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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 20, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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us climate change envoyjohn kerry says we can't wait for the end of the pandemic, we are facing up to the pandemic, we are facing up to the climate crisis mr kerry warned that the suffering caused by not tackling global doing that global warming would far exceed that cause by coronavirus. jeff pazo a ten minute 18 second trip into space accompanied by his brother mark and the oldest astronaut and the oldest. uk prime minister and former prime minister told the bbc he held discussions about trying to oust borisjohnson within days of mr johnson winning the last general election. british government says it's crucial for people to isolate if they are alerted by the governments covert out. minister said people can make in informed and sit doing that decision whether or not to do so.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are anna isaac, economics editor of the independent and iain anderson, executive chairman of pr company cicero. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... collision course set for brussels — the ft leads on government overhauls set to be announced for post—brexit trade deals between britain and northern ireland. the telegraph leads on an appeal to the prime ministerfrom cabinet ministers to expand the list of exempt from isolating or face a wave of closures. also leading on the impact of pingdemic — the mirror reports that one million children are currently off school.
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also on covid the i, reports that england has three weeks to avoid new restrictions, quoting sage scientists calling for early action. channel crossings lead on the front page of the express. it says the home secretary is to pay france another esiimillion to stop migrants reaching britain. a story which also leads on the mail — it reports the number of people to make the journey this year hit 8,162 ?surpassing the figure for the whole of 2020. and on the front of the times, reports that today passed the annual record and coincided with mps backing new laws to clamp down on illegal immigration. the guardian has a report on a leaked data base, with details emmanuel macron, and 13 other heads of state and heads of government. so let's begin... iain, do you want to kick us out this hour with the front of the i who thought they change is certainly
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posed on ending new restrictions were irreversible.— posed on ending new restrictions were irreversible. yeah, basically the i is saying _ were irreversible. yeah, basically the i is saying three _ were irreversible. yeah, basically the i is saying three weeks - were irreversible. yeah, basically the i is saying three weeks for . the i is saying three weeks for freedom day and the releasing of restrictions to prove whether or not there working. talking about sage, that's the governments scientific advisory review that's been advising the uk government all the way through the pandemic. indicating that masks might be back in compulsory form. even about social distancing again. and this idea, this concept of not having to apply an emergency brake basically, a complete lockdown again but reintroducing many of the freedoms so—called that have been introduced just 2a hours ago. it's quite
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extraordinary to be looking at a front page like this. but with a kind of numbers that are coming through and the most important number that i think for me, everyone keeps their eyes on which is the hospital admissions. just starting to significantly rise again. we may be in very short order going backwards rather than forwards. anna? this is i think the key thing to understand here in the logic that's— to understand here in the logic that's informing some of the scientists is that every other major wave _ scientists is that every other major wave we've — scientists is that every other major wave we've had you see the graph and you see _ wave we've had you see the graph and you see it_ wave we've had you see the graph and you see it go— wave we've had you see the graph and you see it go down again. because after— you see it go down again. because after went— you see it go down again. because after went up lockdown again. this time the _ after went up lockdown again. this time the idea that we avoid locking down _ time the idea that we avoid locking down again. you don't get that sudden — down again. you don't get that sudden drop down in infections. what you have _ sudden drop down in infections. what you have is _ sudden drop down in infections. what you have is a — sudden drop down in infections. what you have is a much sustained level of infection — you have is a much sustained level of infection for a long period of time _ of infection for a long period of time and _ of infection for a long period of
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time. and the biggest here because we know— time. and the biggest here because we know that patrick balance the scientific— we know that patrick balance the scientific adviser commissioned a report— scientific adviser commissioned a report to — scientific adviser commissioned a report to look at the impact of flu season— report to look at the impact of flu season potentially this autumn. if that level— season potentially this autumn. if that level doesn't come down quickly enough _ that level doesn't come down quickly enough of— that level doesn't come down quickly enough of covid infection before we start to _ enough of covid infection before we start to see an increase in blue, and that's— start to see an increase in blue, and that's when we start to see this really— and that's when we start to see this really serious overwhelming of the nhs~ _ really serious overwhelming of the nhs~ and — really serious overwhelming of the nhs. and there's a sense that kim the rates _ nhs. and there's a sense that kim the rates prevent some kind of clash between _ the rates prevent some kind of clash between flu and covid for the autumn? _ between flu and covid for the autumn? this is only going to get more _ autumn? this is only going to get more pressing. it's also got a slightly— more pressing. it's also got a slightly eerie ring as we are seeing with dominic cummings looking back at how— with dominic cummings looking back at how the _ with dominic cummings looking back at how the pandemic was handled. there's_ at how the pandemic was handled. there's a _ at how the pandemic was handled. there's a slight area and this advice — there's a slight area and this advice when you think about some of the conversations that were happening this time last year. it does _ happening this time last year. it does make you start to wonder, well the vaccines — does make you start to wonder, well the vaccines have changed the game to a large _ the vaccines have changed the game to a large extent. they haven't ended — to a large extent. they haven't ended the _ to a large extent. they haven't ended the problems, the fundamental problems— ended the problems, the fundamental problems that some of the
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scientists. we haven't found a perfect — scientists. we haven't found a perfect way to stop people getting infected _ perfect way to stop people getting infected or very seriously ill a lot of the _ infected or very seriously ill a lot of the time. infected or very seriously ill a lot of the time-— infected or very seriously ill a lot of the time. read related story on the front of— of the time. read related story on the front of the _ of the time. read related story on the front of the mirror. _ of the time. read related story on the front of the mirror. what - of the time. read related story on the front of the mirror. what it. the front of the mirror. what it calls pingdemic pandemonium. if i could say it. 8 million off school. absolutely —— 1 million kids off schooi~ — absolutely —— 1 million kids off school. how much are people being very cautious because they know the chances _ very cautious because they know the chances of— very cautious because they know the chances of getting pinged now are so hi-h chances of getting pinged now are so high that— chances of getting pinged now are so high that they'd rather withdraw the kids now— high that they'd rather withdraw the kids now then find that they are completely stock for the first ten days of _ completely stock for the first ten days of the end of the school term, the summer— days of the end of the school term, the summer holidays at home. so you have to _ the summer holidays at home. so you have to wonder how much behaviour is a result— have to wonder how much behaviour is a result of— have to wonder how much behaviour is a result of the art. it's a very dramatic— a result of the art. it's a very dramatic numberand it a result of the art. it's a very dramatic number and it builds on that several hundred thousand in recent— that several hundred thousand in recent weeks. it also goes after the question— recent weeks. it also goes after the question of— recent weeks. it also goes after the question ofjust how much school kids have — question ofjust how much school kids have missed and how you fill
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that gap— kids have missed and how you fill that gap going forward. it wasn't that gap going forward. it wasn't that long — that gap going forward. it wasn't that long ago we are talking about future _ that long ago we are talking about future was meant to fill the gap for the extra _ future was meant to fill the gap for the extra lessons that were meant to fill the _ the extra lessons that were meant to fill the dad _ the extra lessons that were meant to fill the gap. but now kids are effectively a fire break. a fire break — effectively a fire break. a fire break and _ effectively a fire break. a fire break and the school holiday is being — break and the school holiday is being used. it's often the impact dampens— being used. it's often the impact dampens the extreme curse of covid infaction— dampens the extreme curse of covid infection was up the numbers we are seeing _ infection was up the numbers we are seeing in _ infection was up the numbers we are seeing in terms ofjust the app begs the question whether that fire break has been _ the question whether that fire break has been enough. ian, the question whether that fire break has been enough.— has been enough. ian, what do you make of it? — has been enough. ian, what do you make of it? were _ has been enough. ian, what do you make of it? were coming _ has been enough. ian, what do you make of it? were coming to - has been enough. ian, what do you| make of it? were coming to the end of the summer term and schools in scotland broke up several weeks but were coming to the end of the summer term in england and wales. in a sense the problem goes away at least from schools. it doesn't go away. because people are in families and they will be a lot of them travelling and different parts of the country for the summer visiting family and maybe going on a holiday themselves with up and then it will all be back in the same position in
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the summer. all be back in the same position in the summer-— the summer. that's right. that is the summer. that's right. that is the real concern. _ the summer. that's right. that is the real concern. of— the summer. that's right. that is the real concern. of course - the summer. that's right. that is the real concern. of course is - the summer. that's right. that is| the real concern. of course is part of the gamble and it's a very calculable but not calculated gamble that freedom day is coinciding with the schools starting to break up. the weather being extremely warm and it would appear that as we've seen over the past 12 months that the hot weather has suppressed certainly previous variance of covid. question is whether or not that's going to have the effect on the delta variant. we don't know yet. the timing of this absolutely is all been about giving people their freedoms over the summer break because hopefully there is going to because hopefully there is going to be less interaction. well maybe not at the moment it ain't going well.
