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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  July 20, 2021 6:00pm-6:29pm BST

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today at six: downing street tries to clear up the confusion about the use of the nhs covid app in england. one minister says it's up to people to make an �*informed decision�* if they're pinged, but downing street says people need to isolate. business owners are complaining that the app is affecting far too many of their staff, and it's making life very difficult. trepidation and panicking each week that those people who you've rota—ed on are actually going to be able to come. we'll be talking to business owners and workers in greater manchester about the effects of the nhs covid app. also on the programme: one of several small vessels carrying migrants across the english channel today — a record number of people crossed to the uk. dominic cummings tells the bbc there was talk of replacing
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borisjohnson as prime minister, days after his election victory. the met office issues an extreme heat weather warning for the coming days, covering large areas of england and wales. two, one... and a day trip to space for the world's richest man in the first crewed flight of his own rocket ship. and coming up in sport on the bbc news channel: despite all the difficulties, athletes prepare for the first day of action at the tokyo olympics, with just hours to go until some events get under way.
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good evening. downing street has been trying to clear up the confusion about the use of the nhs covid app in england. one minister suggested earlier today that individuals and employers could choose to ignore the instructions to self—isolate by making an �*informed decision�*. but downing street stepped in with a different message, urging people to isolate if they were pinged. the app�*s guidance is not legally enforceable, unlike instructions from the nhs test and trace service, which are a legal requirement. pub chains, supermarkets, transport networks and other businesses have warned of the damage being done by the effects of the app, as our business correspondent colletta smith reports. that will turn red and it will give you the number of days you have to isolate. at the moment, every company is living in fear of the ping. jess runs a catering business across a handful of golf clubs. with m full—time staff serving snacks and lunches, and another 1a or so casual staff to work at functions.
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our biggest risk at the moment is, we won�*t have any staff to open at all. yesterday, it was an exciting time for everyone to be able to have those big parties and things, and for us, it�*s kind of a moment of trepidation and panicking each week that those people who you have rota—ed on are going to be able to come in to work. she needs her staff to stay safe but says if they could get some exemptions, it would make a huge difference. having those kind of back—up procedures in place that mean you�*re not automatically saying that�*s it for seven to ten days would be life—saving for us. a number of conservative ministers and a government minister said if you get pinged by the nhs coded up, it isjust advisory. it�*s only if you are contacted by nhs test and trace that you are legally obliged to self—isolate. you have to isolate if you are contacted by the nhs test and trace, or if you are collecting isolation payments, but not everyone has the app, for example, so it is not mandated. that�*s technically correct,
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but downing street are giving a different message, saying the public should still isolate when contacted. we were getting into the realms of farce, dangerous farce, where we had a clear and consistent messaging about the need to self—isolate which has suddenly been completely undermined by the minister this morning. rather than publishing a list of companies or sectors that could qualify for an exemption from the pinging system, the government now say each individual business will have to apply themselves, and for lots of companies, right now, that�*s simply one thing too many. we are part of that supply chain that feeds the nation every day, and the lifeblood to doing that is our drivers out there in the fleet and our workers within the cold store. tim employs 1500 staff across the uk, and a quarter of front line workers at this main site near rochdale are off because they�*ve been pinged. everybody who is off takes a little bit of capability away from what we can deliver on a daily basis, but the challenges that we face make
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it ever more difficult for us just to keep that supply. some exemptions have been granted today, but with very little clarity about the criteria for applications, most companies will have to work out how to keep the show on the road themselves. colletta smith, bbc news. our health editor, hugh pym, is here. as we know, different rules apply across the uk. if people are pinged, they have to obey different sets of rules, and today the government in london trying to sort out confusion over the systems, so what can we say? over the systems, so what can we sa ? ,., ,. , , over the systems, so what can we sa ? ,. , , ., say? government scientists and advisers say _ say? government scientists and advisers say it _ say? government scientists and advisers say it is _ say? government scientists and advisers say it is absolutely - advisers say it is absolutely crucial to try to keep this virus in check. cases are going up 40% week on week, so people need to self—isolate if they have been in contact with someone who has tested positive. as important as those not vaccinated to go and get the jabs. any confusion over that message is
