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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 19, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. after 16 months, nearly all of england's coronavirus rules have been lifted. social distancing rules are over — nightclubs are open and capacity limits have been removed. all this as cases continue to rise. the prime minster insists now�*s the right time. if we don't open up now, then we face the risk of even tougher conditions in the coming months when the virus has a natural advantage. —— in the colder months. the uk has also announced it will vaccinate certain groups of under—18s, but the vast majority won't be eligible for now. also in the programme: we'll get the latest
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on the devastating floods in europe. in germany, more than 170 people are still missing. at least 160 are confirmed dead. rain is continuing to wreak havoc, with attention now shifting to parts of austria — these are the streets in one town in the salzburg region. we begin in england and, 480 days after they were first introduced, most legal restrictions on social contact have been lifted. including the restrictions on social contact. three, two, one! cheering this was the moment when the clock struck midnight — that restrictions eased. these people are celebrating what many have called "freedom day". from today, monday, life can pretty much go back to normal. face coverings are no longer required by law — although they are recommended in some crowded public spaces, such as public transport. the social distancing "one—metre plus" guidance is no longer mandatory except in some
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places like hospitals. nightclubs can reopen and theatres and cinemas can return to full capacity. people currently working from home are being encouraged to return to the workplace. "amber list" travel guidance — which advises against travel to amber list countries — has been removed. and fully vaccinated front—line health workers in england will — when hospitals are short—staffed — be able to avoid self—isolation rules. the number of cases in the uk has returned to january levels 7 currently about 50,000 cases a day are being recorded, spurred by the delta variant. and some scientists predict that that number could reach 200,000 a day later in the summer. but prime minister borisjohnson has said this is the right time to remove all restrictions. if we don't do it now, then we will be opening up in the autumn, the winter months when the virus has the advantage of the cold weather, and we lose the precious fire break that we get with the school holidays. if we don't do it now,
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we've got to ask ourselves, when will we ever do it? the opposition labour party leader kier starmer has said the lifting of restrictions is reckless and chaotic. his character causes chaos. his leadership causes mayhem. labour does not support the government's plan. lifting all restrictions in one day is reckless. —— in one go. nadhim zahawi, the uk's vaccines minister, has defended the timing. there is no perfect time, but a time when schoolsl are on summer holidays, | and that brings downward pressure on the r number, the infection number, - and the high levels of vaccination — almost 80% of all adults now- with one dose, as i said. -- 88%. this is the right time i to cautiously proceed. all this comes as hundreds of thousands of people in the uk
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are being "pinged" by the track and trace app, which tells you if you've been in contact with someone who's tested positive. latest figures show that more than 500,000 people in england and wales were "pinged" by the app in the week to sevenjuly, up 46% on the previous week. if you are "pinged", you're advised — but not legally obliged — to self—isolate for ten days. injanuary, england was in another lockdown. this time, the government has instead been trialling a pilot scheme, in which daily tests would replace self—isolation. on sunday, borisjohnson said he was taking part in this pilot scheme, after health minister sajid javid tested positive for coronavirus — but that didn't work out for him. he briefly was going to excuse himself from the, sort of, self—isolation that half a million odd people are having to do, but quickly realised that would look terrible, it would look as if it was one rule for the politicians and one rule for the rest of us. and so, he made a screeching u—turn. that's certainly how
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the opposition saw it — here's kier starmer again. borisjohnson and rishi sunak only went into isolation because they were busted. we've seen once again their instincts on show. 0ne rule for them, another rule for the rest of us. borisjohnson has urged caution — but that's up to the individual now, not the government. and even he's admitted cases will keep rising. we've got to remember that this virus is sadly still out there, cases are rising — we can see the extreme contagiousness of the delta variant. and there's another thing worrying scientists besides the rising cases. here's our health correspondentjim reed. by allowing people to get infected, you are increasing the chance that a new variant could emerge. so at the moment, as i say, it's this delta variant — which is by far the most prevalent in the uk — could you see some
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mutation to that that is in some ways either more infectious or could make the vaccine less effective? and are you increasing the chances of that by having 50, 60, 70, 100,000 people a day infected? martin hibberd is a professor of emerging infectious diseases at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine. he agrees. what i worry about is that we might be generating a vaccine—resistant . variant, and that's something we need to keep careful eye i on to make sure that that doesn't happen. i otherwise, we might be back into a difficult situation - of having to close again. across the border in scotland, restrictions are also easing — but the picture is very different. pubs and restaurants will now be able to stay open until midnight. but group sizes are still limited the return of workers to offices will be delayed, and face coverings will remain mandatory. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, shared this picture, in which you can see scotland's cases are dropping, while england's are rising steeply.
