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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 20, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'mjames reynolds — our top stories. amazon's founder delivers himself to space. jeff bezos and crew spend ten minutes out of this world, as part of what's been called the "billionaire space race". former top adviser dominic cummings tells the bbc there was talk of replacing borisjohnson as prime minister, days after his election victory. angela merkel visits a german town devastated by floods last week, promising to cut through bureaucracy to free up support funds. and after both obama and trump took centre stage in disney's iconic hall of presidents, now it'sjoe biden�*s turn. we'll show you how he looks a little later.
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hello and welcome to the programme. the richest person on earth has decided that earth itself is not enough. earlier todayjezz bezos blasted into space, accompanied by both the oldest and youngest ever astronauts. the amazon founder was launched from the texan desert on a rocket developed by his own firm, blue origin. the craft travelled at nearly three times the speed of sound, reaching a height of nearly a hundred kilometres above the planet on a flight that lasted little over ten minutes. the bbc�*s sophie long begins our coverage. boarding his 60 foot suborbital rocket. he was not nervous, he said, just excited. this was notjust about realising a lifelong dream, but expanding his ever growing empire beyond the grip of gravity.
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with him on this first fully autonomous flight, three other civilians. his brother, mark, 18—year—old dutch student oliver daemen, and 82—year—old trailblazing aviator wally funk. one of mercury 13, a group of women who went through astral testing and training beforejeff bezos was born but never made it to space until now. five, four, three, two, one...... as you can hear, the reusable rocket carrying its first passengers and paying customer is on its way to space. blast off for the new shepard and lift off for space tourism. look out the window. holy, good god. the capsule separated from the booster at 250,000 feet and continued to the edge of space. look at this.
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where the four people were floating and weightless but critics say this is the wrong time for the uber rich to be blasting off in rockets while the planet faces climate disasters. the blue origin capsule floated back to the desert carrying the richest, oldest, and youngest people to have ever travelled to space. oh, my god. my expectations were high, and they were dramatically exceeded. everybody who has been up into space, they say this, that it changes them, and a look at it and they are kind of amazed and awestruck. i want to thank you, sweetheart, because you made it possible for me. i have been waiting a long time. a historic step for the worlds richest man to move industry into orbit. sophie long, bbc news, in the west texas desert. let's bring in the astronaut and former commander of the international space station, chris hadfield,
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also with us, the retired nasa administrator, charles boldenjr. i would like to start with you. when it is 66 days in space. jeff bases spent 11 minutes in space. do you see him as a astronaut? he spent less than 11 _ see him as a astronaut? he spent less than 11 minutes _ see him as a astronaut? he spent less than 11 minutes in _ see him as a astronaut? he spent less than 11 minutes in space, - see him as a astronaut? he spent. less than 11 minutes in space, from launch to landing. astronaut used to be a very, very exclusive term just by its very nature. like aviator where people who flown british airways are aviators by the not professional pilots. but we have to broaden the definitions and subdivide the definitions a little bit. by anyone's measure, yes flown in space, but we, he is not a professional astronaut, nobody made us a career of. i think it's a little bit of pedantry about
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terminology.— little bit of pedantry about terminolo: . , ., �* ., terminology. general borden. he seems to have _ terminology. general borden. he seems to have an _ terminology. general borden. he seems to have an ultimate - terminology. general borden. he seems to have an ultimate vision j terminology. general borden. he. seems to have an ultimate vision for colonies that can support a trillion human beings. how do you get from an 11 minute flight to 3 trillion people in space.— 11 minute flight to 3 trillion people in space. 11 minute flight to 3 trillion --eole in sace. ,., , ., people in space. visions that will be a multi-planet _ people in space. visions that will be a multi-planet species - people in space. visions that will be a multi-planet species and i people in space. visions that will i be a multi-planet species and that be a multi—planet species and that does not _ be a multi—planet species and that does not mean we are going to colonise — does not mean we are going to colonise anyone. in the smithy of the capability of living at a number of different planets for a period of time _ of different planets for a period of time this — of different planets for a period of time. this messaging this morning, very closely, this is the only planet— very closely, this is the only planet on_ very closely, this is the only planet on which that we know of, that can — planet on which that we know of, that can sustain life as we know it we need — that can sustain life as we know it we need to— that can sustain life as we know it we need to take care of it and we should _ we need to take care of it and we should pause, if not stop talking about _ should pause, if not stop talking about colonising other planets and turn our— about colonising other planets and turn our attention to doing what i think— turn our attention to doing what i thinkjeff— turn our attention to doing what i thinkjeff bases intends to do here on out, _ thinkjeff bases intends to do here on out, focus on what which we live and cleaned — on out, focus on what which we live and cleaned it up.— and cleaned it up. talking about cleanin: and cleaned it up. talking about cleaning it _ and cleaned it up. talking about cleaning it up. _ and cleaned it up. talking about cleaning it up, there _ and cleaned it up. talking about cleaning it up, there is - and cleaned it up. talking about cleaning it up, there is criticism| cleaning it up, there is criticism of the trip saying that there should
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be a focus on earth and he pays little tax and should not waste the money, that he should owe to others are going skyward. of this criticisms fair?— are going skyward. of this criticisms fair? ., , , criticisms fair? the easiest thing the road is _ criticisms fair? the easiest thing the road is to — criticisms fair? the easiest thing the road is to be _ criticisms fair? the easiest thing the road is to be a _ criticisms fair? the easiest thing the road is to be a critic. - criticisms fair? the easiest thing the road is to be a critic. it - the road is to be a critic. it takes no effort in to be a critic in ten seconds. the hard thing is actually doing things and jeff bases, he formed blue origin when amazon was only five or six years old is a company. a long—time vision and he has been investing many billions of dollars in developing this capability, playing all the wages of all those people so that the day now where they're starting to open commercial space flight, sort of like the evolution from the wright brothers through the first world war into the very first airlines are flying in early 20s. paying taxes, sure, that is a us regulatory problem. everyone needs to follow the tax rules the united states and
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if they allow some people not to pay taxes, that's a promise to do with as a nation but what is really important here is that this summer, three different companies starting the ability for people to get the space were not professional astronauts. that is a big change. and it's fascinating that this change, the first space race was between two superpowers and now we've got a mix of emerging powers exploring space and private billionaires and this is, is this type of competition good? i’m billionaires and this is, is this type of competition good? i'm going to sliahtl type of competition good? i'm going to slightly disagree _ type of competition good? i'm going to slightly disagree with _ type of competition good? i'm going to slightly disagree with the - type of competition good? i'm going to slightly disagree with the use - type of competition good? i'm going to slightly disagree with the use of l to slightly disagree with the use of the word _ to slightly disagree with the use of the word competition. go back to something chrisjust the word competition. go back to something chris just said. the word competition. go back to something chrisjust said. jeff has been _ something chrisjust said. jeff has been donating a billion, 1 billion with a _ been donating a billion, 1 billion with a b. — been donating a billion, 1 billion with a b, dollars of his income to make _ with a b, dollars of his income to make the — with a b, dollars of his income to make the company successful. those facilities, _ make the company successful. those facilities, everything. and that is making _ facilities, everything. and that is making a — facilities, everything. and that is making a big difference. that is
