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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 19, 2021 9:00pm-9:59pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm james reynolds. our top stories, covid restrictions end in england — after 16 months. clubbers waste no time in taking advantage of the unlocking. butjust hours after the clubs reopen, the prime minister warns people of plans to prove they're fully vaccinated if they want to go to crowded indoor places in england. we are planning to make full vaccination the condition of entry to nightclubs and other venues, where large crowds gather. proof of a negative test will no longer be enough. president biden joins dozens of western countries in condemning china over a major cyber attack that targeted microsoft servers.
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and after the fire and fury, comes the landlside — we'll talk to journalist michael wolff about his new book documenting the final days of the trump presidency. hello and welcome. big changes to covid restrictions have been made in england and scotland. wales relaxed some rules on 17july. northern ireland is set to ease rules on 26july. so, after well over a year of being in lockdown, what has changed? in england, facemasks are no longer mandatory — but they are still required in some businesses and shops and on some public transport. the government suggests they should be worn in crowded indoor spaces. all social distancing is scrapped. there are no limits now on how many people can gather indoors or outdoors in any situation.
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the guidance to work from home is also lifted. though the government expects people to start returning to work gradually. people who've had both vaccines can now travel to amber list countries without having to isolate on return. that does not include france, though, which has been listed as amber plus. our medical editor fergus walsh has the latest. three, two, one... welcome back, everyone. for some, this is what freedom looks like, no social distancing and very few masks. but from the end of september, vaccination will be a condition of entry to crowded venues like this. many nightclubs across england reopened at midnight, 16 months before they were shut in the first lockdown. it felt like a dream. i feel like we have waited for this moment for a long time. i literally cannot stress how much i have missed being able to go out and just dance,
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and have a laugh. it has been the best night. the prime minister, self—isolating in chequers, said getting vaccinated would enable young people to get back the freedoms they loved. everybody over 18 has had an offer to get a vaccine. 3 million of the group have yet to take it up. we are saying, come on, folks, this is it. you won't regret it, it is the right thing to do for you, for your family and everybody else and above all, it is right for you to get back the freedoms you love. across the world, we have seen night clubs and venues where you have got lots of people indoors, crowded together, are a focus for potential super spreading events. the number of covid patients in hospital has doubled in two weeks, but it is still a tenth of the level from last winter. there is genuine uncertainty
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about what impact this covid wave will have on the nhs in the coming weeks. if there is a sudden return to pre—pandemic behaviour, it is thought 2,000 daily hospital admissions are possible. in a worst—case scenario, it could be double that, matching the admissions we saw in winter. if people are more cautious, then the peak will be lower and spread over several months. whatever happens, deaths will inevitably rise, but it is thought that vaccines are cutting the risk of dying by more than 90%. labour wants masks to remain mandatory. lifting all restrictions in one go is reckless. and doing so when this variant is clearly out of control, risks a summer of chaos. unlike in the us, the government here has for now ruled out vaccinating all 12 to 17—year—olds.
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instead, the jab will be offered to children in at—risk groups. scientists say they need more safety data. after the pfizer vaccine, there are reports of heart inflammation. these are very rare, but it is best we take a precautionary approach before we expose millions of sophie is 1a. she has down's syndrome, one of the groups who will be offered the jab. she is vulnerable to infection and has been kept off school for much of the pandemic. we're very pleased and it means we can move forward. the last 18 months have been very challenging for us a family. very stressful at times. for those tying the knot in england, there are now no restrictions on guest numbers.
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this wedding in devon, one of the first to enjoy the new freedoms. fergus walsh, bbc news. as england reopened, there were violent scenes in and around westminster. anti—lockdown and vaccination protestors gathered outside the houses of pariliament. bottles were thrown at police and protestors protested against lockdown measures, which for all intents and purposes, had been lifted at midnight. a lot to get into today. let's go straight to sarah stewart—brown, a professor of public health at the university of warwick. 0n the one hand, vaccines mean the national lockdown is over but thousands of cases mean that thousands of cases mean that thousands of cases mean that thousands of people are in their own individual lockdowns like the prime minister. how do you see the balance? ~ �* , minister. how do you see the balance?— minister. how do you see the balance? ~ �*, ., , ., balance? well, there's lots of mixed feelin . s. balance? well, there's lots of mixed feelinqs- lots _ balance? well, there's lots of mixed feelings. lots of— balance? well, there's lots of mixed feelings. lots of people _ balance? well, there's lots of mixed feelings. lots of people are - balance? well, there's lots of mixed feelings. lots of people are very - feelings. lots of people are very happy and excited. there's still a lot of anxiety. i think it's quite
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important to go back to some of the stats and what's being reported primarily at the moment is concerns about the number of cases, but the number of cases aren't relating to hospital admissions and deaths in anything like the same way that they were. if you look at a statistic called excess deaths, an amalgam of
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110w now are getting the infection now are much less at risk. either they've been vaccinated or they're young and healthy. so we're not getting the problems on the virus that we were at the beginning and it is safe to let it spread through the population in a way that didn't feel safe at all in march of 2020. but in a way that didn't feel safe at all in march of 2020.— in a way that didn't feel safe at all in march of 2020. but you will know that there's _ all in march of 2020. but you will know that there's a _ all in march of 2020. but you will know that there's a backlog - all in march of 2020. but you will know that there's a backlog of. all in march of 2020. but you will i know that there's a backlog of cases in the nhs and we still don't know what will really happy when all of the country is moving around together. we might only know in three weeks' time?—
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three weeks' time? well, that is true but we _ three weeks' time? well, that is true but we can _ three weeks' time? well, that is true but we can predict - three weeks' time? well, that is true but we can predict it - three weeks' time? well, that is. true but we can predict it because we know who is getting the infection now and we know it's mostly in the young and mostly low risk because the higher risk have almost all been vaccinated or had the covid infection. so we can predict what's going to happen. in other countries where this has happened, they've seen what we've seen, rising cases, but it hasn't been followed by a swamping of the health service or the deaths, so i think the main problem we're dealing with now is that people are still very anxious, and it's very hard for people to feel secure about the changes. and so what we need is more of the reassuring statistics about how very low death rates are at the moment and how the hospitals are well able to cope with the number of covid cases coming in. 0bviously to cope with the number of covid cases coming in. obviously it would be wonderful if there were none and all of the resources of the nhs could be devoted to shifting the
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backlogs and waiting lists that have built up but we aren't at a level that's in anyway a cause for concern at the moment.— that's in anyway a cause for concern at the moment. professor, thank you. thank yom — later in the programme, we'll be talking to a night club owner who took full advantage of today's easing of restrictions and opened on the dot of midnight. we're going to take a good look at hacking and cybersecurity. a new report alleges that human rights activists, journalists and lawyers around the world have been targeted with phone hacking software sold to authoritarian governments by an israeli surveillance firm, that says the spyware is intended to be used against criminals and terrorists. they are on a list of some 50,000 phone numbers of people believed to be of interest to clients of the company, nso group, leaked to major news outlets. nso denies any wrongdoing. 0ur cyber security correspondent joe tidy has been looking into this and joins us now.
