointments they rely upon| experienced disruption in the i appointments they rely upon for muscle — appointments they rely upon for muscle services— appointments they rely upon for muscle services so _ appointments they rely upon for muscle services so we _ appointments they rely upon for muscle services so we are - appointments they rely upon forl muscle services so we are calling for some — muscle services so we are calling for some immediate _ muscle services so we are calling
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for some immediate steps - muscle services so we are calling for some immediate steps to i muscle services so we are calling for some immediate steps to bel muscle services so we are calling i for some immediate steps to be taken that will_ for some immediate steps to be taken that will help people _ for some immediate steps to be taken that will help people come _ for some immediate steps to be taken that will help people come through . that will help people come through the immediate _ that will help people come through the immediate impact— that will help people come through the immediate impact of— that will help people come through the immediate impact of the - the immediate impact of the pandemic, _ the immediate impact of the pandemic, things _ the immediate impact of the pandemic, things like - the immediate impact of the - pandemic, things like improving the mix of— pandemic, things like improving the mix of fixed — pandemic, things like improving the mix of fixed and _ pandemic, things like improving the mix of fixed and base _ pandemic, things like improving the mix of fixed and base appointmentsi mix of fixed and base appointments whilst _ mix of fixed and base appointments whilst rotating — mix of fixed and base appointments whilst rotating virtual— whilst rotating virtual appointments. - whilst rotating virtual appointments. some| whilst rotating virtual- appointments. some people whilst rotating virtual— appointments. some people told us that discussions— appointments. some people told us that discussions with _ appointments. some people told us that discussions with a _ appointments. some people told us that discussions with a clinician - that discussions with a clinician over_ that discussions with a clinician over zoom _ that discussions with a clinician over zoom is— that discussions with a clinician over zoom is fine _ that discussions with a clinician over zoom is fine but _ that discussions with a clinician over zoom is fine but if- that discussions with a clinician over zoom is fine but if they i that discussions with a clinician . over zoom is fine but if they have to go— over zoom is fine but if they have to go to _ over zoom is fine but if they have to go to a — over zoom is fine but if they have to go to a physiotherapist - over zoom is fine but if they have to go to a physiotherapist to - over zoom is fine but if they have . to go to a physiotherapist to assess the impact — to go to a physiotherapist to assess the impact on — to go to a physiotherapist to assess the impact on their— to go to a physiotherapist to assess the impact on their muscle - to go to a physiotherapist to assessi the impact on their muscle wastage, that is— the impact on their muscle wastage, that is very— the impact on their muscle wastage, that is very difficult _ the impact on their muscle wastage, that is very difficult not _ the impact on their muscle wastage, that is very difficult not to _ the impact on their muscle wastage, that is very difficult not to be - that is very difficult not to be done — that is very difficult not to be done face—to—face _ that is very difficult not to be done face—to—face so - that is very difficult not to be done face—to—face so we - that is very difficult not to bel done face—to—face so we have that is very difficult not to be - done face—to—face so we have to look at how— done face—to—face so we have to look at how we _ done face—to—face so we have to look at how we prioritise _ done face—to—face so we have to look at how we prioritise face—to—face - at how we prioritise face—to—face appointments _ at how we prioritise face—to—face appointments and, _ at how we prioritise face—to—face appointments and, to _ at how we prioritise face—to—face appointments and, to make - at how we prioritise face—to—face appointments and, to make surei at how we prioritise face—to—face - appointments and, to make sure that people _ appointments and, to make sure that peopte have — appointments and, to make sure that people have infection— appointments and, to make sure that people have infection control- appointments and, to make sure that people have infection control within. people have infection control within hospitals, _ people have infection control within hospitats, as— people have infection control within hospitals, as tom _ people have infection control within hospitals, as tom was _ people have infection control within hospitals, as tom was saying, - hospitals, as tom was saying, neuromuscular— hospitals, as tom was saying, neuromuscular clinics- hospitals, as tom was saying, neuromuscular clinics are - hospitals, as tom was saying, neuromuscular clinics are very hospitals, as tom was saying, - neuromuscular clinics are very safe environments. _ neuromuscular clinics are very safe environments, because _ neuromuscular clinics are very safe environments, because of- neuromuscular clinics are very safe environments, because of the - neuromuscular clinics are very safe environments, because of the risk| neuromuscular clinics are very safe i environments, because of the risk of infection— environments, because of the risk of infection that — environments, because of the risk of infection that people _ environments, because of the risk of infection that people live _ environments, because