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iain do you want to continue on our covid theme for the first part of this review with the daily telegraph. in the context of all of that the pressure on the government to increase the number who are in fact exempt from having to sell but not self—isolate if they come into contact with somebody who has tested positive? this contact with somebody who has tested ositive? , , , . positive? this reminds me very much ofthe positive? this reminds me very much of the lobbying. _ positive? this reminds me very much of the lobbying, and _ positive? this reminds me very much of the lobbying, and i _ positive? this reminds me very much of the lobbying, and i said _ positive? this reminds me very much of the lobbying, and i said that - positive? this reminds me very much of the lobbying, and i said that is - of the lobbying, and i said that is lobbying guy, to place in the second quarter of last year of key industries trying to make the case that they needed to stay open in order to provide essential services. yeah, there are some exemptions that are in place at the moment. if people get pinged for key workers but what a lot of businesses are saying restaurants, banks, all parts
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of the economy that they need to be able to get people in in order to make money go round and put onto peoples tables. real examples, from the supermarkets real examples of big supply chain problems already in the system put maybe huge supply change problems byjust getting the food that you want. note as a result of anything other than people who have been paying can go and do their jobs and get things like foodstuff to the shelves. it's already an issue, it's a growing issue and businesses are really highlighting to government that they need to do something about it.— something about it. absolutely. i think the something about it. absolutely. i thinkthe list— something about it. absolutely. i think the list that _ something about it. absolutely. i think the list that we _ something about it. absolutely. i think the list that we see - something about it. absolutely. i l think the list that we see discussed very frequently at the moment is
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that same — very frequently at the moment is that same list often applies to key workers. — that same list often applies to key workers, people that were allowed to leave their _ workers, people that were allowed to leave their homes or in lockdown and deliver— leave their homes or in lockdown and deliver essential services. i think particularly when it comes to supermarkets, other people that work and deliver— supermarkets, other people that work and deliver essential services. i think— and deliver essential services. i think particularly when it comes to supermarkets, other people that work in logistics _ supermarkets, other people that work in logistics already have a shortage of lorry— in logistics already have a shortage of lorry drivers for multiple reasons _ of lorry drivers for multiple reasons including the pandemic, it's not simply— reasons including the pandemic, it's not simply possible to put that much pressure _ not simply possible to put that much pressure on — not simply possible to put that much pressure on the supply chain in the same _ pressure on the supply chain in the same way— pressure on the supply chain in the same way that you are certain people that work— same way that you are certain people that work in— same way that you are certain people that work in trade and control stations— that work in trade and control stations or traffic control. you have — stations or traffic control. you have such _ stations or traffic control. you have such highly specialised individuals but the kit replace them with another worker. a very small pool to _ with another worker. a very small pool to draw upon. it can be a major issue' _ pool to draw upon. it can be a major issue. it's _ pool to draw upon. it can be a major issue. it's not — pool to draw upon. it can be a major issue, it's not critical way all. and _ issue, it's not critical way all. and it's — issue, it's not critical way all. and it's difficult, you start to wonder— and it's difficult, you start to wonder whether some of these calculations were meant to be based on a much _ calculations were meant to be based on a much lower level of compliance. which _ on a much lower level of compliance. which shows— on a much lower level of compliance. which shows what a difficult game between _ which shows what a difficult game between policy and behaviour people are trying _ between policy and behaviour people are trying to play. between policy and behaviour people are trying to play-— are trying to play. absolutely. i can imagine — are trying to play. absolutely. i can imagine that _ are trying to play. absolutely. i can imagine that nudge - are trying to play. absolutely. i can imagine that nudge unit - are trying to play. absolutely. i can imagine that nudge unit on| can imagine that nudge unit on number ten of david cameron must been very busy with covid policy