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how did the hacking work? pegasus is an extremely — how did the hacking work? pegasus is an extremely powerful— how did the hacking work? pegasus is an extremely powerful piece - how did the hacking work? pegasus is an extremely powerful piece of- an extremely powerful piece of spyware. this is software used to spy spyware. this is software used to spy on people. it basically turns your phone into an amazing spying device. there are commercially available products that can do this but the incredible thing about pegasusis but the incredible thing about pegasus is the ability to infect mobile phones without actually physically having them in your hand. people could be infected by attackers simply by placing a phone call between the two. the victim didn't even need to pick up the phonein didn't even need to pick up the phone in some cases and the infection was done. it meant an attacker was able to use the camera of the phone, to use the microphone, to read all the messages, to see the social media activity and e—mails and basically whatever was done on the mobile phone, the attackers could see it. is the mobile phone, the attackers could see it.— the mobile phone, the attackers could see it. is everyone at risk? no, this is _ could see it. is everyone at risk? no, this is a _ could see it. is everyone at risk? no, this is a very _ could see it. is everyone at risk? no, this is a very expensive - no, this is a very expensive software which is only given out to
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governments and nso group says they group the organisations and governments to whom they sell the spyware about the accusation is that they aren't abetting them enough. this list of 50,000 mobile numbers that investigators who have investigated this, they say that the list of phone numbers has come from the n50 list of phone numbers has come from the nso group's own operation and gives a glimpse into the kind of individuals being targeted. they're not everyday people, they are journalists, human rights activists and opponents to governments. we know there are at least 188 journalists in 21 different countries who were selected for potential targeting according to the list by nso spyware between 2016 and 2021, in countries including
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azerbaijan, india and morocco. in azerbaijan, india and morocco. in azerbaijan and india, a0 journalists were targeted and some according to investigators actually got hacked by the software themselves.— more hacking allegations now, this time the attack targeting microsoft that could have potentially affected over a 250,000 servers around the world. joe biden has said he believes china is protecting hackers that are carrying out a global cyber—espionage campaign. here he is speaking earlier the chinese government, not unlike the russian government, is not doing this themselves but it is protecting those who are doing it and maybe even accommodating them in being able to do it. today the united states and its allies accused the chinese ministry of state security of other espionage activity, publicly calling out beijing for hacking. let's get more on this from our senior north america reporter anthony zurcher in washington. we normally, when we do these
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stories, end up talking about russia but this time it's china. why is that? �* , ,, ., , but this time it's china. why is that? , ,,., , , that? because the united states is accusin: that? because the united states is accusing china, _ that? because the united states is accusing china, to _ that? because the united states is accusing china, to use _ that? because the united states is accusing china, to use anthony - that? because the united states is i accusing china, to use anthony blank and's time, fostering an ecosystem of criminal contract actors, paying actors, some with affiliation to the chinese government, to hack small businesses around the world through the microsoft exchange servers. talking about 250,000 possibly e—mail servers. the breadth of this is remarkable as well as the breadth of the response. it's notjust the united states but as you mentioned, us allies in europe, nato, canada, australia, new zealand, japan. the fact that there was this large group speaking out against china and pointing the finger at china, that was particularly remarkable in this case. ., was particularly remarkable in this case, ., ., , was particularly remarkable in this case. ., ., , , was particularly remarkable in this case. ., case. how does this complicate the biden administration's _ case. how does this complicate the biden administration's attempts . case. how does this complicate the biden administration's attempts to | biden administration's attempts to deal with china given that it needs to cooperate with them when it comes to cooperate with them when it comes
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to climate change and other areas? it will be difficult. joe biden has framed his foreign policy as a clash between democracies and authoritarian governments around the world. in one way this fits into the framework, that there are countries who are bad actors. russia, china as well, and that there needs to be democratic cooperation to push back against these attempts. condemning them is the first step but i will note that there were no sanctions, note that there were no sanctions, no penalties imposed in the statement of condemnation, unlike the us did with russia and the solar wind act last year. that reflects perhaps a bit of the complexity of us china relations that at least for the moment they aren't willing to turn this from strong words into strong actions. but they will say they are keeping options open going forward. ., . , ., ., _ , forward. how much is an of cyber security for—
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forward. how much is an of cyber security for the _ forward. how much is an of cyber security for the biden _ security for the biden administration? ., �* ., ., administration? you've heard of diiital administration? you've heard of digital cold _ administration? you've heard of digital cold war, _ administration? you've heard of digital cold war, the _ administration? you've heard of digital cold war, the idea - administration? you've heard of digital cold war, the idea that i digital cold war, the idea that conflicts between superpowers won't be on physical battlefields going forward but on digital ones. the idea that the us and other democracies must prepare themselves, notjust democracies must prepare themselves, not just governments democracies must prepare themselves, notjust governments but private actors, to protect secrets and protect against hostile foreign governments and groups that are supported by foreign governments from gaining sensitive or valuable secrets. this is a top priority, clearly for the biden administration. with vladimir putin, they talked about cybersecurity first. that shows where the emphasis these days. first. that shows where the emphasis these da s. . ~ first. that shows where the emphasis these da s. ., ,, , ., let's unpack both strands of those cyber stories with former federal prosecutor and cyber security expert kellen dwyer. thanks forjoining us. we covered these two stories, the malware and these two stories, the malware and the state—sponsored attack. what keeps officials in the department of
