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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 19, 2021 9:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning to you, it's monday, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire, here are the latest headlines. borisjohnson urges us to act cautiously as nearly all legal limits on social contact in england are lifted — despite soaring levels of coronavirus. groups of any size can now meet inside and outdoors, guidance to work from home has been scrapped and face coverings are no longer required by law — although they're still recommended in some places. it's right to be careful, but it's also right to get our country back together, opening up, and as close to normality as possible. businesses hope the end of restrictions will lead to recovery but staff shortages due to self—isolation have hit many. all: three, two, one! cheering. nightclubs in england
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re—open their doors, welcoming their first clubbers since march last year. we will hear this afternoon if the government will recommend vaccinations for children. the whole of scotland has now moved to the lowest level of covid restrictions. but some measures — such as mandatory face coverings — will stay for at least another three weeks. how are you feeling about legal restrictions in england being removed today? let me know, and are you going to continue wearing a mask to protect others? @vicderbyshire on instagram or twitter or email me victoria@bbc.co.uk. the other headlines: a data leak suggests that activists, politicians and journalists around the world may have been monitored using mobile phone spyware designed to target criminals and terrorists. six british athletes are forced to quarantine injapan, four days before the tokyo olympics.
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good morning. 480 days after they were first introduced, most legal restrictions on social contact have been lifted in england. from today, there are now no limits on how many people can meet or go to events, nightclubs can reopen, and table service won't be necessary in pubs and restaurants. borisjohnson has urged all of us to remain cautious — he, the chancellor and the health secretary are all self—isolating. they've warned that the numbers of new infections will continue to surge. from today face coverings are not required by law, although they are recommended in some crowded public spaces, such as public transport. the social distancing "one—metre plus" guidance is no longer
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mandatory except in some places like hospitals. nightclubs can reopen and theatres and cinemas can return to full capacity. people currently working from home are being encouraged to return to the workplace. the guidance recommending against travel to amber list countries has been removed. and fully vaccinated front—line health workers in england will — when hospitals are short—staffed — be able to avoid self—isolation rules. luxmy gopal has this report — i should warn you, it contains flashing images. all: six, five, four, three... the moment they've been waiting for for over a year. cheering. the final stage of unlocking in england, with social distancing rules dropped. 1,000 people packed into this club in central london, with many more lining up outside. cheering.
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they've waited 16 months. what's a little longer? there's so many people there, and we're just so, so pumped to get in there. it's been a year and a half, and now we're alljust ready to dance. i've had my vaccines. i want to have a good time, hon! so excited. so excited! i can't wait for it. it'sjust, like, a relief after such a long time just to have freedom. nightclubs are one of the few businesses that have had to stay closed throughout the whole pandemic — among the last to reopen. loud music plays. and this is what many have waited so long for, and what the nightlife industry has so desperately needed. some feel the sector has been sidelined. the last year has been hell on earth. i mean, it's been very, very difficult. if you look at what happened last week with the football, compared with what's happening tonight, and you think, why were we treated differently? all we're doing is taking the screens out, putting them into storage.
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it's more sedate but no less celebratory at this pub in west london — where they're preparing for an end to table service only and mandatory masks. i can't wait to enjoy doing ourjob, rather than sort of having to basically be a policeman the whole time, and just lecturing people on what they can and can't do, where they can and can't go, the masks they wear, what they touch, where they sanitise, where they track and trace. it's going to be strange for us to adapt again, and the notion of people coming into the pub, being able to go to the table themselves without being directed. as of midnight in england, nearly all legal restrictions on social contact have been removed. face coverings are no longer required by law, but are still recommended in crowded, enclosed spaces. meanwhile, scotland has moved to what's known as level zero. limits on social gatherings remain, with face coverings still mandatory in shops and on public transport. in northern ireland, the latest phase of unlocking is expected next week, while in wales, most covid
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rules are to be scrapped from the 7th of august, though face coverings will still be required in many indoor public places. there is concern about restrictions easing at a time when covid cases in the uk are rising. we're at the point where 10% orjust over of intensive care beds in england are occupied by people who have got covid. so there has been a significant increase in pressure on intensive care services over the last few weeks. with experts warning that cases could surge further, and with a third of adults not yet fully vaccinated, the worry is, at what price this new freedom? luxmy gopal, bbc news. thank you for your messages. how are you feeling in england about legal strictures being removed from today because my sinuses, i am changing nothing. i am sat on a train going to work and most are wearing masks. sharon says, i'm very happy indeed
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about today. karen says, i am sticking with masks and social distancing, iam sticking with masks and social distancing, i am double vaccinated but it is notjust about me. i wish everybody in this country felt the same. bowden says, i'm feeling great! we are on the road to some kind of normality. somewhere in amongst the chaos somebody had to make a decision and borisjohnson has made it. t you lot, we would be locked down forever. ash says, johnson asked, if not now, when? my answer would when everyone has had the opportunity to have both vaccines. right now there are people who are unprotected through no fault of their own. let me know how you are feeling about today if you are in england, send me a message on twitter or instagram or you can e—mail me. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is at downing street. what is the message from downing street on this day? it is what is the message from downing street on this day?— street on this day? it is one of caution and — street on this day? it is one of caution and if _ street on this day? it is one of caution and if i _ street on this day? it is one of caution and if i remind - street on this day? it is one of caution and if i remind we - street on this day? it is one of. caution and if i remind we needed that the lifting of legal restrictions in england does not mark a return to normal and an
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opportunity to put the pandemic behind us, there is the very obvious case of the prime minister isolating at chequers, the chancellor isolating, as well, after they were in contact with the health secretary sajid javid who tested positive for coronavirus and they are doing so only after the initial decision yesterday morning to allow them to take part in a pilot scheme which would have enabled them to carry on working was reversed after criticism came their way. it was one rule for them and one for everybody else. labour are keeping up the pressure on that topic today. nevertheless the lifting of restrictions of course is a very significant day and downing street says it is doing this on the balance of risks, one that cases will continue to rise and that there is still the danger that an unknown variant of coronavirus could present a problem if it is not resistant to the vaccines that people have had. they'll still think it is safe to act now, as the
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vaccines administered nadhim zahawi was explaining this might come of the prime minister, if not now, when? i think it's the right thing to do. as chris whitty has said, there is no perfect time but a time when schools are on summer holidays, that brings downward pressure on the r number — the infection number — and the high levels of vaccination. almost 88% of all adults now with one dose, as i said. it is, i think, the right time to cautiously proceed, but continue to be careful — this is the most infectious respiratory disease that's aerosol—transmitted that man has experienced, and it's only right that we do the right thing on this. the reason the government is urging caution is because there are unknown factors about what the lifting of all restrictions in england will mean for the spread of coronavirus. we heard warnings over the weekend that we could see 1000, up to 2000
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hospitalisations per day, 100,000 or 200,000 cases per day in the coming weeks and months. how people respond to the lifting of restrictions will be crucial, but were labour, the government is still going too far, too fast. the shadow health secretaryjonathan ashworth has said this morning it raises questions about how sustainable this approach is. i think, given where we are with infection rates rising so rapidly — which we know puts pressure on the nhs, which we know will lead to long covid, but we also know, because we got a partially vaccinated population — could mean we see a new variant emerge because of the pressure, the selection pressure put on the virus, then all of these decisions have to be kept under review constantly by ministers. borisjohnson and sajid javid said this would be irreversible. i think that is a foolish, irresponsible thing to be promised. i think we could well see restrictions reimposed later in the year.