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extremely difficult, and that is why downing street had to moved quickly to say it may not be a legal requirement if you are pinged, but you do need to self—isolate. incidentally, the rules in england, wales and scotland are the same, it is not a legal requirement if you are pinged by the app, but it is in northern ireland. the messaging has been made rather more confusing today. there was also a bit of confusion over employers looking for exemptions for their staff. the government line is that it has to be really critical public sector or key worker positions which are affected here, and employers should wait for a letter if they are not clear as to whether they can apply for exemptions, but that has led many businesses and employers still a little bit confused about what the situation is at the moment. hugh, thanks. the latest government figures show 46,558 new infections in the latest 24—hour period, which means an average of 47,438
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new cases per day in the last week. there are more than 4500 people in hospital with coronavirus. and 96 deaths were recorded in the last 24 hours. 35,670 people have received a first dose of a vaccine in the latest 24—hour period. over 46 million people have now had theirfirstjab — that�*s 88% of the adult population. and over 36 million people are now fully vaccinated — 68.8% of all uk adults. more than a million children in england did not attend classes in school last week because of reasons to do with coronavirus. official figures show around one in seven state school pupils were absent. that�*s the highest number since children returned to classrooms in march this year. plans to introduce vaccine passports as a legal requirement to enter nightclubs in england have been
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described as �*deeply concerning�* by leading figures in the hospitality industry. full vaccination will be a condition of entry to clubs and other venues with large crowds from september. and the government is not ruling out introducing vaccine passports in pubs and restaurants, as our correspondent danny savage reports. it has been a roller coaster year for staff at this club in manchester bar this is when they close down. this week, they fully reopened. but to then be told that from september, customers will need a covid—i9 passport has stopped them in their tracks. how are we going to collect the information, how do we keep the information? we have got to employ somebody extra monitoring the door and monitor
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the people coming in. there are costs coming that he has not thought about for us. in the early hours of monday clubbers celebrated the end of social distancing. the nighttime economy woke up again but what will this new restriction mean? it never was freedom day, was it? we had 17 hours of freedom. i cannot understand why the government did such a drastic u—turn. now, again there is anxiety, there is nervousness, people are just at their wits' end. this policy was floated just over 24 hours ago. the big question is, how is it going to work on the door? will you just have to show your card to say you have been double vaccinated or will you have to show a qr code from the nhs app which is linked to your medical records? it has left venues reading. ——it has left venues reeling. this is what their target audience thinks. initially, that�*s how it was told to us. you can be vaccinated, it was fine.
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and quite frankly we have seen people be double vaccinated and still get covid—i9. i would feel more secure going to places if i knew everyone was double vaccinated. with the cards i think it would be easy - for people to make paper cards so it needs to be something _ electronic or some other way stop places everywhere are going up. i doctors say there is some logic to this. if this is one of the ways to encourage people to get protected so they can go on and do all the risky things that they were doing, yes. it is going to be weeks before covid—i9
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no motor, just waves, a tiny dinghy. no motor, just paddles. where are you from, guys? sudan. ., ,, ., ~ paddles. where are you from, guys? sudan. ., ,, ., �* , sudan. from sudan? are you 0k? help will be coming — sudan. from sudan? are you 0k? help will be coming soon. _ sudan. from sudan? are you 0k? help will be coming soon. they _ sudan. from sudan? are you 0k? help will be coming soon. they will - sudan. from sudan? are you 0k? help will be coming soon. they will come . will be coming soon. they will come and pick you up. here are some fruit
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and pick you up. here are some fruit and biscuits, somejuice. having given them some food, we shadowed them and cold the coastguard, who organised their rescue. and not far away, we find another migrant boat. we are about eight miles off the coast of dover now, and we have come across this small dinghy, probably three orfour across this small dinghy, probably three or four metres long. we think there are 12 or 13 on board, a couple of small children at the front, and a couple of women, and we have no cold in the uk border force, the uk coastguard, who are going to pick them up. for some, these are desperate people fleeing some of the world�*s most desperate countries. for others, they are simply economic migrants. overthe for others, they are simply economic migrants. over the last few days, the border force has brought hundreds of migrants are sure. the government says people smugglers are its target, but it is also proposing that unauthorised migrants themselves could be jailed for up to