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justice awake at night more? film. justice awake at night more? oh, that's tough _ justice awake at night more? oh, that's tough to — justice awake at night more? oh, that's tough to say. _ justice awake at night more? oi, that's tough to say. there justice awake at night more? “i, that's tough to say. there are so many different cyber threats you need to be concerned about at the same time. the actions we saw today focused on state—sponsored and at least a state enabled and tolerated threats and that's one of them but also threats from private actors, things like ransomware gangs, a huge priority for the biden administration and in the case of the isos group, the use of private actors who may, wittingly or unwittingly be enabling authoritarian regimes to use these tools for evil. they are all top priorities. i5 tools for evil. they are all top priorities-— tools for evil. they are all top riorities. , �* .., ., ., priorities. is america doing enough to rotect priorities. is america doing enough to protect itself? _ priorities. is america doing enough to protect itself? no. _ priorities. is america doing enough to protect itself? no. you - priorities. is america doing enough to protect itself? no. you can - priorities. is america doing enough| to protect itself? no. you can never do enough — to protect itself? no. you can never do enough to _ to protect itself? no. you can never do enough to protect _ to protect itself? no. you can never do enough to protect yourself - to protect itself? no. you can never do enough to protect yourself and i | do enough to protect yourself and i don't think the administration will tell you that they feel like they've done enough. ifeel like tell you that they feel like they've
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done enough. i feel like the fact that today you had countries all over the world joining in condemning the actions of the chinese state as being out of bounds in cyber. as you know, there are countries including those in europe, the number one trading partnerfor them is china. getting certain countries in the eu to make any criticism of china is a big diplomatic win for the biden administration and it matters because your correspondent talked about a digital cold war. that's so true. the chinese government in particular is very sensitive to this kind of criticism because they want to export their technology to third countries, so if they want third countries, so if they want third countries to purchase huawei products, they must trust the chinese government enough to do that in many ways this government is not
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trustworthy. we in many ways this government is not trustworthy-— trustworthy. we have a debate in this country _ trustworthy. we have a debate in this country about _ trustworthy. we have a debate in this country about huawei. - trustworthy. we have a debate in this country about huawei. more | this country about huawei. more countries, notjust china and russia, are mauled countries learning how to conduct cyber attacks? ~ , , ., j attacks? absolutely and they're seeinr attacks? absolutely and they're seeing how _ attacks? absolutely and they're seeing how valuable _ attacks? absolutely and they're seeing how valuable it - attacks? absolutely and they're seeing how valuable it can - attacks? absolutely and they're seeing how valuable it can be . attacks? absolutely and they're| seeing how valuable it can be an intelligence tool. private companies are springing up that are enabling smaller countries to get these tools. and whether they're going to use them responsibly is a major concern. espionage in 2021 is not cloak and dagger, not putting a mole in an organisation. it is getting access to somebody�*s smartphone because it knows things about us that maybe our closest friends don't know. is that maybe our closest friends don't know. , . , that maybe our closest friends don't know. , ., , ., ., . ,, that maybe our closest friends don't know. , .,, ., ., . ,, ., know. is it easier to hack or rotect know. is it easier to hack or protect against _ know. is it easier to hack or protect against it? - know. is it easier to hack or protect against it? always | know. is it easier to hack or - protect against it? always easier to hack, right? _ protect against it? always easier to hack, right? i— protect against it? always easier to hack, right? i didn't— protect against it? always easier to hack, right? i didn't know- protect against it? always easier to hack, right? i didn't know that! - hack, right? i didn't know that! criminals only _ hack, right? i didn't know that! criminals only need _ hack, right? i didn't know that! criminals only need to - hack, right? i didn't know that! criminals only need to be - hack, right? i didn't know that! criminals only need to be luckyj criminals only need to be lucky once. you have to hope that every employee in your company doesn't
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click on a suspicious e—mail. if one does, that can be enough. looking at a case like the apple iphone that supposedly had a vulnerability that allowed the nso group to create something that can hack it, it is an arms race with companies whose only job is to find vulnerabilities in iphones and if apple miss one it can be used to the detriment of someone very seriously. be used to the detriment of someone very seriously-— very seriously. what is the safest wa to very seriously. what is the safest way to communicate, _ very seriously. what is the safest way to communicate, apart - very seriously. what is the safest way to communicate, apart from | very seriously. what is the safestl way to communicate, apart from a carrier pigeon?— carrier pigeon? lower tech is sometimes _ carrier pigeon? lower tech is sometimes the _ carrier pigeon? lower tech is sometimes the way - carrier pigeon? lower tech is sometimes the way to - carrier pigeon? lower tech is sometimes the way to go. i carrier pigeon? lower tech is - sometimes the way to go. encryption tools like signal and whatsapp give the illusion of security but that only protects you from having your message intercepted. if your phone thatis message intercepted. if your phone that is holding the message is compromised, then that's not going to protect you. compromised, then that's not going to protect you-— to protect you. thanks for “oining us. stay with us on news, still to come.
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german police say there could be more bodies in places they haven't reached — or where water hasn't receded — after last week's devastating floods. more now on the news that the government has confirmed that a limited group of children will be offered covid jabs to protect them against the pandemic. here's the vaccines minister nadhim zahawi in the commons a little earlier. i know that people will have questions about what it means for them and their children, but i can assure them, mr speaker, that nobody needs to come forward at this stage. the nhs will get in touch with them at the right time and make sure that jabs are delivered in a setting that meets their complex needs. we asked dj cpi to consider rolling out vaccines to all children and young people over the age of 12 and although we are not taking this step today, the jcvi although we are not taking this step today, thejcvi advise keeping the matter under review and they will be
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looking at more data as it becomes available, especially on children with a second dose of the pfizer beyond tech vaccine. the with a second dose of the pfizer beyond tech vaccine. german police say 170 people are still missing after last week's disastrous floods, more than have been confirmed dead. there are also warnings more bodies may be found in places where flood waters had not yet receded. the interior minister meanwhile rejected calls to resign over accusations that there were catastrophic shortcomings in the flood warning system. the bbc�*s damien mcguinness has more on the clean—up effort, and the lessons yet to be learned. the rains have stopped and the flood waters are receding but that also means the true extent of the destruction is becoming clear. countless numbers of people have lost everything. and the region's infrastructure has been torn apart.