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and it is important to say this morning that although throughout the government has described its road map out of lockdown in england as cautious but irreversible, they are not ruling out the possibility that restrictions could have to be imposed at some point in the future, although that will be the last thing that the government would want to do a couple of other bits of information to bring you up—to—date with this money. the vaccines administered nadhim zahawi confirmed the government has been advised by its advisory body on immunisation that children who are vulnerable to coronavirus and those living with vulnerable adults should be vaccinated and he will make a statement in parliament about that a little later, and also the nhs staff who have been contacted by a test and trace and still to isolate will be able to avoid that and continue working in exceptional circumstances. that is to alleviate some of the pressure the nhs is already very clearly under. thank ou, already very clearly under. thank you. jonathan- — i'm nowjoined by paul nowak, deputy general secretary of the trade union congress. hello to you, how might the members
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of the trade unions you represent feeling about these legal restrictions being removed in england? restrictions being removed in en . land? , restrictions being removed in encland? , ., ., ., restrictions being removed in encland? ., ., . england? there is a lot of concern out there- — england? there is a lot of concern out there. that _ england? there is a lot of concern out there. that is _ england? there is a lot of concern out there. that is driven - england? there is a lot of concern out there. that is driven by - england? there is a lot of concern out there. that is driven by the i out there. that is driven by the fact the government's approach to unlocking today has been... to describe it as chaotic would be charitable. at the end of the day we have had an unlocking driven by politics more than pragmatic, practical common sense action. a lot of concern in workplaces today, concern for those going back to work for the first time, in some cases for the first time, in some cases for over a year but concerns for millions of people who have been at work through the pandemic i'm going back to work as normal. you work through the pandemic i'm going back to work as normal.— back to work as normal. you say it is bein: back to work as normal. you say it is being driven _ back to work as normal. you say it is being driven by _ back to work as normal. you say it is being driven by politics - back to work as normal. you say it is being driven by politics but - back to work as normal. you say it is being driven by politics but is i is being driven by politics but is it not being driven by a hugely successful vaccination programme with it has been a success... which is why the governor and say we are able to lift that legal restrictions today. able to lift that legal restrictions toda . ., , able to lift that legal restrictions toda . ., ., ,, , ., today. kudos to our nhs staff who have delivered _ today. kudos to our nhs staff who have delivered that _ today. kudos to our nhs staff who have delivered that programme i today. kudos to our nhs staff who | have delivered that programme but today. kudos to our nhs staff who i have delivered that programme but we are seeing rising infections. at some stage you do have to unlock the
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economy, but it is how you go about that becomes really important. to give you practical examples... the government guidance for employers about how to keep workplaces covid secure, they are supposed to be preparing their risk assessments against today so that people can go into work knowing that workplaces are safe as possible. it was published with only two working days of notice before today, employers and employees to sit down and make sure workplaces are covid secure. face coverings, this has gone back and forth but the government guidance says face coverings can help reduce the spread of infection in an overcrowded and enclosed spaces, but they have removed the legal obligation to wear them in places like public transport and in the shops. it is confused and chaotic and causing a lot of concern in workplaces quite is it that confusing? if in workplaces quite is it that confusing?— in workplaces quite is it that confusinu? , ., ., confusing? if people... throughout this pandemic _ confusing? if people... throughout this pandemic broadly _ confusing? if people... throughout this pandemic broadly speaking i this pandemic broadly speaking
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people havejoined in collective action to protect all of our public health. most people have got common sense, i have had messages from people this morning saying most of us want that you are wearing masks but that common—sense has also been underpinned by legally enforceable guidance that the covenant published and developed in consultation with employers and and developed in consultation with emlo e . ., , ., and developed in consultation with emloe . ., , ., employers and unions. that has been relaced b employers and unions. that has been replaced by vague — employers and unions. that has been replaced by vague exhortations i employers and unions. that has been replaced by vague exhortations and i replaced by vague exhortations and recommendations. it is great most people are continuing to wear face covering. i will get on the train this morning and when i but it is not enoughjust to this morning and when i but it is not enough just to give this... 0utsource the responsibility of the commitment to individuals. we know there are lots of people who will feel very uncomfortable, people with real concerns, those who are vulnerable, who were shielding, we will get onto the train sitting next to someone who refuses to wear a face covering and nothing the train company can do about it because it is not legally enforceable. haifa
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company can do about it because it is not legally enforceable.- is not legally enforceable. how are our is not legally enforceable. how are your members _ is not legally enforceable. how are your members being _ is not legally enforceable. how are your members being affected i is not legally enforceable. how are your members being affected by i your members being affected by pinging the nhs test and trace at which it is affecting a lot of workplaces, hospitality through to food manufacturing. the one thing i would say is that it is being driven by a rise in infections and the focus has been on the impact on employers and quite rightly so. lots i warning about the viability of their operations at the moment. i have a real concern about individuals because we know for example 2 million people in this country don't qualify for statutory sick pay. lots of people only get it, £26 per week if they have to sell nicely. in those situations i suspect people are turning off the app. i would urge the government to urgently talk to employers and unions to get a solution to the so—called pingdemic. unions to get a solution to the so-called pingdemic.- unions to get a solution to the so-called pingdemic. thank you for talkin: to so-called pingdemic. thank you for talking to us. _ so-called pingdemic. thank you for talking to us, paul— so-called pingdemic. thank you for talking to us, paul nowak. -
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scotland moves to level zero of covid restrictions today. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw is in ayrshire. james — talk us through the changes there. the surprising thing really is that not very much is changing in scotland compared to england, so there will still be restrictions on there will still be restrictions on the number of people who can meet in private homes, who can meet in public indoor public spaces and even in outdoor spaces, as well. the real big difference that they will be between scotland and england is the fact that masks will still be compulsory in scotland. that is on public transport, in shops, and a lot of other indoor public spaces and workplaces, as well. let's get a sense of how this will affect businesses and people in scotland. let's talk to a gym the joint owner, with his wife, of the bistro here on the west coast of scotland. i know it is the green shutters bistro
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because it is on your shirt. how are you approaching today and what difference will it make? it you approaching today and what difference will it make?- you approaching today and what difference will it make? it will be interesting _ difference will it make? it will be interesting to _ difference will it make? it will be interesting to see _ difference will it make? it will be interesting to see what _ difference will it make? it will be interesting to see what the i interesting to see what the difference is. psychologically for people _ difference is. psychologically for peorrie it — difference is. psychologically for people it will make a difference but in terms _ people it will make a difference but in terms of— people it will make a difference but in terms of what is actually happening, not very much. there is no enthusiasm and excitement for this level— no enthusiasm and excitement for this level change that there has been _ this level change that there has been for— this level change that there has been for previous ones. essentially nothing _ been for previous ones. essentially nothing is — been for previous ones. essentially nothing is really that different. it will be _ nothing is really that different. it will be interesting. there is a lot of fear— will be interesting. there is a lot of fear around, so people are still reticent _ of fear around, so people are still reticent to— of fear around, so people are still reticent to come inside anyway, and i am reticent to come inside anyway, and lam kind _ reticent to come inside anyway, and lam kind of— reticent to come inside anyway, and i am kind of hopeful it will signal a change — i am kind of hopeful it will signal a change maybe in the message from government and perhaps even the media, _ government and perhaps even the media, to — government and perhaps even the media, to say, here is how many people _ media, to say, here is how many peogie have _ media, to say, here is how many people have had it and recovered. there _ people have had it and recovered. there are — people have had it and recovered. there are no recovery figures published. i think we are perhaps missing _ published. i think we are perhaps missing a — published. i think we are perhaps missing a trick there, particularly as england — missing a trick there, particularly as england does open up and we are hopeful— as england does open up and we are hopeful that we will be able to welcome some tourists from south of