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trying to persuade us to do things. we will look at the express. the migration. ijust want we will look at the express. the migration. i just want to make we will look at the express. the migration. ijust want to make a special plea, there was a lovely story on the top of the express more calm and wise first show found in attic. he would be amazed at how many missing tv shows would be discovered in attic. he would be amazed at how many missing tv shows would be discovered in the years. something worth noting about the bbc is we didn't have and i argo policy until our hundredth anniversary coming up in the bbc could have to have a good rummage across your garagejust have a good rummage across your garage just because your grandma or granddad used to work for the bbc and might have something a souvenir. we would be very grateful. take us back to the main point of the story is a migrant story on the front of the express. it's got to the point with the british are having to pay the french £55 million according to the french £55 million according to the papers. the express would say thatis
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the papers. the express would say that is perhaps to do theirjob. absolutely. i think it slightly below — absolutely. i think it slightly below the sump what complex relationship with the migration that the uk _ relationship with the migration that the uk and france have had for a long _ the uk and france have had for a long time — the uk and france have had for a long time. we need to cast our minds back a _ long time. we need to cast our minds back a little _ long time. we need to cast our minds back a little and remember the calais — back a little and remember the calais camp and some of the images we saw— calais camp and some of the images we saw there. in terms of how parts of the _ we saw there. in terms of how parts of the borders met the channel were used to— of the borders met the channel were used to contain migrants for a long time _ used to contain migrants for a long time it's_ used to contain migrants for a long time. it's becoming a much greater problem. _ time. it's becoming a much greater problem. it— time. it's becoming a much greater problem, it seems. it's hard to know sometimes _ problem, it seems. it's hard to know sometimes what is the problem and what is _ sometimes what is the problem and what is the — sometimes what is the problem and what is the coverage. it does seem to be _ what is the coverage. it does seem to be getting greater. reports are a bit mixed _ to be getting greater. reports are a bit mixed in terms of the especially money— bit mixed in terms of the especially money trading going on and you broker— money trading going on and you broker a — money trading going on and you broker a deal between the uk trying to manage this problem better. other papers _ to manage this problem better. other papers are _ to manage this problem better. other papers are looking more at a slightly— papers are looking more at a slightly confusing behaviour of what seems _ slightly confusing behaviour of what seems to _ slightly confusing behaviour of what seems to be french forcing migrants across— seems to be french forcing migrants across the _ seems to be french forcing migrants across the channel. it really will come _ across the channel. it really will come down to the combination of
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sase, _ come down to the combination of sase, reputation management —— safety— sase, reputation management —— safety and _ sase, reputation management —— safety and who wants to own the problem — safety and who wants to own the problem with both sides here. it's difficult _ problem with both sides here. it's difficult to — problem with both sides here. it's difficult to remember it out by eu border— difficult to remember it out by eu border control no longer serves the uk. border control no longer serves the uk the _ border control no longer serves the uk~ the uk— border control no longer serves the uk. the uk fora border control no longer serves the uk. the uk for a time did outsource some _ uk. the uk for a time did outsource some of— uk. the uk for a time did outsource some of its— uk. the uk for a time did outsource some of its border control activity because _ some of its border control activity because the eu operated as one. so you can _ because the eu operated as one. so you can make a case saying that they travel _ you can make a case saying that they travel from _ you can make a case saying that they travel from the uk. back it's much complicated when you don't have the same _ complicated when you don't have the same level_ complicated when you don't have the same level of policing sharing activities _ same level of policing sharing activities going on. you do have to have _ activities going on. you do have to have bilateral agreements on these issues _ have bilateral agreements on these issues was — have bilateral agreements on these issues was there's no reason why france _ issues was there's no reason why france would ask for as much money as possible _ france would ask for as much money as possible what is now a problem that is— as possible what is now a problem that is for— as possible what is now a problem that is for the uk. it�*s as possible what is now a problem that is for the uk.