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she added, "to talk of �*freedom day�* is not sensible, in my opinion, given current situation." vaccinating children is another priority for the government. today, it's said it will vaccinated 370,000 children who are at risk of coronavirus. in teenagers within three months of their 18th birthday. here's the vaccine minister, nadhim zahawi, speaking in the last couple of hours. today's advice recommends that we continue to vaccinate 16—17—year—olds who are in an at—risk group, as we do now. but it also recommends expanding the offer of the vaccine to some younger children with underlying health conditions that put them at greater risk of covid—19. we also ask thejcvi to consider rolling out vaccines to all children and young people over the age of 12. and, although we are not
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taking this step today, thejcvi's keeping this matter under review, and they will be looking at more data as it becomes available. figures from two weeks ago showed 840,000 pupils were out of school in england two weeks ago due to covid—related reasons — the highest number since schools fully reopened in march. that number will be higher now. the uk is by no means ahead of the game when it comes to vaccinating children. that's been replaced by contract tracing through the track and trace app. as you can see, that's been pinging hundreds of thousands of people. the vast majority of children in the uk who are at risk will not —— low risk will not be offered the vaccine. france began vaccinating 12—18—year—olds on 15june. austria aims to have more than 340,000 children between the ages of 12—15 vaccinated
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by the end of august. israel began vaccinating its 600,000 12—15 year—olds on 6june. and the us has become one of the countries that made the most progress — it began vaccinating teens on 13 may, and had given at least one dose to more than 30% of 12—15—year—olds by the end ofjune. i'm joined now by drjennie lavine, an?epidemiologist at emory university in new york, who wrote in the bmj recently that vaccinating children was "hard to justify right now for most children in most countries". thank you very much forjoining us on 0utside source, we appreciate your time. why did you say that? well, i think the first key thing is that we really need to be thinking about how, when we look at a vaccination scheme, what is the cost benefit for direct protection to the vaccinated individuals? so in this case, asking for a child who is
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maybe 13 years old, what's the cost of getting a vaccine, what are the health risks associated with it, and what are the benefits? and because it tends to cause fairly mild disease in that age group, the expected benefit is not especially high, and the risk at this point we don't think is especially high either — but at the same time, these vaccines were rolled out very quickly for very, very good reason — we are still in the middle of a health crisis, it's an emergency globally and for many sectors of the population. but for that sector, i would say it's not a direct emergency to them. but would say it's not a direct emergency to them. but isn't the calculation _ emergency to them. but isn't the calculation not _ emergency to them. but isn't the calculation not just _ emergency to them. but isn't the calculation notjust about - emergency to them. but isn't the calculation not just about that. emergency to them. but isn't the | calculation notjust about that age calculation not just about that age group, but society as a whole? and i thought the argument was the more children you vaccinate, the better chance you have of the entire community reaching herd immunity? great question. i think at this
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point, that was certainly a hope that many of us had for a very long time. and at the beginning, with good reason. ithink time. and at the beginning, with good reason. i think at this point, the chances of reaching a lasting herd immunity threshold — that is to say a point where enough immunity exists for a long enough period of time — and notjust any immunity, but transmission blocking immunity is so unlikely that we are unlikely to reach that threshold whether or not we vaccinate kids. so the question isn't so much, will kids or adults get infected and reinfected with the delta variant, it is, how severe will that disease be? so we can separate the delta variant from covid—19, which we think is the disease caused by it. covid-19, which we think is the disease caused by it.— covid-19, which we think is the disease caused by it. given that american democrat _ disease caused by it. given that american democrat america - disease caused by it. given that| american democrat america has already vaccinated a huge amount of children with a very small amount of children with a very small amount of
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children having adverse effects, would it make sense to protect the majority from long covid?- majority from long covid? there is two different _ majority from long covid? there is two different calculations - majority from long covid? there is two different calculations i'd - majority from long covid? there is two different calculations i'd put . two different calculations i'd put into that. one, it is true that in wealthy countries, we have that luxury of the vaccines. from a global public health perspective, we would be better off giving those vaccines to higher risk individuals in other countries — both for those people getting the vaccine, and also for circulation of the pathogen. and this comes back to what i said before, these vaccines were developed very quickly and incredibly useful in this moment. and we don't have a really good sense of a longer—term consequences. doctor, can i ask you one more thing before you go, which goes back to your first answer? if your assessment of herd immunity is that
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really, in a meaningful sense, assessment of herd immunity is that really, in a meaningfulsense, it assessment of herd immunity is that really, in a meaningful sense, it is completely elusive, what you're telling us is that one of the great hopes that's been driving people for the last 18 months now no longer exists? . , �* ., ., exists? that is true. but i want to sa that i exists? that is true. but i want to say that i don't — exists? that is true. but i want to say that i don't think _ exists? that is true. but i want to say that i don't think that - exists? that is true. but i want to say that i don't think that implies | say that i don't think that implies a bleak future, say that i don't think that implies a bleakfuture, i don't think say that i don't think that implies a bleak future, i don't think that implies a future where we won't be able to have parties and hug our families. it'll be slower, more gradual transition to a mild endemic state. ., ~' , ., gradual transition to a mild endemic state. . ~ i. ., gradual transition to a mild endemic state. . ~ ., , , .,~ gradual transition to a mild endemic state. . ~ ., , , ., ~ ., gradual transition to a mild endemic state. . ~ ., , , .,~ ., , state. thank you to speaking to us, do come back _ state. thank you to speaking to us, do come back again _ state. thank you to speaking to us, do come back again soon. - state. thank you to speaking to us, do come back again soon. thank. state. thank you to speaking to us, | do come back again soon. thank you very much. — do come back again soon. thank you very much. take _ do come back again soon. thank you very much, take care. _ let's get the latest on the devastating floods in europe. in western germany alone, more than 160 have died — and it's possible that number could double. german police say around 170 people are still missing, and they expect many bodies would be found in places where flood waters had not yet receded.
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let's begin our coverage with this report from our correspondent damian grammaticas, he's in the state of rhineland—palatinate. the rains have stopped and the floodwaters are receding — but that also means the true extent of the destruction is becoming clear. countless numbers of people have lost everything. and the region's infrastructure has been torn apart. the roads and bridges have been destroyed, and there are still areas without basic amenities. translation: there is neither electricity nor drinking water. l i don't know what to say. i must stop to take a break now and then and talk to people — otherwise i'll go crazy. within the space of two days, two large states were hit by more rainfall than they usually get into months, causing the region's many rivers to burst their banks. —— in two months. in the village of scholz, the floodwaters destroyed and, in some cases, even washed away houses. and in one town near cologne,
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the water created landslides which undermined a row of homes and a castle — it had survived for centuries, but wasn't able to withstand the onslaught of the floods. often people had just minutes to get to safety. translation: i woke up about 11pm and stepped into the water— with a depth of about 20 cm when i got off the bed. i couldn't have imagined how fast the water would rise if i hadn't experienced it on my own. translation: i don't know what to do. - i have four kids. this is really a disaster. no one told me how long it would take to rebuild this place, which may take 1—2 years. we are out of work. how to carry out the reconstruction is the biggest issue. that was damien mcginnis, not team chromatic us. these picture are from sunday — they show angela merkel visiting the village of schuldt that was devastated by the floods.