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the border~ _ welcome some tourists from south of the border. it welcome some tourists from south of the border. , ., , _ welcome some tourists from south of the border. , . , _ ., the border. it will be a busy date for ou. the border. it will be a busy date for yom the _ the border. it will be a busy date for you. the traditional- the border. it will be a busy date for you. the traditional two i the border. it will be a busy date. for you. the traditional two weeks when everyone piles out of glasgow to the coast. do you expect a big influx today? i to the coast. do you expect a big influx today?— to the coast. do you expect a big influx today? i hope so and we are robabl , influx today? i hope so and we are probably. as _ influx today? i hope so and we are probably. as l _ influx today? i hope so and we are probably, as i said _ influx today? i hope so and we are probably, as i said earlier, - influx today? i hope so and we are probably, as i said earlier, more i probably, as i said earlier, more weather— probably, as i said earlier, more weather dependent level dependent at the moment and when it is nice like this people — the moment and when it is nice like this people can sit outside. they want _ this people can sit outside. they want to— this people can sit outside. they want to come and sit and enjoy the view behind — want to come and sit and enjoy the view behind you, which is really good _ view behind you, which is really good if— view behind you, which is really good. if the weather is dull and cloudy— good. if the weather is dull and cloudy but wet, you know... it decimates— cloudy but wet, you know... it decimates the number of customers we see. 00 _ decimates the number of customers we see. y ., decimates the number of customers we see. ., , decimates the number of customers we see. y., ., , ., decimates the number of customers we see. ., , see. do you feel envious of people runnina see. do you feel envious of people running businesses _ see. do you feel envious of people running businesses like _ see. do you feel envious of people running businesses like yourself i running businesses like yourself south of the border who can throw their masks so ijust get on with it, like it used to be? i their masks so i just get on with it, like it used to be?— their masks so i just get on with it, like it used to be? i would like to see a return _ it, like it used to be? i would like to see a return to _ it, like it used to be? i would like to see a return to normality. i to see a return to normality. personally i would like to get rid of it but — personally i would like to get rid of it but it — personally i would like to get rid of it but it is important to reassure _ of it but it is important to reassure customers and let them feel
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safe. reassure customers and let them feel safe jim _ reassure customers and let them feel safe. , ~ . ~ reassure customers and let them feel safe. ~ . ~ . ~ reassure customers and let them feel safe. . . ~ ., ,, reassure customers and let them feel safe.�* . ., ~' ., ~' i., , safe. jim walker, thank you very much. safe. jim walker, thank you very much- that _ safe. jim walker, thank you very much. that gives _ safe. jim walker, thank you very much. that gives you _ safe. jim walker, thank you very much. that gives you a - safe. jim walker, thank you very much. that gives you a sense i safe. jim walker, thank you very i much. that gives you a sense that things will be really different in scotland compared to england at least for the next few weeks. the 9th of august is the date that scotland is going to come as things stand at the moment, lose all the legal restrictions around covid that it has at the moment. ii legal restrictions around covid that it has at the moment.— legal restrictions around covid that it has at the moment. if you are on a train from — it has at the moment. if you are on a train from england _ it has at the moment. if you are on a train from england up _ it has at the moment. if you are on a train from england up to - it has at the moment. if you are on | a train from england up to glasgow, you would have to put the mask on at some point on the train, wouldn't you? some point on the train, wouldn't ou? . , ., some point on the train, wouldn't ou? ., , ., ~' some point on the train, wouldn't ou? . , ., ,, ., you? that is true and i think that will depend _ you? that is true and i think that will depend on _ you? that is true and i think that will depend on how— you? that is true and i think that will depend on how the - you? that is true and i think that will depend on how the transport operators decide that they will manage that. will you have to put a mask on as soon as you get on the train, why would there be an announcement as it crosses the border? it is most likely that the companies will decide that they will want a policy unmasks which covers the whole of the journey but all those kind of details we will have to wait to see what happens. thank ou ve to wait to see what happens. thank you very much. _ to wait to see what happens. thank you very much, james. _ as we've been hearing, new advice on travel is in place from today. the government is no longer warning against travel to amber—list
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countries, and people who've had both vaccine jabs won't have to quarantine on their return from any country on the amber list — except france. nina warhurst is at manchester airport. either people jetting off this morning? either people “etting off this mornin: ? ., ., either people “etting off this morninu? ., .,, ,., either people “etting off this morninu? ., ., ., . morning? not as you would notice. look morning? not as you would notice. look behind _ morning? not as you would notice. look behind me. _ morning? not as you would notice. look behind me. this _ morning? not as you would notice. look behind me. this is _ morning? not as you would notice. look behind me. this is mid i morning? not as you would notice. look behind me. this is mid july, l look behind me. this is mid july, beginning at the summer holidays is one of the biggest airports in the uk and have a look at the family holiday provider, jet2. a handful of people going through. despite the changes to amber countries they are still running at about 15% capacity. we have flights leaving for aviva, palmer, tenerife. they have moved on to the amber list. as today if you are going to those countries and return to the uk you will not have to quarantine that you will have to take a test up to three days pre—departure and up to two days before you get home. it is still very complicated picture because there is now the france caveat. it is on amber list, you must isolate the ten days and take the extra on
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the ten days and take the extra on the eighth day and that has put a lot of people are travelling and i askedif lot of people are travelling and i asked if few travellers this morning, is it worth it? normally go in the holidays. _ morning, is it worth it? normally go in the holidays, is _ morning, is it worth it? normally go in the holidays, is that _ morning, is it worth it? normally go in the holidays, is that you - morning, is it worth it? normally go in the holidays, is that you look i in the holidays, is that you look forward — in the holidays, is that you look forward to — in the holidays, is that you look forward to be excited about. i have to say— forward to be excited about. i have to say this — forward to be excited about. i have to say this has been a pretty stressful, anxious time for everybody so i'm not sure i would do it again. _ everybody so i'm not sure i would do it again, knowing what i know now from _ it again, knowing what i know now from this— it again, knowing what i know now from this experience. we it again, knowing what i know now from this experience.— it again, knowing what i know now from this experience. we are feeling su er, from this experience. we are feeling super. really — from this experience. we are feeling super, really excited. _ from this experience. we are feeling super, really excited. we _ from this experience. we are feeling super, really excited. we are i from this experience. we are feeling super, really excited. we are going i super, really excited. we are going away _ super, really excited. we are going away again— super, really excited. we are going away again after _ super, really excited. we are going away again after all— super, really excited. we are going away again after all this _ super, really excited. we are going away again after all this lockdown.| away again after all this lockdown. when _ away again after all this lockdown. when it— away again after all this lockdown. when it comes _ away again after all this lockdown. when it comes at _ away again after all this lockdown. when it comes at the _ away again after all this lockdown. when it comes at the expense i away again after all this lockdown. when it comes at the expense of i away again after all this lockdown. . when it comes at the expense of the extra testing, how much has that set you back? i extra testing, how much has that set ou back? ~ , ., :: you back? i think it is about £50 each and charlotte _ you back? i think it is about £50 each and charlotte has - you back? i think it is about £50 each and charlotte has to i you back? i think it is about £50 each and charlotte has to do i you back? i think it is about £50 each and charlotte has to do it, | you back? i think it is about £50 l each and charlotte has to do it, as well, _ each and charlotte has to do it, as well, when — each and charlotte has to do it, as well, when we go back. all in all, about 100 quid per person for all of the testing. that is an expense that lots of families cannot absorb, although others tell us that it was cheaper to do that with the test and try to find somewhere, say, in cornwall or in north wales at the moment. important to say you have to get your tests done vigorously. we spoke to one