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four years. themselves could be 'ailed for up to four ears. , ., , ., four years. putting people in 'ail who have come d four years. putting people in 'ail who have come here i four years. putting people injail who have come here because i four years. putting people injail who have come here because of| four years. putting people injail- who have come here because of the terrible things that have happened to them in their lives is really draconian and punitive, and all it will do is fill up ourjails without resolving the issue. find will do is fill up our “ails without resolving the issue.- will do is fill up our “ails without resolving the issue. and though the number of people _ resolving the issue. and though the number of people crossing - resolving the issue. and though the number of people crossing the - number of people crossing the channel in boats has increased significantly, hitting a record of 2000 last month, overall, the number of people claiming asylum in the uk actually fell last year. behind the figures, though, there are human stories. the government is pushing back, but for those making these dangerous journeys, back, but for those making these dangerousjourneys, the pull of a better future is strong. john dangerousjourneys, the pull of a betterfuture is strong. john donna summer, bbc news, in the english channel. dominic cummings, the prime minister�*s ——jon —— jon donnison. dominic cummings, the prime minister�*s former chief adviser,
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has told the bbc there was talk of trying to replace borisjohnson as prime minister within days of the conservative election victory in december 2019. mr cummings, who had been director of the vote leave campaign in 2016, also suggested that people who were completely sure that brexit was a good idea had �*got a screw loose�*. he spoke to our political editor laura kuenssberg. what really happened? this man used to be one of the most powerful figures in the government, but his friendship of political convenience with the prime minister fell to bits. borisjohnson and dominic cummings became foes. their strategy had produced a massive win at the election. ~ election. well, we did it, we did it. once election. well, we did it, we did it- once they — election. well, we did it, we did it. once they were _ election. well, we did it, we did it. once they were all— election. well, we did it, we did it. once they were all safely - it. once they were all safely installed in _ it. once they were all safely installed in number- it. once they were all safely installed in number ten, - it. once they were all safely installed in number ten, he| it. once they were all safely - installed in number ten, he ended up on the outside. he installed in number ten, he ended up on the outside.— on the outside. he was fed up with the media portrayal _ on the outside. he was fed up with the media portrayal of _ on the outside. he was fed up with the media portrayal of him - on the outside. he was fed up with the media portrayal of him being i on the outside. he was fed up with the media portrayal of him being a| the media portrayal of him being a kind of— the media portrayal of him being a kind of puppet for the vote leave team _ kind of puppet for the vote leave team it — kind of puppet for the vote leave team. it was driving him round the bend _ team. it was driving him round the bend he _ team. it was driving him round the bend. he was upset about the fact, connected — bend. he was upset about the fact, connected to that, that essentially i connected to that, that essentially iwas _ connected to that, that essentially i was spending my time on what i thought— i was spending my time on what i thought was important, not on politics. — thought was important, not on politics, not on media and
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communication and campaigning stuff. he was_ communication and campaigning stuff. he was the _ communication and campaigning stuff. he was the elected prime minister. you were an unelected adviser. yeah, we basically — you were an unelected adviser. yeah, we basically disagreed _ you were an unelected adviser. yeah, we basically disagreed on _ you were an unelected adviser. yeah, we basically disagreed on what - you were an unelected adviser. yeah, we basically disagreed on what was happening on covid. i thought his girlfriend — happening on covid. i thought his girlfriend was interfering with appointments, people who were beingm — appointments, people who were being... she wanted to have people fired and _ being... she wanted to have people fired and have people promoted in ways that — fired and have people promoted in ways that i thought were unethical and unprofessional. and that also led to— and unprofessional. and that also led to a _ and unprofessional. and that also led to a big argument between us. accusing _ led to a big argument between us. accusing somebody of having undue influence, which is what you are doing, is a big claim. the influence, which is what you are doing, is a big claim.— doing, is a big claim. the prime minister doesn't _ doing, is a big claim. the prime minister doesn't have _ doing, is a big claim. the prime minister doesn't have a - doing, is a big claim. the prime minister doesn't have a plan - doing, is a big claim. the prime| minister doesn't have a plan and doing, is a big claim. the prime - minister doesn't have a plan and he doesn't _ minister doesn't have a plan and he doesn't know how whitehall works. someone _ doesn't know how whitehall works. someone is going to set the agenda. it is someone is going to set the agenda. it is going _ someone is going to set the agenda. it is going to be the civil service, or the _ it is going to be the civil service, or the vote — it is going to be the civil service, or the vote leave team, or me. as soon _ or the vote leave team, or me. as soon as— or the vote leave team, or me. as soon as the _ or the vote leave team, or me. as soon as the election was one night, her view_ soon as the election was one night, her view was, why should it be dominic— her view was, why should it be dominic and the leave team, why
