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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 20, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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hi, good morning, it's tuesday. welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire and here are your headlines: the prime minister's former chief adviser, dominic cummings, tells the bbc borisjohnson put politics ahead of people's lives during the pandemic. the attitude at that point was a weird mix of... um...partly, "it's all nonsense and lockdowns don't work anyway" and partly, "well, this is terrible, but the people who are dying are, "essentially, all over 80." what do you make of dominic cummings�* claims? message me on instagram or twitter @vcderbyshire or email victoria@bbc.co.uk. we'll ask the business minister about them in half an hour. no jab, no entry. the pm says that from september only
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the fully—vaccinated can go to nightclubs and mass events. a report by mps says former pm david cameron lacked judgement in the way he lobbied the government over the now—collapsed firm greensill capital. more than 400 migrants crossed the english channel to the uk yesterday, a record number. the home office says it's acting to tackle the issue. and the world's richest man, amazon bossjeff bezos, prepares to blast off to the edge of space. good morning. the prime minister's former chief adviser dominic cummings has launched a fresh attack on borisjohnson over his handling of the pandemic. speaking to the bbc in his first broadcast interview since leaving number ten at the end of last year,
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he accuses mrjohnson of putting his own political interests ahead of people's lives. mr cummings has claimed that borisjohnson resisted tightening coronavirus restrictions again last autumn because the virus mainly affected the elderly. he said that the borisjohnson had messaged him to say that he no longer believed that the nhs was overwhelmed, and was against imposing a second lockdown in england. mr cummings also said that he had to talk the prime minister out of continuing to see the queen for weekly face—to—face meetings, days before the first lockdown was announced. number ten say that incident did not happen. they also said in a statement that the government has always taken the necessary action to protect lives, guided by the best scientific advice. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. a warning — her report contains flashing images. yeah, is everybody happy? no—one was closer to
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the prime minister in government. since their bitter fallout, no—one has been more vicious than him. architect of the brexit campaign, agitator in number ten, and top adviser in the pandemic. looking back to last autumn when coronavirus crept back, what does he now claim went wrong? the prime minister's attitude was that, essentially, the first lockdown was a disaster, we should never have done it. he thought we should never have done the first lockdown? we said we should never have done the first lockdown, he said that repeatedly in meetings at number ten. by the middle of october then, this debate is still going on. his attitude at that point was a weird mix of partly, "it's all nonsense and lockdowns don't work anyway" and partly, "well, this is terrible but the people "who are dying are essentially all over 80, and we can't kill "the economyjust because of people dying over 80."
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a very serious claim to make. what evidence do you have of that? lots of people heard the prime minister say that. the prime minister texted that to me and other people. in a series of whatsapp messages shared with the bbc on the 15th of october, borisjohnson appears to say... a lot of people listening to you today mightjust think, this is revenge. you lost the argument, you lost yourjob, and now you're angry and so you're attacking. it's revenge, isn't it? no, it's not about revenge. it's about... also it doesn't matter if it's personal. it doesn't matter if people are upset. a lot of people have a pop at me, you don't see me crying about it.
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the reason why i'm speaking out is i want people to be thinking about these questions. how are we governed? how is power actually exercised in number ten? what sort of things should be more transparent? at the end of october, national lockdown returned and downing street told us... yet mr cummings claims at the very start in march, borisjohnson was slow to take covid seriously. 0n the evening of wednesday the 18th, he was... the normal thing on a wednesday evening is to go and see the queen. therefore he was going to go and see the queen. but what happened then? obviously, the health advice was already, especially for the very elderly,
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people should take every precaution. he said, "that's what i do every wednesday, sod this. "i'm going to go and see her." so i said to him, "there are people in this office "who are self isolating, you might have coronavirus, "i might have coronavirus, you can't go and see the queen. "what if you see her and give the queen coronavirus. "you obviously can't go." the possibility went through your head at that moment that the prime minister might pass coronavirus to the queen? yes. how did you persuade him not to do it? ijust said, "if you go and give her coronavirus and she dies, "what are you going... "you can't do that, you can't risk that. "it's completely insane. " and he said, he obviously basically just hadn't thought it through. and he said, "yeah, holy sort i can't go." downing street says that didn't happen. what do you say to that?
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do they? they have officially said that didn't happen? i know it happened and other people who were there know it happened. but mr cummings became a national figure for all the wrong reasons. caught out by his own trip to county durham during lockdown. i had repeated security problems at my house, going back to 2019. i was in discussions with the cabinet office in march about the situation. they had suggested maybe all of us moving into government accommodation. i said maybe but maybe i will move them all off to my dad's farm in durham. we talked about the different options when i talked to the pm about that. my wife is kind of ill but not with the kind of official symptoms exactly. has she got it? has she not got it? then you had the combination of security problems, which meant anyway we were going to get out. there was enormous public rage.
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why didn't you just tell the truth at the time? well, the situation was just... it was an extremely chaotic situation. the original plan was, when i discussed it with the prime minister on the saturday, and the sunday, given he knew what had actually happened, he agreed we should just say nothing about it, almost ignore it. what happened on the monday is he suddenly changed his mind and said, "we can't stick with the original plan. "you're going to have to explain it to people." i said, "i'm not going into all of the security stuff," and the whole thing becamejust a huge mess. as an advisor, dominic cummings was meant to stay in the background. after his spectacular bust up with borisjohnson, that's not something he seems willing to do.