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family who had to leave one member behind because his pcr test didn't come back in time for departure and also to check about the country you are hoping to travel to. bulgaria is and our green list so i was keen to look at package deals there but we have moved on to their medallist, so things are moving towards slightly simpler situation but it will not be easy to get abroad this summer. —— we have moved on to bulgaria's red list. . ~ we have moved on to bulgaria's red list. ., ,, , ., we have moved on to bulgaria's red list. . ~' , ., , we have moved on to bulgaria's red list. ., ,, y., , . nightclubs in england were allowed to re—open their doors from just after midnight last night — for the first time since march last year. let's speak to the cabaret performer, and radio and tv presenter amy lame — who's been london's night czar for the last five years. where were you last night? i was clued to where were you last night? i was glued to my _ where were you last night? i was glued to my telephone _ where were you last night? i was glued to my telephone to - where were you last night? i —" glued to my telephone to make sure everybody was reopening and able to do so safely and i am pleased to say that the reopening of the capital pot culture, hospitality and night—time economy venues is a
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really important to step back to the life we knew before stop this is the first time that nightclubs have been able to open in about 16 months. they were the first to close, they were the last to open as now they are able to operate at full capacity and i urge londoners and visitors to go out there and enjoy yourselves but do so carefully and responsibly. do you think they were forgotten to some extent by the government? think in some ways — some extent by the government? think in some ways the _ some extent by the government? think in some ways the industry _ some extent by the government? “in run; in some ways the industry feels they were scapegoated but the most important thing now is that our businesses are able to reopen and i am confident our night—time economy is going to bounce back even stronger. is going to bounce back even stronger-— is going to bounce back even stronuer. ., , m stronger. how can it be safe? well, i think... stronger. how can it be safe? well, lthink--- you _ stronger. how can it be safe? well, i think... you know, _ stronger. how can it be safe? well, i think... you know, this _ stronger. how can it be safe? well, i think... you know, this is - stronger. how can it be safe? well, i think... you know, this is about i i think... you know, this is about personal choice, as the covenant has told us. like everybody else i want told us. like everybody else i want to see people being able to return to see people being able to return to doing things that they love, whether that is going to a
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nightclub, sporting events, music festival, going to see a west end theatre. with regards to wearing masks in public spaces, if i were in a crowded, busy space, i would wear a crowded, busy space, i would wear a mask and that is what i would advise londoners to do. we have cases continuing to rise and i would encourage everybody to go out and get the vaccine, particularly younger people who were really desperate to go out and enjoy themselves again. the vaccine it really is the most important passport that you can have. but --eole passport that you can have. but people are _ passport that you can have. but people are allowed to go to clubs without wearing a mask and without having a vaccination. how can it be safe? ~ ., . ., having a vaccination. how can it be safe? ~ ., ., , safe? well, then how could anything be safe? this _ safe? well, then how could anything be safe? this is _ safe? well, then how could anything be safe? this is not _ safe? well, then how could anything be safe? this is notjust _ safe? well, then how could anything be safe? this is notjust about i be safe? this is notjust about nightclubs, this is about all of our public spaces. but nightclubs, this is about all of our public spaces-— nightclubs, this is about all of our public spaces. but i am asking you about clubs _ public spaces. but i am asking you about clubs because _ public spaces. but i am asking you about clubs because you _ public spaces. but i am asking you about clubs because you are i public spaces. but i am asking you about clubs because you are the i about clubs because you are the night tsar. about clubs because you are the night tsar-_ about clubs because you are the niuhttsar. , , . ,, ., night tsar. yes, but nightclubs are not the only _ night tsar. yes, but nightclubs are not the only place. _ night tsar. yes, but nightclubs are not the only place. we _ night tsar. yes, but nightclubs are not the only place. we only i night tsar. yes, but nightclubs are not the only place. we only need i night tsar. yes, but nightclubs are | not the only place. we only need to look at, for example, the recent euro tournament, where people
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crowded public spaces and we have not seen the full impact of that yet, so i think it is important to take nightclubs as part of a whole, part of our hospitality, our night—time culture, which is reopening, and reopening as safely as possible. i reopening, and reopening as safely as possible-— as possible. i think the euros, at wembley. _ as possible. i think the euros, at wembley. people _ as possible. i think the euros, at wembley, people were - as possible. i think the euros, at| wembley, people were supposed as possible. i think the euros, at i wembley, people were supposed to show either vaccination status or its negative lateral flow tests. i know it didn't always happen, particularly at the final, but i take your point. anyway, good luck, thank you very much, amy lame. ben mundy is at fibre nightclub in leeds. how is it there? i was a good buy and stayed _ how is it there? i was a good buy and stayed in _ how is it there? i was a good buy and stayed in last _ how is it there? i was a good buy and stayed in last night _ how is it there? i was a good buy and stayed in last night that i i how is it there? i was a good buy and stayed in last night that i am i and stayed in last night that i am told there were trays of shops, strip bounces and cheeky toilet savvy. at the 500 days, nightclubs are open again —— strict bounces.
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hundreds of people streamed in at midnight and danced away to the early hours of this money. there is still competitive on the confetti cannons lining the pavement outside. inside right now is a huge clean—up operation because they want to do it all over again tonight —— to put on as many events as possible to recoup some of that lost money over the last 15 months or so. the owner here and for many others, this is a hugely significant moment in this pandemic. they point towards the benefits of mental health the benefits of mental health the benefits of: the economy, whilst others are more cautious given the context of the current coronavirus situation, increasing hospitalisation and cases. despite government advice, fibre and many other nightclubs across the country decided not to check on disease vaccination is whether people had negative test. i decided to not check on covid vaccination status.
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let's bring in a drag queen. are you the first year or the last to go home? �* ., ., , �* , the first year or the last to go home? �* , , ., home? both! i wasn't the first year but ma be home? both! i wasn't the first year but maybe ten _ home? both! i wasn't the first year but maybe ten minutes _ home? both! i wasn't the first year but maybe ten minutes after i but maybe ten minutes after everybody else.— but maybe ten minutes after everybody else. how it was last niuht? everybody else. how it was last niht? it everybody else. how it was last night? it was... _ everybody else. how it was last night? it was... different. i- everybody else. how it was last night? it was... different. ifeltl everybody else. how it was last i night? it was... different. ifelt a bit uncomfortable. _ night? it was... different. ifelt a bit uncomfortable. i _ night? it was... different. ifelt a bit uncomfortable. i have - night? it was... different. ifelt a bit uncomfortable. i have been i bit uncomfortable. i have been around — bit uncomfortable. i have been around 70 _ bit uncomfortable. i have been around 70 people. but once you are in here, _ around 70 people. but once you are in here, after— around 70 people. but once you are in here, aftera around 70 people. but once you are in here, after a year and a half you are going— in here, after a year and a half you are going to— in here, after a year and a half you are going to feel a bit uncomfortable —— i have been around so many _ uncomfortable —— i have been around so many people. knowing everyone everyone _ so many people. knowing everyone everyone keeps safe. all the staff, they work— everyone keeps safe. all the staff, they work here every week, they are all safe, _ they work here every week, they are all safe, they all test, and coming herem _ all safe, they all test, and coming herem i_ all safe, they all test, and coming here... i don't feel noxious around anyone _ here... i don't feel noxious around anyone. just — here... i don't feel noxious around anyone. just incredible —— i did not feel nauseous. do anyone. just incredible -- i did not feel nauseous.— feel nauseous. do you have considered _ feel nauseous. do you have considered that _ feel nauseous. do you have considered that people - feel nauseous. do you have i considered that people coming feel nauseous. do you have - considered that people coming into the venue of... we considered that people coming into the venue of. . ._ the venue of... we will have those consent going _ the venue of... we will have those consent going anywhere. - the venue of... we will have those consent going anywhere. as - the venue of... we will have those consent going anywhere. as long i the venue of... we will have those l consent going anywhere. as long as you are _ consent going anywhere. as long as you are safe — consent going anywhere. as long as you are safe yourself —— we will
