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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 19, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today — cheering. back in business as legal restrictions on masks and social contact are lifted in england. i've are lifted in england. had my vaccines. i want to he a i've had my vaccines. i want to have a good time, hon. it is i've had my vaccines. i want to have a good time, hon.— a good time, hon. it is a relief. such a long _ a good time, hon. it is a relief. such a long time. _ but the prime minister urges caution as scientists warn cases could surge to 200,000 a day.
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the legal requirement to wear one of these in stations like this might have gone, but the expectation and the recommendation to where one is still very much there. fullyjabbed nhs staff could be spared isolation in england amid fears of staff shortages. quarantine free travel to embolus countries from today, but only if you have been double jabbed and not if you are off to france. —— embolus countries. manchester airport only add 10% capacity. how big a day is it for international travel? —— amber list countries. lewis hamilton celebrates winning the british grand prix in front of 140,000 fans, but his championship rival accuses him of being "disrespectful" and "unsportsmanlike." a warm start to the day, and it will also be a hot and sunny one ahead. in fact for the week ahead, we are also looking at a hot and sunny by day, one by night forecast, but a
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chance of some isolated thunderstorms. all the details coming up. —— warm by night. good morning. it's monday, july 19th. our top story — 16 months after they were first introduced, most legal restrictions on social contact have been lifted in england. however, ministers are urging people to remain cautious, as coronavirus infections continue to rise. across the morning, we'll be hearing from those affected by the changes, and speaking to experts about the risks the unlocking could pose. a warning, ourfirst report from luxmy gopal contains flashing images. the moment they've been waiting for for over a year. cheering. the final stage of unlocking in england, with social distancing rules dropped.
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1,000 people packed into this club in central london, with many more lining up outside. cheering. they've waited 16 months. what's a little longer? there's so many people there, and we're just so pumped to get in there. it's been a year and a half, now we are ready all to dance. i've had my vaccines. i want to have a good time, hon. so excited. so excited! i can't wait for it. it'sjust, like, a relief after such a long time just to have freedom. nightclubs are one of the few businesses that have had to stay closed throughout the whole pandemic, among the last to reopen. loud music plays. and this is what many have waited so long for, what the nightlife industry has so desperately needed. some feel the sector has been sidelined. the last year has been hell on earth. i mean, it's been very, very difficult. if you look at what happened last week with the football compared with what is happening tonight, and you think,
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why were we treated differently? all we are doing is taking the screens— all we are doing is taking the screens out, putting them into storage — it's more sedate, but no less celebratory, at this pub in west london, where they are preparing for an end to table service only and mandatory masks. i can't wait to enjoy doing ourjob, rather than sort of having to basically be a policeman the whole time, and lecturing people on what they can and can't do, where they can and can't go, the masks they wear, what they touch, where they sanitise, where they track and trace. it's going to be strange for us to adapt again, and the notion of people coming into the pub, being able to go to the table themselves without being directed. as of midnight in england, nearly all legal restrictions on social contact have been removed. face coverings are no longer required by law, but are still recommended in crowded, enclosed spaces. meanwhile, scotland has moved to what's known as level zero. limits on social gatherings remain, with face coverings still mandatory in shops and on public transport.
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in northern ireland, the latest phase of unlocking is expected next week, while in wales, most covid rules are to be scrapped from the 7th of august, will face coverings will still be required in many indoor public places. there is concern about restrictions easing at a time when covid cases in the uk are rising. we're at the point where 10% to just over of intensive care beds in england are occupied by people who have got covid. so there has been a significant increase in pressure on intensive care services over the last few weeks. with experts warning that cases could surge further, and with a third of adults not yet fully vaccinated, the worry is, at what price this new freedom? luxmy is at a supermarket in london for us this morning. luxmy, how are they adapting to the changes?