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let's speak now with our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. how significant are mr cummings�* claims given he has fallen out badly with the pm? jeremy farrar, the boss of the welcome trust and a member of sage has a book out and he said he considered resigning from the scientific advisory group at around about the same time over these issues about the leadership of the country being too slow to grasp what was happening with covid and new restrictions were required. you could say mr cummings is a rogue former advisor but not necessarily rogue opinions he has got. he has a track record as a very effective campaigner and track record as a very effective campaignerand he track record as a very effective campaigner and he is running a campaigner and he is running a campaign at the moment to try and paint the prime minister as a bad leader and a person who has got bad judgment. look, yet again, he's got us all talking about decisions that were made on october 2020 and we are
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still talking about them injuly 2021. and we will talk about them in 2022 because this will be subject to a public enquiry back. 2022 because this will be sub'ect to a public enquiry backfi a public enquiry back. downing street have — a public enquiry back. downing street have denied _ a public enquiry back. downing street have denied some - a public enquiry back. downing street have denied some very| street have denied some very specific claims and then given a broad statement about all the others. , ,, , others. yes, downing street this mornin: others. yes, downing street this morning are _ others. yes, downing street this morning are saying _ others. yes, downing street this morning are saying that - others. yes, downing street this morning are saying that the - others. yes, downing street this - morning are saying that the anecdote about dominic cummings stopping the prime minister going to see the queen at buckingham palace in march last year because of covid is not true. but the bbc has spoken to several sources who say that it is true. the kind of generic denial from downing street says the prime minister followed the best scientific advice that was available. and you talk to officials in the government and they say ok you can speculate about what they thought personally about lockdowns but at the end of the day, he introduced three national lockdowns that we all lived through. there is a tension for downing street about how they handle this and they don't want to give dominic cummings even
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more publicity by reacting to every single thing he says that at the same time, they have got to say something. same time, they have got to say something-— same time, they have got to say somethina. . ~ ,, , . something. thank you very much, adam. something. thank you very much, adam- thank— something. thank you very much, adam. thank you. _ dominic cummings: the interview will be broadcast tonight on bbc two at 7pm and will be available on bbc iplayer and bbc sounds as a podcast. hospitality leaders have condemned plans to prevent un—vaccinated customers from entering nightclubs in england from september. the announcement, which is subject to approval by mp�*s, came on the first day venues were allowed to re—open by mps, came on the first day venues were allowed to re—open in more than 16 months. the prime minister declined to rule out extending the same requirement to pubs. michael kill is the chief executive of the night time industries association. hello. what is wrong with incentivising young people to get fully vaccinated with this announcement? it presents many challenges- — announcement? it presents many challenges. we _ announcement? it presents many challenges. we worked _ announcement? it presents many challenges. we worked with - challenges. we worked with government, with michael gove,
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through the process of talking about covid passports. we presented a very clear case on the challenges and the discriminative nature, civil liberties, etc. we have had huge amounts of backlash and push from many of the people who come to our industry experience. we passed that to government but itjust seems slightly surreal that we are being used or dangled as a carrot on a stick for people to come in and to be vaccinated in terms of choice. that's a worry to the industry as a whole because we have already suffered 17 months of not being able to trade. many of our industry are united. the next couple of months will be quite critical but moving on from september, there are real worries this will impact businesses. 35% of 18- worries this will impact businesses. 35% of 18— 30—year—olds are not vaccinated, we are told, doesn't public health trump all the other
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arguments you just listed? you public health trump all the other arguments you just listed? arguments you 'ust listed? you say that but the — arguments you just listed? you say that but the report _ arguments you just listed? you say that but the report that _ arguments you just listed? you say that but the report that was - that but the report that was highlighted by michael gove said the impact of putting a covid passport of sorts is disproportionate to the public health benefit. at that point. similarly, sajid javid clearly stated last week that they wouldn't take this as a compulsory move. the u—turn is quite dramatic. we still don't understand why the u—turn is in place and why nightclubs specifically have been highlighted, given there are many, many environments that have the same proximity and contact that nightclubs would have. as you can appreciate with all of this, we hear the headline but we don't understand the headline but we don't understand the detail. the government need to come forward with this detail imminently so we can really understand what they are looking to do. there is a concern that we have been marginalised as an industry. [30 been marginalised as an industry. do you think there will be... you know... some of your members, do you think they will not ask people who
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turn up to their club for vaccination status or covid passport? will they ignore the legal requirement at the end of september? if it is a legal requirement it will be difficult to ignore. many businesses have licenses, as i am sure you are aware. the challenge we have is... interference er we were leased to have is... interference er we were pleased to heatr _ have is... interference er we were pleased to hear the _ have is... interference er we were pleased to hear the commit - have is... interference er we were | pleased to hear the commit approach is in a way that it was a site by size basis when we looked at risk assessment in particular. much of our industry have so many different experiences. from a sedentary environment, which is a vip status like mahiki in manchester to studio 338 which is an electronic dance studio. it was key to associate everything by k spicer case. for us, we felt we had done a phenomenaljob —— assessing everything case—by—case. we have to consider the risks. now that is not a consideration, this is looking to be mandatory and we have a concern
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because many of these businesses rely on things like spontaneity and walk up. some of that will be cast aside. because they will not be able to access it that easy or allow them to access it that easy or allow them to make decisions when they are sat in the pub, as they have done many months before the sort of pandemic. perhaps the cupboard was partly influenced by what we all saw on sunday night, you know? —— perhaps the government was. thousands of 18—year—olds plus going to clubs despite the covid restrictions and safety measures your members may have put in place, people dancing, shouting, hugging, kissing, no masks, no social distancing, because there is no legal requirement any more. that might have put the heebie—jeebies up them. let’s more. that might have put the heebie-jeebies up them. let's be honest, heebie-jeebies up them. let's be honest. over _ heebie-jeebies up them. let's be honest, over the _ heebie-jeebies up them. let's be honest, over the last _ heebie-jeebies up them. let's be honest, over the last couple - heebie-jeebies up them. let's be honest, over the last couple of. honest, over the last couple of weeks, they must have had the heebie—jeebies for some time because the year rose and many other environments have expressed a similar way that people have behaved
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—— because of the euros. is that a fair comparison? i -- because of the euros. is that a fair comparison?— -- because of the euros. is that a fair comparison? i know the final, security was _ fair comparison? i know the final, security was breached, _ fair comparison? i know the final, security was breached, but - fair comparison? i know the final, | security was breached, but people going to wembley to watch england were required to show either vaccination status or that they had proof of a negative test. but vaccination status or that they had proof of a negative test.— proof of a negative test. but from that persnective. _ proof of a negative test. but from that perspective, they _ proof of a negative test. but from that perspective, they also - that perspective, they also highlighted... iam that perspective, they also highlighted... i am very aware that it was a huge challenge for wembley. and those protocols in place. we are aware that the pilots were very demanding in terms of lateral flow tests. we are also aware that the nhs app at the moment is self certified in terms of lateral flow tests. we have some huge challenges, there are some gaps. i'm not underestimating the public health challenge we have and our industry has, as a whole. but we do need to understand what the detail is in terms of government. being quite clear about it in pubs and bars are not expected to do it but clubs are, they could be things like competitive disadvantage to clubs. potentially, we are just going to
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see a very, very challenging environment for nightclubs and culture to express themselves and re—engage. we are worried about things going underground. we are trying to advise the government that some parts of youth culture are not going to want to do this. the challenge we have is that we have safe environments for people to come to. if they put in such a place where people don't want to do it and those masses decide they still want to go out and socially engaged, we will have a challenge around this uprising of ump day or illegal events which will take place which will present anti—social behaviour as wide as covid spread events. == as wide as covid spread events. -- umes. as wide as covid spread events. —— umes. remind me what ume stands for? it is a phrase which is used to signify illegal events by the police more than anything but i can't remember the exact acronym description. it remember the exact acronym description-— remember the exact acronym descri ttion. , , ., description. it must be underground somethint description. it must be underground something that _ description. it must be underground something that we _ description. it must be underground something that we are _ description. it must be underground something that we are both - description. it must be underground j something that we are both showing our age! something that we are both showing ourage! let's something that we are both showing our age! let's leave it there, thanks for talking to us.