— that is for the uk. it's an interesting _ that is for the uk. it's an interesting point - that is for the uk. it's an | interesting point because that is for the uk. it's an i interesting point because i that is for the uk. it's an _ interesting point because i remember talking about this years and years ago to the then maltese home affairs minister was up he kept saying i keep raising the problem of migration and everybody around it tables says yes, we share co—concern but they won't take the fair numbers
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so we end up taking a disproportionate burden. there is this problem of sharing within the eu and expecting countries to art in the same organisation any longer to share is perhaps a leap of faith too far. isn't it? share is perhaps a leap of faith too far- isn't it?— far. isn't it? where ever you were on brexit. — far. isn't it? where ever you were on brexit. the _ far. isn't it? where ever you were on brexit, the plane _ far. isn't it? where ever you were on brexit, the plane reality- far. isn't it? where ever you were on brexit, the plane reality was . on brexit, the plane reality was this whole kind of conversation played through what happened in 2016. part of the reason why david cameron gambled by going for a relatively early brexit referendum and that parliament was that he thought that if he got the referendum away early, before their was summer after summer after summer of these kind he might win. the story in the end overwhelmed him. frankly, with the numbers now higher
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than they've ever been this is an issue that could and should have been dealt with it years ago. let’s been dealt with it years ago. let's move on, been dealt with it years ago. let's move on. we _ been dealt with it years ago. let's move on, we will— been dealt with it years ago. let's move on, we will skip _ been dealt with it years ago. let's move on, we will skip a _ been dealt with it years ago. let's move on, we will skip a couple of stories that we talked about our last review. let's move onto the front of the times. iain, this will interest you because you worked at various times as an adviser to conservative spokespersons. this is the dominic cummings interview. it's funny to think he's the first interview he's done. we've heard so much from him but obviously we've heard it in select committee testimony or in softies written his blog. and the extraordinary suggestion that he's made, that discussions were going on about ousting borisjohnsonjust discussions were going on about ousting borisjohnson just days after he want the general election in 2019. ., , .,' ., after he want the general election in 2019. ., , ., ., ., �* in 2019. hats off to laura kunz berg for caettin in 2019. hats off to laura kunz berg for getting this _ in 2019. hats off to laura kunz berg for getting this interview. _ in 2019. hats off to laura kunz berg for getting this interview. it - in 2019. hats off to laura kunz berg for getting this interview. it was - for getting this interview. it was
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compelling television, she didn't pull her punches. i found her asking some of the questions, i think many of us wanted to be asked for the past four or five years let alone the past two or three years. i kind of walked away from it with a sort of, a real big sense of incredulity on many of the things that dominic cummings said. as you say focusing in on the idea that literally a month after the general election, december 2019 when dominic cummings had been instrumental in helping borisjohnson get his majority, he kind of started having conversations about getting rid of him. in a democratic society who is in control here? i think that was the most