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roads and bridges have been destroyed, and there are still areas without basic amenities. translation: there's neither electricity nor drinking water. l i don't know what to say. i must stop to take a break now and then and talk to people, otherwise i'll go crazy. within the space of two days, two large states were hit by more rainfall than they usually get in two months, causing the region's many rivers to burst their banks. in the village of schuld, the flood waters destroyed, and in some cases, even washed away houses. and in one town near cologne, the water created landslides which undermined a row of homes and a castle. it had survived for centuries, but wasn't able to withstand the onslaught of the floods. often people had just minutes to get to safety. translation: ! woke up about 11pm and stepped into the water— with a depth of about 20 centimetres
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when i got off the bed. i couldn't have imagined how fast the water would rise if i hadn't experienced it on my own. translation: i don't know what to do. i i have four kids. this is really a disaster. no—one told me how long it would take to rebuild this place, which may take a year or two years. we are out of work. how to carry out the reconstruction is the biggest issue. the german chancellor angela merkel has visited the region and expressed her shock at the destruction. on wednesday her cabinet will agree a rescue package for these areas. as the devastated areas are cleaned up and rebuilt, though, pressure will grow on the german government to fulfil its promises. damien mcguinness, bbc news, neuburg, in rhineland—palatinate. neighbouring austria has also been hit hard by the flooding. these pictures are from the weekend and led to emergency crews having to rescue people from homes in the region of salzburg, where floodwaters submerged
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the streets of one town. the fire brigade said the capital vienna saw more rainfall in an hour on saturday night than in the previous seven weeks. the bbc�*s bethan bell is in hallein, near salzburg. here in hallein, the rain has stopped and the clean—up is in full swing. it is dirty work and there is mud everywhere. the old town centre was hit by rain on saturday night, a torrent of water rushing through the streets after a river burst its banks. shops, homes and businesses have been hit hard. 0ur ice creams machines and our electric is very damaged and now we have a lot of mud. the army and fire brigade have been helping to clean the streets and pump out cellars. volunteers are helping to clear out the mess. yes, it's a shock and
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it's really difficult. i stay with us. more in a moment. hello. in response to the ongoing heat across the uk, the met office has now issued an extreme heat warning for parts of england and wales. it's the first time we've seen one of these warnings issued, but this part of our warnings suite only came into force from the 1st ofjune. it essentially indicates elevated temperatures both by day and by night. you can get more details on what that warning means and how it fits in with the other warnings you see as issued by taking a look on our website. certainly overnight, though, there will be a lot of heat hanging around across the uk with a core
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of it across england and wales. in some areas, for the bulk of the sleeping hours, temperatures will be setting close to 20 celsius. this is the weather pattern that's bringing all of the heat. a lot of sunshine across much of the uk, but underneath that area of high pressure, tuesday afternoon, a little bit like we saw on monday, there's the possibility of some very localised clusters of thunderstorms breaking out. a little bit more cloud for northern scotland, cooler here, but heat creeping in to southern scotland and northern ireland. temperatures around the 30 mark for many inland spots across england and wales. a closer look certainly worthy for those showers heading later on into the afternoon on tuesday into the small hours of wednesday. could locally be inundated rain for some, certainly and some large hail. for wednesday, we still have the high with us. again, an indicator that to the east of england, just enough instability sits in the atmosphere for us to see some thunderstorms breaking out, perhaps earlier in the day, midday into the afternoon on wednesday. bit more cloud across the northeast of england, that, i think,
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will linger, actually, for north sea coasts. so cooler for the likes of newcastle and hull. you can still see plenty of heat elsewhere, mid to high 20s widely, those temperatures. and the extreme heat warning stands for those parts of england and wales on into thursday. friday is a different story — the temperatures are easing back, fresher air is arriving. where is it coming from? it's getting pulled in around an area of low pressure that will be starting to approach the southwest of the uk. 0vernight friday can they may start to throw in some showers, certainly it looks like there will be plenty of those circulating around in time for the weekend.
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this is bbc news — our top stories: england ends its lockdown after 16 months of covid restrictions, clubbers waste no time in time in taking advantage of the newfound freedoms. shortly after the grand reopening —— the prime minister floats the idea of vaccine passports for those wanting to go to crowded indoor places in england. we'll get reaction from the owner of one of leeds' most famous clubs. charting the final days of the donald trump presidency — journalist and author michael wolff joins us to talk about his new book. and a moment of introspection for the democratic party as it considers how best to win over voters in rural america.