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good morning, louise. yes, masks are no longer mandatory, but the government advice is that people continue wearing them in enclosed crowded spaces, like for example a shop, although not very crowded at the moment. but iceland is one of many of the main supermarket chains who say that they will continue to encourage customers to keep wearing face coverings. an iceland's trading director is with me now. paul, tell me what happens when an iceland customer decides not to wear a mask to come in. are you going to stop them? ~ ., ., ., ., , them? we are not going to stop them, but our recommendation _ them? we are not going to stop them, but our recommendation to _ them? we are not going to stop them, but our recommendation to customers | but our recommendation to customers is that_ but our recommendation to customers is that they— but our recommendation to customers is that they do wear a mask, and an approach _ is that they do wear a mask, and an approach of— is that they do wear a mask, and an approach of caution how the pandemic is ongoing _ approach of caution how the pandemic is ongoing i_ approach of caution how the pandemic is ongoing. i would like to say a massive — is ongoing. i would like to say a massive thank you to all our store colleagues — massive thank you to all our store colleagues and all retail workers across _ colleagues and all retail workers across the uk for being true heroes during _ across the uk for being true heroes during this — across the uk for being true heroes during this pandemic and keeping the nation _ during this pandemic and keeping the nation fared. if during this pandemic and keeping the nation fared. ,., ., .,, nation fared. if some of those colleagues — nation fared. if some of those colleagues you _ nation fared. if some of those colleagues you mention, - nation fared. if some of those colleagues you mention, if. nation fared. if some of those i colleagues you mention, if they nation fared. if some of those - colleagues you mention, if they feel unsafe coming into work as a result of people not wearing masks, what
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are you going to do? we of people not wearing masks, what are you going to do?— are you going to do? we need to listen to the _ are you going to do? we need to listen to the challenges - are you going to do? we need to listen to the challenges that - are you going to do? we need to listen to the challenges that our| listen to the challenges that our store _ listen to the challenges that our store colleagues are facing, and given— store colleagues are facing, and given as — store colleagues are facing, and given as much support making sure they feel— given as much support making sure they feel as safe as possible, the safety _ they feel as safe as possible, the safety of — they feel as safe as possible, the safety of our colleagues is of paramount importance to us. some supermarkets — paramount importance to us. some supermarkets have _ paramount importance to us. some supermarkets have said _ paramount importance to us. some supermarkets have said there - paramount importance to us. fin- supermarkets have said there are supermarkets have said there are such high numbers of their staff having to isolate as a result of being pinged by the covid out. is that something iceland has experienced?— that something iceland has experienced? that something iceland has exerienced? ~ , , , ., experienced? absolutely, this is a bi . experienced? absolutely, this is a big challenge _ experienced? absolutely, this is a big challenge for _ experienced? absolutely, this is a big challenge for a _ experienced? absolutely, this is a big challenge for a lot _ experienced? absolutely, this is a big challenge for a lot of - experienced? absolutely, this is a big challenge for a lot of retailers| big challenge for a lot of retailers across _ big challenge for a lot of retailers across the — big challenge for a lot of retailers across the uk, and a lot of industries. we have over 1000 people off work— industries. we have over 1000 people off work at— industries. we have over 1000 people off work at the moment because of covid, _ off work at the moment because of covid, but — off work at the moment because of covid, but only 30% of them have tested _ covid, but only 30% of them have tested positive, so we urge the government to find a solution quickly— government to find a solution quickly to— government to find a solution quickly to allow these healthy peopie — quickly to allow these healthy people to come back to work. briefly, — people to come back to work. briefly, the premise of said businesses have the discretion to enforce mask wearing on the premises if they wanted to. why did iceland choose not to go down that route? it choose not to go down that route? it would be unfair to ask our store