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a report by a group of mps says david cameron showed "a significant lack ofjudgement" on the way he lobbied government ministers on behalf of a failed lender. the treasury select committee found that the former prime minister didn't break any rules but said the rules should be strengthened. the report comes after mr cameron was found to have spoken to the chancellor, rishi sunak, on behalf of the financial services firm greensill capital, which has since gone bust. let's talk to the chair of the treasury select committee — conservative mp mel stride. hello a of your committee told david cameron the scandal had left his reputation in tatters —— a member of your committee told. it reputation in tatters -- a member of your committee told.— your committee told. it has been a very difficult _ your committee told. it has been a very difficult moment _ your committee told. it has been a very difficult moment for _ your committee told. it has been a very difficult moment for david - very difficult moment for david cameron. he put himself in a position where, whilst on one hand, he didn't break any of the lobbying rules, and i think it is important to stress that, on the other hand, he did show a lack ofjudgment in making the kind of approaches to senior people in the treasury, including the chancellor. the informality of those approaches and
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the frequency of those approaches on behalf of a business in which he had a significant personal interest. find a significant personal interest. and how would you _ a significant personal interest. and how would you describe that behaviour?— how would you describe that behaviour? regrettable. it is trobabl behaviour? regrettable. it is probably how— behaviour? regrettable. it is probably how david - behaviour? regrettable. it is probably how david cameron| behaviour? regrettable. it is- probably how david cameron will himself would describe that situation. and what we have got to do now is make sure that we change the rules, so that, going forward, we don't have situations like this. what the committee in particular has recommended is that the treasury should come forward with a set of guidance to make sure that where there are approaches of this nature in the future, they are handled in a more formal process driven way than was the case why are these informal texts, etc. ., , , , texts, etc. that 'ust seems so obvious. _ texts, etc. that 'ust seems so obvious. to _ texts, etc. that just seems so obvious, mr stride, _ texts, etc. that just seems so obvious, mr stride, don't - texts, etc. that just seems so obvious, mr stride, don't you | texts, etc. that just seems so - obvious, mr stride, don't you agree? yes. i think many things might seem very obvious when things go wrong in hindsight but i am hopeful because we do now have the best part of a dozen enquiries into the events
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around greensill and we would avoid the situation in the future. it is important we do this if people are going to have confidence in our political system.— going to have confidence in our political system. why do you think neither the chancellor, _ political system. why do you think neither the chancellor, rishi - political system. why do you think i neither the chancellor, rishi sunak, nor any of his officials simply texted back david cameron to say, look, you need to put this in writing, you need to do this formally?— writing, you need to do this formall ? ., , ., , ., formally? that is the main thrust of the criticism — formally? that is the main thrust of the criticism we _ formally? that is the main thrust of the criticism we have _ formally? that is the main thrust of the criticism we have of— formally? that is the main thrust of the criticism we have of the - the criticism we have of the treasury. we feel they should have done that. ~ , treasury. we feel they should have done that. . , ., treasury. we feel they should have done that. ~ , ., ~' , done that. why do you think they didn't? i suspect, _ done that. why do you think they didn't? i suspect, and _ done that. why do you think they didn't? i suspect, and i _ done that. why do you think they didn't? i suspect, and i am - done that. why do you think they | didn't? i suspect, and i am simply speculating _ didn't? i suspect, and i am simply speculating here _ didn't? i suspect, and i am simply speculating here that _ didn't? i suspect, and i am simply speculating here that there - didn't? i suspect, and i am simply speculating here that there was i didn't? i suspect, and i am simply speculating here that there was a | speculating here that there was a lot going on. it was a quick series of text exchanges, you've got to bearin of text exchanges, you've got to bear in mind that, clearly, the economy and the country was pressure and the treasury was at the centre of coming up with a scheme to put that right. the main thrust of the pitch that david cameron was cameron was making was that this business was making was that this business was able to help small and medium business sized businesses. the re torts business sized businesses. the reports said — business sized businesses. the reports said it _ business sized businesses. the reports said it didn't believe that claim. ~ , , reports said it didn't believe that claim. . ., reports said it didn't believe that claim. t , ., ., claim. well, it says that it and the bank of england _ claim. well, it says that it and the bank of england were _ claim. well, it says that it and the bank of england were sad - claim. well, it says that it and the bank of england were sad seems l claim. well, it says that it and the | bank of england were sad seems to
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claim. well, it says that it and the - bank of england were sad seems to be sceptical as to whether that was on offer. —— this bank of england seemed to be. it was right for the treasury to have seriously considered the approach, given what was going on in the economy at the time. as i say, the main lesson here is not that anybody acted with impropriety within the treasury and the bank of england, because we do find that the ministers and the civil services acted with personal integrity. there were no favours done, no backscratching, nothing of that nature at all. however, the nature of the approach should have been put on a much more formal basis right at the beginning. that is the key lesson for the treasury going forward. ,, w' , key lesson for the treasury going forward. ,, a , i. key lesson for the treasury going forward. ,, ., ., , ., forward. quickly, you already told mr cameron. _ forward. quickly, you already told mr cameron, when _ forward. quickly, you already told mr cameron, when he _ forward. quickly, you already told mr cameron, when he appeared l forward. quickly, you already told - mr cameron, when he appeared before your committee, that "many people would conclude at the time of your lobbying, your opportunity to make a large amount of money was at risk". he denied that. did you ever discover how much he was being paid? 0ne discover how much he was being paid? one recent report suggested it was £40,000 per day he was being paid by greensill £40,000 per day he was being paid by greensil ., ., , ., , greensill there are lots of reports about lots of _
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greensill there are lots of reports about lots of things. _ greensill there are lots of reports about lots of things. we - greensill there are lots of reports about lots of things. we put - greensill there are lots of reports about lots of things. we put that l about lots of things. we put that specific question to mr cameron when he appeared before us and he said it was a private matter and we were happy enough to leave it at that. whatever the figures were, it is fair to say that everybody, including himself, would accept that he had a significant interest in that business. that is a pertinent point. that business. that is a pertinent toint. ., , , that business. that is a pertinent oint. , ~ , �*, point. lastly, the prime minister's announcement _ point. lastly, the prime minister's announcement about _ point. lastly, the prime minister's announcement about vaccine - point. lastly, the prime minister's - announcement about vaccine passports for young people. they will have to be fully vaccinated in order to get into clubs or big events. will you support that when it comes to a vote in the commons or not? i will! support that when it comes to a vote in the commons or not?— in the commons or not? i will need to look at the _ in the commons or not? i will need to look at the precise _ in the commons or not? i will need to look at the precise detail - in the commons or not? i will need to look at the precise detail to - in the commons or not? i will need to look at the precise detail to see | to look at the precise detail to see what is happening at the time of that vote. but my general feeling is that vote. but my general feeling is that it that vote. but my general feeling is thatitis that vote. but my general feeling is that it is probably the direction we will have to go in. the level of vaccination amongst young people is markedly lower than other parts of society. whilst they may not be impacted by this terrible disease as much as older people, there is a long covid and there is the fact that if there is a reservoir of that disease amongst young people, then
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it spills over into older generations who are more impacted. regrettably, some of these measures, draconian though they may feel to some, i'm going to be necessary. thank you for talking to us, thank you, mel stride conservative mp. we will talk to the business minister paul scully at 9:30pm about all sorts of things —— at 9:30am. including the claims by dominic cummings. the uk border force intercepted 430 people yesterday as they tried to cross the english channel — that's a record daily figure for this year. it's a dangerous journey and one which could soon result in a four—yearjail sentence — if the government's proposed nationality and borders bill is passed by parliament. jon donnison is in doverfor us now. he has been there for the last few days. tell us what you have been observing. days. tell us what you have been observing-— days. tell us what you have been observint. ., , , , observing. undoubtedly it has been an extremely _ observing. undoubtedly it has been an extremely busy _ observing. undoubtedly it has been an extremely busy few _ observing. undoubtedly it has been an extremely busy few days - observing. undoubtedly it has been an extremely busy few days for - observing. undoubtedly it has been an extremely busy few days for the | an extremely busy few days for the uk border force going on for 700 migrants have tried to make that
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crossing. this has now become the primary route for criminal gangs to smuggle people into the uk. i'm not sure if you can actually make out behind me, it is probably a bit far away but there is a border force boatin away but there is a border force boat in the harbour, it has just come in, and orange life jackets you have migrants on the boat. they have been picked up, this morning. it is another clear day with pretty good weather and calm seas. i think we're going to have a big day with lots of people being brought ashore again. we have been out at sea two or three days over the last week or so. yesterday was particularly busy when we set off into the channel. rolling out of dover at dawn. eyes on the horizon as we head south. 0ur skipper has told us it's the most likely time to spot migrants risking the crossing from france.
