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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  July 19, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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as all social distancing restrictions are lifted in england — the government announces plans for covid passports from september and urges caution. three, two, one... cheering. but for clubbers hitting the dance floor for the first time in over a year, it's a moment of pure elation. i'm buzzing, i'm buzzing, me. because i'm a massive, massive social person, me. and this lockdown, i've found it really tough. people are dancing, we're all drinking again, no social distancing. this is what life's about. absolutely. butjust hours after the clubs reopen, the prime minister warns people of plans to prove they're fully vaccinated by september if they want to go to crowded indoor places in england. we're are planning to make full vaccination the condition of entry to night clubs and other venues where large crowds gather. proof of a negative test
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will no longer be enough. this announcement was made in the last half hour — does this mean people in england will need a vaccine passport if they want to go to, notjust to a club but to any crowded indoor venue? we'll try to work out the implications of this latest announcement for you. also tonight. relief for businesses in england as restrictions are lifted is tempered by staff shortages and uncertain consumer confidence. a bbc investigation reveals that thousands of racehorses are being sent to slaughter and rules to prevent cruelty appear to be regularly ignored. and with just days to go until the olympics, the story of the weightlifter who's gone from sleeping rough to competing as a refugee. and coming up on the bbc news channel. with restrictions lifted, capacity crowds are allowed back at english sporting events — with a full house expected in manchester tomorrow, for england against pakistan.
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good evening, and welcome to the bbc news at six. after living with the covid pandemic for well over a year, almost all covid restrictions in england have been lifted. but it's not exactly freedom day — with the self—isolating prime minister urging people to exercise great caution and young people to get vaccinated as infections soar. in the last half hour, borisjohnson has announced plans that from september, people in england will have to show proof of double vaccination — effectively a covid passport — to enter any crowded indoor space such as a nightclub. so what has changed in england from today? facemasks are no longer manadatory — but they are still required in some businesses and shops and on some public transport. the government suggests they should be worn in crowded indoor spaces.
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all social distancing is scrapped. there are no limits now on how many people can gather indoors or outdoors in any situation. the guidance to work from home is also lifted. though the government expects people to start returning to work gradually. people who've had both vaccines can now travel to amber list countries without having to isolate on return. that does not include france, though, which has been listed as amber plus. we'll be looking at the status of restrictions in the other three nations in a moment. but first here's our medical editor fergus walsh. three, editor fergus walsh. two, one... three, editor feruus walsh. two, one... ~ three, editor fer:uswalsh. two, one... . everyone. three, two, one... welcome back, everyone- for— three, two, one... welcome back, everyone. for some, _ three, two, one... welcome back, everyone. for some, this - three, two, one... welcome back, everyone. for some, this is - three, two, one... welcome back, everyone. for some, this is what l everyone. for some, this is what freedom looks _ everyone. for some, this is what freedom looks like, _ everyone. for some, this is what freedom looks like, no _ everyone. for some, this is what freedom looks like, no social- freedom looks like, no social distancing and very few masks. but from the end of september, vaccination will be a condition of entry to crowded venues like this. many nightclubs across england
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reopened at midnight, 16 months before they were shot in the first lockdown. it before they were shot in the first lockdown. ~ ., ., lockdown. it felt like a dream. i feel like we _ lockdown. it felt like a dream. i feel like we have _ lockdown. it felt like a dream. i feel like we have waited - lockdown. it felt like a dream. i feel like we have waited for - lockdown. it felt like a dream. i i feel like we have waited for this moment for a long time. i literally cannot stress _ moment for a long time. i literally cannot stress how _ moment for a long time. i literally cannot stress how much _ moment for a long time. i literally cannot stress how much i - moment for a long time. i literally cannot stress how much i have - moment for a long time. i literally - cannot stress how much i have missed being _ cannot stress how much i have missed being able _ cannot stress how much i have missed being able to go out and just dance, and have _ being able to go out and just dance, and have a _ being able to go out and just dance, and have a laugh. it has been the best night — and have a laugh. it has been the best night-— and have a laugh. it has been the best niuht. ~ , , best night. the prime minister, self isolatin: in best night. the prime minister, self isolating in chequers _ best night. the prime minister, self isolating in chequers said _ best night. the prime minister, self isolating in chequers said getting i isolating in chequers said getting vaccinated would enable young people to get back the freedoms they love. if everybody over 18 has had an offer to get a vaccine, 3 million have yet to take it up. we are saying, come on, folks, this is it. you won't regret it, it is the right thing to do for you, for yourfamily and everybody else and above all, it is right for you to get back the freedoms you love.— is right for you to get back the freedoms you love. is right for you to get back the freedoms ou love. ~ . .,, , ., freedoms you love. across the world, we have seen — freedoms you love. across the world, we have seen night _ freedoms you love. across the world, we have seen night clubs _ freedoms you love. across the world, we have seen night clubs and - freedoms you love. across the world, we have seen night clubs and venues| we have seen night clubs and venues where _ we have seen night clubs and venues where you _ we have seen night clubs and venues where you have got lots of people indoors, _ where you have got lots of people indoors, crowded together are a
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focus _ indoors, crowded together are a focus for— indoors, crowded together are a focus for potential super spreading events _ focus for potential super spreading events. , ., ., , events. the number of covid patients in hosital events. the number of covid patients in hospital has _ events. the number of covid patients in hospital has doubled _ events. the number of covid patients in hospital has doubled in _ events. the number of covid patients in hospital has doubled in two - in hospital has doubled in two weeks, but it is still a tenth of the level from last winter. there is genuine uncertainty about what impact this covid wave will have on nhs in the coming weeks. if there is a sudden return to pre—pandemic behaviour, it is thought 2000 daily hospital admissions are possible. in a worst—case scenario, it could be double that, matching the admissions we sow in winter. if people are more cautious, then the peak will be lower and spread over several months. whatever happens, debts will inevitably rise, but it is thought that vaccines are cutting the risk of dying by more than 90%. labour wants masks to remain mandatory. lifting all restrictions in one go
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is reckless. in doing so when this variant is clearly out of control, risks a summer of chaos. unlike the us, the government _ risks a summer of chaos. unlike the us, the government here _ risks a summer of chaos. unlike the us, the government here has - risks a summer of chaos. unlike the us, the government here has for. risks a summer of chaos. unlike the i us, the government here has for now ruled out vaccinating all 12 to 17—year—olds. instead, the jab will be offered to children in at risk groups. scientists say they need more safety data.— groups. scientists say they need more safety data. after the fires of actin: , more safety data. after the fires of acting. there _ more safety data. after the fires of acting, there are _ more safety data. after the fires of acting, there are reports _ more safety data. after the fires of acting, there are reports of- more safety data. after the fires of acting, there are reports of heart l acting, there are reports of heart inflammation. these are very rare, but it is best we take a precautionary approach before we expose millions of children to this vaccine. , , ' ,, ., , expose millions of children to this vaccine. , , ' ,, .,, vaccine. sophie is 14. she has down syndrome. — vaccine. sophie is 14. she has down syndrome. one _ vaccine. sophie is 14. she has down syndrome, one of— vaccine. sophie is 14. she has down syndrome, one of the _ vaccine. sophie is 14. she has down syndrome, one of the groups - vaccine. sophie is 14. she has down syndrome, one of the groups who i vaccine. sophie is 14. she has down l syndrome, one of the groups who will be offered the job. she syndrome, one of the groups who will be offered thejob. she is vulnerable to infection and has been kept off school for much of the pandemic. kept off school for much of the pandemic— kept off school for much of the andemic. ~ �* , , ., pandemic. we're very pleased and it means we can _ pandemic. we're very pleased and it means we can move _ pandemic. we're very pleased and it means we can move forward. - pandemic. we're very pleased and it means we can move forward. the i pandemic. we're very pleased and it.