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it is the highly anticipated third installment of journalist michael wolff's series of books documenting the turbulent trump presidency. fire and fury charting the former president's first year in office sold a million copies, with readers across the world lapping up the drama, but if the reviews are to go by, this is wolff's most dramatic account yet. charting the events that led up the riot on the capitol, and looking at how trump is spending his post—presidency, secluded but still powerful. he's is the man with trump's ear and i'm so glad to say michael wolffjoins us now. hello, michael. 200 years ago, ever give been talked about the fall of the roman empire, the most powerful entity on earth. you talked about the downfall of the trump administration. will your book still
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be read in two centuries' time? you know, be read in two centuries' time? you know. one — be read in two centuries' time? you know. one can _ be read in two centuries' time? i'm, know, one can only hope. be read in two centuries' time? you know, one can only hope. it - be read in two centuries' time? you know, one can only hope. it is i be read in two centuries' time? you know, one can only hope. it is the l know, one can only hope. it is the third book, _ know, one can only hope. it is the third book, and _ know, one can only hope. it is the third book, and act _ know, one can only hope. it is the third book, and act three. - know, one can only hope. it is the third book, and act three. we i know, one can only hope. it is the. third book, and act three. we know that act iii contains climactic battles and confrontations. how did you create a sense of drama with this when we all knew what was going to happen. we had seen it happen? it is a super good question and it wasn'tjust is a super good question and it wasn't just that we know what was going to happen because, this is already happened and whenjoe biden became the president onjanuary 20. but everyone around donald trump and this is part of the tension is the craziness here, everyone in the white house, everyone in the campaign, everyone in his family, from shortly after november three election day, they understood that
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on january election day, they understood that onjanuary 20, joe biden would be president and that nothing that donald trump could do or would do would interfere with that. so, i think the tension comes from this weird other reality that donald trump is living in, that donald trump is living in, that donald trump thinks a, the election was stolen from him, be that he could do something about it in reverse the selection. so, you are really watching what you want to see is not how events turn out, but what happens to a crazy man who thinks that somehow, he can change the events that everyone knows are going to transpire. events that everyone knows are going to transire. ~ ., events that everyone knows are going to transpire-— to transpire. when, if at all, did he realise _ to transpire. when, if at all, did he realise that _ to transpire. when, if at all, did he realise that mr _ to transpire. when, if at all, did he realise that mr biden - to transpire. when, if at all, did he realise that mr biden was i to transpire. when, if at all, did i he realise that mr biden was going to be sworn in?—
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to be sworn in? right up until january six. — to be sworn in? right up until january six, that _ to be sworn in? right up until january six, that fateful i to be sworn in? right up until january six, that fateful day i to be sworn in? right up until| january six, that fateful day on january six, that fateful day on january six, that fateful day on january six, he believed that the vice president, he believed the vice president have the power to reverse the votes of the electoral college and he believed that was what the vice president would use that power to donald trump to benefit. and only been one the vice president did not use that power, and mind you the vice president had told him again and again and again that he did not have that power and therefore would not use it. but only then, when he did not use it and when it did not come to pass that donald trump begin to accept thatjoe biden would be the president onjanuary six. you the president on january six. you would have _ the president on january six. you would have said _ the president onjanuary six. you would have said the words i lost, he would have said the words i lost, he would say that it was stolen from them. at would say that it was stolen from them. �* , , ._ would say that it was stolen from them. �* , , ., would say that it was stolen from them. �* , , ~ , them. at this very day and very moment. _ them. at this very day and very moment. he — them. at this very day and very moment, he believes - them. at this very day and very moment, he believes that i them. at this very day and very moment, he believes that he i them. at this very day and very i moment, he believes that he did not lose in that he in fact when the
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selection and won this election in a landslide and, that the only reason that he is not president is because this election was stolen from him and he believes not only does he believe that now, i will guarantee you rated the second, he is telling someone exactly this.— you rated the second, he is telling someone exactly this. from what i understand. _ someone exactly this. from what i understand, donald _ someone exactly this. from what i understand, donald trump - someone exactly this. from what i i understand, donald trump threatened to sue you after your first book, this time he invited you to interview him. why the change of heart? ., , ., . , heart? you understand correctly because everyone, _ heart? you understand correctly because everyone, this - heart? you understand correctly because everyone, this was i heart? you understand correctly i because everyone, this was announced very publicly that he was going to sue me and that i was a loser and a disgrace and on and on and on. but then, i can only, it is almost inexplicable why after all that, he then agreed to not only see me but to invite me tomorrow lago and have
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dinner with him and sit and spend the afternoon talking to him. why? i know the circumstances, i have told someone who is close in the closed on from circle that i was working on this book and this person went to donald trump and told him that i was doing this book and i assume it's kind of a warning, but donald trump said oh, that guy gets ratings. let's see him. and i was in short order invited tomorrow lago and donald trump treated me like i was his long—lost best friend. iiiruiiiiii his long-lost best friend. will select interview? _ his long-lost best friend. will select interview? incredibly i select interview? incredibly gracious- — select interview? incredibly gracious. difficult _ select interview? incredibly gracious. difficult to - select interview? incredibly i gracious. difficult to interview because he doesn't answer, it's hard to have a conversation with them. but he certainly fills the time just talks and talks and talks and benefit comes into his hand, comes
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out of his mouth and so, it is nevertheless in his own way, very revealing to interview donald trump. was most revealing bit?— was most revealing bit? overall, i think the thing _ was most revealing bit? overall, i think the thing that _ was most revealing bit? overall, i think the thing that was _ was most revealing bit? overall, i think the thing that was most i think the thing that was most revealing is his obsession with the stolen election. that he could go on again and again repeating and repeating all of the reasons and most of them are preposterous reasons why he believes that he has fairly and legitimately won this election. it is full of weird numbers, the maths goes all kinds of sideways in a sideways fashion and the numbers change constantly also. so, that is the thing you are most left with but then he says other things, and itjust falls out of his