of the risk of infection that people live with - infection that people live with everyday, _ infection that people live with everyday, so _ infection that people live with everyday, so people - infection that people live with everyday, so people need - infection that people live with everyday, so people need be| everyday, so people need be reassured _ everyday, so people need be reassured that _ everyday, so people need be reassured that they - everyday, so people need be reassured that they have - everyday, so people need be reassured that they have a l reassured that they have a face—to—face _ reassured that they have a| face—to—face appointment, reassured that they have a - face—to—face appointment, that they do so, _ face—to—face appointment, that they do so, and _ face—to—face appointment, that they do so, and in — face—to—face appointment, that they do so, and in the _ face—to—face appointment, that they do so, and in the long _ face—to—face appointment, that they do so, and in the long term, - face—to—face appointment, that they do so, and in the long term, tom . do so, and in the long term, tom summed— do so, and in the long term, tom summed it— do so, and in the long term, tom summed it up— do so, and in the long term, tom summed it up well, _ do so, and in the long term, tom summed it up well, there's - do so, and in the long term, tom - summed it up well, there's long—term things— summed it up well, there's long—term things that _ summed it up well, there's long—term things that are — summed it up well, there's long—term things that are challenging _ things that are challenging neuromuscular— things that are challenging
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neuromuscular services, . things that are challenging i neuromuscular services, in things that are challenging - neuromuscular services, in the uk, where _ neuromuscular services, in the uk, where there — neuromuscular services, in the uk, where there is— neuromuscular services, in the uk, where there is this _ neuromuscular services, in the uk, where there is this framework - neuromuscular services, in the uk, where there is this framework and i where there is this framework and reforms, — where there is this framework and reforms, but — where there is this framework and reforms, but the _ where there is this framework and reforms, but the government - where there is this framework and reforms, but the government and| where there is this framework and - reforms, but the government and nhs say they— reforms, but the government and nhs say they are _ reforms, but the government and nhs say they are keen— reforms, but the government and nhs say they are keen to _ reforms, but the government and nhs say they are keen to learn _ reforms, but the government and nhs say they are keen to learn lessons - say they are keen to learn lessons from _ say they are keen to learn lessons from the _ say they are keen to learn lessons from the pandemic— say they are keen to learn lessons from the pandemic and _ say they are keen to learn lessons from the pandemic and highlight i say they are keen to learn lessons - from the pandemic and highlight what can be _ from the pandemic and highlight what can be improved, _ from the pandemic and highlight what can be improved, so— from the pandemic and highlight what can be improved, so we _ from the pandemic and highlight what can be improved, so we want- from the pandemic and highlight what can be improved, so we want to - from the pandemic and highlight what can be improved, so we want to see l can be improved, so we want to see improved _ can be improved, so we want to see improved access _ can be improved, so we want to see improved access to _ can be improved, so we want to see improved access to that _ improved access to that multidisciplinary- improved access to that multidisciplinary team, | improved access to that - multidisciplinary team, physios, mental— multidisciplinary team, physios, mental health— multidisciplinary team, physios, mental health specialist, - multidisciplinary team, physios, mental health specialist, we - multidisciplinary team, physios, i mental health specialist, we also want _ mental health specialist, we also want to— mental health specialist, we also want to see — mental health specialist, we also want to see improved _ mental health specialist, we also want to see improved outreach . mental health specialist, we also . want to see improved outreach and community— want to see improved outreach and community services— want to see improved outreach and community services so _ want to see improved outreach and community services so that - want to see improved outreach and community services so that people| community services so that people don't _ community services so that people don't rety— community services so that people don't rely on — community services so that people don't rely on the _ community services so that people don't rely on the kind _ community services so that people don't rely on the kind of— community services so that people don't rely on the kind of a - community services so that people don't rely on the kind of a small. don't rely on the kind of a small number— don't rely on the kind of a small number of— don't rely on the kind of a small number of centrally— don't rely on the kind of a small number of centrally based - don't rely on the kind of a small- number of centrally based services, and we _ number of centrally based services, and we are — number of centrally based services, and we are delighted _ number of centrally based services, and we are delighted to— number of centrally based services, and we are delighted to come - number of centrally based services, . and we are delighted to come forward with a _ and we are delighted to come forward with a set— and