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shouldn't— dominic and the leave team, why shouldn't it be me that is pulling the strings? in shouldn't it be me that is pulling the strings?— the strings? in response to mr cummings" — the strings? in response to mr cummings' claims, _ the strings? in response to mr cummings' claims, downing i the strings? in response to mr- cummings' claims, downing street cummings�* claims, downing street told us political appointments are entirely made by the prime minister. in the end, you lose the argument, you lose that influence.— in the end, you lose the argument, you lose that influence. that's what ha - ened, you lose that influence. that's what happened. isn't _ you lose that influence. that's what happened, isn't it? _ you lose that influence. that's what happened, isn't it? yeah, _ you lose that influence. that's what happened, isn't it? yeah, in - you lose that influence. that's what happened, isn't it? yeah, in fact, . happened, isn't it? yeah, in fact, literally— happened, isn't it? yeah, in fact, literally immediately after the election, there was already —— it was _ election, there was already —— it was already— election, there was already —— it was already clear that this was a problem — was already clear that this was a problem. before midjanuary, was already clear that this was a problem. before mid january, we were having _ problem. before mid january, we were having meetings in number ten, saving _ having meetings in number ten, saving it — having meetings in number ten, saving it is — having meetings in number ten, saying it is clear that carrie wants rid of _ saying it is clear that carrie wants rid of all — saying it is clear that carrie wants rid of all of — saying it is clear that carrie wants rid of all of us. at that point, we were _ rid of all of us. at that point, we were all— rid of all of us. at that point, we were all ready saying by the summer he would _ were all ready saying by the summer he would be gone from hero we would be in he would be gone from hero we would he in the _ he would be gone from hero we would be in the process of trying to get rid of— be in the process of trying to get rid of him — be in the process of trying to get rid of him and get someone else in as prime _ rid of him and get someone else in as prime minister.— rid of him and get someone else in as prime minister. within months of the prime minister _ as prime minister. within months of the prime minister winning - as prime minister. within months of the prime minister winning the - the prime minister winning the biggest conservative majority in decades, you and a few others from the vote leave campaign were discussing the possibility of getting rid of him.- discussing the possibility of getting rid of him. days, not
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months- _ getting rid of him. days, not months. within _ getting rid of him. days, not months. within days - getting rid of him. days, not months. within days of- getting rid of him. days, not months. within days of the i getting rid of him. days, not - months. within days of the election ou were months. within days of the election you were discussing _ months. within days of the election you were discussing getting - months. within days of the election you were discussing getting rid - months. within days of the election you were discussing getting rid of i you were discussing getting rid of him? , �* . ., , you were discussing getting rid of him? , �*, ., ., you were discussing getting rid of him? , �* , ., ., ., him? yes. because of all we have been discussing. _ him? yes. because of all we have been discussing. he _ him? yes. because of all we have been discussing. he doesn't - him? yes. because of all we have been discussing. he doesn't have | him? yes. because of all we have. been discussing. he doesn't have a plan, _ been discussing. he doesn't have a plan, doesn't know how to be prime minister. _ plan, doesn't know how to be prime minister, and we only have got him in there _ minister, and we only have got him in there to — minister, and we only have got him in there to solve a certain problem, not because — in there to solve a certain problem, not because we thought it was right to run— not because we thought it was right to run the _ not because we thought it was right to run the country.— not because we thought it was right to run the country. what kind of con did ou to run the country. what kind of con did you pull — to run the country. what kind of con did you pull off— to run the country. what kind of con did you pull off on _ to run the country. what kind of con did you pull off on the _ to run the country. what kind of con did you pull off on the british - did you pull off on the british public if that is what you think was mike we don�*t think it is a con. haste mike we don't think it is a con. we were trying to solve very hot problems in the order we can solve them _ problems in the order we can solve them in _ problems in the order we can solve them in. �* ., ., ., , , ., them in. before the relationship at them in. before the relationship at the heart of _ them in. before the relationship at the heart of government _ them in. before the relationship at the heart of government broke, i them in. before the relationship at i the heart of government broke, boris johnson and dominic cummings did achieve their top priority — brexit. so how does the architect of the vote leave campaign look—back? questions like, is brexit a good idea? _ questions like, is brexit a good idea? no— questions like, is brexit a good idea? no one on earth knows what the answer— idea? no one on earth knows what the answer to— idea? no one on earth knows what the answer to that is.