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mouth like, his view of supreme courtjustice brett cavanaugh, who, his nominee and who the appointment he shepherded and defended and now he shepherded and defended and now he thinks that brett cavanaugh is the lowest of the low. a real stinker, a real creep for not voting to overturn the election and hand the presidency to donald trump. donald trump can understand why the man who he supported, a man who is in thejob because man who he supported, a man who is in the job because what donald trump did for him would not do something for donald trump. the man lives in the quid pro quo world. what for donald trump. the man lives in the quid pro quo world.— for donald trump. the man lives in the quid pro quo world. what is life like for him — the quid pro quo world. what is life like for him now— the quid pro quo world. what is life like for him now in _ the quid pro quo world. what is life
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like for him now in florida? - the quid pro quo world. what is life like for him now in florida? i i the quid pro quo world. what is life like for him now in florida? i don'tl like for him now in florida? i don't have the feeling _ like for him now in florida? i don't have the feeling that _ like for him now in florida? i don't have the feeling that life _ like for him now in florida? i don't have the feeling that life has i have the feeling that life has changed much for him between trump tower and the white house and he conducts himself in the same way he always has and he spends his days with a lot of people coming to flatter him and then he goes out and plays golf. so, that idea that is ingrained into american presidential history that the presidency changes any man who holds the office is very clearly has not been true for donald trump at all. he remains donald trump at all. he remains donald trump and so, in some way it is much more significant that he is donald trump in that he has been the president of the united states. thank you so much for speaking to
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us. what are democrats going to do about rural america? there's a growing number of lawmakers who feel the party needs to broaden its appeal beyond the beltway and demonstate to voters in conservative states that it too will represent their interests. former clinton strategist james carville has gone as far as saying the democrats have a woke problem. and the advice from carville and others is to simplify the messaging, and focus on populist econmic policies in the run—up to the all—important mid term elections. is that the right idea? neisha blandin is head of political strategy at swing left and formerly deputy women s vote director for hillary clinton's 2016 campaign. she joins us now from washington. we talked about james there, the 1982 slogan, that was invented by him, i can think back to 2012, perez and joe biden came up with the slogan, general motors is
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alive bin laden is dead. here's the midterms. . ~ alive bin laden is dead. here's the midterms. ., ,, , ., alive bin laden is dead. here's the midterms. . ~' , ., ., alive bin laden is dead. here's the midterms. ., ,, , ., ., ., midterms. thank you for having me. and if were — midterms. thank you for having me. and if were talking _ midterms. thank you for having me. and if were talking about _ midterms. thank you for having me. and if were talking about bumper i and if were talking about bumper stickers, i canjust go by swinging left with the candidates and the volunteers we have been talking to on the ground. democratic candidates are really running on the kitchen table issues. talking about the economy, there talking about health care talking about covid—19 recovery. their love democratic policies and accomplishments on all of these issues that we have seen since president biden and the administration came in to place and democrats of a strong record to run on. they've been delivering for the american people. bud on. they've been delivering for the american people.— on. they've been delivering for the american people. and get james kovel said and these — american people. and get james kovel said and these are _ american people. and get james kovel said and these are his _ american people. and get james kovel said and these are his words, - american people. and get james kovel said and these are his words, he i said and these are his words, he said and these are his words, he said the democratic party has a woke problem which would imply that he would struggle to connect with
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people in red states who might identify with different kinds of values. how would you address the point made by him? this values. how would you address the point made by him?— values. how would you address the point made by him? as for what we su ort, point made by him? as for what we support. the _ point made by him? as for what we support, the democratic _ point made by him? as for what we support, the democratic candidates in the sum of the most swing districts across the country, but we are seeing is voters are energised and engaged around results and democrats have been delivering results and for example with the american rescue plan for the tax credits, the checks went out last week and even the issues that the democrats are running on, republicans want you to believe that there is a problem and the democrats do not know how to serve the people. their only accomplishments is trying to defy the american people. they are pushing through over 250 bills in over a0 states to restrict voting because they cannot run on the issues, they have to keep people away from the ballot box. each
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candidate has _ away from the ballot box. each candidate has a _ away from the ballot box. each candidate has a choice, - away from the ballot box. each candidate has a choice, where they take a picture with the serving president to gain them votes or should they steer clear? what will democratic candidates do next year? i think that we could do is that americans overwhelmingly support the biden administration and a lot of the policies and a lot of the events they been pushing out. democrats overwhelmingly are in favour of the goods of the american rescue plan, the support infrastructure and the work of the administration and i think things will see a lot of democrats taking pictures with the presidents and where's republicans have just been obstructing that word. instead, they are trying to run on the democrats record, they did not vote for the american rescue plan but are talking about all the good that it's doing in their districts. ~ ,., ., districts. when he said that americans _ districts. when he said that americans are _ districts. when he said that i americans are overwhelmingly in favour, it's fair to say the democrats are in favours but republicans are not. republican voters will come out in 2022, hoping
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to regain the house, the senate, take a step towards retaking the white house and that is a very serious prospects given the fact that democrats incredibly small margins, both senate and the house. right, and also the focus is driving early and sustained grassroots support but democratic nominees in the most competitive races across the most competitive races across the country, especially with eyes to the country, especially with eyes to the midterm next year. most americans are in favour of thejoe biden administration policies, they are in favour of the work that the joe biden administration is doing around the covid—19 recovery, getting shots and arms and also the economic recovery. with that focus, swinging left and making sure that driving early sustained grass supports and seeing this from the volunteer leaders that are doing the work every day. volunteer leaders that are doing the work every day-— work every day. thank you so much for 'oinin: work every day. thank you so much
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forjoining us- _ stay with us on bbc news, still to come: night clubs across england opened up at the stroke of midnight, but will the government's plan to introduce vaccine passports leave owners with a hangover come september? scotland has moved to the lowest level of covid restrictions as it continues on its road map out of lockdown. the move to level zero means more people will be allowed to meet indoors and attend weddings and funerals. here's our scotland editor, sarah smith. after 16 months apart, the north lanarkshire chiefs are jumping with joy to be shooting buckets again, as adult indoor contact sport can resume again today. scotland is now in level zero covid rules but zero does not mean none. here many restrictions remain. after so long when you haven't been able to practice, how was it?