we are delighted to come forward with a set of— and we are delighted to come forward with a set of recommendations - and we are delighted to come forward with a set of recommendations that l with a set of recommendations that we think— with a set of recommendations that we think we — with a set of recommendations that we think we will— with a set of recommendations that we think we will see _ with a set of recommendations that we think we will see the _ with a set of recommendations that we think we will see the reforms i we think we will see the reforms that the — we think we will see the reforms that the government _ we think we will see the reforms that the government and - we think we will see the reforms that the government and nhs i we think we will see the reformsl that the government and nhs are looking _ that the government and nhs are looking to — that the government and nhs are looking to make, _ that the government and nhs are looking to make, so— that the government and nhs are looking to make, so we _ that the government and nhs are looking to make, so we will- that the government and nhs are i looking to make, so we will discuss that with _ looking to make, so we will discuss that with and — looking to make, so we will discuss that with and continue _ looking to make, so we will discuss that with and continue to _ looking to make, so we will discuss that with and continue to support . that with and continue to support people _ that with and continue to support peopte with — that with and continue to support people with wasting _ that with and continue to support people with wasting conditions i that with and continue to support i people with wasting conditions like tom and _ people with wasting conditions like tom and charlotte. _ people with wasting conditions like tom and charlotte.— tom and charlotte. thank you for talkin: to tom and charlotte. thank you for talking to us. _ tom and charlotte. thank you for talking to us, rob _ tom and charlotte. thank you for talking to us, rob burley - tom and charlotte. thank you for talking to us, rob burley from i talking to us, rob burley from muscular dystrophy uk, and tom and charlotte, thank you for your time. a secret location in the cotswolds has become the focus of one of the most important excavations ofjurassic
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fossils ever in the uk. the site holds the remains of tens of thousands of marine animals, dating back to when a tropical sea covered much of southern england. but it's a race against the clock as scientists have been given just three days to excavate. our science correspondent rebecca morelle joined them at the dig. a race against time to reveal our ancient past. the team from the natural history museum has just three days to excavate this unique site. look how long they are. that's really cool! the cotswold quarry holds a treasure trove of sea creatures that lived during the jurassic period. what's here is so extraordinary, the location is being kept secret. we've got another really nice, exceptional specimen here. it's actually a brittle star. it is likely to be a new species. it's the quality of preservation, it's the number of fossils that we're finding but it's also the diversity.
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it's really unprecedented in geological sites of this age across the world. usually on an excavation, you might get a handful of finds but here, it's different. scientists think there are tens of thousands of fossils lying in the mud. this place must have been teeming with life 167 million years ago. this area was once covered by a shallow tropical sea. living there were animals like starfish, sea urchins, brittle stars and sea cucumbers. the site was discovered by local fossil hobbyists, nav and sally. a slab of life. but at first, the quarry didn't look too promising. we were finding very small fragments of sea urchins, i tiny, tiny fragments, _ though, nothing really spectacular. when we got it home and cleaned it iup, he was like, "oh my god, sal, i you've got to come and see this", and there's this beautiful. -
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jurassic sea creature coming to life. - they're amazing! they're just, you know, just- as like they were alive yesterday. with so many fossils here, the challenge is working out which ones to keep. the very best are now heading to the natural history museum. the team says it's the discovery of a lifetime. rebecca morelle, bbc news, at a secret location in the cotswolds. we heard from dr tim ewin in that report — we're going to speak to him further now — he is senior curator and palaeontologist at the natural history museum and led the dig. why is it a secret location? we haven't got _ why is it a secret location? we haven't got all _ why is it a secret location? , haven't got all of the fossils out yet and we want to make sure that we uncover them. you yet and we want to make sure that we uncover them-— uncover them. you don't want people turnin: u- uncover them. you don't want people turning pp and _ uncover them. you don't want people turning up and getting _ uncover them. you don't want people turning up and getting in _ uncover them. you don't want people turning up and getting in the - uncover them. you don't want people turning up and getting in the way, - turning up and getting in the way, basically. can you explain why this 167 million year old discovery are such a massive deal? it is