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have _ you are safe yourself —— we will have those _ you are safe yourself —— we will have those concerns. as long as you stay safe _ have those concerns. as long as you stay safe and — have those concerns. as long as you stay safe and have fun people will be fine _ stay safe and have fun people will be fine and have fun.— stay safe and have fun people will be fine and have fun. what was the atmosphere _ be fine and have fun. what was the atmosphere at _ be fine and have fun. what was the atmosphere at life _ be fine and have fun. what was the atmosphere at life last _ be fine and have fun. what was the atmosphere at life last night - be fine and have fun. what was the atmosphere at life last night on - be fine and have fun. what was the | atmosphere at life last night on the dance floor? it atmosphere at life last night on the dance floor?— dance floor? it was... i can't even describe it- _ dance floor? it was... i can't even describe it. it _ dance floor? it was... i can't even describe it. it was _ dance floor? it was... i can't even describe it. it was just _ dance floor? it was... i can't even describe it. it wasjust incredible. | describe it. it wasjust incredible. the way— describe it. it wasjust incredible. the way people... it has been a year and a _ the way people... it has been a year and a half _ the way people... it has been a year and a half. and does not go the way people _ and a half. and does not go the way people were acting was just... and a half. and does not go the way people were acting wasjust... it was like — people were acting wasjust... it was like a — people were acting wasjust... it was like a new year. it was just incredible _ was like a new year. it was just incredible. sis was like a new year. it was 'ust incredible.�* was like a new year. it was 'ust incredible. �* , ., incredible. as i mentioned, event after event _ incredible. as i mentioned, event after event to _ incredible. as i mentioned, event after event to try _ incredible. as i mentioned, event after event to try to _ incredible. as i mentioned, event after event to try to recoup - incredible. as i mentioned, event after event to try to recoup some | incredible. as i mentioned, event. after event to try to recoup some of that lost money over the last 15 months or so. do you imagine that kind of atmosphere at night after night after night? i kind of atmosphere at night after night after night?— night after night? i think it will car on. night after night? i think it will carry on. everyone _ night after night? i think it will carry on. everyone is _ night after night? i think it will carry on. everyone is so - night after night? i think it will i carry on. everyone is so excited, having _ carry on. everyone is so excited, having such _ carry on. everyone is so excited, having such an amazing time. last night _ having such an amazing time. last night was — having such an amazing time. last night was the best night... i have been _ night was the best night... i have been doing — night was the best night... i have been doing drive for four years and that has— been doing drive for four years and that has been the best night i've worked — that has been the best night i've worked -- — that has been the best night i've worked -- i_ that has been the best night i've worked —— i have been doing drag for four years _ worked —— i have been doing drag for fouryears. everyone worked —— i have been doing drag for four years. everyone was excited and having _ four years. everyone was excited and having fun _ four years. everyone was excited and having fun and it was so good and
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what _ having fun and it was so good and what better place. leeds, drag, gorgeous, — what better place. leeds, drag, gorgeous, incredible. are what better place. leeds, drag, gorgeous, incredible.— what better place. leeds, drag, gorgeous, incredible. are you going home to sleep? _ gorgeous, incredible. are you going home to sleep? no! _ gorgeous, incredible. are you going home to sleep? no! one _ gorgeous, incredible. are you going home to sleep? no! one club, - gorgeous, incredible. are you going home to sleep? no! one club, next} home to sleep? no! one club, next club, home to sleep? no! one club, next club. another _ home to sleep? no! one club, next club, another club, _ home to sleep? no! one club, next club, another club, next _ home to sleep? no! one club, next club, another club, next club. - home to sleep? no! one club, next club, another club, next club. you i club, another club, next club. you have had 15 _ club, another club, next club. you have had 15 months _ club, another club, next club. wm. have had 15 months to sleep stuff i am exactly! talk to me about the lack of lack do not quote vaccinations. do you feel that could lead to more restrictions down the line? has lead to more restrictions down the line? �* , . . lead to more restrictions down the line? m ., ., ., lead to more restrictions down the line? . ., , line? as a drag queen i always test. we are told — line? as a drag queen i always test. we are told to _ line? as a drag queen i always test. we are told to always _ line? as a drag queen i always test. we are told to always test. - line? as a drag queen i always test. we are told to always test. i - line? as a drag queen i always test. we are told to always test. i always| we are told to always test. i always make _ we are told to always test. i always make sure — we are told to always test. i always make sure that i have tested. so if i make sure that i have tested. so if t can— make sure that i have tested. so if t can yeah — make sure that i have tested. so if t can yeah i — make sure that i have tested. so if i can yeah i would never come here and find _ i can yeah i would never come here and find out — i can yeah i would never come here and find out that i have, and anyone elsem _ and find out that i have, and anyone elsem and — and find out that i have, and anyone else... and you don't go out if you haven't— else... and you don't go out if you haven't tested. like... stay safe! everyone — haven't tested. like... stay safe! everyone needs to stay safe, don't they? _ everyone needs to stay safe, don't the ? , . , everyone needs to stay safe, don't the ? , ., , ., everyone needs to stay safe, don't the? , ._ ., ., ,, everyone needs to stay safe, don't the? , ., .mg, , they? they really do. thank you very much for your— they? they really do. thank you very much for your time. _
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they? they really do. thank you very much for your time. i _ they? they really do. thank you very much for your time. i will _ they? they really do. thank you very much for your time. i will hand - they? they really do. thank you very much for your time. i will hand back | much for your time. i will hand back to you, victoria, but the good news about being in a nightclub when no one else is here, there is no queue for the bar or the toilets so i am off to do both of those things quite i think that might have been a bit too much information but thank you very much. l’m too much information but thank you ve much. �* . too much information but thank you very much-— very much. i'm asking you this mornin: very much. i'm asking you this morning how _ very much. i'm asking you this morning how you _ very much. i'm asking you this morning how you are - very much. i'm asking you this morning how you are feeling i very much. i'm asking you this - morning how you are feeling about restrictions being removed. mrs t has said nothing has changed, i have to wear full has said nothing has changed, i have to wearfull ppe, has said nothing has changed, i have to wear full ppe, fill has said nothing has changed, i have to wearfull ppe, fill in a disclaimer to get my mum into my back garden for one hour and fill in a questionnaire when i take her back to the home. michelle says, "i'm glad responsibility for our lives has been handed back to us. there has always been and will always be a risk in life but we always managed it ourselves before. we can't stop living in case we die." jenny says, "i'm really scared. nhs friends are back working seven—day shifts, my brother is back on a ventilator with covid, dread another summer of freedom leading to more
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restrictions in september. the government should have waited until more were vaccinated." keep them coming in. katie hopkins is to be deported from australia after having her visa cancelled. this is the most popular story on the bbc website. let's get more on this from our correspondent in sydney shaimaa khalil. she was bragging about floating hotel quarantine regulations. katie hopkins entered australia initially to take part in the celebrity edition of big brother on friday and in an instagram video she said she was given instructions by hotel quarantine officers that when someone knocks on her door essentially to deliver food that she should wait 30 seconds and then she should wait 30 seconds and then she should open the door and get her food but should wear a facemask. she was laughing through the whole video and then she said what she hoped she would do is wait until someone knocked on the door, open the door naked with no facemask to scare them and essentially, of course, put
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their lives at risk. she also described lockdown as the biggest hoax in human history. she is saying that while in sydney we are in our fourth week of lockdown and melbourne is in lockdown at the moment so the two biggest cities in australia are in lockdown because of the spread of the delta variant. when this video came out, of course, it sparked all sorts of anger, not just these disrespectful comments but also at the fact she was able to enter australia and take part in ems enter australia and take part in big brother: given how controversial a character she is. we brother: given how controversial a character she is.— character she is. we heard from the home affairs — character she is. we heard from the home affairs minister _ character she is. we heard from the home affairs minister karen - character she is. we heard from the | home affairs minister karen andrews who described her behaviour as appalling and a slap in the face to all of those australians in lockdown and confirmed that her visa was cancelled and she will be deported as soon as possible. the seven network and production company behind the show also said she was sacked. but neither the government is 07 network addressed fully why she was hired in the first place.
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this is the commentator who described refugees as cockroaches, who said islam was repugnant, who is known for her controversial comments. she was allowed to come into australia. the home affairs minister said the new south wales government here where i am made that request on economic benefits basis but she was glad that katie hopkins was leaving. again, this really touches a very sore spot with australians will stop the restrictions have meant that thousands and thousands of australians are still stranded overseas, unable to come home at a time, like i said, when australia's two biggest cities are still in lockdown. two biggest cities are still in lockdown-— two biggest cities are still in lockdown. . ,, ., .,., two biggest cities are still in lockdown. . ,, ., ., ,, lockdown. thanks, shaimaa, thank ou. it lockdown. thanks, shaimaa, thank you- it has — lockdown. thanks, shaimaa, thank you- it hasiust_ lockdown. thanks, shaimaa, thank you. it hasjust gone _ lockdown. thanks, shaimaa, thank you. it hasjust gone 9:30am. - now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. the forecast for this week is a hot and a sunny one with the chance we could see the odd heavy shower which could be thundery.