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she said she was shocked at the destruction. on wednesday, her cabinet will agree a rescue package for these areas, and mrs merkel said her government will also strengthen its measures to combat climate change. many leaders are blaming climate change for the floods — one of them is deputy interior minister, gunter krings. here he is speaking to my colleague kasia madera as he visited the steinbachtal dam area south west of bonn, which is in danger of being breached. one of the biggest european—wide, the biggest single project on climate protection is to go out of the brown coal mining — and this is actually the area, it's not very far from here, the brown coal mining area — and we get out of this. and that's, i think, a very important contribution to climate protection, a really high reduction of carbon dioxide. so, that is one of the biggest projects — maybe european—wide, the biggest project on climate protection — and this is just one example. but in a sentence, would you say what we saw — the devastation, the destruction, the washing machines out on the street — is it because of climate change?
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i think it's very, very likely that what we saw, the heavy rains here and ultimately the damage is because of climate change, and that is why we are acting on climate change. let's get more from the steinbachtal dam. it's just been confirmed safe, and the thousands of people who'd been evacuated from the downstream areas have gradually been returning. here's germany's interior minister, horst seehofer, visiting the dam. like all of germany's political leaders, he's facing tough questions about what some are calling the catastrophic shortcomings of the flood warning systems. officials insist the system worked properly, but politicians say there should have been more warnings on television, radio, and social media. mr seehoger rejected criticism that the central government was to blame for failing to warn people. translation: the german weather service gives warnings for severe - weather conditions and is supported by a european institution. these warnings are passed on to the federal states and, from there, the state's flooding centres to the different
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regional communities. they are the ones making the decisions when it comes to protective measures against environmental disasters. a state of emergency is not declared in berlin, but where it is taking place. hanna cloke is a flood expert from reading univestiy. thank you very much forjoining us. when you look at what's happened in germany, what's your additional analysis of how this perhaps wasn't managed as best it could have been? it's just incredibly frustrating. i mean, so very many people have lost their lives — and that's really unacceptable, we shouldn't say that anything has been successful when so very many people have died. what very many people have died. what would ou very many people have died. what would you have — very many people have died. what would you have preferred to happen last week? i would you have preferred to happen last week? ~ ., ., last week? i think we have to look at the entire _ last week? i think we have to look at the entire chain, _ last week? i think we have to look at the entire chain, all— last week? i think we have to look at the entire chain, all the - last week? i think we have to look at the entire chain, all the way - at the entire chain, all the way from the forecasts that were issued — and those forecasts were quite good, they said there would be
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flooding in the right area — so that message didn't get all the way to the ground. in some cases, people felt they hadn't been warned, and in some cases people didn't understand the risk — so they didn't obey evacuation orders. so we are missing some pieces in this chain. it's no good having a massive supercomputer proved producing excellent forecasts if in the end, people are dying because they aren't listening or they aren't getting the information. the issue of people not listening is one that would take many years to change, wouldn't it? i one that would take many years to change, wouldn't it?— change, wouldn't it? i think we should start — change, wouldn't it? i think we should start now, _ change, wouldn't it? i think we should start now, we _ change, wouldn't it? i think we should start now, we will- change, wouldn't it? i think we should start now, we will onlyl change, wouldn't it? i think we i should start now, we will only see more of these types of events. as we heard, this is very likely to be due to climate change, these are exactly the types of rainfall we would expect, and they could happen anywhere. the flooding happening in these areas, we experienced this type of heavy rainfall in the summer, and we had one in london
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recently, and it could be the same in berlin. we really need to prepare better and take this more seriously. there are questions about the systems in place to warn people, but i wonder what you think about simply how we organise the towns and cities, and villages that we live in? because presumably a part of this is a town planning, infrastructure, and an architectural challenge? infrastructure, and an architectural challenue? , . ., challenge? exactly right, climate chance is challenge? exactly right, climate change is one — challenge? exactly right, climate change is one thing, _ challenge? exactly right, climate change is one thing, warning - challenge? exactly right, climate i change is one thing, warning people is another — but we must also have better infrastructure. we must prepare for these big flooding events in our big cities. but that's very difficult to do over 20—30 years when it doesn't flood, it's very easy to encroach on the river which is flowing through the town. but of course it can turn into this roaring torrent when you do get these heavy rainfall. fine roaring torrent when you do get these heavy rainfall.— these heavy rainfall. one last ruestion these heavy rainfall. one last question for _ these heavy rainfall. one last question for you, _ these heavy rainfall. one last question for you, hannah - l these heavy rainfall. one last question for you, hannah - i | these heavy rainfall. one last i question for you, hannah - i can question for you, hannah — i can hear your frustration when you see the response of politicians in germany and belgium, and the netherlands, are you satisfied that
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they are ready to learn from the advice that you and other experts are offering? i advice that you and other experts are offering?— are offering? i think that it is really important _ are offering? i think that it is really important right - are offering? i think that it is really important right now i are offering? i think that it is really important right now to| are offering? i think that it is i really important right now to ask really important right now to ask really good questions about which information was passed to who, when that information was given out and received, and what actions were taken so that we can learn from this, so this never happens again. thank you very much forjoining us, we appreciate it. thank you very much for “oining us, we appreciate ki let's go live to kasia madera who's in bonn. i understand there's better news on that damn in the last few hours? irate that damn in the last few hours? we were that damn in the last few hours? - were down there when the interior minister was there to see what was happening, and there was a lot of concern over whether it would reach. it is now safe in the areas around — thousands of people had to be evacuated because of the fears that the dam would breach. but those
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warnings have now gone away, it is secure, a huge effort in trying to pump out the water to bring the water levels down. now bearing in mind that half that dam breached, it would be flooding areas that is experienced already so much damage earlier on because of the floods. the damage we've been witnessing — we've been here for three days, travelling between the two states that were really damage, it's staggering. you get there and it really does look like a war zone — homes because the micro gutted, it really is devastated for these small communities in what is such a beautiful part of germany nestled against lots of rivers. and there lies the problem. just against lots of rivers. and there lies the problem.— lies the problem. just so i understand _ lies the problem. just so i understand this, - lies the problem. just so i understand this, is - lies the problem. just so i understand this, is is i lies the problem. just so i understand this, is is now| understand this, is is now completely about trying to find people who are missing and rebuild villages and towns? or is there still the risk of flooding in some