— answer to that is. even you are still not sure _ answer to that is. even you are still not sure if _ answer to that is. even you are still not sure if brexit - answer to that is. even you are still not sure if brexit was - answer to that is. even you are still not sure if brexit was a - answer to that is. even you are l still not sure if brexit was a good idea? i still not sure if brexit was a good idea? ~ ., , ., ., still not sure if brexit was a good idea? ~ ., ., , still not sure if brexit was a good idea? ~ ., y., ., , , idea? i think anyone who says they are sure about _ idea? i think anyone who says they are sure about questions _ idea? i think anyone who says they are sure about questions like - idea? i think anyone who says they are sure about questions like that. are sure about questions like that has got _ are sure about questions like that has got a — are sure about questions like that has got a screw loose, whether you are on _ has got a screw loose, whether you are on the — has got a screw loose, whether you are on the remain side or our site. one of— are on the remain side or our site. one of the — are on the remain side or our site. one of the reasons we won was
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precisely— one of the reasons we won was precisely because we didn't think we were definitely right and remainser —— remainers... do were definitely right and remainser -- remainers..._ -- remainers. .. do you think you have done _ -- remainers. .. do you think you have done more _ -- remainers. .. do you think you have done more good _ -- remainers. .. do you think you have done more good than - -- remainers. .. do you think you - have done more good than damage? i think brexit was a good thing. i think— think brexit was a good thing. i think that — think brexit was a good thing. i think that the way in which the world — think that the way in which the world has— think that the way in which the world has worked out since 2016 vindicates — world has worked out since 2016 vindicates the arguments that vote leave _ vindicates the arguments that vote leave made in all sorts of ways. i think— leave made in all sorts of ways. i think it's — leave made in all sorts of ways. i think it's good that brexit happened. he think it's good that brexit happened-— think it's good that brexit hauened. ., �* , think it's good that brexit ha ened. ., �* , ., ., happened. he won't be the one to settle that — happened. he won't be the one to settle that question. _ happened. he won't be the one to settle that question. nor - happened. he won't be the one to settle that question. nor will - happened. he won't be the one to settle that question. nor will he l settle that question. nor will he write his entry in the books of our recent history, but there will be a page, for sure. recent history, but there will be a page, forsure. laura recent history, but there will be a page, for sure. laura kuenssberg, bbc news. you can see dominic cummings: the interview�* tonight on bbc two at 7pm. it�*ll also be on the iplayer, and as a podcast on bbc sounds. the time is 6:18pm. our top story this evening: downing street tries to clear up the confusion about the use of the nhs covid app in england, insisting people do need to isolate if they are pinged.
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and we speak to lauren price, the first female boxer from wales coming up on sportsday on the bbc news channel. south africa rugby confirms all three tests against the british and irish lions will now be staged in cape town because of the pandemic, with no tests injohannesberg. the met office has issued a new—style extreme heat weather warning and told people to watch out for sunburn and heat exhaustion. the amber warning, in place until thursday, covers large parts of wales, all of south—west england and parts of southern and central england. live to southsea in hampshire, and our correspondent duncan kennedy. it's it�*s been extremely hot down here on the south coast and thousands of
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people have been enjoying the sunshine, but as you say, there is another side to the story. we have had of these new, extreme heat weather warnings from the met office which means it�*s going to be very uncomfortable, and potentially very dangerous for many people. the heat warnings are in place across huge areas of the country, including here in southsea. but not everyone can get to the cooling air of a coastline. what if you live on the tenth floor of a block of flats? that is what kelvin turner does. by mid afternoon, his lounge is at 30 celsius. kelvin, who is 57, struggles to keep the heat down. it's struggles to keep the heat down. it�*s already at 30 here and pretty sticky. it's already at 30 here and pretty stic . ~ , ,., , it's already at 30 here and pretty stic , �* sticky. absolutely. if you weren't here, the sticky. absolutely. if you weren't here. the too _ sticky. absolutely. if you weren't here, the top would _ sticky. absolutely. if you weren't here, the top would be _ sticky. absolutely. if you weren't here, the top would be off. - sticky. absolutely. if you weren't here, the top would be off. it's l sticky. absolutely. if you weren't| here, the top would be off. it's as you feel— here, the top would be off. it's as you feel it— here, the top would be off. it's as you feel it now, very still, very warm — you feel it now, very still, very warm and _ you feel it now, very still, very warm and you can feel it on your skin, _ warm and you can feel it on your skin. the — warm and you can feel it on your skin, the warmth, so you grin and bear— skin, the warmth, so you grin and