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colleagues to force customers to wear _ colleagues to force customers to wear a _ colleagues to force customers to wear a mask, we don't want to put them _ wear a mask, we don't want to put them in _ wear a mask, we don't want to put them in that— wear a mask, we don't want to put them in that situation, but our recommendation is to protect each other— recommendation is to protect each other and — recommendation is to protect each other and ask our colleagues as well as customers to wear a mask where possible _ as customers to wear a mask where ossible. . ., ~ as customers to wear a mask where ossible. . . ~' , ., as customers to wear a mask where ossible. . ., ,, , ., . ., possible. paul, thank you much for “oininu us possible. paul, thank you much for joining us this _ possible. paul, thank you much for joining us this morning. _ possible. paul, thank you much for joining us this morning. that - possible. paul, thank you much for joining us this morning. that is - possible. paul, thank you much for joining us this morning. that is the j joining us this morning. that is the message from a lot of supermarket chains, something they are not enforcing that they are encouraging customers to do.— customers to do. thank you very much, customers to do. thank you very much. we _ customers to do. thank you very much. we will — customers to do. thank you very much, we will get _ customers to do. thank you very much, we will get a _ customers to do. thank you very much, we will get a reaction - customers to do. thank you veryl much, we will get a reaction from all sorts of places throughout the programme this morning. england may be unlocking, but three senior members of the cabinet, including the prime minister, are self—isolating. let's get the latest on that from our political correspondent, jonathan blake, whojoins us in downing street for us this morning. jonathan, talk us through what has happened. if you are lucky enough to be enjoying a sunday line, you might have missed what is probably the quickest government u—turn in history. —— sunday lie in. the chancellor is isolating, the prime minister isolating at his country residence in chequers, and the
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health secretary sajid javid isolating after testing positive for covid. the are doing so only after an initial decision to allow these ministers to take part in a pilot scheme, which would enable them to continue working, even though they have been close contacts of somebody has tested positive. but after a backlash yesterday morning, that decision was reversed, and those three ministers will be isolating for the next few days as you say. it is important, though, because at this point in the pandemic, government guidance to continue following the rules of your contacted by test and trace as key to keeping cases at a manageable level. a change has been announced for nhs staff, who will, in exceptional circumstances, be allowed to continue working if they are contacted by test and trace only after they themselves get a negative test. no talk of a return to normal today, no talk of putting the pandemic behind us, and for people to continue to follow the rules that are there. , ., ., ., ., ,, ,.,
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to continue to follow the rules that are there. , ., . ., ., ,, y., ., are there. jonathan, thank you for that. we'll be speaking to the vaccines minister, nadhim zahawi, at 7.30 this morning. it's been scorchio this weekend, so we thought we'd put carol on the roof this morning. yesterday, on the roof this morning. 31.6 celsius recorded at heathrow yesterday, 31.6 celsius recorded at heathrowjust yesterday, 31.6 celsius recorded at heathrow just outside yesterday, 31.6 celsius recorded at heathrowjust outside london. that is almost 89 fahrenheit, and that made at the warmest day of this year so far. 0vernight, it has also been quite uncomfortable for sleeping in, temperatures currently on the isle of wight 21 celsius, 20 in london. if you are in the moment, about 6.5 in aviemore, because we have a bit more cloud around. the forecast for today once again is a hot and sunny one for the bulk of the uk, you could say that for much of this week, but there's a chance to be weak we could catch the odd isolated
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thunderstorm, which could be quite heavy later in the afternoon into the early evening period. but most of us will miss them. today across the north, a bit of cloud around, fairly broken, a little bit of fog across parts of northern ireland. all of that will lift, they will see some sunshine. some of those already starting with that sunshine, a bit more cloud perhaps hanging on to the north—east of scotland through the day, and again the risk of the thunderstorm as we go through the course of the latter part of the afternoon. but temperatures once again ranging from 13 in the north end the clouds to about 20 may be 30 as become further south. through this evening and overnight come in the tend to fade, a lot of clear skies. a bit more cloud and some mist form and across parts of the north and the west. 0nce mist form and across parts of the north and the west. once again, a fairly warm night in prospect. so thatis fairly warm night in prospect. so that is how we start the day tomorrow, fairly warm. and again, a lot of blue sky to start the day. in the north and west, more cloud, that will break, we lose the misfit forms, any patchy fog that forms