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spending — making a big difference. that is spending money on the planet and not wasting _ spending money on the planet and not wasting space that some people would like to— wasting space that some people would like to saw _ wasting space that some people would like to say. i don't see it is competition as i would like to see it is from — competition as i would like to see it is from the collaboration and they're — it is from the collaboration and they're all— it is from the collaboration and they're all trying to help nasa get people _ they're all trying to help nasa get people back to the surface of the moon— people back to the surface of the moon and — people back to the surface of the moon and onto mars and that's we need _ moon and onto mars and that's we need. do— moon and onto mars and that's we need. , ., moon and onto mars and that's we need. ,, ~' moon and onto mars and that's we need. i. ~ ., ,~' moon and onto mars and that's we need. ,, ~' ., n' ., moon and onto mars and that's we need. i. ~ ., ,~' ., .,, need. do you think elon musk who has his own ambitions _ need. do you think elon musk who has his own ambitions sees _ need. do you think elon musk who has his own ambitions sees it _ need. do you think elon musk who has his own ambitions sees it that - need. do you think elon musk who has his own ambitions sees it that way? i his own ambitions sees it that way? to make you just have not heard of the communications between the two of them but i'm sure they've sent along their congratulatory things like sir richard did. there has not been an open effort to make this a bit of competition between the two of them and when we try to make a big deal of crossing the common land, for them, they enjoy watching him do this kind of stuff but they're all focused on advancing humanity and investing their own personal funds to do that and i
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think it is important that the issue of paying taxes, that is our fault, the us government fault for not paying the tax. the us government fault for not paying the tax— the us government fault for not paying the tax. what are preferred to have as a _ paying the tax. what are preferred to have as a crew— paying the tax. what are preferred to have as a crew member? - paying the tax. what are preferred to have as a crew member? jeff. to have as a crew member? jeff bases, elon musk richard branson? i bases, elon musk richard branson? i know all three of them to some degree but they are all extremely motivated people and all inspired by the programme. the leftists fly in the programme. the leftists fly in the space station. all of them would be fine. but i was a commander. we don'tjust show up on space stations, takes a selection and training and i would choose elon musk because he is the most deeply technical and if we face real serious problems like when we had an emergency space flock to fix a leak,
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i want someone who has as many technical skills as possible. i would be happy to fly with any of them but i would pick elon, he will be the most useful crewmate. same auestion be the most useful crewmate. same question to — be the most useful crewmate. same question to you- _ be the most useful crewmate. same question to you. i've _ be the most useful crewmate. same question to you. i've never- be the most useful crewmate. same question to you. i've never been - be the most useful crewmate. same question to you. i've never been thej question to you. i've never been the commander — question to you. i've never been the commander of _ question to you. i've never been the commander of an _ question to you. i've never been the commander of an international - question to you. i've never been the l commander of an international space station. _ commander of an international space station, only a shuttle crew and i met chris. — station, only a shuttle crew and i met chris. i_ station, only a shuttle crew and i met chris, i would take all three. and i_ met chris, i would take all three. and i know— met chris, i would take all three. and i know you would say i would only pick— and i know you would say i would only pick one, but i can only pick one when— only pick one, but i can only pick one when it _ only pick one, but i can only pick one when it is unlikely either the three _ one when it is unlikely either the three of— one when it is unlikely either the three of really going to be working with me _ three of really going to be working with me on the way to mars and back. i with me on the way to mars and back. i don't _ with me on the way to mars and back. idon't really— with me on the way to mars and back. i don't really know. it is with me on the way to mars and back. i don't really know.— i don't really know. it is been a leasure i don't really know. it is been a pleasure speaking _ i don't really know. it is been a pleasure speaking to _ i don't really know. it is been a pleasure speaking to you both. j dominic cummings, the former chief adviser to the uk prime minister, has told the bbc there were discussions about trying to replace borisjohnson as prime minister, within days of the conservatives overwhelming election victory in december 2019. mr cummings, who was the been
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director of the vote leave campaign in 2016, also suggested that people who were completely sure that brexit was a good idea had a screw loose'. he spoke to our political editor laura kuenssberg. what really happened? this man used to be one of the most powerful figures in the government, but his friendship of political convenience with the prime ministerfell to bits. borisjohnson and dominic cummings became foes. their strategy had produced a massive win at the election. well, we did it, we did it. once they were all safely installed in number ten, he ended up on the outside. he was fed up with the media portrayal of him being a kind of puppet for the vote leave team. it was driving him round the bend. he was upset about the fact, connected to that, that essentially i was spending my time on what i thought was important, not on politics, not on media and communication and campaigning stuff.
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he was the elected prime minister. you were an unelected adviser. yeah, we basically disagreed on what was happening on covid. i thought his girlfriend was interfering with appointments, people who were being... she wanted to have people fired and have people promoted in ways that i thought were unethical and unprofessional. and that also led to a big argument between us. accusing somebody of having undue influence, which is what you are doing, is a big claim. the prime minister doesn't have a plan and he doesn't know how whitehall works. someone is going to set the agenda. it is going to be the civil service, or the vote leave team, or me. as soon as the election was one night, her view was, why should it be dominic and the leave team, why shouldn't it be me that is pulling the strings?
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in response to mr cummings' claims, downing street told us political appointments are entirely made by the prime minister. in the end, you lose the argument, you lose that influence. that's what happened, isn't it? yeah, in fact, literally immediately after the election, it was already clear that this was a problem. before mid january, we were having meetings in number ten, saying, "it is clear that carrie wants rid of all of us" _ at that point, we were all ready saying by the summer he would be gone from here or we would be in the process of trying to get rid of him and get someone else in as prime minister. within months of the prime minister winning the biggest conservative majority in decades, you and a few others from the vote leave campaign were discussing the possibility
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of getting rid of him. days, not months. within days of the election you were discussing getting rid of him? yes. because for all the reasons we have been discussing. he doesn't have a plan, doesn't know how to be prime minister, and we only have got him in there to solve a certain problem, not because we thought it was right to run the country. what kind of con did you pull off on the british public if that is what you think? i don't think it is a con. we were trying to solve problems in the order we can solve them in. before the relationship at the heart of government broke, borisjohnson and dominic cummings did achieve their top priority — brexit. so how does the architect of the vote leave campaign look—back? questions like, "is brexit a good idea?" no one on earth knows what the answer to that is. even you are still not sure if brexit was a good idea? i think anyone who says they are sure about questions like that has got a screw loose, whether you are on the remain side or our side.