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interesting piece that i wish laura put to cummings again and again and again. you are unelected and yet you were seemingly pulling the strings. he kind of proved that whole narrative in every answer he gave. it's intriguing because i suppose that raises the question about the appropriateness of him being appointed to prime minister chief adviser in the first place if he was unclear about the limits and the extent of the role. and that becomes a question pride ministersjudgment, i presume. a question pride ministers 'udgment, i resume. , ., a question pride ministers 'udgment, i-resume. , ., . a question pride ministers 'udgment, iresume. ., . ., ., i presume. exactly that. we have to remember at _ i presume. exactly that. we have to remember at the _ i presume. exactly that. we have to remember at the end _ i presume. exactly that. we have to remember at the end of _ i presume. exactly that. we have to remember at the end of the - i presume. exactly that. we have to remember at the end of the day - i presume. exactly that. we have to remember at the end of the day he | remember at the end of the day he .ave remember at the end of the day he gave him _ remember at the end of the day he gave him the job. remember at the end of the day he gave him thejob. he remember at the end of the day he gave him the job. he signed up for that trade — gave him the job. he signed up for that trade and if it happened as was described _ that trade and if it happened as was described who made those decisions? because _ described who made those decisions? because ultimately boris johnson couid _ because ultimately boris johnson could have fired dominic cummings anytime _ could have fired dominic cummings anytime that he wanted to. he couid've — anytime that he wanted to. he could've held a press conference and set unfortunately my adviser it
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never — set unfortunately my adviser it never longer works for me. he had in ektraordinary— never longer works for me. he had in extraordinary amount of power if he chooses _ extraordinary amount of power if he chooses to — extraordinary amount of power if he chooses to exercise it. and so while i appreciate — chooses to exercise it. and so while i appreciate it is very inside both of us _ i appreciate it is very inside both of us are — i appreciate it is very inside both of us are fascinated by the mechanics of west minister really enjoyed _ mechanics of west minister really enjoyed it. ithink mechanics of west minister really enjoyed it. i think it's important in terms — enjoyed it. i think it's important in terms of— enjoyed it. i think it's important in terms of accountability. yes it's important — in terms of accountability. yes it's important to work out where the powers — important to work out where the powers begin and end. but ultimately when it's_ powers begin and end. but ultimately when it's still up to the prime minister— when it's still up to the prime minister who works for him, we really— minister who works for him, we really should be putting more of these _ really should be putting more of these questions are borisjohnson. if these questions are borisjohnson. if we _ these questions are borisjohnson. if we don't— these questions are borisjohnson. if we don't get an answer, asking them _ if we don't get an answer, asking them again— if we don't get an answer, asking them again and again and again. it's certainly— them again and again and again. it's certainly not — them again and again and again. it's certainly notjust down them again and again and again. it's certainly not just down to finding a useful— certainly not just down to finding a useful bogeyman. it sounded really hoiding _ useful bogeyman. it sounded really holding those who have been elected to account _ holding those who have been elected to account. if there was scheming like that— to account. if there was scheming like that going on that yes, it is troubling — like that going on that yes, it is troubling. but it's also the case that there — troubling. but it's also the case that there were clearly tensions in ongoing _ that there were clearly tensions in ongoing disagreements between the two before a very extended period of time _
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two before a very extended period of time at _ two before a very extended period of time. at the prime minister felt he was being — time. at the prime minister felt he was being undermined. you have to ask the _ was being undermined. you have to ask the question, if the prime minister— ask the question, if the prime minister did feel he was being undermined didn't but not why didn't he stood _ undermined didn't but not why didn't he stood up — undermined didn't but not why didn't he stood up to dominic cummings? on the one—handed shows a strong impact of two _ the one—handed shows a strong impact of two powerful advisers and as very bil of two powerful advisers and as very big questions of the prime minister. that is— big questions of the prime minister. that is the _ big questions of the prime minister. that is the end of the politics do you want to end on a last thought, tokyois you want to end on a last thought, tokyo is on a knife edge according to theguardian sports page. do you think the olympics is go to limp through to the end? it’s think the olympics is go to limp through to the end?