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will lift as well, and temperatures tomorrow again at roughly 1a to 28 celsius. possibly slightly higher. as i mentioned, we hang on this mild weather, still with the chance of a thunderstorm as we go through this week, but most will miss them all together and stay dry. thank you very much for that, carroll. carroll will be with us throughout the morning. looks like a lovely morning. let's take a look at today's papers. most of them lead with the revelation that borisjohnson and rishi sunak are now self—isolating after coming into contact with the health secretary, who has tested positive for coronavirus. the times reports that daily cases could reach 200,000 by mid—august. it also carries this image of sir lewis hamilton celebrating after winning the british grand prix. the daily mirror leads
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with mrjohnson's plea to the nation to be cautious as social distancing restrictions are lifted in england. and the telegraph is reporting that all children may be offered the covid vaccine by the end of year. lee also paying tribute tom o'connor. he died yesterday, a very popularfigure on tv. and the telegraph is reporting that all children may be offered the covid vaccine by the end of year. thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation is expected to announce its recommendation on vaccinating kids later today. lewis hamilton also on the front page of the telegraph, and sally has a bumper day of sport. and we have mark cavendish coming this morning live on the programme at 8.30. and
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we have linda bauld life with us this morning. you are here this morning to take a look at some of the papers as well.— the papers as well. very interesting, _ the papers as well. very interesting, we - the papers as well. very interesting, we are - the papers as well. very interesting, we are all. the papers as well. - interesting, we are all interested interesting, we are all interested in what the public think at the moment, you can see that people are still really cautious. a public opinion poll in the times from yugo, essentially telling us that fewer than a third of people will be going to party with lots of people. —— from yougov. about 20% of young people would feel comfortable going to a nightclub at the moment. and on a more light—hearted note, conferences, some of us keen to get back, you can see that only about 27% of people would be happy to go to a conference. and the final thing, actually more people feel we should not be using as quickly now as we are, so quite cautious. titer? as we are, so quite cautious. very interesting- _ as we are, so quite cautious. very interesting- -- — as we are, so quite cautious. very interesting. -- we _ as we are, so quite cautious. very interesting. -- we should - as we are, so quite cautious. very interesting. -- we should not - as we are, so quite cautious. very interesting. -- we should not be i interesting. -- we should not be easinu. interesting. -- we should not be
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easing- we _ interesting. -- we should not be easing. we have _ interesting. -- we should not be easing. we have become - interesting. -- we should not be - easing. we have become accustomed to livin: in easing. we have become accustomed to living in different _ easing. we have become accustomed to living in different ways. _ easing. we have become accustomed to living in different ways. yes, _ easing. we have become accustomed to living in different ways. yes, and - easing. we have become accustomed to living in different ways. yes, and i - living in different ways. yes, and i think ou living in different ways. yes, and i think you see _ living in different ways. yes, and i think you see the _ living in different ways. yes, and i think you see the population - living in different ways. yes, and i j think you see the population split. some people really want to take advantage of all the other new freedoms, and others thinking let's move more slowly. i freedoms, and others thinking let's move more slowly.— freedoms, and others thinking let's move more slowly. i have a good 'ob over move more slowly. i have a good 'ob here. i — move more slowly. i have a good 'ob here. uustfi move more slowly. i have a good 'ob over here, ijust have i move more slowly. i have a good 'ob over here, ijust have to i move more slowly. i have a good 'ob over here, ijust have to see. i move more slowly. i have a good job over here, ijust have to see. while i over here, ijust have to see. while you talk about it. daily mail next. this will really test me this morning. this will really test me this morning-— this will really test me this morninu. , ,. ., , this will really test me this mornin.. , ,. ., , ., morning. this is close to my heart, because all— morning. this is close to my heart, because all the _ morning. this is close to my heart, because all the way _ morning. this is close to my heart, because all the way through - morning. this is close to my heart, because all the way through the . because all the way through the pandemic, we have seen loads of photos of people outside, and it looks like they are crowding, the publicity from a public health perspective, that looks jolly risky. but there outside in the fresh air, and when you look closer, people are quite far apart. so when the weather is particularly good, let's get outside and try to do a bit less inside. �* . outside and try to do a bit less inside. . ., , outside and try to do a bit less inside. . . , ., , ., inside. and that is really important as well for people's _ inside. and that is really important as well for people's mental - inside. and that is really important as well for people's mental health | as well for people's mental health as well for people's mental health as well, just being able to get outside. right back to the start when we were all in lockdown, the option to exercising for a small amount of time each day was crucial