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but most of us will miss them. we've got a bit more cloud across some northern and western areas. most of that continuing to break up through the day, although it may linger in the north—east. but for the bulk of the uk it's going to be dry, hot and sunny with the chance of a showerjust here and there — most of us, as i mentioned, will miss them. cool air with sea breezes developing along the coastlines. as we head through the evening and overnight, we'll lose any remaining showers. there'll be a lot of dry weather, the cloud returning across the north and the west, with some misty conditions and another uncomfortable night for sleeping in. for tomorrow, the cloud should continue to break up in the north and the west, we should lose the mist, and for most it's going to be a dry day with just the chance of a shower somewhere in the south—eastern quarter — but, again, most of us will miss them. if you catch one it could be heavy and thundery. temperatures 13 in the north to 29 in the south. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's sally. good morning. some fallout from yesterday. lewis hamilton has been accused
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of being "disrespectful" and "unsportsmanlike" after his win at the british grand prix. he collided with his championship rival max verstappen on the opening lap which ended verstappen's race. he then criticised hamilton on social media. our sports correspondent joe wilson was at silverstone. silverstone, and a crowd on a pre—covid scale, 140,000, an organised arrangement of spectators to be checked for tests or vaccines. they came for excitement and many were supporting the reigning world champion. come on, lewis! lewis hamilton started second on the grid in his black mercedes, aware that red bull's max verstappen ahead of him had a faster car, aware that he had to make an impression quickly. first and second in the drivers�* championship, battling for the lead in the british grand prix, untilthis. commentator: this time . on the inside, and they touch! verstappen is out of the race and that's a big crash! the most important thing was that max verstappen was ok. of course, he was out of the race. lewis hamilton's assessment was that verstappen turned into him.
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red bull said hamilton was fully to blame. intense discussions followed. ford and cruise. who wrote this plot? when the race resumed it was decided hamilton was at fault. ten seconds' penalty taken in the pits but he was soon moving. past lando norris here into third. hamilton's team—mate to let him through into second to challenge for the lead. charles leclerc in his red ferrari seemed to move aside. hamilton through. fans in the stands, film stars in the pits, lewis hamilton crossing the line in first, a hollow victory, claimed verstappen's team. spectators leaving may still be discussing what happened on the first lap. but the outcome of this race has dramatically changed the dynamic of the championship. in lewis hamilton's favour. joe wilson, bbc news, silverstone. since then, hamilton has been the target of racist abuse on social media after his victory on sunday. his team mercedes,
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as well as formula i and the fia, have condemned the abuse, "in the strongest possible terms". they said in a statement, "these people have no place in our sport. "we urge that those responsible should be held accountable "for their actions." britain's mark cavendish says he will take a break before deciding on his future, after a successful tour de france. i spoke to him a short time ago cavendish won the green jersey for the first time in a decade and equalled the record for most stage wins at the tour, with 3a, although he was unsuccessful in beating the record on the champs—elysees yesterday. when we started in brittany three weeks ago i was just happy to be here, you know? it is the race i've dedicated my life too, it has given me the life that i have and i have so much respect for it and its history. just to be here one more time was big itself. and to win a stage after everything that has happened in the last few years and everything i've been through, that was enough. that was more than
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enough. that was a bonus to win anything, then to win four and then when the greenjersey. anything, then to win four and then when the green jersey. it has been a journey. it has not been an easy one but it has been a beautiful one. you are sa inc but it has been a beautiful one. you are saying that _ but it has been a beautiful one. you are saying that was enough just to even be there. on the monday morning now as you reflect, are you going to have another go? i now as you reflect, are you going to have another go?— have another go? i don't know. we will see. have another go? i don't know. we will see- it — have another go? i don't know. we will see. it is _ have another go? i don't know. we will see. it is a _ have another go? i don't know. we will see. it is a year _ have another go? i don't know. we will see. it is a year away - have another go? i don't know. we will see. it is a year away yet. - have another go? i don't know. we will see. it is a year away yet. and | will see. it is a year away yet. and actually, if i'm honest, ithink will see. it is a year away yet. and actually, if i'm honest, i think it is my 13th tour de france and after every one i was like, i don't know if i would do that again and by the tuesday or wednesday a couple of days after it you are missing it and looking forward next year. 21 south african footballers and officials are self—isolating in the olympic village in tokyo after being identified as close contacts of individuals who returned positive covid—i9 tests. two of their players and a video analyst tested positive on saturday. while, separately, six athletes and two staff members from team gb's
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athletics team are self—isolating after being identified as close contacts of an individual who tested positive after their arrival into tokyo on friday. you do wonder whether we will be hearing more cases like that in the next coming days. that's all the sport for now. victoria, back to you. thank you very much, sally. good morning, monday morning, 9:40am. with almost all coronavirus restrictions being lifted in england today, it means that — for the first time in 18 months — there is no limit on the number of people who can attend wedding services or receptions, whatever the venue. inside, outside, you name it, it can go ahead. that means couples like nafessa mitha and james timmings can finally have the wedding they've wanted. they're getting married this weekend. hurray for you two! thank goodness. what does this mean for your wedding plans? what does this mean for your wedding lans? , ., ., ., what does this mean for your wedding lans? ,., ., ., ., ,, what does this mean for your wedding lans? ,., ., ., ., ~' ,., what does this mean for your wedding lans? ., ., ,, . plans? good morning, thank you. we were very delighted _ plans? good morning, thank you. we were very delighted that _ plans? good morning, thank you. we were very delighted that the - were very delighted that the restrictions ended when they did. it means that we can and have go ahead,
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all the guests we have invited can come along, and are able not to have to worry about that side of things any more. 50 to worry about that side of things an more. . , to worry about that side of things an more. ., , , ., to worry about that side of things i any more-_ the any more. so what is the plan? the lan any more. so what is the plan? the [an is to any more. so what is the plan? the plan is to have _ any more. so what is the plan? the plan is to have just _ any more. so what is the plan? the plan is to have just under— any more. so what is the plan? the plan is to have just under 120 - plan is to have just under 120 people — plan is to have just under 120 people. we are going to have the ceremony— people. we are going to have the ceremony inside but try and have some _ ceremony inside but try and have some of— ceremony inside but try and have some of the reception outside, just obviously— some of the reception outside, just obviously taking into account that people _ obviously taking into account that people may not be as comfortable, and obviously the current situation with the _ and obviously the current situation with the coronavirus. we are trying to go— with the coronavirus. we are trying to go ahead — with the coronavirus. we are trying to go ahead and have a really good day but _ to go ahead and have a really good day but also be mindful of how people — day but also be mindful of how people might be feeling. what does mindful mean _ people might be feeling. what does mindful mean in _ people might be feeling. what does mindful mean in practical— people might be feeling. what does mindful mean in practical terms? i people might be feeling. what does. mindful mean in practicalterms? are mindful mean in practical terms? are people not sitting quite as close together as they would pre—pandemic? are you asking people to wear masks, or what? we are you asking people to wear masks, or what? ~ ., ., ., ,~' are you asking people to wear masks, orwhat? ~ ., ., ., , .,, are you asking people to wear masks, orwhat? ~ ., ., ., , ., or what? we are not asking people to wear masks — or what? we are not asking people to wear masks but _ or what? we are not asking people to wear masks but we _ or what? we are not asking people to wear masks but we are _ or what? we are not asking people to wear masks but we are making - or what? we are not asking people to wear masks but we are making them | wear masks but we are making them available _ wear masks but we are making them available. �* , ., , ., available. and in terms of seating arrangement? — available. and in terms of seating arrangement? we _ available. and in terms of seating arrangement? we will— available. and in terms of seating arrangement? we will probably i available. and in terms of seating i arrangement? we will probably wear masks at different _ arrangement? we will probably wear masks at different points. _ arrangement? we will probably wear masks at different points. the - masks at different points. the seating arrangement is limited, it is quite hard with all the venue