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and it doesn't take long. coast guard, this is city of westminster, we have spotted another small boat, which appears to be another migrant boat. amid one of the world's busiest shipping lanes, a tiny dinghy, bobbing on the waves. desperate people do desperate things. they've no motor, just paddles. where are you from, guys? sudan. from sudan? are you 0k? help will be coming soon, they will come and pick you up. would you like some water? yeah. how long have you been at sea, this morning? two o'clock, we started. why do you want to go to england? it's a safe place. and tell me about your journey from sudan. come from libya, italia. libya to italy? and then through europe?
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and why did you leave sudan? because we need a safe place. safe place? yeah. here is some fruit, some biscuits, somejuice. after that, we shadowed them and called the coastguard, who organised their rescue. it's getting busier all the time. when we first sort of started seeing these migrants come across three or four years ago, there were just a few come across in dribs and drabs but now it seems like a very well organised people smuggling boat. and not far away, we find another migrant boat. we're about eight miles off the coast of dover now and we've just come across this small dinghy, probably three or four metres long. we think there's maybe 12 or 13 on board, couple of small children at the front and a couple of women. i've asked them how long they've been at sea this morning and they said a couple of hours. they must have set off before dawn.
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we've now called in the uk border force, the uk coastguard who are going to pick them up. rescued migrants are then brought to dover and ferried ashore for processing. the government says its new nationality and borders bill currently passing through parliament targets people smugglers but it also includes a new law, meaning migrants arriving without permission could be jailed for up to four years. critics say it amounts to cruelty. it's a really callous, cold hearted brutal response by a government that's trying to arrest and prosecute its way out of a problem. it won't succeed. putting people injail who have come here because of the terrible things that have happened to them in their lives is really draconian and punitive and all that it will do is fill up ourjails without resolving the issue. the number of migrants crossing the channel in small boats has risen sharply in the last few years.
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more than 2,000 — a record — made thejourney injune. but overall, the number of people claiming asylum in the uk actually fell last year to just below 30,000 and that's way down on the peak back in 2002 of more than 80,000. and britain accepts far fewer asylum applications than many of its european neighbours. behind the migrant numbers, though, are the human stories. the government is pushing back. but for those making these dangerous journeys, the pull of a better life is strong. jon donnison, bbc news, in the english channel. i think you got a sense of how vulnerable these people are and it is hard not to feel sorry for them when you see them out there in the middle of the channel making what is really a very, very dangerous journey. what is interesting is that while the number of people arriving
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by boat has gone up, the number of people arriving in lorries and containers, perhaps coming through the channel tunnel, that has fallen. i think that reflects the fact that, for the people smugglers, that route has become a bit more risky. there is higher security, we have had some pretty high profile cases of migrants suffocating in containers and whatnot. and i think now, for the people smugglers, it is this route that offers best return. thank ou ve route that offers best return. thank you very much. _ route that offers best return. thank you very much. jon- _ ice cream company ben &jerry�*s has said it will end the sale of its ice cream in the palestinian territories of the west bank and eastjerusalem. the company said it was "inconsistent with our values for ben &jerry�*s ice cream to be sold in the 0ccupied palestinian territory". the west bank and eastjerusalem have been under israeli control since 1967. israeli politicians have reacted angrily to the announcement. prince harry has announced plans to publish a memoir next year, in which he says he will share "mistakes and lessons learned".
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prince harry said he would reflect "the highs and lows" of his life, and be "accurate and wholly truthful". proceeds will be donated to charity. the bbc has been told the duke has recently spoken privately with his family about writing the book. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. the met office has issued a new weather warning for extreme heat. amber weather warning. weather warning for extreme heat. amberweatherwarning. like weather warning for extreme heat. amber weather warning. like the met office's other one, it is impact based. up until 23:59pm on thursday, it cover this area and it looks at the impact of the extreme heat on health and also on infrastructure. today, lots of dry weather and hot and sunny conditions. an isolated chance we could catch a shower and if we do, we are likely to be in the south—eastern court and they could be heavy and fun to read. temperatures up to 30 degrees and pressure in the north. even by the end of the night, temperatures are not falling away that much. it will
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be another uncomfortable night for sleeping and a warm start to the day. tomorrow it will start with cloud across the north and the east. lots of that will tend to burn away and tomorrow, once again, another hot and sunny day with a chance of a shower. it could be heavy and thundery. hello this is bbc news with victoria derbyshire. the headlines: prime minister's for much adviser dominic cummings tells the bbc boris johnson put politics ahead of peoples lives during the pandemic. nojab, no entry, the prime minister says that from september only the fully vaccinated and go to nightclubs and big events in england. a report by mps says former prime minister david cameron lacked judgment, when he lobbied the government over the collapsed firm, greensill capital. and nearly 400 migrants cross the english channel
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to the uk yesterday, a record number. the home office says that it is acting to tackle the issue. and the world's richest man, the amazon founderjeff bezzoss, prepares to blast off to the edge of space. borisjohnson's former chief adviser, dominic cummings, has renewed his attack on the prime minister's handling of the pandemic. in his first broadcast interview since leaving number ten, he accuses mrjohnson of putting politics ahead of people's lives. mr cummings has claimed that prime minister initially resisted the idea of a second lockdown in england last autumn — because the virus was mainly affecting the elderly. we're joined now by paul scully, consumer and small businesses minister. good morning. ijust want to read julie whatsapp message dominic cummings says is from the prime minister which he showed to our political editor. this is what boris
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johnson wrote in october last year, "hardly anyone under 60 goes into hospital and there is virtually all survive, and i no longer buy all of this nhs overwhelm stuff. folks, i think we may need to recalibrate. there are a maximum of 3 million in this country aged over 80. it shows that we don't go for nationwide lockdown." how shocked are you about bad? ~ ., lockdown." how shocked are you about bad? . ., ., , , lockdown." how shocked are you about bad? . ., ., ,, , lockdown." how shocked are you about bad? ., , ., bad? what will happen is that, when we have our— bad? what will happen is that, when we have our inquiry _ bad? what will happen is that, when we have our inquiry into _ bad? what will happen is that, when we have our inquiry into covid - bad? what will happen is that, when we have our inquiry into covid we - we have our inquiry into covid we will see what decisions were taken, how they were taken and what decisions are made, and that is really important. what we are focusing on now is making sure that, rather than speculating on what dominic cummings did or didn't do saw or didn't see last year, focusing on the here and now, keeping people safe and protecting peoples jobs and livelihoods. keeping people safe and protecting peoplesjobs and livelihoods. it is peoples 'obs and livelihoods. it is not peoplesjobs and livelihoods. it is not speculation. downing street have not speculation. downing street have not denied that borisjohnson wrote that whatsapp message. not denied that boris johnson wrote that whatsapp message. nonetheless, the decisions that _ that whatsapp message. nonetheless, the decisions that the _ that whatsapp message. nonetheless, the decisions that the prime _ the decisions that the prime minister and cabinet took were taken