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167 million year old discovery are such a massive deal?— such a massive deal? it is 'ust unprecedented, i such a massive deal? it is 'ust unprecedented, the i such a massive deal? it isjust unprecedented, the quality i such a massive deal? it isjust unprecedented, the quality of| unprecedented, the quality of preservation and the number of individuals recovering —— we are recovering from the site is exceptional, and that will bring some interesting signs, and some big variation, and let us tie down some key evolutionary questions about how some of these creatures evolved, because they are still all with us today and play important roles in marine eco systems.— today and play important roles in marine eco systems. starfish, for examle. marine eco systems. starfish, for example- what — marine eco systems. starfish, for example. what else? _ marine eco systems. starfish, for example. what else? starfish, . marine eco systems. starfish, for| example. what else? starfish, sea urchins, brittle _ example. what else? starfish, sea urchins, brittle stars, _ example. what else? starfish, sea urchins, brittle stars, sea - urchins, brittle stars, sea cucumbers and some very graceful looking fossils. they are still alive with us today but live in a
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very different environment. 50 that is one of the interesting questions we can look at is why they don't live in those environments today and why they were able to do it in the past. why they were able to do it in the ast. . . why they were able to do it in the ast, , ., , ., why they were able to do it in the ast. , ., , ., ., ,., ., past. tell us a bit more about how sall and past. tell us a bit more about how sally and neville _ past. tell us a bit more about how sally and neville hollingworth - sally and neville hollingworth discovered this site. it was during the lockdown and it was through google earth, wasn't it?- the lockdown and it was through google earth, wasn't it? where they would no google earth, wasn't it? where they would go on — google earth, wasn't it? where they would go on physically _ google earth, wasn't it? where they would go on physically that, - google earth, wasn't it? where they would go on physically that, they . would go on physically that, they started looking online. they identified a quarry on private land. so they sought permission when the restrictions were lifted and they were able to go in and collect. they then sent pictures through to me by e—mail and as soon as i saw them i knew that they were going to be important, but then there was rather a long wait until the restrictions, the covid restrictions were lifted sufficiently that we could actually go and collect there, safely, so
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that was a bit of frustration there, but it was well worth the wait, we got about 100 slabs of exceptionally preserved items. normally you would find one or two slabs and thinking of having an exceptionally good days two to come back with 100 was really exciting. two to come back with 100 was really excitina. ~ , ., , . exciting. when you were sent a photograph _ exciting. when you were sent a photograph she _ exciting. when you were sent a photograph she knew— exciting. when you were sent a i photograph she knew immediately exciting. when you were sent a - photograph she knew immediately it was a big deal. to most of us this would have looked like photographs ofjust would have looked like photographs of just stone. would have looked like photographs ofjust stone. it is would have looked like photographs ofjust stone-— ofjust stone. it is the detail of preservation. _ ofjust stone. it is the detail of preservation. i— ofjust stone. it is the detail of preservation. i have _ ofjust stone. it is the detail of preservation. i have looked . ofjust stone. it is the detail of preservation. i have looked at| ofjust stone. it is the detail of- preservation. i have looked at lots of these things. i was able to see exceptional detail, sol of these things. i was able to see exceptional detail, so i was able to identify these straightaway. normally you need to have the things in your hand to get an idea of that. and alsojust looking, we
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collections we only have 25 from that ancient rock, so it gives you a basic understanding of how important the site is, and the stuff we have in the museum isjust the site is, and the stuff we have in the museum is just fragments, the site is, and the stuff we have in the museum isjust fragments, but this is complete, over 100 specimens that are actually complete so that will enable us to answer some key questions about how they actually looked, how they behave, and what were the eventual evolutionary pathways that they have taken. and so, they only really appeared in the lowerjurassic in terms of fossils, so looking at the middlejurassic, the diversification, that will hopefully give us some really interesting insights. is hopefully give us some really interesting insights.- hopefully give us some really interesting insights. is this the most exciting _ interesting insights. is this the most exciting time _ interesting insights. is this the most exciting time of- interesting insights. is this the most exciting time of your - most exciting time of your professional career? it most exciting time of your professional career?- most exciting time of your professional career? it is certainly ri . ht professional career? it is certainly riaht u- professional career? it is certainly right pp there _ professional career? it is certainly right up there with _