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hear it _ skin, the warmth, so you grin and bear it. ., ., :: :: :: bear it. there were more than 2000 heat -related _ bear it. there were more than 2000 heat -related deaths _ bear it. there were more than 2000 heat -related deaths in _ bear it. there were more than 2000 heat -related deaths in britain - heat —related deaths in britain last year, which is why doctors are now warning people of the dangers of this oppressive weather. h0 warning people of the dangers of this oppressive weather.- this oppressive weather. no one is able to keep _ this oppressive weather. no one is able to keep an — this oppressive weather. no one is able to keep an eye _ this oppressive weather. no one is able to keep an eye on _ this oppressive weather. no one is able to keep an eye on you - this oppressive weather. no one is able to keep an eye on you and - able to keep an eye on you and get help when— able to keep an eye on you and get help when you _ able to keep an eye on you and get help when you are _ able to keep an eye on you and get help when you are having - able to keep an eye on you and get help when you are having heat - help when you are having heat exhaustion _ help when you are having heat exhaustion within _ help when you are having heat exhaustion within 30 - help when you are having heat exhaustion within 30 minutesl help when you are having heat. exhaustion within 30 minutes you can have heatstroke, _ exhaustion within 30 minutes you can have heatstroke, which _ exhaustion within 30 minutes you can have heatstroke, which is _ exhaustion within 30 minutes you can have heatstroke, which is a _ have heatstroke, which is a medical emergency— have heatstroke, which is a medical emergencyand _ have heatstroke, which is a medical emergency and that _ have heatstroke, which is a medical emergency and that is _ have heatstroke, which is a medical emergency and that is when - have heatstroke, which is a medical emergency and that is when you - have heatstroke, which is a medical. emergency and that is when you have to call— emergency and that is when you have to call an _ emergency and that is when you have to call an ambulance _ emergency and that is when you have to call an ambulance and _ emergency and that is when you have to call an ambulance and get - emergency and that is when you have to call an ambulance and get aid - to call an ambulance and get aid straightaway _ to call an ambulance and get aid straightaway. for— to call an ambulance and get aid straightaway-— straightaway. for the first time this week. _ straightaway. for the first time this week, the _ straightaway. for the first time this week, the met _ straightaway. for the first time this week, the met office - straightaway. for the first time this week, the met office has l straightaway. for the first time - this week, the met office has issued new style extreme heat weather warnings, aimed at are learning all sectors of our lives. it�*s warnings, aimed at are learning all sectors of our lives.— sectors of our lives. it's all about im acts, sectors of our lives. it's all about impacts. impacts _ sectors of our lives. it's all about impacts, impacts on _ sectors of our lives. it's all about impacts, impacts on the - sectors of our lives. it's all about impacts, impacts on the health l sectors of our lives. it's all about | impacts, impacts on the health of vulnerable — impacts, impacts on the health of vulnerable people but also impacts on infrastructure such as transport as well— on infrastructure such as transport as well as — on infrastructure such as transport as well as energy and impacts on the wider— as well as energy and impacts on the wider business community. and as well as energy and impacts on the wider business community.— wider business community. and it seems the — wider business community. and it seems the impact _ wider business community. and it seems the impact is _ wider business community. and it seems the impact is also - wider business community. and it seems the impact is also long - wider business community. and it i seems the impact is also long term. this doctor has studied climate change for 26 years and says weather patterns are now very distinct. brute patterns are now very distinct. we had always expected unusual heat waves _ had always expected unusual heat waves and cold spells but the point here is— waves and cold spells but the point here is the — waves and cold spells but the point here is the frequency of the warming
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events— here is the frequency of the warming events is— here is the frequency of the warming events is definitely increasing, and the frequency of the cold events appears — the frequency of the cold events appears to be decreasing. today is officially the _ appears to be decreasing. today is officially the hottest _ appears to be decreasing. today is officially the hottest day _ appears to be decreasing. today is officially the hottest day of - officially the hottest day of the year so far. 32 degrees at heathrow. part of a summer be carefree, but also cautious. duncan kennedy, bbc news. last week... last week, the prime minister boris johnson announced plans to tackle inequality and, in his words, to �*level up�* the united kingdom. today the government�*s independent advisors have published a report looking at how that could be done. the social mobility commission argues that one of the challenges is enabling people to move up the career ladder , without having to move to new areas , as our correspondent katie wray reports. for the last ten years i feel like i have gone backwards. the pandemic happened. my dreams, my career was alljust put on hold. the experiences of two young people from different parts of the uk. one of them is from here, grimsby.