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in the context of a whole range of factors. it is not binary. we clearly want to make sure that we can protect people, save lives and make sure that the nhs isn't overwhelmed but also protect peoples jobs and livelihoods, making sure that other operations can happen within the nhs as well, that mental health and other issues caused by unemployment, losing businesses, doesn't rise as well. so unemployment, losing businesses, doesn't rise as well.— doesn't rise as well. so it would be ok for the — doesn't rise as well. so it would be ok for the prime _ doesn't rise as well. so it would be ok for the prime minister - doesn't rise as well. so it would be ok for the prime minister to - doesn't rise as well. so it would be ok for the prime minister to let - doesn't rise as well. so it would be | ok for the prime minister to let the over 80s die?— ok for the prime minister to let the over 80s die? people are still dying at the moment _ over 80s die? people are still dying at the moment and _ over 80s die? people are still dying at the moment and every _ over 80s die? people are still dying at the moment and every single - over 80s die? people are still dying at the moment and every single life is a human cost.— is a human cost. doesn't sound like the prime minister _ is a human cost. doesn't sound like the prime minister cared _ is a human cost. doesn't sound like the prime minister cared about - is a human cost. doesn't sound like the prime minister cared about the| the prime minister cared about the over 80s in october, we were six months into the pandemic, we knew quite a lot by then, including the government, and, according to this whatsapp, he was prepared to let those over 80 die.— those over 80 die. people died esterda those over 80 die. people died yesterday and _ those over 80 die. people died yesterday and the _ those over 80 die. people died yesterday and the day - those over 80 die. people died yesterday and the day before. | those over 80 die. people died - yesterday and the day before. we're still dealing with covid and having to make difficult decisions on getting balance right between the economy, people's freedoms and
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mental health, and also people's safety and lives as well. rather than dealing speculation about this, i'm more interested in the decision. it is not speculation. it is right there for us all to see.- it is not speculation. it is right there for us all to see. also the context in _ there for us all to see. also the context in which _ there for us all to see. also the context in which the _ there for us all to see. also the context in which the decisions l there for us all to see. also the i context in which the decisions are taken. it is the decisions which were taken which have an outcome on people's lives and livelihoods rather than whatsapp messages. the outcome on people's lives and livelihood is that the accusation from people like dominic cummings and notjust him, people like professorjeremy farrar, the top scientist who has been advising the government, that people died unnecessarily, because of the kind of decisions that the prime minister made. i of decisions that the prime minister made. ,., of decisions that the prime minister made. . ., ., ,., made. i disagree, victoria. if you look at what _ made. i disagree, victoria. if you look at what happened _ made. i disagree, victoria. if you look at what happened last - made. i disagree, victoria. if you l look at what happened last autumn going into the second lockdown, there was considerable debate about it, discussion about the value of things like circuit breakers, and we saw in wales that the circuit—breaker came in and didn't have much effect so it was,
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re—locking people down unnecessarily, causing pain in terms ofjobs and livelihoods, to have an effect on people's health? that is the difficult balancing act the government was travelling with. the government was travelling with. the government made the decision for circuit—breaker, but six weeks after the scientists were telling the prime minister to bring in a circuit—breaker. to become actor after we saw that it didn't have much effect in wales, and that is the issue. �* , ., much effect in wales, and that is the issue-— much effect in wales, and that is the issue. �* ., , ., the issue. but you did it anyway at the issue. but you did it anyway at the end of october. _ the issue. but you did it anyway at the end of october. then - the issue. but you did it anyway at the end of october. then we - the issue. but you did it anyway at the end of october. then we saw. the issue. but you did it anyway at i the end of october. then we saw the rise of the variants from october which caused a lot of difficulty in decision—making over the last few months especially, and we have gone through any number of variants which have caused extra spikes so that is why it is not a binary choice when dealing with all of this. i why it is not a binary choice when dealing with all of this.— dealing with all of this. i want to be clear about _ dealing with all of this. i want to be clear about the _ dealing with all of this. i want to be clear about the whatsapp - dealing with all of this. i want to - be clear about the whatsapp message. you're not denying the authenticity of the whatsapp message that dominic cummings said was from boris johnson. �* ,
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cummings said was from boris johnson. �* _ ., johnson. i'm saying nothing either way because _ johnson. i'm saying nothing either way because i _ johnson. i'm saying nothing either way because i haven't _ johnson. i'm saying nothing either way because i haven't seen - johnson. i'm saying nothing either way because i haven't seen it. - johnson. i'm saying nothing either way because i haven't seen it. i i way because i haven't seen it. i have read it to you. i'm - way because i haven't seen it. i have read it to you. i'm not - way because i haven't seen it. i i have read it to you. i'm not giving airtime to — have read it to you. i'm not giving airtime to dominic— have read it to you. i'm not giving airtime to dominic cummings - have read it to you. i'm not giving l airtime to dominic cummings when have read it to you. i'm not giving - airtime to dominic cummings when he has an agenda, i'm more interested in the decisions the government has taken to in the decisions the government has ta ken to protect in the decisions the government has taken to protectjobs and livelihoods and save lives and get that balance right. did livelihoods and save lives and get that balance right.— that balance right. did they get that balance right. did they get that balance — that balance right. did they get that balance right? _ that balance right. did they get that balance right? that - that balance right. did they get that balance right? that is - that balance right. did they get| that balance right? that is what that balance right. did they get - that balance right? that is what the intui will that balance right? that is what the inquiry will see- _ that balance right? that is what the inquiry will see. no _ that balance right? that is what the inquiry will see. no government - that balance right? that is what the | inquiry will see. no government has ever had to face this kind of pandemic, this kind of situation, so we have been learning about covid, we're still learning to live with covid at the moment, so is incredibly complex but that will all come out when the inquiry is held at the appropriate time. do come out when the inquiry is held at the appropriate time.— the appropriate time. do you think ttrievin the appropriate time. do you think grieving relatives _ the appropriate time. do you think grieving relatives are _ the appropriate time. do you think grieving relatives are comfortable | grieving relatives are comfortable with waiting for the public inquiry and with government ministers coming on the airwaves refusing to answer questions, because of the public inquiry which is coming down the track, 12 months, two years? i know that it has been _ track, 12 months, two years? i know that it has been a _ track, 12 months, two years? i know that it has been a tough _ track, 12 months, two years? i know that it has been a tough few- track, 12 months, two years? i know
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that it has been a tough few monthsj that it has been a tough few months for so many people, and so many have lost their lives, but families with what all of the information and decisions and the reflections of any discussion about the decision is taken to be made in the whole, rather than a single interview. let me ask you as the small businesses minister, if people are pinned by the test and trace app, should they self—isolate? brute the test and trace app, should they self-isolate?— self-isolate? we are encouraging --eole to self-isolate? we are encouraging people to stick — self-isolate? we are encouraging people to stick with _ self-isolate? we are encouraging people to stick with the _ self-isolate? we are encouraging people to stick with the app, - self-isolate? we are encouraging people to stick with the app, but| people to stick with the app, but the legal position has not changed, you have to isolate if contacted by the nhs test and trace or if you are collecting isolation payments but not everyone has the app, so it is not everyone has the app, so it is not mandated, but it is a really important tool alongside the vaccination programme, estimated to have saved 8000 lives over the past few months, so we encourage people to still use it in this form. that was not as _ to still use it in this form. that was not as emphatic— to still use it in this form. that was not as emphatic as - to still use it in this form. that was not as emphatic as i - to still use it in this form. that was not as emphatic as i was l