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professional career? it is certainly right up there with the _ professional career? it is certainly right up there with the best. - professional career? it is certainly right up there with the best. i'm l right up there with the best. i'm very excited. it is a real privilege and honour to be working on this project, and so thanks to sally and nev for inviting us.— nev for inviting us. what a great smile. it tells _ nev for inviting us. what a great smile. it tells us _ nev for inviting us. what a great smile. it tells us everything. - nev for inviting us. what a great smile. it tells us everything. it l nev for inviting us. what a great| smile. it tells us everything. it is nice to see one —— see someone smiling. thank you, tim, a palaeontologist at the natural history museum. we've had some comments in about the violence against women story. recently one viewer says my 12—14 year old cousins were both cat called by multiple grown men, and that, alone, makes my stomach churn. this e—mail from a viewer. i was sexually harassed by the police when i reported a rape. they pinned my
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knickers to the notice board. the male officers asked me out for dinner. the womenjust male officers asked me out for dinner. the women just my appearance. the measures today are simply band—aids. this woman, anna, says i was spiked and beaten up on a night out when i was at university a few years ago. unfortunately it was assumed by the emergency services that i had taken drugs myself, and i don't believe proper action was taken because of that assumption. nothing got swallowed up and no one was held accountable. kate —— nothing got followed up. kate said she was listening to the safeguarding minister and said it was another example of a government minister refusing to answer an outlet and personal question, all smoke and mirrors in an attempt to disguise that in fact, reduction in the numbers of police officers available to respond directly to attacks on women is pertinent. i am still waiting to hear the minister's response. if you want to get in
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touch to talk about your own experience, which victoria atkins actually did, she talked about the time she was walking home late at night and a man followed her. she hid behind a van. he hid behind the other side of the van and she said as she was describing it this morning, she could feel the fear again. if you want to share your own experiences, please do. you can do that anonymously as well. you can message me on twitter or instagram. it is time for a full weather forecast. impossible to sleep at the moment. sarah keith—lucas will tell us if it is going to continue. hello, our spell of hot and sunny summery weather is set to continue for a few days with high pressure truly in charge. yesterday, we saw temperatures up to 32 degrees and today could be similar. in fact, we have two extreme health warnings in force from the met office. the first one for the south—west of england, parts of central and southern england
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and south wales, the second one for northern ireland. we could see temperatures up to about 31 degrees. across these zones and elsewhere, there could be some adverse health effects with all that heat. particularly for people vulnerable to extreme heat. but for the wider population, sunburn and dehydration could be a problem. bear that in mind through today. lots of sunshine for most areas. a bit more cloud for northern and eastern scotland, parts of north—east england as well through the day. some fair weather cloud building up and one or two hit—and—miss showers later in the afternoon but temperatures are widely in the high 20s perhaps 30 or even 31 degrees towards the west. a bit cooler into the cloud for the north of scotland, the hit—and—miss showers and thunderstorms almost anywhere, many of us avoiding them in the evening hours. it could be torrential with localised flash flooding around. most places staying dry overnight, staying warm, mid—to—high teens. another fairly uncomfortable night for sleeping overnight tonight. now, into thursday morning and we start off the day again on a similar note, sunshine, pretty hot and humid from the word go.
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high pressure firmly in charge of our weather, not many isobars around close to the uk, so, generally lighter winds around, too. another day of high levels of uv during the day on thursday. again, more cloud for northern and eastern scotland and the north—east of england. a repeat performance to today. again, a few isolated showers developing during thursday afternoon but most places avoiding them, staying hot and dry once again. temperatures widely up into the high 20s, possibly 30 degrees or so. cooler around those eastern coasts. towards the end of the week, subtle change, perhaps not quite as hot for some of us on friday, more of an easterly breeze developing but dry and sunny for the bulk of the uk for most of the day. you will notice this rain waiting in the south west and it will creep its way in later on on friday and into the weekend, bringing us something more unsettled but not quite as hot as it has been this week as we head through the weekend. bye for now.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: a top police officer is to lead a new drive to tackle violence against women and girls in england and wales — including £5 million to improve safety in public places at night. as a woman, what's your experience? have you been harassed, abused or assualted? what would make you feel safer? let me know @vicderbyshire on instagram and twitter or email me at victoria@bbc.co.uk. as record numbers of people cross the english channel, france is to double police patrols on its beaches in a deal with the uk. the uk will pay another £54 million to the french. torrential rain causes severe flooding in parts of central china. at least 12 people died in one city after its subway system
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was almost submerged.

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