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for so many people, wasn't it? it for so many people, wasn't it? it was, and in some countries there were not allowed to do that, they were not allowed to do that, they were supposed to stay at home most of the time, so at least we have that. but getting out into the fresh air, even as restrictions ease, very important. air, even as restrictions ease, very important-— air, even as restrictions ease, very imortant. ,, . ., ., , ,, ., important. such a lovely weekend for that as well- — important. such a lovely weekend for that as well. financial— important. such a lovely weekend for that as well. financial times - important. such a lovely weekend for that as well. financial times next. i that as well. financial times next. i am not sure you are trained enough to do this, so i will continue. haste to do this, so i will continue. we have spent _ to do this, so i will continue. - have spent the last 15 months talking about the covid emergency, but the climate emergency is also that large. the leader of the german government to do saying we need stuck solid action on climate change, they have an election coming up, but i think it isjust a sobering note for all of us as we look ahead to this big emergency that we will be dealing with probably for the rest of our lifetimes.— probably for the rest of our lifetimes. �* , . , probably for the rest of our lifetimes. . , . , ., lifetimes. and if pictures tell an extraordinary _ lifetimes. and if pictures tell an extraordinary story _ lifetimes. and if pictures tell an extraordinary story coming - lifetimes. and if pictures tell an | extraordinary story coming from germany and other places as well. hundred and 80 people lost their lives, all those places near rivers as we have many in the uk, just a
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reminder to all of us it is really tough. i reminder to all of us it is really tou~h. . . _., , reminder to all of us it is really tou~h. . . , ., reminder to all of us it is really touch. ., ., , ., , tough. i a amended everybody who is watchin: , tough. i a amended everybody who is watching. you — tough. i a amended everybody who is watching, you will _ tough. i a amended everybody who is watching, you will have _ tough. i a amended everybody who is watching, you will have questions - watching, you will have questions this morning about the changes that have come into place. tell us how you are feeling about the changes. when there will be back with us later. —— linda will be back with us later. from today, double—vaccinated travellers from england, scotland and wales will be able to visit amber list destinations — excluding france — without the need to quarantine on their return. in a moment, we'll speak to our europe correspondent nick beake, who is in ibiza for us this morning, but first, let's catch up with nina, who is at manchester airport. nina, foreign travel remains complicated, doesn't it? good morning. things are simplified in some areas today, but remains incredibly complex. let's start on a
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high, might have a look at that list? where do you fancy? i would take any of them. we are a manchester airport, take any of them. we are a manchesterairport, new take any of them. we are a manchester airport, new departure lounge at terminal two, but having the ground here. bear in mind today the ground here. bear in mind today the first week of the kids' summer holidays in greater manchester and the north west all the places that come to this airport hub, it is really quite quiet. they are still running at 10% capacity here, so how many have seen today is a big step forward for travel, is it really? let's talk through the changes with the amber list. lots of the hotspots you might fancy visiting, italy, france, greece, spain, they are on the amber list. from today. in england, the advice is no longer not to travel there, in scotland and wales, nonessential travel to those places is still advised against, the northern ireland even more strict, the advice is to not travel abroad at all if you can avoid it. when arriving back in any part of the uk,