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was not as emphatic as i was expecting you to be, actually. should people self—isolate if they are pinged by the app? i should people self-isolate if they are pinged by the app?— are pinged by the app? i would absolutely _ are pinged by the app? i would absolutely encourage - are pinged by the app? i would absolutely encourage people i are pinged by the app? i would| absolutely encourage people to are pinged by the app? i would - absolutely encourage people to do that but they can make an informed decision. ., ., ., , , ., decision. hang on a minute, but you are encouraging _ decision. hang on a minute, but you are encouraging them _ decision. hang on a minute, but you are encouraging them back - decision. hang on a minute, but you are encouraging them back you - decision. hang on a minute, but you are encouraging them back you are l are encouraging them back you are then also going back saying, with a nod and a wink, you don't really need to because it is only advisory. i and explain the legal position that has always been the case, and that has always been the case, and that has always been the case, and that has always been so. i don't want to have to mandate and tell people what to do as this government any longer than i did have to do. people should make their own decisions and have their own freedoms, but they do have a responsibility to themselves, families and communities, it is about doing the right thing that we can keep covid at bay, which we are still living with, let's not forget. i want to ask about a report in the times which says ministers have written two major manufacturers emphasising that staff are not legally obliged to isolate if pinged. lord grimston, and
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investment minister, told one large employer that the app was only an advisory tool and that people are not under any legal duty. is that right? i not under any legal duty. is that ritht? ., �* , , right? i haven't seen the letter but if he has is — right? i haven't seen the letter but if he has is reflecting _ right? i haven't seen the letter but if he has is reflecting the _ right? i haven't seen the letter but if he has is reflecting the legal - if he has is reflecting the legal position as i havejust if he has is reflecting the legal position as i have just set out. so people don't have to isolate, do they? people don't have to isolate, do the ? , , , people don't have to isolate, do the? ,, , ., people don't have to isolate, do the? ,, .,�* they? this is exactly what i'm sa int, they? this is exactly what i'm saying. the — they? this is exactly what i'm saying, the legal— they? this is exactly what i'm saying, the legal position - they? this is exactly what i'm i saying, the legal position hasn't changed. this is the first time you have concentrated on what is there in the regulations. nonetheless as i say, the app has saved 8000 lives over the past few months. it is still a really important tool because we haven't finished with covid, although we have got to this stage, this is not the end of the film, killing the covid baddie, roll credits, we are still learning to live with it, the app and the vaccination programme are two major weapons in the army keeping covid at bay. i weapons in the army keeping covid at ba . ., ., ., weapons in the army keeping covid at ba. ., bay. i want to ask me about vaccine toassorts bay. i want to ask me about vaccine passports as _ bay. i want to ask me about vaccine passports as a _ bay. i want to ask me about vaccine passports as a legal _ bay. i want to ask me about vaccine passports as a legal requirement i bay. i want to ask me about vaccine|
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passports as a legal requirement for nightclubs, and operators of big events and big venues, to ask people for their vaccination status, they will have to be fully vaccinated before they can go to a club. that is discriminatory, isn't it?- is discriminatory, isn't it? people who cannot _ is discriminatory, isn't it? people who cannot take _ is discriminatory, isn't it? people who cannot take the _ is discriminatory, isn't it? people who cannot take the vaccine - is discriminatory, isn't it? people who cannot take the vaccine for. who cannot take the vaccine for medical reasons, there will be exemptions, allowances written into the detail there. it is the detailthere. it is discriminatory - the detail there. it is| discriminatory against the detail there. it is discriminatory against people who don't want to have the vaccination. then they don't have to go to a crowded venue as well. as i say we are living with covid, we want to get this working fully, in the next couple of months, but we also want to get as many people double—vaccinated, which we will able to do by september which is why it is coming then. we all have a responsibility to look out for each other. ., ~' , ., responsibility to look out for each other. ., ,, , ., ., responsibility to look out for each other. ., ,, ., ., ,, ., , other. thank you for talking to us this morning. _ other. thank you for talking to us this morning, paul— other. thank you for talking to us this morning, paul scully, - other. thank you for talking to us this morning, paul scully, the i this morning, paul scully, the business and consumer minister.
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dominic cummings: the interview will be broadcast tonight on bbc two at 7pm and will be available on bbc iplayer and bbc sounds as a podcast. hospitality leaders have condemned plans to prevent un—vaccinated customers from entering nightclubs in england from september. we were just discussing this with paul scully. the announcement, which is subject to approval by mps, came on the first day venues were allowed to re—open in more than 16 months. the prime minister declined to rule out extending the same requirement to pubs. with me now is dr shaun fitzgerald of cambridge university who is a member of the sage environmental modelling group. he's speaking in a personal capacity. he is also director of the centre for climate repair at cambridge. hello, doctor sean fitzgerald. i want to ask you generally about what professorjonathan van tam was saying in the downing street news conference last night about how cases are going to rise. he says that it cases are going to rise. he says thatitis cases are going to rise. he says that it is in our hands, if we tear the pants out of it cases will continue to search, if we are cautious maybe they will not search
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so much. is that right? it cautious maybe they will not search so much. is that right?— so much. is that right? it has alwa s so much. is that right? it has always been _ so much. is that right? it has always been from _ so much. is that right? it has always been from the - so much. is that right? it has i always been from the beginning so much. is that right? it has - always been from the beginning of the pandemic, a mix of responsibilities. it starts with ourselves, the sort of thing is that we can do to try to reduce the spread of this horrible disease, hands, face, space, ventilate, and then other things such as getting vaccinated, then doing things like voluntary testing, so that we can just try to be forewarned whether we should be going out and mixing with people and on top of that, secondly, the thing is that the government might mandate regarding imposing restrictions. it has been a mix, all along, and back mix between the government was not roll and our own particular role has obviously changed, but insofar as what the government is doing, our role has stayed the same, we need to make sure that we are doing what we can to protect one another. and that is whatjonathan is saying. to protect one another. and that is what jonathan is saying. interesting that ou what jonathan is saying. interesting that you repeated _ what jonathan is saying. interesting that you repeated hands, _ what jonathan is saying. interesting that you repeated hands, face, - that you repeated hands, face, space, and ventilate. that is still
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important, even now, yes,? mast important, even now, yes,? most definitely. — important, even now, yes,? most definitely, these _ important, even now, yes,? it'ifisii definitely, these mitigations that each one of us can do are really important. i would argue, even more important. i would argue, even more important now, because, as restrictions, once the government has put down are being lessened, then what is left are things that we can do ourselves, so i would urge people not to throw caution to the wind and do what we can to try to keep ourselves safe but most importantly to keep others safe, in case you are infectious. let importantly to keep others safe, in case you are infectious.— importantly to keep others safe, in case you are infectious. let me ask ou about case you are infectious. let me ask you about the _ case you are infectious. let me ask you about the announcement - case you are infectious. let me ask you about the announcement that i you about the announcement that nightclubs and other big venues will be legally required to ban customers if not fully vaccinated and that you could argue is part of an effort to incentivise young people to getjams because we know that fewer 18—30 —year—olds have had the jab so far. what do you think that? -year-olds have had the “ab so far. what do you think that?_ what do you think that? there is alwa s a what do you think that? there is always a role _ what do you think that? there is always a role between _ what do you think that? there is always a role between what - what do you think that? there is always a role between what we l what do you think that? there is - always a role between what we should be doing and then what is required
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of us if we want to go to certain places, so the idea that you must be double—vaccinated, the reason why there sorts of things may be considered by the government is that those particular venues are more risky to society, because we have a lot of people congregating in very close quarters, then the risk for transmission are greater, and this balance, trying to make sure that we keep this overall prevalence, and going back to the r number, the spread rate, the country as low as possible so it is a mix of what the government does and what we can do. know that you have recently done some work on ventilation. how key is that, whether it is a night club, pub or school? tslur that, whether it is a night club, pub or school?— that, whether it is a night club, pub or school? that, whether it is a night club, tub or school? ., , ., ., pub or school? our thoughts are that ventilation is — pub or school? our thoughts are that ventilation is one _ pub or school? our thoughts are that ventilation is one of _ pub or school? our thoughts are that ventilation is one of the _ pub or school? our thoughts are that ventilation is one of the primary - ventilation is one of the primary transmission mechanisms, the airborne transmission route, but even now, 18 months into the pandemic, the three groups of droplet contact and aerosol, we do