— through to the end? it's really hard to tell. through to the end? it's really hard to tell- we — through to the end? it's really hard to tell. we are _ through to the end? it's really hard to tell. we are hearing _ to tell. we are hearing somebody stories _ to tell. we are hearing somebody stories about athletes effectively unable _ stories about athletes effectively unable to compete. the figures are looking _ unable to compete. the figures are looking very troubling in terms of a faction _ looking very troubling in terms of a faction that — looking very troubling in terms of a faction that i believe there was a falling _ faction that i believe there was a falling out between those organising it one _ falling out between those organising it one of— falling out between those organising it one of the competitors is that the opening ceremony. increasingly if you _ the opening ceremony. increasingly if you don't— the opening ceremony. increasingly if you don't of the athletes come if you don't— if you don't of the athletes come if you don't have people watching the athletes _ you don't have people watching the athletes who are still able to perform _
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athletes who are still able to perform and you're struggling with an opening ceremony and the infection— an opening ceremony and the infection rate going up, it does look— infection rate going up, it does look like — infection rate going up, it does look like the perfect ingredient for having _ look like the perfect ingredient for having to — look like the perfect ingredient for having to put the brakes on. last thou~ht having to put the brakes on. last thought on _ having to put the brakes on. last thought on that _ having to put the brakes on. last thought on that iain, brief last word. i thought on that iain, brief last word. ., , thought on that iain, brief last word. . , ., , thought on that iain, brief last word. ., , .,, ., thought on that iain, brief last word. ., , ., ., ., word. i really hope we are going to net in word. i really hope we are going to get in olympics — word. i really hope we are going to get in olympics end. _ word. i really hope we are going to get in olympics end. it _ word. i really hope we are going to get in olympics end. it would - word. i really hope we are going toj get in olympics end. it would bring a lot ofjoy i think to everyone's heart. i'm afraid the pingdemic is probably going to wash it. iain and anna thank— probably going to wash it. iain and anna thank you — probably going to wash it. iain and anna thank you very _ probably going to wash it. iain and anna thank you very much. - thank you very much for your company. thank you very much for your company. that's it for the papers this evening. goodbye for now. i have to do my 0lympic best and run up i have to do my 0lympic best and run up the stairs to another studio. good evening, i'm tulsen tollett with your sports news. in cricket england have claimed a thrilling three wicket victory over pakistan to win their t20 match at old trafford, and with
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it a 2—1 series win. watching was adam wild. this is the noise cricket has longed for. 22,000 inside old trafford raising those levels yet further pakistan with the bat. but such blows comes with a warning, get it wrong miss it and you miss out. that was receives first of four wickets. pack them at two pakistan meant to 150 for celebrations and noise naturally. they might�*ve wanted more. whether they needed more well, that would be up to england's batsmen. in truth almost any target looks achievable whenjason roy takes aim. he passed 50 in a flash but one miss time blow for him for england's terrible timing in a massive blow. england and father and it was getting worse. this the drama the crowd, the atmosphere deserved. two needed from three balls. they didn't need them all.
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chrisjordan scrambling the winning runs. the celebrants to eight celebrations in old trafford just belonged to england. it's been 16 months since celtic played a meaningful game in front of a crowd, and they drew the opening leg of their champions league qualifier with fc midtjylland1—1 in glasgow. ange postecoglou's first competitive match saw his side find the net first when debutant liel abada followed in a parried shot to take the hoops in front five minutes before the break but a needless foul from nir bitton on the stroke of half time that led to a second yellow card meant his side were down to ten, the danes then found themselves down to ten after the interval but evander ferreira found the net from a free kick to leave it honours even ahead of next wednesday's second leg in denmark. heavyweight world champion anthonyjoshua will fight 0leksandr usyk on the 25th of september, at the tottenham hotspur stadium. usyk�*s never fought for a heavyweight title, but has held all it belts in the cruserweight division.