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spaces to do too much. we have tried to sit different families together to sit different families together to make sure we are not having the meal times to many different groups sitting together and at the ceremony there will be elements of that as well. it is difficult to do too much. , ., , , ., well. it is difficult to do too much. , ., ,, ., ., , much. in terms of the ups and downs of these plans. _ much. in terms of the ups and downs of these plans, talk _ much. in terms of the ups and downs of these plans, talk us _ much. in terms of the ups and downs of these plans, talk us through - of these plans, talk us through that. it of these plans, talk us through that. . , of these plans, talk us through that. ., , ., of these plans, talk us through that. ., 'j~ of these plans, talk us through that. 'j~ ., , of these plans, talk us through that. 'j~ ., ., that. it was about 18 months ago we not that. it was about 18 months ago we got engaged- _ that. it was about 18 months ago we got engaged- we — that. it was about 18 months ago we got engaged. we were _ that. it was about 18 months ago we got engaged. we were kind - that. it was about 18 months ago we got engaged. we were kind of- got engaged. we were kind of thinking about a november wedding last year, and that very quickly became clear it would not happen. so we ended up kind of changing our mind in the venue we were going for and the time of year because we thought this was much more likely to go ahead. we ended up deciding fairly late on sort of in the spring that we were going to go ahead with it. there has been a few changes in how we will approach it. we both have international family and how we will approach it. we both have internationalfamily and i have
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lots of international friends. we said to them early on, as much as we would love you guys to come and join us it is very unlikely in terms of restrictions, but also for their safety and sense of comfort we felt it was easiest to just kind of say to them it's not the best thing to do. j to them it's not the best thing to do. , , ., ., , , to them it's not the best thing to do. , y., ., , , ., ,, do. i wish you all the best. thank ou for do. i wish you all the best. thank you for talking — do. i wish you all the best. thank you for talking to _ do. i wish you all the best. thank you for talking to us. _ do. i wish you all the best. thank you for talking to us. i _ do. i wish you all the best. thank you for talking to us. i hope - do. i wish you all the best. thank you for talking to us. i hope you i you for talking to us. i hope you have an amazing day and amazing rest of your life. have an amazing day and amazing rest of our life. . ~ have an amazing day and amazing rest of our life. ., ,, ,., all of today bbc news will be in birmingham, talking to members of the hospitality industry about the ending of restrictions there. rob darby is the owner of cafe 200 degrees coffee, and hejoins me now. hello. good morning. how are you feelin: hello. good morning. how are you feeling about _ hello. good morning. how are you feeling about today? _ hello. good morning. how are you feeling about today? i'm _ hello. good morning. how are you feeling about today? i'm feeling i feeling about today? i'm feeling fine about it. _ feeling about today? i'm feeling fine about it. from _ feeling about today? i'm feeling fine about it. from our - feeling about today? i'm feeling fine about it. from our point - feeling about today? i'm feeling fine about it. from our point of| fine about it. from our point of view we are not changing the way we look after our customers. we are
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keeping all the regulations the same for all of our teams. we felt it was really important to work hard to keep everyone safe so that's what we are doing. in terms of observing the customers coming in, we are not enforcing that they are wearing facemasks which is one of the things that obviously they don't have to do from today in terms of a mandatory sense. but our observation is nearly everyone has been wearing a facemask when they have come in which really pleases me. i when they have come in which really pleases me— pleases me. i 'ust wonder if that will drop off — pleases me. i just wonder if that will drop off as _ pleases me. i just wonder if that will drop off as days _ pleases me. i just wonder if that will drop off as days go - pleases me. i just wonder if that will drop off as days go by, - pleases me. i just wonder if that will drop off as days go by, or. will drop off as days go by, or maybe it won't if cases continue to soar, which is predicted to happen. yeah, i mean, i guess we will have to wait and see how people behave. but my feeling is the general behaviour of the public has been really good and i think there has been a lot of sensible people out there and i think a lot will carry
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on wearing facemasks at the right times. j on wearing facemasks at the right times. . . , on wearing facemasks at the right times. ., ., , ., times. i have a message here from christina douglas _ times. i have a message here from christina douglas on _ times. i have a message here from christina douglas on twitter- times. i have a message here from christina douglas on twitter who i christina douglas on twitter who says "today feels great, victoria, especially getting rid of the masks. " there are obviously a number of messages from people who say they will continue wearing the masks. how have your profits been hit in the last 18 months or so, and what is your prediction for what they bounce back and what the recovery will be like? , ., , , back and what the recovery will be like? ,., g , ., back and what the recovery will be like? ,., , .,, like? obviously profits have been huael like? obviously profits have been hugely impacted- _ like? obviously profits have been hugely impacted. we _ like? obviously profits have been hugely impacted. we have - like? obviously profits have been i hugely impacted. we have struggled as a business over the last 18 months, we have worked really hard to minimise our losses and work with our landlords and receive the furlough has been a real lifeline for us. in terms of bounce back and i don't see there are to be a real bounce back coming. i think it's going to be a gradual growth and a gradual recovery back to normal business, and i think that's going to be a long time coming. i don't
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see it really recovering to normal levels for at least another 12, may be 2a months. levels for at least another 12, may be 24 months-— be 24 months. really? up to two ears be 24 months. really? up to two years potentially? _ be 24 months. really? up to two years potentially? let _ be 24 months. really? up to two years potentially? let me - be 24 months. really? up to two years potentially? let me ask- be 24 months. really? up to two i years potentially? let me ask you, rob, how are you being affected by contact tracing? the test and trace at your staff being pinged? that contact tracing? the test and trace at your staff being pinged?- at your staff being pinged? that is at your staff being pinged? that is a real challenge _ at your staff being pinged? that is a real challenge and _ at your staff being pinged? that is a real challenge and continues - at your staff being pinged? that is a real challenge and continues to l at your staff being pinged? that is i a real challenge and continues to be a real challenge and continues to be a challenge. the store i'm sitting at the moment has been run by people outside of birmingham by 200 degrees staff from around the country over the last week because we have not had any birmingham staff able to come to work due to track and trace. we have had a number of stores affected in the same way. our other store in birmingham has been closed over the last week because we just couldn't man it. the impact of track and trace is pretty significant on us and i'm quite sure it will continue to be so.- us and i'm quite sure it will continue to be so. ~ ., continue to be so. when you say none of our
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continue to be so. when you say none of your birmingham _ continue to be so. when you say none of your birmingham staff, _ continue to be so. when you say none of your birmingham staff, how- continue to be so. when you say none of your birmingham staff, how many i of your birmingham staff, how many people in total? ladle of your birmingham staff, how many people in total?— people in total? we had about 20 isolatin: people in total? we had about 20 isolating last _ people in total? we had about 20 isolating last week _ people in total? we had about 20 isolating last week in _ people in total? we had about 20| isolating last week in birmingham. and what did you think when you heard the news first thing yesterday that the chancellor and the prime minister were not going to be self—isolating, that they had this special pilot scheme they were involved in? l special pilot scheme they were involved in?— involved in? i thought it was bonkers in — involved in? i thought it was bonkers in terms _ involved in? i thought it was bonkers in terms of- involved in? i thought it was bonkers in terms of the - involved in? i thought it was bonkers in terms of the one | involved in? i thought it was - bonkers in terms of the one rule for them and the one rule for us. i thought they were also bonkers in terms of not appreciating how the public would react to that. i can't believe how out of touch that decision and announcement really was. it staggered me to be honest. thank you very much for talking to us and we wish you all the best with your business, good luck, thank you. thanks ever so much, all the best. cheers. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson has urges people to act cautiously as nearly all legal limits on social contact in england are lifted — despite soaring levels of covid.
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groups of any size can now meet inside and outside, guidance to work from home has been scrapped and face coverings are no longer required by law, although they're still recommended in some places. the whole of scotland has now moved to the lowest level of covid restrictions. but some things — such as mandatory face coverings — will stay for at least another three weeks. while quite a lot of you are celebrating greater freedoms from today, for many of the 3.7 million people in england who are classed as clinically vulnerable, the lifting of restrictions is worrying. the department of health says they should take extra precautions to keep themselves safe. our health correspondent katharine da costa has been speaking to some of those affected. right now i'm feeling quite hopeless for the first time in my life. it's been a long 16 months and there doesn't seem an end to this. we're not out of the woods yet.