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circumstances?— still the risk of flooding in some circumstances? well, the water in those places _ circumstances? well, the water in those places where _ circumstances? well, the water in those places where it _ circumstances? well, the water in those places where it was - circumstances? well, the water in those places where it was really, l those places where it was really, really bad — and we've been to towns where the water levels reached at least three metres, the waters have been receding now, but we are talking about basements that are still flooded, car parks that are still flooded, car parks that are still flooded, car parks that are still flooded, everyday places that are still difficult to access — we were at a dual carriage with the other day that had been completely flooded. so there are still pockets of areas that are difficult to reach, and there's one place we've been hearing about that, because of landslides, it'sjust impossible been hearing about that, because of landslides, it's just impossible to reach. so there's still an awful lot of concern as to those areas that are just not passable. there are trafficjams everywhere, also. traffic jams everywhere, also. thousands trafficjams everywhere, also. thousands of people are trying to help people, turning up from other towns that have not been affected to these really badly affected areas, and they've been pulling up their shirts and getting really muddy, and helping people move all their stuff out in order to try and do some sort of clean—up operation. but this is a
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huge, huge effort and what we are hearing from the interior minister todayis hearing from the interior minister today is that this won't be a localised issue — this will be a national issue, they are going to pour money into these areas that were so destroyed. but honestly, it'll take a really long time for any semblance of normality, there are still so many cars as we drive around turned upside down. it really is a catastrophe, in the words of angela merkel.— is a catastrophe, in the words of anuela merkel. ., ,, i. , . angela merkel. thank you very much indeed. germany isn't the only country badly affected by the floods. luxembourg, the netherlands, and belgium have all suffered badly, too. these images are from the belgian town of pepinster, the hardest—hit by the floods in the country. more than 1,000 residents had to be evacuated and as you can see — the search and rescue operation there continues. while rains are subsiding in those areas, its continuing to wreak havoc elsewhere, with attention now shifting to parts of austria. images like these from the region of salzburg have been
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posted on social media. emergency crews rescued people from homes as floodwaters submerged the streets of one town. in the upper bavaria region, one person was killed as heavy rains deluged basements and roads. the bbc�*s bethan bell is in hallein, near salzburg. here in hallein, it has finally stopped raining and the clear—up is in full swing. its dirty work, there's mud everywhere. the old town centre was hit by flooding on saturday night. there was a torrent of water rushing through the streets after a river burst its banks. shops, homes, and businesses have been hit hard. our ice cream machines and our electric is very damaged. and now we have a lot of mud. the army and the fire brigade had been helping to clean the streets and pump out sellers.
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—— cellars. volunteers are helping to clear up the mess. it's a shock and it's really difficult. i'll be back with you in a couple minutes' time, remember you can find more information on the bbc website. hello. in response to the ongoing heat across the uk, the met office has now issued an extreme heat warning for parts of england and wales. it's the first time we've seen one of these warnings issued, but this part of our warnings only came into force from the 1st ofjune. it essentially indicates elevated temperatures both by day and by night. you can get more details on what that warning means and how it fits in with the other warnings you see as issued by taking a look on our website. certainly overnight, though, there will be a lot of heat hanging around across the uk with a core of it across england and wales. in some areas, for the bulk
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of the sleeping hours, temperatures will be setting close to 20 celsius. this is the weather pattern that's bringing all of the heat. a lot of sunshine across much of the uk, but underneath that area of high pressure, tuesday afternoon, a little bit like we saw on monday, there's the possibility of some very localised clusters of thunderstorms breaking out. a little bit more cloud for northern scotland, cooler here, but heat creeping in to southern scotland and northern ireland. temperatures around the 30 mark for many inland spots across england and wales. a closer look certainly worthy for those showers heading later on into the afternoon on tuesday into the small hours of wednesday. could locally be inundated rain for some, certainly and some large hail. for wednesday, we still have the high with us. again, an indicator that to the east of england, just enough instability sits in the atmosphere for us to see some thunderstorms breaking out, perhaps earlier in the day,
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midday into the afternoon on wednesday. bit more cloud across the northeast of england, that, i think, will linger, actually, for north sea coasts. so cooler for the likes of newcastle and hull. you can still see plenty of heat elsewhere, mid to high 20s widely, those temperatures. and the extreme heat warning stands for those parts of england and wales on into thursday. friday is a different story — the temperatures are easing back, fresher air is arriving. where is it coming from? it's getting pulled in around an area of low pressure that will be starting to approach the southwest of the uk. overnight friday can they may start to throw in some showers, certainly it looks like there will be plenty of those circulating around in time for the weekend.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. after 16 months, nearly all of england's coronavirus roles has been lifted. social distancing reels are overcome the capacity limits have been removed. all of this as cases continue to rise, the prime minister insists now is the right time. if we don't open up now, the right time. if we don't open up now. then — the right time. if we don't open up now. then we _ the right time. if we don't open up now, then we face _ the right time. if we don't open up now, then we face a _ the right time. if we don't open up now, then we face a risk _ the right time. if we don't open up now, then we face a risk of - now, then we face a risk of even—tempered conditions in the coming months when the virus has a natural advantage. the coming months when the virus has a natural advantage.—
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natural advantage. the uk has also announced vaccinating _ natural advantage. the uk has also announced vaccinating groups i natural advantage. the uk has also announced vaccinating groups of i announced vaccinating groups of under 18, announced vaccinating groups of under18, but announced vaccinating groups of under 18, but the vast majority will not be eligible for now. also in the programme, we will continue to report on the devastating floods in europe. in germany, more than 170 people are missing, at least 160 are confirmed dead. rain is continuing to wreak havoc for austria committees of the streets in one town. on a baking hotjuly monday, england reached a crucial moment. most covid restrictions have been lifted, the uk has the highest infection rate in the world and the prime minister addressed the nation while in self—isolation. if we don't open up now, then we face a risk of even tougher conditions in the colder months when the virus has a natural advantage.