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he'll risk his ibf, wba and wbo belts against the ukrainian, who is his mandatory challenger. joshua was set to fight tyson fury, but that fight was cancelled after fury had to honour a contract to face deontay wilder for the third time. south african rugby has announced this afternoon that all 3 tests against the british and irish lions will now take place in cape town. only the first test of the series was due to be in the city, with the next two taking place injohannesburg. however, after significant covid—related interruptions throughout the tour, south african rugby says leaving the current bio—secure environments, would expose the series to renewed risk. meanwhile, south africa have named their team for saturday's first test and captain siya kolisi is back, after recovering from covid—19. the 2019 world cup winning captain only rejoined the squad yesterday after 10 days in isolation. the side includes 11 players who started the world cup final. it's important to get off a good
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start 100% against these guys. and we showed in the first, and that south africa a game, even, that, you know, if you get off to a bad start, it's difficult to come back. that's the kind of, on a smaller scale, when you look at the entire series as a whole, how important it is to try and get off to a good start not only in the game, but in the series. just three days out from the official start of the olympics, the head of the tokyo 2020 organising committee, hasn't ruled out cancelling the games. toshiro muto says he'll keep an eye on infection numbers and hold discussions with organisers if necessary. however, the president of the international olympic committee, thomas bach, says cancelling has never been an option. joe lynskey reports. faster, higher, stronger. but together. the first events starts in a few hours' time when the ioc hopes the focus is the joy of sports. in this promotional
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video committee revealed a new word in the olympic motto — together. but this year, most metals will be one in silence. today, we hearjust how close they games came into being scrapped altogether. we had doubts every day. there were sleepless nights. cancellation would've been the easy way for us. we could have drawn on the insurance that we had at the time and moved on to paris 202a. but in fact, cancellation was never an option for us. in the village, there are staggered athletes or but already, there are 71 people connected to the games that have tested positive. tokyo wants a strict grip on close contacts. it's caused disruption to bbc crews. the broadcasting from scotland will now spend much of the gains in quarantine.
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there are very strict playbooks for each client group which they have to follow, and unfortunately there are consequences if they aren't followed even if it isn't the fault of the person involves, and for that, we can on the apologise, but we need to make sure that these games are safe and secure. there are six unnamed british athletes who have had to isolate, but many others have now got to holding camps. tomorrow, the women's football starts when team gb play chile at 8:30 am. britain's four abominations together again, and across tokyo, they hope to the unity is key, a city and a country has spent billions on what will be the toughest games to stage. joe linsky, bbc news. world champion gerwyn price is through to the quarterfinals of the 2021 world matchplay darts beating johnny clayton 11 legs to three in blackpool. the welshman who's also the world number one won his last eight legs against his compatriot who's the premier league champion to ease into the last eight.
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for everything else you can go to the bbc sport website. for everything else you can go to the bbc sport website. and that's all the sport for now. hello. the heat goes on and it will do for a couple more days and indeed nights. in response to this the met office haveissued in response to this the met office have issued an amber level heat warning. two particular areas have been picked out for the greatest risk of impact. but that does not necessarily mean very high temperatures. widely across the uk we are looking at a hot wednesday. to pick out some cooler areas scotland with cloudless day in the cooler side and the north sea coast after starting out with some cloud on the north east of england that cloud will tend to cling to the shoreline on into wednesday afternoon. temperatures in the low 20s here. perhaps 31 the southwest
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of northern ireland, low 30s across south wales and southern england. if you are waiting for things to turn fresh or friday is the day. we pick up fresh or friday is the day. we pick up an easterly breeze, start to usherin up an easterly breeze, start to usher in fresher air, showers for england and wales come the weekend to cool things off.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the us climate envoy warns that the suffering caused by the coronavirus will be magnified many times over if the world fails to tackle global warming. this test is now as acute and as existential as any previous one. torrential rain in central china is causing widespread disruption — these passengers had to be rescued from a subway train. the billionaire's space race heats up, as amazon founder jeff bezos launches to the edge of the cosmos. afterwards he summed up the experience. oh, my god! laughter my expectations were high and they were dramatically exceeded.
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drawing inspiration for the olympics. we introduce you to the international anime

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