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know what the relative proportion of those are. this is 18 months in, and this is because this thing is changing. it is a very difficult situation. therefore, we werejust saying, let's assume that they are all important and making sure that you use ventilation as a weapon against the airborne transmission route, that we do everything that we can to keep the air is fresh in these places as possible. when you hear the prime _ these places as possible. when you hear the prime minister _ these places as possible. when you hear the prime minister say - these places as possible. when you hear the prime minister say as - these places as possible. when you hear the prime minister say as he i hear the prime minister say as he has a number of times, "if not now, then when?", he said in summer the school holidays will act as a natural break, do you agree with him? it natural break, do you agree with him? , ., , natural break, do you agree with him? , ., ., ., him? it is not my position to comment — him? it is not my position to comment on _ him? it is not my position to comment on when _ him? it is not my position to comment on when the - him? it is not my position to - comment on when the government him? it is not my position to _ comment on when the government does certain things. 0ur role as scientists and engineers is to ensure that we are trying to bring the best of science and engineering to the knowledge that the government to the knowledge that the government to make the appropriate decisions. i would say right now when we are spending as much time as possible outside, this week in particular, a very pleasant week, there will be many more people outside, therefore
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allowing us to do so seems more sensible than trying to do that in colder weather wear and fact it would be very, very difficult. thank ou ve would be very, very difficult. thank you very much _ would be very, very difficult. thank you very much for _ would be very, very difficult. thank you very much for talking _ would be very, very difficult. thank you very much for talking to - would be very, very difficult. thank you very much for talking to us, i you very much for talking to us, doctor sean fitzgerald, of cambridge university. a premier league footballer has been arrested on suspicion of child sex offences. the 31—year—old man, who has not been named for legal reasons, was detained on friday by greater manchester police. in a statement, the player's club confirmed he had been suspended and added it would "continue supporting the authorities with inquiries and would not be commenting further". the footballer has since been bailed pending further inquiries. more than 2,000 firefighters are battling to control a massive wildfire in the us state of oregon. it's been raging for two weeks, and has displaced thousands of people from their homes and destroyed 160 buildings. it's now the largest of more than 80 wildfires which are burning throughout the united states.
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in britain, and across the world muslims are marking eid.? it's one of the two important festivals in the islamic calendar. it's the first time since the pandemic that many muslims have felt able to celebrate as a community by attending mosques for special prayers. and we canjoin our reporter shabnam mahmood, who's at a mosque in south london. good morning. 0h, good morning. oh, dear. i do not think she could hear me. we will go back to her, in the next hour. the world's richest man is preparing to propel himself to the edge of outer space later today — 62 miles above earth. amazon founderjeff bezos hopes the trip will mark a giant leap forward in commercial space travel. sophie long has this report from the launch site. deep in the west texas desert, the richest man on earth is preparing to take his first passengers to space, making history and dreams come true.
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with him will be trailblazing aviator wally funk, who at 82, will become the oldest person ever to travel to space. whoo! also on board will bejeff bezos�* younger brother mark, and joining them to enjoy a rare view of earth, dutch teenager 0liver daemen. spaceships seem to be becoming the new super yachts. the launch comes just over a week after another billionaire realised his lifelong dream. sir richard branson may have been the first billionaire to make it to the edge of space, but when jeff bezos launches in his new ship, he will be travelling faster and will go higher. it will travel at more than three times the speed of sound, to 62 miles above the earth's surface, with no human pilot on board. we've been training. this vehicle is ready, this crew is ready, this team is amazing, we just feel really good about it. the four passengers will float weightless for a few minutes before
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the capsule starts to freefall back to earth. parachutes will be released to soften its impact with the desert. if all goes according to plan, the four will emerge proof that for future tourism, the sky is no longer the limit. sophie long, bbc news, texas. let's talk about eid. shabnam is at a mosque in south london. i can hear ou now, a mosque in south london. i can hear you now. thank _ a mosque in south london. i can hear you now, thank you. _ a mosque in south london. i can hear you now, thank you. after— a mosque in south london. i can hear you now, thank you. after 18 - a mosque in south london. i can hear you now, thank you. after 18 months| you now, thank you. after 18 months of lockdown restrictions, today hundreds of muslims have been able to gather at this mosque and community centre in south london to mark eid and to celebrate eid together as a community. of course for the last three eid festivals weave as social distancing in place and today, for the first time, people are able to pray together, side by side, albeit a lot of people
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were wearing masks. now, prayer is very important for any eid celebrations. the day always starts with muslims congregating at their local mosques, like this one, to read their eid prayers. we are marking the festival of eid al—adha, the second most important festival in the islamic calendar, the first is celebrated at the end of ramadan, and eid al—adha follows the end of hajj, the annual pilgrimage taking programmes to saudi arabia. people were new clothes on eid, get together, get together with their communities, and, like christmas, people have a good food, and people also have, they exchanged gifts and meet each other. and the mosque here today has organised a fun day in the local park for the muslim community
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to celebrate eid with their families. there are going to be activities for children, and there will be food as well. with me now is amal, one of the worshippers at this mosque. eid mubarak. eid amal, one of the worshippers at this mosque. eid mubarak.— amal, one of the worshippers at this mosque. eid mubarak. eid mubarak. it has been amazing. _ mosque. eid mubarak. eid mubarak. it has been amazing. there _ mosque. eid mubarak. eid mubarak. it has been amazing. there have - mosque. eid mubarak. eid mubarak. it has been amazing. there have been i mosque. eid mubarak. eid mubarak. it| has been amazing. there have been so many— has been amazing. there have been so many people _ has been amazing. there have been so many people i have not seen in two years _ many people i have not seen in two years or— many people i have not seen in two years or more. this pandemic has been _ years or more. this pandemic has been a _ years or more. this pandemic has been a challenging time. it has been amazing _ been a challenging time. it has been amazing to _ been a challenging time. it has been amazing to catch up with loved ones to find _ amazing to catch up with loved ones to find out _ amazing to catch up with loved ones to find out how they survive, because _ to find out how they survive, because many of us did not have an amazing _ because many of us did not have an amazing last two years, had lost loved _ amazing last two years, had lost loved ones but it is amazing to catch _ loved ones but it is amazing to catch up — loved ones but it is amazing to catch up and see people and to pray next to _ catch up and see people and to pray next to them because it has been so lon- next to them because it has been so long since _ next to them because it has been so long since i— next to them because it has been so long since i have prayed next to anyone — long since i have prayed next to anyone it — long since i have prayed next to anyone. it is amazing. it long since i have prayed next to anyone. it is amazing.— long since i have prayed next to anyone. it is amazing. it has been a very difficult — anyone. it is amazing. it has been a very difficult 18 _ anyone. it is amazing. it has been a very difficult 18 months. _ anyone. it is amazing. it has been a very difficult 18 months. many - very difficult 18 months. many communities have been affected by the pandemic. how has prayer help you through this last 18 months?