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one of the reasons we won was precisely because we didn't think we were definitely right and remainers are all idiots or traitors. do you think you have done more good than damage? i think brexit was a good thing. i think that the way in which the world has worked out since 2016 vindicates the arguments that vote leave made in all sorts of ways. i think it's good that brexit happened. he won't be the one to settle that question. nor will he write his entry in the books of our recent history, but there will be a page, for sure. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. i'm joined now by our uk political correspondent rob watson, who's in oxford was this about public interest or personal revenge? i was this about public interest or personal revenge?— was this about public interest or personal revenge? i think the first thin to personal revenge? i think the first thing to say _ personal revenge? i think the first thing to say is _ personal revenge? i think the first thing to say is that _ personal revenge? i think the first thing to say is that it's _ personal revenge? i think the first thing to say is that it's one - personal revenge? i think the first thing to say is that it's one the - thing to say is that it's one the most riveting pieces of political
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journalism. so, complements to her. it is utterly fascinating. it's like having to interview thomas cromwell and the court of king henry viii and i expect it's a bit of both, having denied it, the two men have had a major falling denied it, the two men have had a majorfalling out but denied it, the two men have had a major falling out but i think there's more to it than that and i think dominic cummings is the fundamentally driven person who has a very strong view and is a very strong view that somehow britain is a country that needs fundamental reform though its politics work the way it's party has worked in the way its governance works. the unelected officials, the whole works. i its governance works. the unelected officials, the whole works.— officials, the whole works. i missed it at the time. _ officials, the whole works. i missed it at the time, rob, _ officials, the whole works. i missed it at the time, rob, today - officials, the whole works. i missed it at the time, rob, today of- officials, the whole works. i missed it at the time, rob, today of the . it at the time, rob, today of the cummings criticisms of the prime minister, i will watch it later. cummings criticisms of the prime minister, iwill watch it later. did any of those criticisms of the prime
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minister likely to stick?— minister likely to stick? look, in normal times, _ minister likely to stick? look, in normal times, if— minister likely to stick? look, in normal times, if you're - minister likely to stick? look, in normal times, if you're closest i normal times, if you're closest advisers says, as well as your clever and complex, if they going to say that you are chaotic, clueless, incompetent, cynical, i could go on and on, that can be absolutely terminal. but these are not normal times and they are not normal times because essentially the country is split into two tribes after the referendum into thousand 16. the probe for us pro brexit tribe in the other tried but doesn't like brexit and doesn't like boris very much. and talking to members of the first tribe, they are just not receptive to this kind of criticism and they dismiss mr cummings this summer with sour grapes and dismiss mr cummings this summer with sourgrapes and an dismiss mr cummings this summer with sour grapes and an oddball. but the other tribe, for them, mr cummings believes the prime minister is unfit for purpose but in the short term,
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was something as explosive as this should change everything but in the short term, i don't think it will. thank you so much. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: in afghanistan, rockets land near the presidential palace in kabul — on the first day of the muslim festival of eid downing street says it's crucial for people to stay at home when contacted by the nhs app in england — after the business minister, paul scully, earlier suggested people had a choice. the former chair of the nhs test and trace advisory board, sirjonathan montgomery, says workers need clear advice. i don't think it's really acceptable for the government to say, make an informed choice without also giving us the information that we need to use when we make those choices. so, i think we should be expecting is
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someone, some advice on what difference it makes, people being double vaccinated. it reduces the need that they will catch the virus or, it doesn't eliminate it but it produces it and if they do get it they cannot pass it on. so, there will be some people will be double vaccinated when the risk of vaccination is much lower and i also expect to see some advice on thinking about whether or not self isolation is always needed or whether there will be some gradation to things that we could do. now to aghanistan, president ashraf ghani has accused the taliban of having no intention of stopping the war. it comes after explosions were heard during a live broadcast on state television. three rockets landed just outside the presidential palace. there were no casualties, but it was the first
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rocket attack on kabul, since the taliban launched a series of offensives — to co—incide with the departure of nato—led foreign troops from the country. secunder kermani is in kabul. the sounds and images of the moments those rockets struck near the presidential palace this morning really quite dramatic and while some taliban supporters are mine have been trying to mark those officials who somewhat flinched, many afghans have been praising the president and those alongside him for their defiance in continuing with the prayer service led by an afghan soldier. forthis prayer service led by an afghan soldier. for this incident also highlights the ongoing struggle of the security forces and even the centre of the capital against attack, these rockets were launched from the back of the vehicle inside the city. the islamic state group has claimed responsibility, no casualties of the reported but the day of the festival is largely passed of peacefully and at the
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moment, the wider picture in afghanistan is one of escalating violence as a result of a tale been offensive. and the president spoke after the prayer service had ended and he criticised the taliban think they had no intention of peace. talks between the senior delegation of african political leaders and the insurgents over the weekend and it really was just the promise of further talks but on the ground here, the taliban and now i have captured around half of the territory in afghanistan whilst the government retain control of all major cities. the mood here is one of real apprehension. many feared there is much more bloodshed and store. the german chancellor angela merkel has pledged funding within days to get essentials to flood victims without bureaucratic delays. speaking in the devastated town of bad muen—ster—eifel, she said a cabinet meeting would free up finances on wednesday. in the nearby town of ahr—weiler, anna holligan has been to visit the homes of the victims of the disaster. they re not convinced the money