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and while mrjohnson made the case for his decision, he didn't refer to this as freedom day. his message was one of caution — because of the data. the day before the change, england had more than 44,000 new covid cases. the government expects this to rise. then there's covid—related hospital admissions. while the vaccines have radically reduced them — recent data shows an increase of 61% week on week. this data is why borisjohnson is urging people to be cautious — though he's each of us to decide what cautious means. and as his rule changes came into effect at midnight, the nightclubs opened. six, five, four, three, two, one! it's just like a relief after such a long time — just to have freedom. boris johnson today emphasised the sacrifices younger people have made. but for hundreds of thousands of people though there's no
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freedom to go to a club — or indeed anywhere else — because they're self—isolating. the most recent figures show half a million people in england and wales isolating in the first week ofjuly. that figure will almost certainly be higher now. and that's meant staff shortages — with some public transport disrupted, some pubs and shops having to close, some hospital operations being cancelled and if that's adults, then there's children. figures from two weeks ago showed 840,000 pupils were out of school in england two weeks ago due to covid—related reasons — the highest number since schools fully reopened in march. and for many this is the final week of term. a week normally packed with hugely important moments — from sports days — to meeting new teachers — to saying goodbye to each other — and somtimes to the school. for hundreds of thousands of children, those moments won't be happening. and the daily telegraph's frontpage turned to this issue of isolation — with the headline: "freedom day farce as borisjohnson urged to end "pingdemic". now whether the problem here is the isolation policy or the virus is far from settled. either way, the policy
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stays for now. we have to consider two things. we have to obviously open up and away we said we would and wanted to, but at the same time, we've got to get the extra precaution, so that's why we are going to be asking people to self—isolate until the 16th of august, and that's what the prime minister... there's no movement on that? when they were pinged, there isn't any movement on it. this government minister was able to visit lbc to explain the government's policy on this most important of mornings. for other senior ministers, that option wasn't available — because they are self—isolating. because two days before the implementation of one of the most consequential policy shifts of the pandemic — on saturday — the health secretary sajid javid tested positive. and began to self—isolate. then on sunday, we were told, prime minister borisjohnson and chancellor of the exchequer rishi sunak had been contacted by nhs test and trace — because of contact with the health secretary.
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it ensures that the pm in the chancellor can conduct the most essential business, but at other times of the day, it they won't be mixing with people outside of their own households. that position lasted less than three hours — they would now be self—isolating it was announced. so the day before he was to lift all the restrictions, borisjohnson posted this video on twitter. briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily. of course, putting out a press release and then allowing minister to do interviews defending the plan isn't everyone's definition of briefly. either way, the prime minister, the chancellor and the health minister — three of the four most powerful political roles — are all isolating — at the moment we reach what mrjohnson calls the " terminus date'. terminus meaning finishing point — but now it's here, it's not clear whether this is the finish. whenjuly 19th was announced,
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chief medical officer chris whitty was there with borisjohnson — supporting the decision. last thursday, he didn't change that position — but warned that the number of people in hospital could reach "quite scary" levels. and said: "i don't think we should underestimate the fact that we could get into trouble again". that language is quite different to what we heard from the prime minister injune. the road map was always cautious but irreversible. and so here we are onjuly 19, with everything happening that i've described. if this is irreversible, it's not perhaps how people imagined irreversible would feel. but for mrjohnson, this isn't about dismissing concerns or dismising the risks — it is in part about a question: "if not now then when?" if we can't reopen our society in the next few weeks, when we will be helped by the arrival of summer and by the school holidays, then we must ask ourselves, when will we be able to return to normal?