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once the world�*s largest sea fishing port, it still has a fish processing industry and is also a hub for car imports. yet some in the town feel forgotten and see their futures elsewhere. this was actually a working men�*s club. yet some in the town feel forgotten and see their futures elsewhere. here, they are known as grimberians. he has a passion for acting. his passions were discovered in his local youth theatre but he had to move to london to develop them. i had threejobs before moving , saved as much money as i could, found my feet, worked with the national youth theatre, got my agent and then the pandemic happened and things got put on hold. how do you feel about the fact that you have had to leave grimsby in order to pursue a career in acting? i�*m a bit devastated, to be honest. why can�*t there be creative outlets and big productions in grimsby? spreading opportunity is something that has been called for by the government�*s own advisory watchdog, the social mobility commission. the pandemic has ravaged
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all corners of the uk. social mobility is in a decline and we really need to get a grip with how we improve it. for people who lead those areas, they need to have greater powers and greater cash to actually get things done that the local people want and need. so it seems that where you grow it really matters and it can have a huge affect on people�*s future prospects. grimsby is a proud town with a rich history, but how evenly but how evenly spread are opportunities across the uk? in a yougov poll commissioned by the charity turn to us, 63% of people think the gap between the social classes is now wider because the pandemic. 31—year—old kayleigh lives in bournemouth and graduated from university ten years ago and hoped to work in the public sector in her local area but doesn�*t feel she fulfilled her potential. the jobsjust weren't there in my area. i've had to kind of accept other things. i got it instilled into me that you should really cut a career for yourself, look afteryourself, don't really rely on anyone else because you will be this highly career
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driven career woman and then that will be that, but over time, as things have turned out in the last ten years or so, i feel like i've gone backwards. the government does acknowledge that while talent is evenly distributed across the uk, opportunity isn�*t and has committed to make levelling up one of its top priorities. yes, that�*s right, thank you. but in the meantime, adam has left his home town to realise his acting dreams. katie wray, bbc news. jeff bezos, the billionaire founder of amazon, has been to space and back in the first crewed flight of his rocket ship, new shepard. on the flight were the oldest person who has been to space — 82—year—old wally funk, and the youngest, 18—year—old oliver daemen. our correspondent sophie long reports from texas. boarding his 60 foot suborbital rocket. he was not nervous, he said, just excited. this was notjust about realising a lifelong dream,
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but expanding his ever growing empire beyond the grip of gravity. with him on this first fully autonomous flight, three other civilians. his brother, mark, 18—year—old dutch student oliver daemen, and 82—year—old trailblazing aviator wally funk. one of mercury 13, a group of women who went through astral testing and training before jeff bezos was through astral testing and training beforejeff bezos was born but never made it to space until now. piste. made it to space until now. five, four, made it to space until now. five, four. three. _ made it to space until now. five, four, three, two, _ made it to space until now. five, four, three, two, one...... - made it to space until now. five, four, three, two, one...... as. made it to space until now. five, l four, three, two, one...... as you can hear, the reusable rocket carrying its first passengers and paying customer is on its way to space. paying customer is on its way to sace. �* . , paying customer is on its way to sace. �* .,, .,' paying customer is on its way to sace. �* ., ,, space. blast off for the new shepard and lift off for— space. blast off for the new shepard and lift off for space _ space. blast off for the new shepard and lift off for space tourism. - space. blast off for the new shepard and lift off for space tourism. look i and lift off for space tourism. look out the window. _ and lift off for space tourism. look out the window. holy, _ and lift off for space tourism. look out the window. holy, good - and lift off for space tourism. look out the window. holy, good god. | and lift off for space tourism. look i out the window. holy, good god. the ca sule out the window. holy, good god. the capsule separated _ out the window. holy, good god. the capsule separated from _ out the window. holy, good god. the capsule separated from the _ capsule separated from the booster at 250,000 feet and continued to the