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will reach them anytime soon, so are starting to rebuild on their own. the scenes do you cherish for a lifetime. you'll make it's the first thing you do. she could not solve or photo albums. but her three children survived. , . ., , photo albums. but her three children survived. , . . , . survived. they are alive, they are ok and yeah. _ survived. they are alive, they are ok and yeah, that _ survived. they are alive, they are ok and yeah, that makes - survived. they are alive, they are ok and yeah, that makes me - survived. they are alive, they are j 0k and yeah, that makes me feel ok and yeah, that makes me feel really happy. and that's the biggest thing you can get. really happy. and that's the biggest thing you can get-— really happy. and that's the biggest thing you can get. people who could not aet thing you can get. people who could not net to thing you can get. people who could not get to higher — thing you can get. people who could not get to higher ground, _ thing you can get. people who could not get to higher ground, did - thing you can get. people who could not get to higher ground, did not. not get to higher ground, did not have a hope. this not get to higher ground, did not have a hope-— have a hope. this used to be my kitchen. without _ have a hope. this used to be my kitchen. without warning, - have a hope. this used to be my kitchen. without warning, her i have a hope. this used to be my i kitchen. without warning, her son was trapped _ kitchen. without warning, her son was trapped inside. _
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kitchen. without warning, her son was trapped inside. is _ kitchen. without warning, her son was trapped inside. is a _ kitchen. without warning, her son was trapped inside. is a lot - kitchen. without warning, her son was trapped inside. is a lot of- was trapped inside. is a lot of water, there _ was trapped inside. is a lot of water, there is _ was trapped inside. is a lot of water, there is a _ was trapped inside. is a lot of water, there is a man - was trapped inside. is a lot of water, there is a man coming j was trapped inside. is a lot of. water, there is a man coming by was trapped inside. is a lot of- water, there is a man coming by and he screams, help, help, help and he went down the water and he comes back up and down again and then he was gone. her back up and down again and then he was one. ,., , ., back up and down again and then he was one. , ., ., ., was gone. her son is not among the leuions of was gone. her son is not among the legions of young _ was gone. her son is not among the legions of young people _ was gone. her son is not among the legions of young people investing i legions of young people investing their energy and the regionwide clean—up. they have travelled from across the country, teaming up with the exhausted emergency workers. brute the exhausted emergency workers. we have the brigade with us. those that are still— have the brigade with us. those that are still here and hoping to get all the things— are still here and hoping to get all the things out. this helping hands, neighbours— the things out. this helping hands, neighbours that have help from all over germany. neighbours that have help from all over germany-— neighbours that have help from all over germany. here in the village, so many of — over germany. here in the village, so many of the _ over germany. here in the village, so many of the homes _ over germany. here in the village, so many of the homes that - over germany. here in the village, so many of the homes that were . so many of the homes that were washed away by the flood water remained uninhabitable and they have
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to demolish those first before beginning the process of rebuilding peoples homes and lives again. toothpaste, a candle, the bare essentials are enough for now. despite the support, as night falls, with literally no doors to lock, new threats emerge.— with literally no doors to lock, new threats emerge. beside my bed and i close my door. _ threats emerge. beside my bed and i close my door, if— threats emerge. beside my bed and i close my door, if somebody - threats emerge. beside my bed and i close my door, if somebody comes i threats emerge. beside my bed and i i close my door, if somebody comes and wants to take, i don't think there's much to take away. tomorrow is a new day, hopefully we will wake up and work again.
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now, it is a tradition as american as the super bowl or the 4th ofjuly — a short while after a new president is inaugurated, an animatronic version of the new leader is built to go on display at the hall of president's at walt disney world in california. it's an iconic moment for any president, a true sign that their image is now for the ages. both barack obama and donald trump have been centre stage. whether they're happy with how they look, i'm not so sure! but now it's president biden's chance to enjoy the honour. today disney world released the first pictures of the 46th president animatronic — president biden has even recorded a speach to accompany his model. disney says it's a "realistic and symbolic" glimpse nto the office of the president. on the table next to him peach blossoms to signify his home state of delaware, and a pair of aviator glasses of course!
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much more ahead on the programme — do stay with us on bbc news. hello. the severe thunderstorms we've seen across parts of england this afternoon and evening, they fade into the night, but the heat story doesn't go away — it's with us for a few more days yet. met office amber warning for extreme heat remains in place across the southwestern corner of the uk. it's those high daytime temperatures and night—time temperatures coupled over several days which is having an impact on the body, on our health, and potentially on infrastructure too. and just take a look at the temperatures as we approach midnight. still well into the 20s across many parts of the country. those storms, though, across east anglia, southeast fade away. most will be dry by the end of the night. temperatures really dropping much in the hours that take us towards dawn, still in mid—to—high teens, but tomorrow, there will be more low cloud across eastern parts of scotland and northeast england. whereas in northern ireland, temperatures under sunny skies are set to rise even further. extreme heat warning,
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amber one from the met office comes into force from eight o'clock tomorrow, goes all the way through to friday. and that's because we've got more of a drift of a south westerly wind, so the heat across the south is slowly transferring its way westwards. now, we will see that low cloud towards the east to begin with, that will break up, but still across the south with some blue skies overhead, isolated showers, nowhere near as much as we've seen today. still seeing temperatures into the low 30s. but temperatures higher tomorrow — northwest england to the west of northern ireland across fermanagh in particular. pretty hot too to the south of scotland, but around the north and east, still with some low cloud nearby, alwaysjust that little bit cooler. and as i said, a few isolated showers may be across parts of northwest england, central and southern england and northern ireland. but where you do see those storms, they could be quite severe. they will fade, though, as we go through the night and into thursday. thursday, blue skies back for many, some mist and low cloud around northeast coasts to begin with, probably a bit more sunshine in northern and eastern scotland and northeast england.
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and as i said, that core of heat pushing its way northward and westwards. 31 celsius, may be higher towards fermanagh, which, again, will have an impact on health. but here and across the rest of the country, temperatures drop a little bit on friday, plenty of sunshine and dry weather still around. the big change, though, comes into the weekend. this area of low pressure starting to push its way up, so if you've not enjoyed any of the heat, it's time to open the windows — when it's not raining that is — allow the priest to push through the house and flats, but there will be outbreaks of rain, some heavy and thundery across england and wales. staying dry for the time being, though, scotland and northern ireland, but all seeing temperatures drop back to levels we should be for this time of year.