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to which some scientists answer — when we don't have the highest infection rate in the world, when we aren't isolating hundreds of thousands of people, when we have completed the vaccine roll out. other scientists though argue this is a risk worth taking. it is though beyond dispute that, for now — here onjuly 19 — this is not a return to normal. not by a long way. the government's hopes is that it is an important step towards normality. in time, we'll know wherejuly 19 fits into the covid story. the united states and it's western allies have accused china of being behind a huge cyber attack that took place earlier this year. the attack targeted microsoft's widely used email server software, affecting over a quarter of a million servers around the world. a statement from the white house said china had used "criminal contract hackers to conduct unsanctioned cyber operations globally, including for their own personal profit." let's get more from
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the bbc�*s security correspondent gordon corera. hi, good to have the on the programme. just help me understand the allegation here. how china is accused of organising all of this. well, this is a major hack that took place earlier this year, a link to microsoft exchange, as he said. what western intelligence experts say that this wasn't espionage as usual, but turned into something much bigger in which chinese based hackers launched what they call a kind of smash and grab raid globally and passed the exploit the vulnerability, the back door if you like into lots of microsoft exchange systems to other chinese based hacking groups with the result that tens of thousands of machines were compromised. it's the scale of that alleged behaviour by hackers linked western intelligence to its chinese
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state which led to this unusually broad coalition of countries today calling out chinese behaviour. he had the us, uk, the eu as well, perhaps significantly also japan, canada, australia, new zealand and nato all saying that that kind of behaviour was reckless, that it crossed a line, and that they wanted it to stop. the crossed a line, and that they wanted it to sto -. , , it to stop. the chinese tinnitus. if the had it to stop. the chinese tinnitus. if they had done _ it to stop. the chinese tinnitus. if they had done this, _ it to stop. the chinese tinnitus. if they had done this, what - it to stop. the chinese tinnitus. if they had done this, what would . it to stop. the chinese tinnitus. if| they had done this, what would be their motivation and?— their motivation and? well, that's what i their motivation and? well, that's what i think _ their motivation and? well, that's what i think is _ their motivation and? well, that's what i think is interesting - their motivation and? well, that's what i think is interesting about . what i think is interesting about this, frankly, espionage goes on all the time in cyberspace. western countries do it as well. i think it was the escalation of this hack against microsoft exchange wished surprised people and still puzzles some people i've spoken to in trying to understand it. they don't know whether that was cover for something specific, whether this was a group within china which was acting in a more unrestrained way or whether it was ordered to be less restrained. if this was a different pastor from
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china. i think that's what makes worried people most is that perhaps the kind of escalation we have seen more generally in relation to china and the west may also be moving into the world of cyberspace and cyber espionage. that could be significant. yes, china certainly has denied its. we see there are no sanctions attached to this claim that china was involved, and we will see whether the breath of the coalition against china in this case is enough to cause china perhaps to take different action in the future. gordon, thank you very much indeed. formula one world champion lewis hamilton has been the target of racist abuse on social media after his victory at sunday's british grand prix. hamilton received a ten—second penalty after a collision with title rival max verstappen during the first lap of the race, which led to verstappen crashing out. mercedes, formula 1 and governing body the fia have
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all condemned the abuse "in the strongest possible terms". bbc sport'sjoe wilson told me more about what happened at silverstone. what happened on the first lap was exciting, it was dangerous, it was controversial. and i think all of those things are constituent elements of formula 1. when you observe the correlation between max and lewis hamilton, it is possible to have a great number of legitimate opinions and conclusions. what the authorities decided yesterday is that hamilton was at fault, but not hugely at fault, because obviously they only docked him 10 seconds, like he said, which enabled him to get back in the race and win it. so there are legitimate opinions that can stem from that's collation between the two drivers who are competing for the world title. but what is triggered in some circumstances is racial abuse of lewis hamilton. now, the wearying thing about this and the depressingly familiar thing
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about this is that it's what we've almost come to expect. there are a great number of high—profile and outstanding sportsman and sports women in britain who are black. they've come to expect that if they make a mistake, say they miss a penalty in a big match for england's football team, it will trigger in some kind of twisted logic a reaction online which is racist. facebook — which owns instagram — said in a statement the racist abuse aimed at hamilton during the british grand prix is unacceptable and we have removed a number of comments from instagram. you might think back to euros final, twitter removed, they say, 1000 posts after abuse aimed at some of england's black footballers. i think what is interesting, you mentioned this in your intro, there has been a joint statement, notjust from the teams and notjust from the list hamilton, but from formula 1 and from motorsports governing body condemning the abuse in the string as possible terms. remember, now there is gestures which are made by the drivers before a grand prix, there is a video which is played out to us on television before every
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grand prix. there are official moves into diversity to what is a very conservative, even elitist sports. the reason that's happened is quite simply lewis hamilton. his stance, his profile, what he talks about, what he represents has changed the whole stance of formula 1. i think he has shifted it into a different ethical, social, even political dimension, and that is why he is such an important figure in sport. stay with us on outside source. still to come: there's been a fourth positive coronavirus case among athetes injapan preparing for the tokyo olympics. thai police have used force to break up large protests calling for the resignation of the prime minister. courtney bembridge reports. anger on the streets of bangkok was met by water cannons, rubber bullets and tear gas.