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means we can move forward. the last 18 months have been very challenging for us a family. very stressful at times. ., .,, , for us a family. very stressful at times. ., , ~ ., times. for those tying the knot in encland, times. for those tying the knot in england. there — times. for those tying the knot in england, there are _ times. for those tying the knot in england, there are now _ times. for those tying the knot in england, there are now no - england, there are now no restrictions on guest numbers. this wedding in devon, one of the first to enjoy the new freedoms. fergus walsh, bbc news. 0ur deputy political editor, vicki young, joins us from westminster. 0n the day nightclubs reopen, the government announces plans of effectively a covic passport from september. it is only the last 30 minutes, there has already been a backlash, what does it mean? it is interesting. _ backlash, what does it mean? it 3 interesting, when people used to talk about step four of the road map in england, the lifting of the legal restrictions, there were many people a few months ago thought that would be the moment when we return to normal. some people did brand it, some conservative mps, as freedom day. this is not what they would be
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expected. the prime minister, his health secretary and the chancellor in isolation, demonstrating very much that this pandemic isn't over. as you say, immediately talking about future restrictions that might come in and they are pretty controversial. the reason is, the way they can lift the restrictions now is because of the vaccination programme. but 3 million under 30s have not had the vaccine. this will be seen as, whatever you want to call it, a bribe, incentive or threat to the of young people to get double vaccinated by september. but conservative mps and the liberal democrats saying it is effectively compulsory vaccination and they are against it. compulsory vaccination and they are auainst it. w' compulsory vaccination and they are auainst it. a ., ., ,, ,., the latest government figures on coronavirus show 39,950 new infections in the latest 24—hour period — which means an average of 46,024 new cases per day in the last week. there are 4,094 people in hospital with coronavirus. 19 deaths were recorded in the last 24 hours of people who'd had
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a positive covid—19 test within the previous 28 days. just over 18,000 people have received a first dose of a vaccine in the latest 24—hour period — that's the lowest number since the uk's vaccination programme began. over 46 million pople have now had theirfirstjab — that's 87.9% of the adult population. and just over 36 million people are now fully vaccinated — 68.5% of all uk adults. today's opening up in england is being welcomed by businesses who've struggled during the pandemic. while it means relief for many, staffing shortages, a lack of foreign tourists, consumer confidence and rising coronavirus cases are still causing problems as our economics editor, faisal islam, reports from york. the grand reopening in york. this museum of chocolate can now let in significantly more visitors than last week, though some changes will stick on a voluntary basis. we do advise you to wear your masks... 0ur visitors are telling us they want us to be cautious.
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they want to remain careful and they want us to look after them. so for us, it's notjust freedom day, it's... well, we don't like that phrase, it's still being very considerate and careful of the health of the people who work here and our visitors. 0n the main tourist route close to york station, for the second half ofjuly it is not busy. domestic tourists are not making up for missing the international ones, mainly from the us and china. hello. morning. new cafes continue to focus on takeaway business. we are here at last, we are open. bring on the tourists, bring on the crowds. so we're still waiting for the crowds to to come back, to be honest? very much so, yeah. we can tell the tourists have not arrived yet. the international tourists, that is. better news around the corner, the reopening has helped this newly refurbished hotel to get fully booked out by domestic tourists. if not now, when? but now the issue is about much needed staff being told
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to isolate by the covid app. there was already a staff shortage in hospitality. now that's been compounded by the fact of people self isolating, so the demand for custom is there, but trying to service it is very hard work. the lifting of compulsory restrictions is a major milestone on the pathway back to economic normality. but isn't everything? because much of the economic impact arose from people voluntarily deciding they didn't want to mix socially because of the risk of the virus. that should get much better from now on. as people return to cinemas, restaurants and cafes, how much they will determine the strength of the economic bounce back? 0n the outskirts of the city, this supplier of fine coffee says business is up and prices will be too, as cafes cope with fewer customers. it's going to be very, very difficult and i think a lot of cafes will be keeping a very
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close eye on what's going on, because the revenue that is required to pay for the rent and rates is huge. so stand by for some price rises, perhaps. the world looks to an experimented england for the economy. no one here wants to be marched back down from the top of the hill. faisal islam, bbc news, in york. new advice about travelling abroad from the uk has come into effect. there is no longer a government warning against travel to amber—list countries. and people who've had both doses of a vaccine, or are under 18, won't have to quarantine on their return from any country on the amber list, except france. 0ur transport correspondent caroline davies reports. the summer holiday rush has not returned. today is the biggest reopening so far this yearfor international travel as passengers fully vaccinated in the uk can now come back from time to list countries without quarantine.