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sign up arejust you through this last 18 months? sign up are just staying grounded, never feeling lost or demoralised, and doing prayers in my room because i had a tough time with finances, and i had covid and up until now i still cannot smell, from december. we had a health scare for my dad. it has been _ we had a health scare for my dad. it has been really challenging. my faith has— has been really challenging. my faith has helped me to stay strong, i've faith has helped me to stay strong, i've had _ faith has helped me to stay strong, i've had good with me, able to speak with him. _ i've had good with me, able to speak with him, communicate to him, and 'ust with him, communicate to him, and just literally — with him, communicate to him, and just literally have a safe space. i feel like — just literally have a safe space. i feel like there is a reason for me to keep — feel like there is a reason for me to keep pushing through and i am grateful— to keep pushing through and i am grateful that i'm here today and i'm able to— grateful that i'm here today and i'm able to see — grateful that i'm here today and i'm able to see that there is life after lockdown — able to see that there is life after lockdown. i know that we are coming out of _ lockdown. i know that we are coming out of lockdown and we are seeing everyone _ out of lockdown and we are seeing everyone in — out of lockdown and we are seeing everyone in the community. it has been _ everyone in the community. it has been amazing. everyone in the community. it has been amazing-— everyone in the community. it has been amazing. everyone in the community. it has been amazint. . ., ., , ., ., been amazing. what does eid mean to ou as a been amazing. what does eid mean to you as a british _ been amazing. what does eid mean to you as a british muslim? _ been amazing. what does eid mean to you as a british muslim? sign - been amazing. what does eid mean to you as a british muslim? sign up - you as a british muslim? sign up rate means community, worship, the fact that we are able to still stay grounded and be at one with our spiritual selves. at the same time,
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it is community, and have this collective vibe look after one another, check in, and that is what it means to our community. en'oyed a da . the it means to our community. en'oyed a day. the festivities * it means to our community. en'oyed a day. the festivities will fl it means to our community. en'oyed a day. the festivities will carry _ it means to our community. enjoyed a day. the festivities will carry on - day. the festivities will carry on any local park around the corner, there will be lots of food to eat, i'll go and enjoy some of that but in the meantime, eid mubarak, back to you. thank you very much, shabnam. australia's great barrier reef has recovered slightly over the past year after a decade of destruction, mainly caused by climate change. but a report by marine scientists said the future outlook for the reef was poor. this is because of an increased prominence of extreme weather events caused by global warming that damage the coral. the reef is a world heritage site, but could be listed as endangered at a meeting of unesco later this week. australia opposes the move, believing it could discourage tourists from visiting the area. thank you for your messages about
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dominic cummings' claims in an interview with our political editor laura kuenssberg. peter says, that the man dominic cummings is either stupid or a lawyer, he said he went to barnard castle to see if you could try, why put his wife and child at risk as matter he would not have got the job if you are stupid, therefore he must be a liar so how can we trust anything he says with macro another viewer has e—mailed to say do not waste your time listening to dominic cummings was a bitter and twisted man hell—bent on causing trouble through his own self centred agenda. dominic cummings would absolutely stand by what he has claimed to laura kuenssberg and he showed her whatsapp messages to back up showed her whatsapp messages to back up what he was saying. tracey says, the thing about these dominic cummings interviews is that they just confirm what we already suspected. joseph says on twitter, borisjohnson and his yes men and women that surround him always put their own interests first. if you want to get in touch... you can
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message me on twitter or on instagram. hello again. the hot and sunny weather is set to continue for another few days, with just an isolated chance of a shower. doesn't look like it's going to break down until towards the end of the week when we expect that breakdown to come from the south with some rain. but, today, what we've got is a new weather warning from the met office. this is an amber extreme heat warning. it is impact based, like the warnings that the met office has for wind, snow, for rain, for example and it's looking at health impacts due to the heat, as well as impacts on infrastructure. now, the forecast for today is largely dry. we have started off with some mist and a fair bit of cloud, most of that burning away, but we could hang on to a bit more cloud across the country and it is around the coasts, of course, where it will be cooler with sea breezes developing. through the day, we could see the odd shower, which could be heavy and thundery, most will miss them,
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and these are our temperature ranges. and these are our cooler in the north, and pressure, at around 15 celsius, and as we come south, we are looking at the high 20s or the low 30s. even into the evening, we still have ambers and reds on the chart, with the temperature only slowly coming down, and not coming down by much. by the end of the night, these will be the temperatures we are looking at, 12—18 celsius. so it is going to be a warm start to the day tomorrow. tomorrow, high pressure remains in charge of our weather. if anything, just a little bit further north eastwards, so we will see more warmth getting in across northern ireland and scotland, than we are looking at today, but it does remain settled. we start off still with some cloud across the north and also parts of the east. most of this will tend to break up or burn away. there will be a little bit at times on the coastline, but again it is on the coasts where we will have sea breezes develop. a lot of dry, hot and sunny weather with a chance of an isolated shower which could be heavy and thundery. and you can see the temperatures, the warmth getting in, glasgow, 27 celsius.
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we could hit 30, possibly 31, in the south of northern ireland, something we are keeping an eye on. into thursday, we still have some cloud across the north and to the east, most of that burning away. then we see some sunshine come out. still the risk of a shower. this time the risk transfers a bit further west, but they will be isolated, and the temperature range, 14 in the north, 26 in belfast, 28 in cardiff.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: the prime minister's former chief adviser, dominic cummings, tells the bbc borisjohnson put politics ahead of people's lives during the pandemic. the attitude at that point was a weird mix of... um...partly, "it's all nonsense and lockdowns don't work anyway" and partly, "well, this is terrible, but the people who are dying are, "essentially, all over 80." what do you make of dominic cummings' claims? message me on instagram or twitter @vicderbyshire or email victoria@bbc.co.uk. no jab, no entry. from september — only the fully—vaccinated can go to nightclubs and mass events in england. the government denies that's discrimination.

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