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this is bbc news, our top stories... amazon founderjeff bezos completes a ten—minute round—trip into space with three other people, travelling at three times the speed of sound. the us climate envoy says the world can't wait for the pandemic to end before facing up to the reality of global warming. most americans who still aren't vaccinated say there's nothing that will convince them to get the coronavirus jab. we'll drill down into the latest figures. and gmos in ourfood — friend orfoe? we'll hear from the molecular biologist who's trying to reframe the way we think about genetically modified organisms
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the us climate envoy, john kerry, has said the world doesn't have the luxury of waiting for the pandemic to end before it deals with global warming. speaking here in london, mr kerry said that "while it may be unfolding in slow motion to some — this test is as acute and as existential as any previous one. time is running out." he called on china — the world's biggest user of fossil fuels — to increase the speed and depth of its efforts to cut carbon emissions. mr kerry said november's international summit on climate change, cop26, in scotland would be "a pivotal moment" and 2021 "a decisive year". the climate crisis, my friends, is the test of our times. and while some may still believe it is unfolding in slow motion — no. this test is now as acute
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and existential as any previous one. i am very sorry to say the suffering of covid will be magnified many times over in a world that does not grapple with and ultimately halts the climate crisis. we don't have the luxury of waiting until covid is vanquished to take up the climate challenge. emma gatten is the telegraph newspaper's environment editor and was at that speech — shejoins me now from london. hi, mi. in order to hi, mi. in orderto make hi, mi. in order to make progress, john kerry must bring china with him, despite the fact that the us and china are opponents in almost every other area —— emma. how does he do this? every other area -- emma. how does he do this?— he do this? what john kerry is t in: to he do this? what john kerry is trying to do — he do this? what john kerry is trying to do is _ he do this? what john kerry is trying to do is really _ he do this? what john kerry is i trying to do is really separate the claimant question from all the other foreign policy issues between china and the us. he talked on this very specifically about it being an issue
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on climate whether they need to work together. he made a reference to the us allying with... and called climate change a mutual suicide pact. so he's really trying to isolate claimant as the one thing where it's kind of a mutual issue. do you think he'll be successful? i think it really depends on some larger forces. think it really depends on some largerforces. i think think it really depends on some larger forces. i think we cannot discount that china makes its decisions on climate change based on its own policies and accounting. it will notice obviously bigger market forces are moving in that direction. whether the us can directly appealed to china on this issue and make no
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concessions and any other areas is a bit more questionable — but it may be that just leaving bit more questionable — but it may be thatjust leaving on it and the eu and the uk leading on it, they bring china along at some point. [10 bring china along at some point. do you get the sense that the world has enough bandwidth to deal with both the pandemic and the claimant crisis at the same time —— claimant? i think in some instances, what we are seeing at the moment in europe, we are seeing floods in china has concentrated the minds, because what you actually don't want is to have a pandemic and dealing with the climate change at the same time. the two go hand—in—hand. so i think that has focused minds. on a more specific route, i think cop 26 is a more open question and it depends on
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whether the uk can bring people together and whether they can secure the financing they need when governments around the world are hesitant to spend money, including the uk. ., ., ~ hesitant to spend money, including the uk. . ., ~ , ., hesitant to spend money, including the uk. . ., ~ ,., . hesitant to spend money, including the uk. . ., ~ . ., the uk. emma, thank you so much for “oininu us. for americans who are unvaccinated, it's going to take a whole lot of convincing to get the jab. a recent poll by axios and ipsos found that not even incentives like a celebrity's endorsement or even paid time off are likely to make them get the vaccine. that same poll also found that vaccinated americans are getting increasingly concerned about catching coronavirus, but are unwilling to change their behaviour or take more safety precautions. as it stands, just under half of the us population is jabbed — and this just reveals just how hard it may be to reach herd immnity. let's bring in mallory newall, one of the authors of the poll and the director of public affairs at ipsos. also with us, republican analyst and former adviser to george w bush, ron christie.
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hi to you both, mallory, let's start with you. hi to you both, mallory, let's start with ou. ., hi to you both, mallory, let's start with you._ what i hi to you both, mallory, let's start with you._ what will. hi to you both, mallory, let's start with you._ what will it | with you. hello there. what will it take to convince _ with you. hello there. what will it take to convince those _ with you. hello there. what will it take to convince those hard-corel take to convince those hard—core vaccine sceptics? take to convince those hard-core vaccine sceptics?— vaccine sceptics? that a great auestion vaccine sceptics? that a great question and _ vaccine sceptics? that a great question and i _ vaccine sceptics? that a great question and i think _ vaccine sceptics? that a great question and i think our i vaccine sceptics? that a great question and i think our paull question and i think our paul illustrates just question and i think our paul illustratesjust how big question and i think our paul illustrates just how big the holdout is about those so—called sceptics —— pole. and we are seeing the number of things, from giving workers paid time off to making the vaccine available at your doctor's office is just not really reaching those that need to be reached.— just not really reaching those that need to be reached. ron, you've been in the white — need to be reached. ron, you've been in the white house _ need to be reached. ron, you've been in the white house - _ need to be reached. ron, you've been in the white house - how _ need to be reached. ron, you've been in the white house - how do - need to be reached. ron, you've been in the white house - how do you i in the white house — how do you reach hard—to—reach people? goad reach hard-to-reach people? good evenin: to reach hard-to-reach people? good evening to you. — reach hard-to-reach people? good evening to you, james. _ reach hard-to-reach people? good evening to you, james. i _ reach hard—to—reach people? good evening to you, james. i think the thing _ evening to you, james. i think the thing from — evening to you, james. i think the thing from a — evening to you, james. i think the thing from a white house perspective is using _ thing from a white house perspective is using the _ thing from a white house perspective is using the white house office of media _ is using the white house office of media affairs. in other words, to not use — media affairs. in other words, to not use the _ media affairs. in other words, to not use the national media, but break— not use the national media, but break it— not use the national media, but break it down and talk to people in toledo. _ break it down and talk to people in toledo, ohio, ortalk to people in pennsylvania at the local markets
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and say, — pennsylvania at the local markets and say, "this is a very important message — and say, "this is a very important message coming from washington, but we wanted _ message coming from washington, but we wanted to talk to you directly." there's _ we wanted to talk to you directly." there's so — we wanted to talk to you directly." there's so much work that needs to be done, _ there's so much work that needs to be done, and mallory and her term democrat— be done, and mallory and her term democrat team are to be commended for that— democrat team are to be commended for that poll they put out in the field _ for that poll they put out in the field - — for that poll they put out in the field - but— for that poll they put out in the field — but with only 49% of americans fully vaccinated, there's a lot more — americans fully vaccinated, there's a lot more that the white house, state _ a lot more that the white house, state and — a lot more that the white house, state and local leaders needed do to make _ state and local leaders needed do to make sure _ state and local leaders needed do to make sure more americans have it and finally— make sure more americans have it and finally reach _ make sure more americans have it and finally reach herd immunity. let�*s finally reach herd immunity. let's start looking _ finally reach herd immunity. let's start looking at _ finally reach herd immunity. let's start looking at some _ finally reach herd immunity. let's start looking at some of- finally reach herd immunity. let�*s start looking at some of the people the white house has deployed. first of all, there was olivia roderigo, the young recording artist whose hugely popular with young people — did that help connect with younger people, herappearance did that help connect with younger people, her appearance at the white house was yellow it doesn't appear too, that was one of the things we asked about, whether too, that was one of the things we asked about, whethe— asked about, whether celebrity or ublic asked about, whether celebrity or public figures _ asked about, whether celebrity or public figures that _ asked about, whether celebrity or public figures that you _ asked about, whether celebrity or public figures that you like, i asked about, whether celebrity or public figures that you like, if i public figures that you like, if they were to endorse the vaccine, would that make a difference? and for a vast majority, more than three quarters of an vaccinated people said no. ~ ., �* quarters of an vaccinated people