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edge of space. look at 250,000 feet and continued to the edge of space-— at 250,000 feet and continued to the edge of space._ where i edge of space. look at this. where the four people — edge of space. look at this. where the four people were _ edge of space. look at this. where the four people were floating - edge of space. look at this. where the four people were floating and i the four people were floating and weightless but critics say this is the wrong time for the uber rich to be blasting off in rockets while the planet faces climate disasters. the blue origin capsule floated back to the desert carrying the richest, oldest, and youngest people to have ever travelled to space. filth. oldest, and youngest people to have ever travelled to space._ oldest, and youngest people to have ever travelled to space. oh, my god. my expectations _ ever travelled to space. oh, my god. my expectations were _ ever travelled to space. oh, my god. my expectations were high, - ever travelled to space. oh, my god. my expectations were high, and - my expectations were high, and they were dramatically exceeded. everybody who has been up into space, they say this, that it changes them, and a look at it and they are kind of amazed and awestruck. i they are kind of amazed and awestruck.— awestruck. i want to thank you, sweetheart. — awestruck. i want to thank you, sweetheart, because _ awestruck. i want to thank you, sweetheart, because you - awestruck. i want to thank you, sweetheart, because you made| sweetheart, because you made it possible — sweetheart, because you made it possible for me. i have been waiting a long _ possible for me. i have been waiting a longtime — possible for me. i have been waiting a long time. a possible for me. i have been waiting a long time-— a long time. a historic step for the worlds richest _ a long time. a historic step for the worlds richest man _ a long time. a historic step for the worlds richest man to _ a long time. a historic step for the worlds richest man to move - a long time. a historic step for the i worlds richest man to move industry into orbit. sophie long, bbc news, into orbit. sophie long, bbc news, in the west texas desert. lauren price is set to realise her childhood dream as she becomes wales�* first female
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boxer to compete at the olympics this summer. she is currently ranked world number one , and is the reigning european and commonwealth games champion. she�*s been talking to our sports correspondent nesta macgregor about her olympic challenge. there is just a 1% chance of somebody becoming a professional athlete. by that logic, the chances of someone making it to the top of four different sports — well, that�*s just ridiculous. from the minute i started kickboxing and playing football, i was sport mad. on lauren price�*s cv, a job history including international footballer, 52 caps for wales, kickboxer, a four—time world champion, tae kwon do, british silver medallist and the 27—year—old�*s current role is boxer. her responsibilities include being the european, commonwealth and world middleweight champion. but lauren is seeking a promotion to be olympic gold medallist when she goes to work
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from the tokyo office. in previous years, team gb, when it comes to boxers, there�*s been some great stories like audley harrison, anthonyjoshua, nicola adams, you said was a big inspiration. have you allowed yourself to dream? oh, yes, definitely. it�*s been a dream of mine to go to the olympics from the age of eight. hopefully i will be on the wall in the english institute of sport in gb boxing like anthony joshua and nicola adams. the boxing ring can be a lonely place but the team gb fighter says she can always feel the spirit of her grandad. abandoned as a baby atjust three days old, she was raised in south wales by her grandparents. when we went up for parents evening and the teacher showed us that lauren said she wanted to be a world championship kickboxer, play football for wales and she wants to go to the olympics. i've always told all of my children, reach for the moon and if you fall short, you land on the stars. sadly my grandpa passed away in november, but i know when i go into that ring he is always looking
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down on me. i want to go and win gold and it would be nice to bring that medal back to say thank you, and win it for them. her birthday was injune, and she spent the day as a guest of the duke of cambridge at kensington palace. hopefully we chose the right sport. we could have gone for kickboxing or football, but we thought that was the better one? and did the duke and duchess make that, or was it shop bought? oh, i don�*t know. lauren price proving you can have your cake and eat it. nestor mcgregor, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here�*s matt taylor. thank you. a different side to the hot weatherfor some with thank you. a different side to the hot weather for some with big billowing clouds, and as we could see in essex, some sizeable hailstones. severe storms pushing across parts of the east midlands, east anglia and the kent and london area, pushing south and east and these are in the last hour and will continue in the evening, gradually
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fading away but what is not going to

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