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who knows how long it's going to be before we can get back to some sort of normality? mentally, it's been tough, _ being different from everybody else. being scared to be out. 28—year—old holly from leicester suffers from cystic fibrosis. six years ago, she had a double lung transplant and takes immunosuppressants to stop her body rejecting them. she's been shielding since the first lockdown in march last year. i've been exceptionally lucky that my parents have been able to shield with me, so i haven't been completely isolated on my own. it's had a huge impact on my mental health. i've had days where i'vejust cried. it's been really tough, logging on to social media and seeing my friends all go out to parties and restaurants and enjoying themselves and it's not that i don't want them to do that, ijust really wish i could do
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it with them safely. holly says she'd feel more confident if masks had remained compulsory in essential places, like supermarkets, health care settings and public transport. do you think there's been enough guidance and support for people with a weakened immune system? we've been told to try to avoid people who have not yet had both doses of the vaccine or any doses. well, that's very difficult. they've told us to go shopping, if we like, at quieter times. it's now the summer holidays, i don't know when those quieter times are going to be. i've got so much life still that i want to live and make the most of the gift of life i've been given. so i am just going to have to stay home, shielding really but without the support. it's difficult. i feel very abandoned right now. chris sandon's garden has become his sanctuary for the last 16 months. the 79—year—old from sheffield is currently undergoing chemotherapy after his prostate cancer returned. the treatment has knocked out his immune system, so he's having to be extremely careful. we were advised when we first started shielding that we
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weren't to go out to shops or pharmacies. we had to keep ourselves very safe and basically we were sort of locked away. we couldn't meet the grandchildren and give them a hug, you know, all this sort of thing. it impacts on your mental being and your health generally and you just get very, very down. chris and his wife should have been off to the cotswolds today but they cancelled their holiday, fearing the risks were just too great. i can't take the risks to go and mix indoors in a crowded hotel with other people who probably will not be wearing masks, and neither will the staff. i have had nothing directly from the nhs or the government advisers, to me, as a clinically vulnerable person. i think the message could be much stronger and more detailed to help people in my situation. 39—year—old delyth parton from west bromwich had her third child in the first lockdown last march. delyth has lupus and takes immunosuppressants to stop
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her body attacking itself. it has meant shielding away from friends and family. i've found it really hard without my parents and my support bubble. my husband is brilliant. but a new baby on your own. five of us stuck in a small house for the best part of a year with no respite, it's been horrible, it's been awful. as a music teacher and professional singer, delyth's desperate to get back to the job she loves. booster shots and antiviral treatments may be on the way but right now she is concerned about the surging infection rates. how do you feel about so—called freedom day? you can already see it. a lot less masks in shops now, people are sort of on top of each other. let's alljust keep a lid on it, just for a little bit, and let's alljust keep each other safe because that's the kindest thing we can do for each other and then everybody can enjoy freedoms
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and we'll be out of this a lot sooner than if we keep... if we go absolutely nuts as soon as the restrictions come off. katherine da costa, bbc news. i want to read you this message that i want to read you this message that i got yesterday on twitter from an 80—year—old woman called carol. "i'm in the unfortunate position i can't have the vaccine because of severe allergies. i was willing to take the risk but the doctors refused. this precludes me from flying abroad to visit family because i honestly can't produce a vaccine passport. it is likely i will not be able to go to events and concerts etc if the vaccine pass system becomes mandatory. there must be thousands like me who find themselves in this predicament but no one has addressed this. surely this creates a two tier society. i've written to my mp, the prime minister and health secretary and not even had a reply. i will be 80 next month and there are things i would love to do but now it seems i won't be allowed. i have spent over
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a year holed up in my bungalow with only my sainsbury�*s delivery person to break the monotony once a fortnight. my closest family are a four—hour drive away. i thank goodness i am computer literate and can have video calls to keep in touch with the family. no one has ever checked on me, not even the surgery. i have rigidly stuck to the rules throughout and i feel i'm being penalised through no fault of my own. sorry for the rant, victoria. i hope you are feeling well and keeping cancerfree." i asked carol if she wanted to talk to us but she said she felt better writing stuff down than actually speaking to us on air. a couple more messages from you. i'm asking how you are feeling today. tom is in edinburgh and says, "reopening feels doomed to fail. when autumn comes. i work for an arts venue in edinburgh working on the fringe and unless more help comes the sector will be decimated come january. more help comes the sector will be decimated comejanuary. having spent all funds on this precarious reopening." brian says, "are we
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allowed to shake hands? i haven't heard anybody speaking about this." i think you are right, but the bottom line is it is up to you, you must manage the risk and make that decision if you are in england. activists, journalists and politicians around the world may have been spied on using mobile phone malware that is intended to be used against criminals and terrorists — according to a massive data leak. reports suggest widespread misuse of spyware — sold and developed by an israeli surveillance company. the company in question have strongly denied the allegations against them and say their technology is only sold to the law enforcement and intelligence agencies of vetted governments. bill marczak is a senior research fellow at citizen lab — he was the first person to discover an iphone hack used by the israeli cyber—warfare company nso group. he explains how it works. nso group sells the pegasus spyware to governments all around the world,
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and originally it required the target to click on a link to facilitate the hacking of the phone. but nowadays the spyware system uses what is called a zero click technique meaning that the government can hack the phone without the target having to take any action. your phone can be sitting on the table, one minute it is fine and the next minute it is compromised. i think it's the responsibility of the company nso group and the responsibility of israel's government, the ministry of defence, which is regulating the export of these tools, it is their responsibility to sit nso group down and say, look, if you sell this to saudi arabia, the uae, bahrain, or these other repressive governments, what do you think they are going to do with them? maybe they will go after some criminals and terrorists, but the main concern, the main concern of these governments like saudi arabia, is trying to figure out what their critics are up to.
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more messages from you. thank you. david says "it seems like those who have made the effort to stay safe over the last 18 months are being thrown under the bus. we will only go to places where people wear masks and keep social distancing." darren says "let the bed—wetters stay behind the sofa and mashed up forever never going outside and never doing anything again, the fear firmly embedded into them." charming! this from richard who says "i'm apprehensive, but let's respect each other�*s choices." carol is here with a full weather forecast for you. hello again. yesterday, we recorded 31.6 celsius at london heathrow, making it the hottest day of this year so far. once again today, it's going to be hot and sunny. at the moment, what we have is a bit more cloud across the north and the west, courtesy of these weather fronts. high pressure firmly in charge, though, keeping things settled. and high pressure will be with us for much of this week. so still a little bit of cloud
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across the north and the west, most of that will break up. sunny skies will develop, but we could hang on to it across the far north—east. for the rest of the uk, a lot of sunshine. again, there's a chance we could see the heavy shower. we could see the odd heavy shower. it could also be thundery, but most of us will stay dry and miss them altogether, with highs, 14 to about 29. locally, we could once again see 30 degrees. as we head on through the evening and overnight, showers will fade. there'll be a lot of dry weather and we see a return to this cloud coming in across the north and also the west. some mistiness with it as well. it's going to be another warm night. so another uncomfortable one for sleeping in. for tuesday, well, we are looking once again at high pressure firmly in charge of our weather. not much of a breath of wind. it will be cooler along the coastlines as sea breezes develop as we go through the course of the day. but inland, we're expecting high temperatures once again. so we start with all this cloud and mist in the north and the west. that will thin and break. we'll see some sunny spells develop, joining the rest of the uk in some sunshine. but again, the south—east quarter
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perhaps prone to catching the odd heavy shower, which could be thundery. but like today, most of us will miss them and our temperature range, 13 to about 28. but 30 is not outwith the realms of possibility either. tuesday into wednesday, we still have this high pressure. low pressure waiting in the wings in the atlantic might come our way for the weekend. more on that later. but on wednesday, we start off with more cloud in the north and also the east, less cloud in northern ireland. but the cloud should tend to thin and break. we'll see the sun come out, againjoinoing the rest of the uk in a dry, hot and sunny day with a chance of a shower, which could be heavy in thundery and temperatures 14 to about 30 degrees. so thursday and friday remain dry. still hot in the south, not as hot as we push further north. it's as we head into the weekend, that low pressure might come ourway, bringing rain in from the south—west, but it might not.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. borisjohnson urges us to act cautiously as nearly all legal limits on social contact in england are lifted — despite soaring levels of coronavirus. groups of any size can now meet inside and outdoors, guidance to work from home has been scrapped and face coverings are no longer required by law although they're still recommended in some places. it's right to be careful, but it's also right to get our country back together, opening up, and as close to normality as possible. businesses hope the end of restrictions will lead to recovery but staff shortages due to self—isolation have hit many. all: three, two, one! cheering. nightclubs in england
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re—open their doors — welcoming the first clubbers since march last year.

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