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saidno. ~ ., �* , ,, quarters of an vaccinated people said no. ~ ., �* , , , ., quarters of an vaccinated people saidno. �* , ,, ., _ said no. wow, i'm surprised that by -- by that- — said no. wow, i'm surprised that by -- by that. someone _ said no. wow, i'm surprised that by -- by that. someone decided i said no. wow, i'm surprised that by -- by that. someone decided to i said no. wow, i'm surprised that by| -- by that. someone decided to give —— by that. someone decided to give a message from his own studios, have a message from his own studios, have a look. please take covid seriously. i can't say it enough. enough people have died, - we don't need any more deaths. research like crazy, _ talk to your doctor, your doctors, medical professionals you trust based on your unique _ medical history, your- current medical condition. and you and your doctor make a very important decision i for your own safety. take it seriously. if olivia roderigo didn't break through to people, do you think sean hannity will have? let through to people, do you think sean hannity will have?— hannity will have? let me take that, i've been friends _ hannity will have? let me take that, i've been friends with _ hannity will have? let me take that, i've been friends with sean - i've been friends with sean hannity for over— i've been friends with sean hannity for over 20 — i've been friends with sean hannity for over 20 years, and i've been friends with sean hannity for over20 years, and i can i've been friends with sean hannity for over 20 years, and i can tell you that — for over 20 years, and i can tell you that he _ for over 20 years, and i can tell you that he reaches tens of millions of americans every week. his programme and television programme — for a lot— programme and television programme — for a lot of— programme and television programme — for a lot of people in predominately southern _ for a lot of people in predominately southern states, a lot of people don't _ southern states, a lot of people don't want to take the vaccine,
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hearing — don't want to take the vaccine, hearing something of that magnitude from sean— hearing something of that magnitude from sean hannity might actually move _ from sean hannity might actually move the — from sean hannity might actually move the dial a little bit to give people — move the dial a little bit to give people to — move the dial a little bit to give people to talk to their doctor or physician— people to talk to their doctor or physician and consider getting a vaccination. | physician and consider getting a vaccination.— physician and consider getting a vaccination. ., ., ., vaccination. i would agree, and the messaue vaccination. i would agree, and the message that _ vaccination. i would agree, and the message that he's _ vaccination. i would agree, and the message that he's using _ vaccination. i would agree, and the message that he's using - - vaccination. i would agree, and the message that he's using - if i i vaccination. i would agree, and the message that he's using - if i can i message that he's using — if i can interject — the messages using points to one of the more effective ways to get people on board, according to our poll. first, we know that news consumption is incredibly important in terms of a trusted messenger and where people are getting their information about the vaccine. that's first. second of all, you notice he says, "talk to your doctor, talk to your primary care provider" — that's the thing that makes most unaccented people more willing to get the job.- more willing to get the 'ob. doctor anthony found * more willing to get the 'ob. doctor anthony found she i more willing to get the job. doctor anthony found she said _ more willing to get the job. doctor anthony found she said recently i more willing to get the job. doctor| anthony found she said recently on tv set that we still have smallpox in the united states, the current
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level of misinformation that existed in the us decades ago. when did vaccines become political in the united states? it vaccines become political in the united states?— vaccines become political in the united states? it seems with this articular united states? it seems with this particular strain _ united states? it seems with this particular strain of _ united states? it seems with this particular strain of covid - united states? it seems with this particular strain of covid it, i particular strain of covid it, it has _ particular strain of covid it, it has become political in the us. i would _ has become political in the us. i would take us from a different tag, james _ would take us from a different tag, james i_ would take us from a different tag, james. i would look at this from when _ james. i would look at this from when i _ james. i would look at this from when i got — james. i would look at this from when i got my vaccination a number of weeks _ when i got my vaccination a number of weeks ago, the number of people my colour, _ of weeks ago, the number of people my colour, african americans, who thought— my colour, african americans, who thought this — my colour, african americans, who thought this was a, a teske experiment being performed on them, and b, _ experiment being performed on them, and b. this _ experiment being performed on them, and b, this was an opportunity for the government to insert a chair up to track— the government to insert a chair up to track their every movement —— tough _ to track their every movement —— tough tuskegee experiment. people need to— tough tuskegee experiment. people need to realise that they need to trust _ need to realise that they need to trust their— need to realise that they need to trust their officials, but there is so much — trust their officials, but there is so much disinformation and misinformation out there, particularly with people of colour that we — particularly with people of colour that we still have a long way to go in this— that we still have a long way to go in this political climate.— in this political climate. mallory, what about _ in this political climate. mallory, what about simply _ in this political climate. mallory, what about simply paying i in this political climate. mallory, j what about simply paying people in this political climate. mallory, i what about simply paying people to get vaccinated?— get vaccinated? that's a great question. _ get vaccinated? that's a great question. it's _ get vaccinated? that's a great question, it's not _ get vaccinated? that's a great question, it's not one - get vaccinated? that's a great question, it's not one that i get vaccinated? that's a great i question, it's not one that we've explored thus far. i think we are
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planning to in future waves of this research. we did ask employed people if you got paid time off from your employer to receive the vaccine — that, along with getting your doctor's office is one of the leading contenders. ultimately we see that the vast majority of the unvaccinated say they are unlikely to get the vaccine under any of these circumstances. at the end of these circumstances. at the end of the day, you are trying to figure out who is movable and how we can get them there.— out who is movable and how we can get them there. when you've got the next noll, get them there. when you've got the next poll. let — get them there. when you've got the next poll. let us _ get them there. when you've got the next poll, let us know. _ get them there. when you've got the next poll, let us know. mallory i get them there. when you've got the next poll, let us know. mallory and l next poll, let us know. mallory and ron, thank you both so much for joining us. ron, thank you both so much for joining ue— ron, thank you both so much for joining no— ron, thank you both so much for 'oinin: us. , ., ., , joining us. great to see you both. thank you- _ the uk is seeing a record number of migrants trying to reach its shores. yesterday, 430 migrants tried to cross the english channel in small boats — a record for a single day. so far this year, nearly 8,000 people have reached the uk in small boats. meanwhile parliament is debating a bill that would make it a crime for anyone to knowingly arrive in the uk without permission. the bbc�*sjon donnison spent the last few days out on the channel
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and sent this report. they have come a long way. some of them may have travelled thousands of miles, but for these migrants, the journey�*s end comes near dungeness, south—west of dover. it's a giant step in their search for a better life, and scenes like this are now playing out on a daily basis. earlier, we took a boat out into the channel. we've spotted another small one which appears to be a migrant boat. it's one of the world's busiest shipping lanes, but bobbing on the waves, a tiny dinghy. no motor, just paddles. where are you from, guys? sudan. from sudan? are you 0k? help will be coming soon. they will come and pick you up. here are some fruit
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and biscuits, somejuice. having given them some food, we shadowed them and called the coast guard, who organised their rescue. and not far away, we find another migrant boat. we're about eight miles off the coast of dover now, and we've come across this small dinghy, probably 3—4 metres long. we think there are 12—13 on board, a couple of small children at the front, and a couple of women, and we've no called in the uk border force, the uk coast guard, who are going to pick them up. for some, these are desperate people fleeing some of the world's most desperate countries. —— most troubled countries. for others, they are simply economic migrants. over the last few days, the border force has brought hundreds of migrants ashore. the government says people—smugglers are its target, but it's also proposing that unauthorised migrants themselves could be jailed for up to four years.