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it was brilliant. you know what, notjust the physical benefits of getting back to basketball, but mentally as well. it's been a tough year, 18 months for everybody. being able to blow off some steam, it's just brilliant. but there's little appetite for relaxing the restrictions further in scotland. i don't think it's the right thing just now. cases are a wee bit too high for me. if i was to walk around and see people without masks i'd feel a bit uncomfortable. facemasks are still mandatory in all indoor public places and on public transport. on a day like this, meeting outside is a good option. up to 15 people can now do that. ten people from four households are allowed in a cafe or pub with only eight in someone�*s home. throughout the pandemic, nicola sturgeon has adopted a more cautious tone and tighter restrictions. now she says talk of freedom day in england is not
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sensible and the rules must be relaxed gradually. the scottish government hope they can left the remaining restrictions here next month on the 9th of august. the country's largest vaccination centre has just closed its doors, while one third of young adults have not had a first dose. drop—in clinics from shopping centres to student campuses will try to convince them to get the jab. health and care workers are being left behind in efforts to vaccinate the world against covid—19 7 according to the international council of nurses. new figures suggest tens of millions of frontline workers have yet to be fully vaccinated worldwide. the bbc s global health correspondent, tulip mazumdar, reports. ever since this outbreak began, health and care workers have been putting their lives on the line to protect ours. the world was caught woefully unprepared for covid—19. we've had doctors tell us that they feel like lambs to the slaughter. protective equipment was in short supply —
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some were reduced to using bin liners as barriers against the virus. now, more than a year on, as vaccines are rolled out around the world, tens of millions of those working on the covid front line still haven't received a single vaccine dose. you've got nurses and health care workers going to work knowing that there is a way to protect them, and nurses and health workers in other countries are getting that. people who are less vulnerable in other countries are getting that, as well. but they are being left behind. it feels that, despite all of the warm words of support, they in some way are dispensable or disposable. many countries are not officially reporting the number of health and care workers who have died of covid, but the world health organization estimates it's at least 115,000 — that's around 200 deaths a day — though it says the true figure is likely to be much higher. and even though health and care workers were supposed to be prioritised for covid jabs as soon as they became available, only one in eight globally have been fully vaccinated — and the vast majority of them
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are in richer nations. i had my first shot, i'm currently waiting for my second dose. things have been very, very difficult on our part because we have been short staffed and then the number of cases that we are receiving each and every single day is so overwhelming. to see the suffering, to go physically through it again, the emotional impact again — at this moment, ifeel like... i feel most of us will not survive it mentally. health care workers around the world have staged protests about working conditions, pay, and a lack of protection throughout this crisis. but there are concerns that governments may be reluctant to share the data of health care worker infections and deaths out of fear of facing legal action. covid vaccines are in scarce supply, particularly in lower—income countries. it's also these countries that tend to have precious few health care workers.
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the wider concern is that if they are not protected, that the communities they serve are also left more vulnerable. tulip mazumdar, bbc news. let's look at some of the day's other news a florida man has become the first to be sentenced to prison for his part in the us capitol riots injanuary. paul allard hodgkins pled guilty injune to one felony count of entering the capitol to obstruct congress. he was jailed for eight months. the sentence is expected to set a benchmark for hundreds of upcoming cases from the capitol riots. south africa s former president jacob zuma has appeared on a video link from prison to attend a corruption trial. mr zuma faces charges of fraud and racketeering dating back to the 1990s. this is the first time he s been seen since he was sent to jail for contempt of court 7 a move that sparked a week of looting and arson in south africa prince harry is to release a memoir next year. the publishers say it will be a definitive account of the experiences, losses, and life lessons that have helped shape
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the thirty—six year old. a very public rift has opened up in the past few years between harry his american wife meghan — who've moved to the united states — and other senior members of britain's royal family. borisjohnson has announced that from september those going to night clubs will need to be double jabbed and show proof. it is quite the comedown for night clubs that have been taking full advantage of the loosening of restrictions today. these were the scenes at the mighty fibre in leeds with club goers celebrating the end of restrictions and the beginning of clubbing again, and its owner terry george joins us now. trying to put it into words. it is like new year's eve but with a lot of emotion. is like new year's eve but with a lot of emotion-— of emotion. is like opening a pressure _ of emotion. is like opening a pressure pot- _ of emotion. is like opening a pressure pot. so _ of emotion. is like opening a pressure pot. so many- of emotion. is like opening a l pressure pot. so many people of emotion. is like opening a - pressure pot. so many people crying, absolutely excited. it was the best feeling i've ever felt from the last
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21 years of owning this place and it has been incredible. i do remember the first track that you played was yellow everyone is free to feel good. thus the first track that we played. good. thus the first track that we -la ed. ., good. thus the first track that we . [3 ed. ., ., good. thus the first track that we -la ed. ., ., ., good. thus the first track that we -la ed. ., ., . , played. how long have you been wantin: played. how long have you been wanting to _ played. how long have you been wanting to play _ played. how long have you been wanting to play that _ played. how long have you been wanting to play that when? - played. how long have you been| wanting to play that when? there played. how long have you been - wanting to play that when? there so many tracks — wanting to play that when? there so many tracks and _ wanting to play that when? there so many tracks and could've _ wanting to play that when? there so many tracks and could've used - wanting to play that when? there so many tracks and could've used and l wanting to play that when? there so many tracks and could've used and i | many tracks and could've used and i think that was the most fitting for a venue because it is the one that gets everyone singing along and has real emotion as well. hesse gets everyone singing along and has real emotion as well.— real emotion as well. have attended to close the — real emotion as well. have attended to close the morning? _ real emotion as well. have attended to close the morning? 5am - real emotion as well. have attended to close the morning? 5am this - real emotion as well. have attended to close the morning? 5am this willl to close the morning? 5am this will be finished and _ to close the morning? 5am this will be finished and i _ to close the morning? 5am this will be finished and i went _ to close the morning? 5am this will be finished and i went to _ to close the morning? 5am this will be finished and i went to the - to close the morning? 5am this will be finished and i went to the gym l to close the morning? 5am this will| be finished and i went to the gym at seven a:m., so it was not a lot. i’m seven a:m., so it was not a lot. i'm amazed just — seven a:m., so it was not a lot. i'm amazed just no _ seven a:m., so it was not a lot. i'm amazed just up the energy to go to the gym. what checks did you make if any? we the gym. what checks did you make if an ? ~ ., ., ~ the gym. what checks did you make if an? ., ._ the gym. what checks did you make if an? ., any? we did not make any because it wasn't mandatory. _ any? we did not make any because it wasn't mandatory. and _ any? we did not make any because it wasn't mandatory. and we _ any? we did not make any because it wasn't mandatory. and we spoke - any? we did not make any because it wasn't mandatory. and we spoke to l any? we did not make any because itj wasn't mandatory. and we spoke to a lot of customers that had one vaccine jab and some had both. some had nojet at