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but it has been a turbulent process before these passengers even stepped onto a plane. normally going on holiday something you look forward to and be excited about. i have to say this has been a pretty stressful, anxious time for everybody. jet2... we have a system, it seemed to work and it is adding confusion and making people more worried about booking and that is what we don't need at the moment when we are starting to get back to normal. the government _ starting to get back to normal. the government said the decision was made because of the beta variant in france. the big daily—macro with cases rising of the delta variant rising here, is now the right time for us to be going abroad? irate rising here, is now the right time for us to be going abroad? we have aood for us to be going abroad? we have good vaccine _ for us to be going abroad? we have good vaccine rates _
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for us to be going abroad? we have good vaccine rates in _ for us to be going abroad? we have good vaccine rates in the _ for us to be going abroad? we have good vaccine rates in the uk, - for us to be going abroad? we have good vaccine rates in the uk, but i good vaccine rates in the uk, but countries — good vaccine rates in the uk, but countries we go to do not have that coverage _ countries we go to do not have that coverage. we have a moral obligation to prevent _ coverage. we have a moral obligation to prevent the same situation happening in foreign countries that have less _ happening in foreign countries that have less protection than we have i’i l ht have less protection than we have right now — have less protection than we have riaht now. ., ., have less protection than we have riaht now. ., ._ ,, have less protection than we have riaht now. ., ,, ., , right now. today the us told its citizens to _ right now. today the us told its citizens to avoid _ right now. today the us told its citizens to avoid travel - right now. today the us told its citizens to avoid travel to - right now. today the us told its citizens to avoid travel to the i right now. today the us told its i citizens to avoid travel to the uk, classing it as the highest risk level of countries to visit. as cases rise, transport unions are pushing the government to push the law in england. a drop in estimated passengers wearing masks from 95% to 85% in a week. but it doesn't reflect the number one on—board services. whether near or far travellers returning, but the journey back to normal is still over the horizon. caroline davies, bbc news. scotland has moved to the lowest level of covid restrictions as it continues on its roadmap out of lockdown. the move to level zero means more people will be allowed
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to meet indoors and attend weddings and funerals. but some limits on outdoor meetings are to be maintained, and the mandatory use of face coverings in pubs, restaurants and on public transport is to remain in place for "some time". here's our scotland editor, sarah smith. after 16 months apart the chiefs are jumping withjoy to after 16 months apart the chiefs are jumping with joy to beat shooting buckets again as adult indo contact sport resumes today. scotland is now at level zero rules but that does not mean none. here are many restrictions to remain.- restrictions to remain. after so lona restrictions to remain. after so long when _ restrictions to remain. after so long when you _ restrictions to remain. after so long when you have _ restrictions to remain. after so long when you have not - restrictions to remain. after so long when you have not been l restrictions to remain. after so i long when you have not been able restrictions to remain. after so - long when you have not been able to practice, how was it? it was brilliant. notjust the physical benefits but mentally as well. it has been a tough 18 months for everyone and be able to blow off steam and come down a bit is just brilliant. but steam and come down a bit is “ust brilliant. �* , brilliant. but there is little
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a - etite brilliant. but there is little appetite for _ brilliant. but there is little appetite for restriction - brilliant. but there is little i appetite for restriction easing further in scotland. i do appetite for restriction easing further in scotland.— appetite for restriction easing further in scotland. i do not think it is the right _ further in scotland. i do not think it is the right time. _ further in scotland. i do not think it is the right time. cases - further in scotland. i do not think it is the right time. cases are - further in scotland. i do not think it is the right time. cases are a i it is the right time. cases are a bit too — it is the right time. cases are a bit too high _ it is the right time. cases are a bit too high and i think i would be a bit _ bit too high and i think i would be a bit uncomfortable.— bit too high and i think i would be a bit uncomfortable. facemasks are still mandatory _ a bit uncomfortable. facemasks are still mandatory in _ a bit uncomfortable. facemasks are still mandatory in indoor— a bit uncomfortable. facemasks are still mandatory in indoor public- still mandatory in indoor public places and public transport. meeting outside on a day like this is a good option and up to 50 people can now do that. ten people from four households are allowed in a cafe or pub butjust eight in someone's home. nicola sturgeon has adopted a more cautious tone throughout the pandemic and now she says that the likes of freedom day in england is not sensible and regulations must be lifted gradually. they help to lift remaining restrictions on the 9th of august. experts are sceptical about the situation where restrictions remain as england opens up in the face of rising rates. i’zre
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remain as england opens up in the face of rising rates.— face of rising rates. i've always tried to stay — face of rising rates. i've always tried to stay out _ face of rising rates. i've always tried to stay out of _ face of rising rates. i've always tried to stay out of the - face of rising rates. i've always tried to stay out of the politics| tried to stay out of the politics but what i welcome is the requirement for face coverings. i don't want to be sitting on a busy train or bus with people without covering when you have someone near us was vulnerable. the covering when you have someone near us was vulnerable.— us was vulnerable. the scottish health secretary _ us was vulnerable. the scottish health secretary got _ us was vulnerable. the scottish health secretary got his - us was vulnerable. the scottish health secretary got his second us was vulnerable. the scottish - health secretary got his second jab today as he comes under criticism for not having deliberate at double dose to more adults. all should have been offered a saxon vaccine by mid—september. the largest vaccination centre in the country has just closed its doors whilst one third of young adults have not had their first dose. third of young adults have not had theirfirst dose. drop—in third of young adults have not had their first dose. drop—in clinics from shopping centres to student campuses will try to convince them to get the jab. sarah smith, bbc news.