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the protesters were flouting a nationwide ban on public gatherings. thailand has also extended stay—at—home orders and the night—time curfew to three more provinces because of coronavirus. translation: i understand that the situation is not i getting any better. but we have to come out and show them that we are not happy about the measures imposed by the government. it's like they only wanted everything to stop at a standstill but they were not trying to fix anything. thailand is facing its worst wave of infections and it has overwhelmed hospitals, strained the economy and thrown tourism recovery plans in doubt. translation: the government has been poor at managing _ the situation, and if we don't do anything there will be no change. they should open their eyes and see how the people have been living and not remain like a dictator. i feel very disappointed. these are not the pictures thailand wanted going around the world in the same month
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it launched a tourism scheme to lure back vaccinated visitors. less than 5% of the thai population is fully vaccinated, mostly with the chinese made sinovacjab. but the country is to become the first to mix vaccines using locally produced astrazeneca the second dose after hundreds of medical staff who were fully vaccinated with sinovac got covid. the government is also considering a cap on the number of locally produced vaccines it sends overseas, a move that could disrupt supply to its regional neighbours like indonesia and malaysia which are also battling a surge in infections. courtney bembridge, bbc news. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is... nearly all of england's covid restrictions have been lifted,
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despite rising cases. uk prime minister borisjohnson has defended the decision saying, "if not now, when?" let's go to russia now. and this footage from northeastern siberia's sakha—yakutia region. 560,000 hectares of forest are burning after an unprecedented heatwave in the region. smoke from fires covered the city of yakutsk, where people were advised by the mayor to stay home and not open windows. here you see efforts to douse the fires — the russian defence ministry said it provided transport planes to dump water over the most active fires. the military also sent helicopters to help transport firefighters and supplies in the region. bbc russian's olga ivshina has more. first of all, we need to remember that the territory affected by wildfires in russia is huge. it can be compared to one third of territory of... so, thousands of
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people all mainland villages and also in small towns had to flee and leave their houses, leaving everything behind because of the fire. in certain areas, fire is spreading as quickly as 150 meteors per minute, so extremely quickly. of course, this is always amplified by extreme heat and smoke, so people are saying it is, coming know, the conditions are unbearable. brushing emergency ministry is trying very hard to put the fires down, but at the moment, this is critical. unfortunately, such situations repeat themselves almost every year. we hear similar stories. it's very hard to understand the nature of this fire and why they are repeating themselves almost every year, on the one hand, you know, it is global warming, of christ, extreme heat, and the climate is changing, but on the other hand, you know, officials
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are saying that the majority of those buyers have a human factor behind them, so they have human nature, and many ecologists are saying this leads to the fact that there is a huge amount of illegal fire catching in russia and illegal logging in russia, and in order to cover up as wrongdoings you know, sometimes people will light a forest on fire and it's hard to distinguish where all that weight has disappeared, whether it was cut illegally or it was damaged by fire. so it's a coincidence of factors, big money, big politics involved, but ordinary people are suffering. health and care workers are being left behind in efforts to vaccinate the world against covid—19 ? according to the international council of nurses. new figures suggest tens of millions of frontline workers have yet to be fully vaccinated worldwide. the bbc s global health correspondent, tulip mazumdar, reports.
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ever since this outbreak began can help and care workers have been putting their lives on the line to protect ours. the world was caught woefully unprepared for covid—19. irate woefully unprepared for covid-19. we have woefully unprepared for covid—19. - have had doctors tell us that they feel like lambs to the slaughter. protective equipment was in short supply. some were reduced to using bin liners has barriers against the virus. now more than a year and as vaccines are rolled out around the world, tens of millions of those working on the covid front line still haven't received a single vaccine dose. if still haven't received a single vaccine dose.— still haven't received a single vaccine dose. if that nurse and health care — vaccine dose. if that nurse and health care workers _ vaccine dose. if that nurse and health care workers going i vaccine dose. if that nurse and health care workers going to i vaccine dose. if that nurse and i health care workers going to work knowing that there is a way to protect them and nurses and health records and other countries are getting bats. people who are less vulnerable in other countries are getting that as well, but they are being left behind. it feels, despite all of the warm words of support, theyin all of the warm words of support, they in some way are dispensable or disposable. they in some way are dispensable or disosable. a , .., , ., they in some way are dispensable or disosable. , , ., ., disposable. many countries are not officially reporting _ disposable. many countries are not officially reporting the _ disposable. many countries are not officially reporting the number i disposable. many countries are not officially reporting the number of l officially reporting the number of health and care workers who have
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died of covid, but the world health organization estimates its at least 115,000, that's around 200 deaths a day, though it says the true figure is likely to be much higher, and even though help and care workers were supposed to be prioritised for covid jabs as soon as they became available, only one in eight globally have been fully vaccinated, and the vast majority of them are in richer nations. that and the vast ma'ority of them are in richer nations.— richer nations. at samara responsibility _ richer nations. at samara responsibility we - richer nations. at samara responsibility we should l richer nations. at samara i responsibility we should all be concerned about. we need to go beyond the plots for health workers into action. i beyond the plots for health workers into action. ., , beyond the plots for health workers into action. . , , , ., into action. i had my first shot, and currently _ into action. i had my first shot, and currently waiting _ into action. i had my first shot, and currently waiting for - into action. i had my first shot, and currently waiting for my i into action. i had my first shot, i and currently waiting for my second dose _ and currently waiting for my second dose. things have been very, very difficult _ dose. things have been very, very difficult on — dose. things have been very, very difficult on our part because we have _ difficult on our part because we have been_ difficult on our part because we have been short staffed and the number— have been short staffed and the number of cases that we are receiving _ number of cases that we are receiving each and every day is so overwhelming stopping to see the suffering, to go there with the physical— suffering, to go there with the physical impact again from the emotional impact again from at this moment, _ emotional impact again from at this moment, i— emotional impact again from at this moment, i feel most of us will not survive _ moment, i feel most of us will not survive if— moment, i feel most of us will not
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survive it mentally.— survive it mentally. health care workers around _ survive it mentally. health care workers around the _ survive it mentally. health care workers around the world i survive it mentally. health care workers around the world have | survive it mentally. health care i workers around the world have staged protests about working conditions, pay and a lack of protection throughout this crisis. here in france, the family of health workers who died of covid while fighting the pandemic are given monetary support and recognition of their service to the country, some other nations have similar schemes, the country, some other nations have similarschemes, but there the country, some other nations have similar schemes, but there are concerns that governments may be reluctant to share the data of health care worker infections and deaths out of fear of facing legal action. it's just four days until the delayed 2020 olympics begins in tokyo — and the olympic village has been hit by a fourth coronavirus case. so far, two south african footballers a czech beach volleyball player and an american gymnast have all tested positive for covid—19. but athletes aren't the only cases connected to the olympics. others involve media, contractors and other personnel, though none of those were in the olympic village. it brings the total number of positive cases to 62, with 29 of those among the 22,000 accredited people who have arrived from abroad.