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putting people injail who have come here because of the terrible things that have happened to them in their lives is really draconian and punitive, and all it will do is fill up ourjails without resolving the issue. and though the number of people crossing the channel in boats has increased significantly, hitting a record of 2,000 last month, overall the number of people claiming asylum in the uk actually fell last year. behind the figures, though, there are human stories. the government is pushing back, but for those making these dangerous journeys, the pull of a better future is strong. john donnison, bbc news, in the english channel. the usjustice department has announced that the man who chaired former president donald trump's inauguralfund, thomas barrack, has been arrested on foreign lobbying charges. federal prosecutors have charged mr barrack, a private equity investor, with lobbying on behalf of the uae as an adviser to candidate and then—president trump. according to the indictment,
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mr barrack was directly and indirectly in contact with uae senior leadership. 0ur correspondent samira hussain has been following the story and joins us now. take us through the charges, please. well, there are seven separate charges, but wrote really amounts to is that federal prosecutors here in the us is saying that mr barrack didn't actually register as a lobbyist at all, therefore all the dealings he did on behalf of the government of the united arab emirates really amounts to being a state actor for another country. in addition to those charges, there is additional charges that he was actually acting on behalf of the emma ready government, so trying to get some favourable message —— messages into donald trump's speech is make speeches and trying to get more favourable policy for the uae using his close connections to the president at the time. what
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using his close connections to the president at the time.— using his close connections to the president at the time. what role did mr barrack play _ president at the time. what role did mr barrack play in _ president at the time. what role did mr barrack play in donald _ president at the time. what role did mr barrack play in donald trump's l mr barrack play in donald trump's inner circle, outer circle? where was he? ~ inner circle, outer circle? where washe? . ., , was he? most certainly he was an ardent supporter— was he? most certainly he was an ardent supporter of _ was he? most certainly he was an ardent supporter of mr _ was he? most certainly he was an ardent supporter of mr trump, i was he? most certainly he was an j ardent supporter of mr trump, he was he? most certainly he was an - ardent supporter of mr trump, he was ardent supporter of mr trump, he was a big fundraiserfor mrtrump, he was on his inaugural committee, he led the fundraising in 2016 for trump and the inaugural celebrations in 2017. so he really played a pivotal role with mr trump at the time. ., ~' ,, pivotal role with mr trump at the time. ., ~ in ,., pivotal role with mr trump at the time. ., ~ in . pivotal role with mr trump at the time. ., ~ . ., ., time. thank you so much for 'oining us. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: gmos in yourfood — long criticised by many — but are they as bad as we think? we speak to one biologist. 0n the hottest day of the year, the met office issued a new extreme heat weather warning for large parts of wales, and areas of southern and western england.
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the heat warnings are in place across huge areas of the country, including here in southsea. but not everyone can get to the cooling air of a coastline. what if you live on the tenth floor of a block of flats? that's what kelvin turner does. by mid—afternoon, his lounge is at 30 celsius. kelvin, who's 57, struggles to keep the heat down. it's already at 30, though, it's pretty sticky, isn't it? yeah, absolutely, yeah. if you weren't here, this top would be off. it is as you feel it now, it's very still and warm — you just feel it on your skin, the warmth. so, you just grin and bear it. there were more than 2,000 heat—related deaths in britain last year — which is why doctors are now warning people of the dangers of this oppressive weather. if no—one is able to keep an eye on you and get help when you're having heat exhaustion, within 30 minutes, you can
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then get heat stroke, which is a medical emergency. and that's when you have to call an ambulance and get aid straightaway. for the first time this week, the met office has issued new—style extreme heat weather warnings — aimed at alerting all sectors of our lives. and it seems the impact is also long—term. dr nick pepin has studied climate change for 26 years and says weather patterns are now very distinct. well, you'd always expect there to be unusual heat waves and cold spells. but i think the point here is that the frequency of the warm events is definitely increasing, and the frequency today is officially the hottest day of the year so far — 32 celsius at heathrow. part of a summer to be carefree, but also cautious. duncan kennedy, bbc news. let's get a look at the stories making headlines around the world.
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more than 2,000 firefighters are battling to control a raging wildfire in the us state of oregon. the bootleg fire, which started two weeks ago, has forced thousands of residents from mostly rural areas to abandon their homes. the fire has burned through more than 1,200 square kilometres. former hollywood producer harvey weinstein has been extradited from new york to california to face trial on rape and assault charges. weinstein was convicted in new york in 2020 for sexual assault and rape, and was sentenced to 23 years in prison. in los angeles, he is wanted for trial on charges of attacking five women from 2004 to 2013. ben &jerry�*s will stop selling its ice cream by the end of next year in the israeli—occupied west bank and eastjerusalem. the us ice cream—maker said continued sales in the region would be "inconsistent with its values". israel's prime minister naftali bennett warned the us firm's parent company, unilever, that there would be legal
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and other consequences. an operation is under way to rescue passengers submerged in waist—deep floodwaters on a subway train in china. the passengers were travelling in zhengzhou, in central henan province when they became stranded amid the rising water. state media reports at least one person has died and two are missing. walk down the aisle of your local supermarket, and you'll inevitably come across a number of items proudly asserting they are free of gentetically—modified organisms — or gmos. and so, you'd be forgiven for thinking that gmos are best avoided. they've got quite a bad reputation with some saying they pose a health risk — but that's not necessarily the case. in fact, some people say it's quite the opposite. bob goldberg is a molecular biologist in los angeles and joins us now to explain why that might be the case.
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doctor goldberg, when you are in a store walking through the aisles and you see gmo free labels, are you tempted to rip them off?- you see gmo free labels, are you tempted to rip them off? know, but i smiled because _ tempted to rip them off? know, but i smiled because all— tempted to rip them off? know, but i smiled because all the _ tempted to rip them off? know, but i smiled because all the items - tempted to rip them off? know, but i smiled because all the items in - tempted to rip them off? know, but i smiled because all the items in the i smiled because all the items in the store are genetically modified. all these beautiful, beautifulfood things that we eat, all these nice vegetables that are in the grocery store didn't exist 10,000 years ago. so they are all genetically modified organisms, or gmo does. it's the misconception that has directed change to benefit humanity. look at the plentiful food supply that we have in most parts of the world. so why do they get such bad press? because i think food is very dear to people's hearts, and it's very combined for nutrition and culture.