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in wales, the government hopes to move to alert level zero on the 7th of august — which would remove limits on numbers meeting inside. all premises, including nightclubs would be allowed to reopen — although face coverings would still be required in most indoor public places. while in northern ireland, where daily case numbers have topped 1,700 for first time since january, other restrictions will only be eased next monday if approved at a review on thursday. that includes the reopening of theatres, an increase on numbers able to meet inside and in private gardens and social distancing rules lifted entirely in outdoor settings. social distancing is no longer mandatory in england, there are no limits on the number of people that can meet or gather. it's a reason for many to celebrate. but others are fearful that it's too much too soon. jon kay has been listening to some contrasting views. in swindon, it didn't look or feel like a moment of liberation. it seems new habits die hard. rules changed today. yeah. how does that make you feel? it doesn't make me feel any different. because like, i'm still going
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to continue wearing my mask. nothing really changed, to be honest. just like another day. just get on with it. after 16 long months, most people here were cautious. even nervous. the numbers are still going up. the hospital numbers are going up. so i think it's too soon. i've been in and out of a few shops and i'm just about to jump on the bus. so no point taking the mask off to put it back on again in five minutes, is there? can't wait to get out and enjoy the freedom with my friends. being locked indoors has affected a lot of people. we are going to party. we are going to party hard! good day. charles can't believe the rules have been relaxed now. a few weeks ago, he lost his wife katie and his mum, both of them to covid. i think it's going to lead to more tragedy and more loss for the country. the country that's already suffered enough. there will be people today who say
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enough is enough, we have to get back to something like normal. we have to have some freedoms again. what do you say to them? absolutely, i agree with them. but we need to do it in a responsible, safe manner. mid afternoon and after testing negative, they are finally allowed to club again in bristol. i actually can't believe it. you know, words can't describe how happy i am right now. and what do you say to people who say it's too soon? that we shouldn't be easing restrictions? if not now, when? society has to carry on. we can'tjust keep on locking down overand overagain. you've still got your mask on? i know. i mean, it's weird, because i'm walking into a club. it's the first time for a while. are you going to keep it on in there? i don't know. i'll see. it's going to take some getting used to. jon kay, bbc news. our top story this evening.
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as social distancing restrictions are lifted in england — the government urges caution and says evidence of full vaccination will soon be needed for entry into nightclubs. and still to come — the uk and the eu have accused china of carrying out a major cyber attack earlier this year. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel — with less than four days to go until the start of the tokyo 0lympics, coronavirus cases continue to rise injapan, with some of them inside the athletes village. a bbc investigation has revealed that thousands of racehorses are being sent to slaughterhouses in britain and ireland. at least 4,000 animals, most of them trained in ireland by some of the biggest names in racing, have been put down in abattoirs since 2019. panorama also reveals how regulations meant to protect horses from a cruel death appear to be
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regularly ignored at one of britain's biggest abattoirs. the abbatoir said it did not accept any form of animal abuse. darragh macintyre reports. last february, a picture of grand national—winning trainer gordon elliott sitting on a dead horse sent shock waves through the world of racing and beyond. campaign group animal aid — which wants an end to horse racing — said the picture raised big questions about the whole industry. what concerned me was not particularly gordon elliott being an idiot, but the fact there's a dead young horse below him. what were the reasons for that horse dying in training? animal aid was already investigating — it set up covert cameras in one of britain's biggest abattoirs — drury�*s. 0ver four days of filming in 2019 and 2020, the footage captured dozens of racehorses being slaughtered. when we looked at the footage, we were absolutely astounded at the sheer volume of young thoroughbreds.
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many of them had been sent from ireland. three of them had been recently trained by gordon elliott. mr elliott told panorama that none of those animals were sent by him to the abattoir. he said the horses had retired from racing due to injury, and were not under his care or ownership when they were euthanised in england. he said the first time he learned of their fate was when panorama contacted him. equine expert professor daniel mills found what appeared to be routine breaches of regulations — including a practice of shooting horses from a distance. to me, that's, you know, completely out of order. if you're going to euthanise a horse, you've got to get the bullet in the right place. if that's representative of how they're being killed, then we've got a really serious problem. 0ther apparent breaches of the rules included horses being shot together. drury & sons told panorama that they take great care to maintain high welfare conditions, and do not accept any form of animal abuse.