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vaccine jab and some had both. some had no jet at all —— vaccine jab and some had both. some had nojet at all —— no jab vaccine jab and some had both. some had no jet at all —— no jab at all. it is also confusing because we're the only venue doing these checks and people would've gone elsewhere who have had an unfair competition going on that is part of the problem. it needs to be kind of fair needs to be mandatory if it's going to happen and so everyone is taking part in it. to happen and so everyone is taking art in it. ~ ., to happen and so everyone is taking art in it. ~ . ., , part in it. what about these new checks, part in it. what about these new checks. the _ part in it. what about these new checks, the vaccine _ part in it. what about these new checks, the vaccine certificates. checks, the vaccine certificates that they are imposing on the end of september. that is the time were adults over 18 and will have been offered a second jab. hat adults over 18 and will have been offered a second jab.— adults over 18 and will have been offered a second jab. offered a second 'ab. not quite true because this — offered a second jab. not quite true because this evening, _ offered a second jab. not quite true because this evening, i _ offered a second jab. not quite true because this evening, i spoke - offered a second jab. not quite true because this evening, i spoke to - because this evening, i spoke to about 25 other customers and some of them don't qualify for the second jab until after that day and so they'll give them a bit of a mixture of time. in bringing in for everybody, we have to accept it. that is how it has to be, that is how it has to be. but there's lots of people who don't want to be checked and want to feel that they're taking their own precautions and being sensible but it seems that
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the government feel that it has to be put back onto their toes so that they can put the implementations and eviction of the people do get vaccinated.— eviction of the people do get vaccinated. �* , ., . vaccinated. and when you are there for midnight — vaccinated. and when you are there for midnight until— vaccinated. and when you are there for midnight until five _ vaccinated. and when you are there for midnight until five a:m. , - vaccinated. and when you are there for midnight until five a:m. , did - vaccinated. and when you are there for midnight until five a:m. , did it l for midnight untilfive a:m., did it feel like the pandemic had all been just a bad dream? it feel like the pandemic had all been just a bad dream?— just a bad dream? it did, it felt like it never— just a bad dream? it did, it felt like it never happened - just a bad dream? it did, it felt like it never happened but - just a bad dream? it did, it felt like it never happened but the | just a bad dream? it did, it felt. like it never happened but the fact that we were just back in their dancing and we were getting so emotional over dancing and loud music and being able to stand up was, it's kind of strange, really. it's real because people just walking to the bar, the simple things like that has such an emotional effect on people because you forget, that is what we used to do and it's been so long since we've been suppressed are not able to do this. but it was just incredible. the owner and the manager of fibre in leads, and told most famous nightclub. in leads, and told most famous niuhtclub. . ., ., in leads, and told most famous nightclub-— in leads, and told most famous niuhtclub. �* ., ., , nightclub. around the world by the look of things. _
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nightclub. around the world by the look of things. thank _ nightclub. around the world by the look of things. thank you - nightclub. around the world by the look of things. thank you so - nightclub. around the world by the look of things. thank you so much | look of things. thank you so much forjoining us. find look of things. thank you so much forjoining us— look of things. thank you so much forjoining us. and to stay with bbc news. hello. the weekend brought us plenty of sunshine and plenty of heat. we've started this week with the same weather scenario and that's going to be staying with us through the next few days thanks to a well—established area of high pressure. however, we are going to be introduced to the possibility of some isolated thunderstorms in the next couple of days, particularly in the evenings. even overnight tonight with moisture and humidity for the southeast of england, there could be some local thunderstorms rumbling on and certainly an uncomfortable night. lows, at the end of the night, 17 and 18 degrees. realistically, through the small hours, temperatures closer to 20. here's the big area of high pressure on tuesday but look closely at the map, you can see that
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area of blue. our model indicating enough instability in the atmosphere that come tuesday afternoon, we will see some towering cloud developing across parts of the east midlands, lincolnshire, east anglia in the southeast and it could then develop into some very intense thunderstorms. heat creeping further north on tuesday, 26 there in glasgow. through the afternoon, on into the evening, and particularly the small hours of wednesday, is when the showers may be concerning. slow moving and a lot of rain in a short space of time. some big hail, strong, gusty winds could and as you can see, they go on for a through the evening finally petering out into the early hours of wednesday. wednesday, dawn is fine, a lot of sunshine and just a slight chance as the high moves eastwards that we drag a bit more cloud on the north sea coast for wednesday. again, there's that area of blue. we start the day fine and some cloud across the northeast of england, fading back to the coast where it will stay cooler. eastern england still with the possibility of some heavy
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thunderstorms developing. certainly not for all areas. they will be a very local phenomenon, but if you're caught in them, you will almost definitely know about it. notice that heat again is creeping a bit further north through midweek. wednesday into thursday, as the high re—orientates itself, it looks like we may lose some of that instability in the upper atmosphere from across eastern england, and so the chance of showers is greatly reduced. i think thursday a fine story across the board. patchy cloud drifting across parts of the eastern area, but still, essentially sunny with a fair weather cloud and temperatures widely in the high 20s to low 30s. if you have had enough of the heat, well here comes the change in our story for you. cooler air arriving as this area of low pressure pushes in to the southwest. it looks like it will start to make inroads on friday. friday is a dry day until we get to the evening with the showers
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moving towards the southwest but it will already start to feel fresher because it will be developing a south—westerly atlantic air steam. temperatures mid rather than high 20s. what's happening? well, this week, thejet�*s been away to the north of us, but by the end of the week, we move into this dip or trough and thejet, if you'd like. that allows us to move into cooler air, which will come down from the north. relatively cooler, and it certainly won't feel chilly, but it also allows for low pressure to sit across the uk. a very different scenario to this week, it is looking like temperatures are returning much closer to average, slightly below values and it also looks like it will be unsettled.
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tonight at ten: the prime minister's former chief adviser dominic cummings accuses borisjohnson of putting politics ahead of people's lives during the pandemic. he said the prime minister was reluctant to tighten restrictions again last autumn, saying the people who were dying were "essentially all over 80", and he didn't buy the idea that the nhs would be overwhelmed. dominic cummings also claimed he had to stop borisjohnson from going to see the queen in person as the virus took hold. if you go and you give her coronavirus and she dies, what are you...? you can't do that. you can't risk that. that's completely insane. tonight, downing street says the government has always taken the necessary action to protect lives, guided by the best scientific advice.
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