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and people like to think that our foods are natural, that they came from god — but they don't really know that that's a misperception because none of the foods we eat are natural, they are produced by really terrific breeding, and now through dna breeding techniques, there really precise, and it leaves the door wide open in terms of the next generation of foods. so door wide open in terms of the next generation of foods.— generation of foods. so let's say ou are generation of foods. so let's say you are shopping _ generation of foods. so let's say you are shopping next _ generation of foods. so let's say you are shopping next to - generation of foods. so let's say l you are shopping next to someone generation of foods. so let's say - you are shopping next to someone and they said to you, you were talking, they said to you, you were talking, they said to you, you were talking, they said they only eat gmo free food. what would you say to that? i would say that's your prerogative, but would you eat a gmo free peanut over a genetically engineered peanut, which is hypoallergenic? which would be healthierfor you? the non—gmo using dna technology, the conventional peanut may cause
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significant allergenic reaction affect your health and a significant way. but the gmo peanut would be healthy and ever cause and allergenic reaction. so it's a question of which foods you choose to eat. i5 question of which foods you choose to eat. , ., , to eat. is part of the problem the fact that the _ to eat. is part of the problem the fact that the term _ to eat. is part of the problem the fact that the term genetically - fact that the term genetically modified organisms sounds utterly terrifying and like something out of sci—fi? if it had a less scary name, would some of this problem go away? part of the problem is people go, what's a gmo? most people think it's a general manufactured food of some kind, and you have to say no, it's a genetically modified organism. and most people don't understand that the gmos that we eat, and most of them in the store are grown in
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fields and made to have feed and things for animals and other kinds of organisms — the fact of the matter is that the gmo that makes drugs like insulin, that saved millions and millions of lives, the bacteria that has a human insulin gene, that technology is the same that makes the gmos like papaya that goes into your grocery store. share that makes the gmos like papaya that goes into your grocery store.- goes into your grocery store. are we the general _ goes into your grocery store. are we the general public _ goes into your grocery store. are we the general public good _ goes into your grocery store. are we the general public good at _ goes into your grocery store. are we the general public good at knowing i the general public good at knowing what we are eating? or do we not even know what this stands for, gmo? i think some of the scientists have done a very poorjob of communicating that all foods and domesticated animals have been genetically engineered. and what is genetically engineered. and what is genetic engineering? it's kind of scaring people, as you said. but in some respects, it's the most precise technology to alter the genes of an organism. a lot of people don't really know that there's actually
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human gmos walking around... i’m really know that there's actually human gmos walking around... i'm so sor to human gmos walking around... i'm so sorry to bring — human gmos walking around... i'm so sorry to bring you _ human gmos walking around... i'm so sorry to bring you to _ human gmos walking around... i'm so sorry to bring you to an _ human gmos walking around... i'm so sorry to bring you to an end, - human gmos walking around... i'm so sorry to bring you to an end, we - sorry to bring you to an end, we run out of time. thank you so much for joining us. that's it for me. hello. i think we've all got differing personal views on how we're viewing the heat at the moment. for some of you, if you're enjoying it, well, it's going to continue for a few more days yet. if it's starting to have an impact on you, you're not enjoying it at all, wait for this weekend. things will turn fresher, breezier, and for some of you there'll be the return of some rain. that said, there's some thunderstorms around. that's been set off by the extreme heat, and the met office amber warnings for extreme heat continue into wednesday and thursday across parts of the south—west of the uk, and come into force in northern ireland, which will last through until friday. and it's notjust the heat by day. it's because we're seeing these pretty warm temperatures by night as well, temperatures high teens, low 20s as we start wednesday morning. a little bit cooler, though, into parts of north—east england, eastern scotland, with more in the way of misty low cloud to begin with.
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less so, though, across some other parts of western scotland. a few isolated showers and thunderstorms mainly across western areas into wednesday afternoon but temperatures once again will soar. maybe 30—31 towards the south—east of wales, potentially 30 for fermanagh in northern ireland. so temperatures here continuing to rise once again. but those isolated thunderstorms we do see brew, and some will continue into the night in northern ireland, but many will fade away. most will stay dry through the day, through the night and into thursday, and it will be another fairly sultry one as well with temperatures for some not dropping below the high teens. so into thursday we go. this is the chart. high pressure is still firmly with us, starting to move a little bit further eastwards, so we should pick up a little bit more breeze, but that's just shifting the emphasis of the hot air out towards the west and cooling things down a little bit in the east. there will still be some low cloud around the coasts in the north, but parts of eastern england will probably see sunshine return more widely. highest of the temperatures parts of north—western england, north wales and into the west of northern ireland — 31—32 celsius not out of the question.
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so provisionally we could see again one of the warmest days on record in northern ireland. that high pressure continues to move away a little bit further, more in the way of breeze developing into friday. that will limit the temperatures a little bit across the southern half of the country, bringing a bit more cloud to east anglia and the south—east. end the day with some storms close to the channel islands and south—west england, but further north and west, still temperatures into the upper 20s, with that heat continuing. that should, though, be the last day of it for the most of you, because as we go into the weekend, this area of low pressure starts to spin up, bringing weather fronts. now, the rain i think is going to be a fairly showery nature, but it could be heavy and thundery, torrential for one or two. spreading mainly northwards across england and wales, bit of sunshine in between. low cloud to eastern scotland. western scotland, northern ireland, though, staying dry here. i know there's a lot of pressure on water resources in northern ireland, but no significant rain yet, and in the west we can still see temperatures into the mid 20s. then as we go through saturday night into sunday, that area of low pressure becomes fairly slow—moving and it's going to be the focus for maybe some longer spells of rain
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across some northern and eastern parts of england, with showers breaking out elsewhere. few showers, though, for scotland and northern ireland at this stage, but even here it will feel cooler. temperatures 18—23 celsius, around where we should be for this time of year. 1—2 probably a little bit cooler. then as we go through into next week, that area of low pressure clears through, brief ridge of high pressure, and then another one moves in, a sign that the jet stream is wakening into life to give us a bit more of a changeable theme to next week compared with the week gone. after this week's heat, temperatures will be much closer to where we should be for this stage. greater chance of some rain at times, including in scotland and northern ireland, but it won't rain all the time. if you're on holiday, there'll still be some warm sunshine, too. bye for now.
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