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they said all horses are humanely destroyed, and that on occasions where issues do occur, they take swift action to review and rectify. the bottom line is these horses, if they are to be euthanised, could and should be euthanised at home. this is unnecessary suffering. horse racing ireland said it places great importance on the welfare of horses. the british horseracing authority told panorama it is committed to high standards of care for racehorses before, during and after racing, and that it would carefully consider any issues raised by the programme. darragh macintyre, bbc news. you can see panorama: the dark side of horse racing on bbc one tonight at 8.30pm. the met office has issued its first amber "extreme heat" warning for parts of the uk amid sweltering temperatures
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and more expected over the coming days. the warning covers a large part of wales, all of south—west england and parts of southern and central england, and will remain in force until the end of thursday. extreme heat warnings have recently been introduced by the met office after a record—breaking number of heatwave deaths were recorded last summer. the uk and eu have accused china of carrying out a major cyber attack earlier this year. the uk said chinese state—backed actors were responsible while the eu said the attack came from the territory of china'. 0ur security correspondent, gordon corera, is here. so what is the cyber attack earlier this year that's being referred to — and what's the proof that china is behind it? this is the uk and the eu and also the us, australia, canada, japan, new zealand and even nato calling this out. it relates to microsoft
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exchange and it was uncovered in march. the intelligence services reckon that it was not a normal cyber espionage targeted operation but it turned into what some describe as a global smash and grab raid in which chinese hackers piled in and gave the way to other chinese hacking groups leaving about 30,000 organisations compromised. the scale of that as lead all these countries to decide to speak out about chinese cyber activity. of course china has denied the claims. there are no sanctions attached to this attribution as they call it about chinese behaviour so we will have to see if it really changes anything other than raising the temperature with beijing. other than raising the temperature with iteijing-_ it's just a few days until the start of the olympics in tokyo, and one of those who'll be taking part is weightlifter cyrille tchatchet who last competed at the 2014 commonwealth games in glasgow for cameroon. afraid to return home he left the team base and ended up sleeping rough down in brighton. now he's part of the
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refugee olympic team. 0ur sports correspondent natalie pirks went to meet him. cyrille tchatchet�*s journey to the pinnacle of sport has not been a regular one. he grew up in cameroon and aged 19, qualified for the 2014 commonwealth games in weightlifting. but whilst in glasgow, he felt strongly he could not face going home for reasons he still feels unable to talk about. i just left the commonwealth games village. i didn't really care where i was going. i didn't know where i was going. i didn't know anyone in glasgow. i was like walking in an empty space. he felt desperate and wanted to get far away, so ended up on a bus to brighton. but that wasn't the end of his problems. it was a very difficult experience because when i got there i was actually homeless for a long time. i think about two months. and i didn't know anyone there so i was sleeping rough, feeding on biscuits
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and things like that. how bad did it get for you in brighton? what was the lowest point? i came to a point where i was actually very suicidal. so i was actually going to attempt to kill myself. he was rehoused in immigration centres while he applied for asylum, and his mental health suffered. finally, two years later, his case was approved and his new career took shape, getting his degree in mental health nursing. he has since beenjuggling work with training as part of the 29 strong refugee team in tokyo. i'm quite privileged to be representing you know, notjust myself but all the other people who are going through what i've gone through, difficult moments. there's a french proverb i think on your facebook page. just tell us what it is and what it means. le soleil n'oublie jamais un petit village, meme s�*il est tout petit.
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i think itjust kind of sums up my own experience, you know. because me going through very difficult moments, been close to terminating my life, you know, to coming back and actually going to uni and competing, completing my course. getting a job, training, competing again. actually going to the olympics. so itjust sums up my own experience. cyrille tchatchet ending that report by natalie pirks. details of organisations offering information and support with mental health are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline. time for a look at the weather, here's susan powell. it's been another sweltering day and the met office has issued an extreme heat weather warning. this is the first time the met office has issued this type of warming at amber level. it
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replicates the other warnings we've received for rain, snow and strong wind and in this case it indicates elevated temperatures by day and night and the risk of some disruption along with knock—on effects to health. 0ut there at the moment some showers across the far south—east of england. these are the temperatures by the end of the night for england and wales. still in the 20s. fresherfor for england and wales. still in the 20s. fresher for scotland and northern ireland in the mid teens. this high pressure is to thank for the settled weather story. tomorrow it means more sunshine. by tomorrow afternoon some showers again set to break out. temperatures close to 30 degrees to the south. these showers where of a closer look for tomorrow
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evening. across eastern england

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