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all of this is a concern for the japanese public, especially in tokyo itself where cases continue to rise. but the international olympic committee insists that these positive cases do not post a wider threat to the population. here's one doctor who's advising the ioc. the degree of contact between the international community inside but the ledge and the local japanese population outside is extremely small, because as you know, the athletes aren't travelling around tokyo, they are not using public transport, they are using designated transport to go to the village to their training our competition venues and back again. so the degree of separation is quite good, and that again gives us some comfort and reassurance that we will not spread events into the japanese population. that confidence that the virus won't spread more widely isn't one that's shared by the japanese public. opinion polls consistently show a lack of support for the olympics going ahead. rupert wingfield—hayes is in tokyo. so is this a nightmare scenario for the organisers — orjust a sign the testing system is working. certainly the olympic organising
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committee here in tokyo and the international olympic committee are both saying it is the latter, that it shows the system is working, that cases are being detected early, and that the athletes are the staff members affected can be put into self isolation, kept away from the rest of the team and from other people in the olympic village and elsewhere, so there is nothing to be too worried about at the moment, there is no reason to panic, that this is not an indication that the olympics is in danger. however, i think what we have seen over the last few months is that this has been a sort of moving target, as things have got worse in the last few months with covid infections injapan entering a fourth wave, we have seen the olympic organising committee sort of tighten and tighten and tighten its regulations, increase testing and make this bubble around the olympics tighter and tighter.
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it does suggest that they were not expecting this to happen at least a few weeks ago, and it has taken them somewhat by surprise. the controversial right—wing commentator katie hopkins has been sent home from australia after having her visa cancelled. in case you're not familiar with her — here she is. the australian government took the decision after she flouted hotel quarantine rules and then boasted publicly about it. ms hopkins was in the country to appear in celebrity big brother. shaimaa khalil has more from sydney. katie hopkins came to australia, entered australia, initially to take part in the celebrity edition of big brother. on friday and instagram video, she said that she was given instructions by hotel quarantine instructions by hotel quarantine officers that when someone knocks on her door, essentially to deliver food, that she should wait 30 seconds, and then she should open the door and get herfood, but should wear a facemask. she was laughing through the whole video and then she said that what she hoped she would do is wait until someone knocked on the door,
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open the door naked with no facemask to scare them and essentially, of course, then their lives at risk. also described lockdowns as the biggest hoax in human history. mind you, she is saying that while sydney, we are in our fourth week of lockdown, melbourne is also in lockdown at the moment, so the two biggest cities in australia are in lockdown because of the spread of the delta variant. when this video came out, of course, itjust sparked all sorts of anger, not just at these disrespectful comments, but also the fact that she was able to enter australia and take part in big brother given how controversial a character she is. this morning, we heard from the home affairs minister, karen andrews, who described her behaviour as appalling, as a slap in the face to all of those australians in lockdown and did confirm that her visa was cancelled and that she will be deported as soon as possible. seven network and the production company behind the show also said that she was sacked. what niether the government nor seven network actually addressed
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fully is why she was hired in the first place. thank you to her for finishing this addition of outside source. hello. in response to the ongoing heat across the uk, the met office has now issued an extreme heat warning for parts of england and wales. it's the first time we've seen one of these warnings issued, but this part of our warnings only came into force from the 1st ofjune. it essentially indicates elevated temperatures both by day and by night. you can get more details on what that warning means and how it fits in with the other warnings you see as issued by taking a look on our website. certainly overnight, though, there will be a lot of heat hanging around across the uk with a core of it across england and wales. in some areas, for the bulk of the sleeping hours, temperatures will be setting close to 20 celsius. this is the weather pattern that's bringing all of the heat.
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a lot of sunshine across much of the uk, but underneath that area of high pressure, tuesday afternoon, a little bit like we saw on monday, there's the possibility of some very localised clusters of thunderstorms breaking out. a little bit more cloud for northern scotland, cooler here, but heat creeping in to southern scotland and northern ireland. temperatures around the 30 mark for many inland spots across england and wales. a closer look certainly worthy for those showers heading later on into the afternoon on tuesday into the small hours of wednesday. could locally be inundated rain for some, certainly and some large hail. for wednesday, we still have the high with us. again, an indicator that to the east of england, just enough instability sits in the atmosphere for us to see some thunderstorms breaking out, perhaps earlier in the day, midday into the afternoon on wednesday. bit more cloud across the northeast of england, that, i think, will linger, actually,
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for north sea coasts. so cooler for the likes of newcastle and hull. you can still see plenty of heat elsewhere, mid to high 20s widely, those temperatures. and the extreme heat warning stands for those parts of england and wales on into thursday. friday is a different story — the temperatures are easing back, fresher air is arriving. where is it coming from? it's getting pulled in around an area of low pressure that will be starting to approach the southwest of the uk. overnight friday can they may start to throw in some showers, certainly it looks like there will be plenty of those circulating around in time for the weekend.
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hello, i'm ros atkins. this is outside source. after 16 months, nearly all of england's coronavirus rules have been lifted. social distancing rules are over; nightclubs are open and capacity limits have been removed. all this as cases continue to rise. the prime minster insists now�*s the right time. if we don't open up now, then we face a risk of even tougher conditions in the cold months, when the virus has a natural advantage. the uk has also announced it will vaccinate certain groups of under—18s — but the vast majority won't be eligible. also in the programme,
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we'll get the latest on the devastating floods in europe.

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