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headington and country from today if you have been double jabbed and you are under 18, you will no longer have to qualify —— over 18. but you will still have to test within three days of leaving and within two days of coming back. you are looking at the cost of that being around £100 per person, quite a lot of extra expense on top of your holiday. but it is pretty expensive holiday in the uk at the moment, and alex is one of those people who has decided to absorb that extra cost, and he is on his merry way to greece. airlines of mask wearing, _ on his merry way to greece. airlines of mask wearing, they _ on his merry way to greece. airlines of mask wearing, they have - of mask wearing, they have sanitisation, in some cases testing, and given the air is filtered when you're on the plane, i actually feel safer being on a plane than i would strolling around my local supermarket. the other thing really is that we looked at the cost of doing a staycation in the uk, cornwall and scotland and other
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places, and it feels prohibitively expensive. but actually going to greece felt like a more competitive option, and even with the cost of testing, it was still cheaper for us to do that than it was to stay in the uk. ~ , ., ., to do that than it was to stay in the uk. . , ., ., ., ,., the uk. we 'ust got a family on their wa the uk. we just got a family on their way to — the uk. we just got a family on their way to ibiza, _ the uk. we just got a family on their way to ibiza, saying - the uk. we just got a family on their way to ibiza, saying it - the uk. we just got a family onj their way to ibiza, saying it was only £40 per person to prearrange their testing, so it is that something we willjust have to accept now is part of travel? we can speak to a travel expert now. you stayed here last night, have you ever known manchester airport this quiet? ever known manchester airport this ruiet? , . ever known manchester airport this i uiet? , ., ., ., .,y quiet? open that after today we will see more flights _ quiet? open that after today we will see more flights taking _ quiet? open that after today we will see more flights taking off, - quiet? open that after today we will see more flights taking off, but - see more flights taking off, but yeah, very quiet. see more flights taking off, but yeah. very quiet-— see more flights taking off, but eah, ve uiet. ., . ., ., yeah, very quiet. how much damage does this situation _ yeah, very quiet. how much damage does this situation in _ yeah, very quiet. how much damage does this situation in france - yeah, very quiet. how much damage does this situation in france do? - yeah, very quiet. how much damage does this situation in france do? it i does this situation in france do? it is on the amber list, yet you still have the quarantine for ten days and send a test after eight days. the fact they can change the rules is quite off—putting for people, isn't it? quite off-putting for people, isn't it? , , , , , quite off-putting for people, isn't it? , , ,, , ., , it? the biggest issue is really that, the risk _
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it? the biggest issue is really that, the risk of _ it? the biggest issue is really that, the risk of changes. - it? the biggest issue is really that, the risk of changes. it i it? the biggest issue is really| that, the risk of changes. it is unfortunate that what happened with france, that creates even more uncertainty. but we have seen passengers who had already booked to go to france, unless you have booked in the last ten days, you are booking the venue would have to isolate. but it does show you that things can change at the very last minute or so. things can change at the very last minute or so-_ things can change at the very last minute or so. you have done it, you have been — minute or so. you have done it, you have been abroad. _ minute or so. you have done it, you have been abroad. talk— minute or so. you have done it, you have been abroad. talk me - minute or so. you have done it, you have been abroad. talk me through| have been abroad. talk me through the process, how much extra expense and time, and whether ruin your holiday vibe. i and time, and whether ruin your holiday vibe-— and time, and whether ruin your holiday vibe. i travel for business, i did back holiday vibe. i travel for business, i did back in _ holiday vibe. i travel for business, i did back in may _ holiday vibe. i travel for business, i did back in may to _ holiday vibe. i travel for business, i did back in may to portugal, - holiday vibe. i travel for business, i did back in may to portugal, and| i did back in may to portugal, and having done that, honestly, it really wasn't that difficult. provided you have got everything organised, yourforms in place, the testing prices have come down, we are looking at around £100. for the job looking for a professional agent for a professional tour operator, at least they can help navigate you through that. so once you have done it, you know what you're doing, you become a lot more confident. travel is possible. it is a bit different, but definitely possible. although it is iuite but definitely possible. although it is quite here _ but definitely possible. although it is quite here today, _ but definitely possible. although it is quite here today, watching - is quite here today, watching families coming through, they are
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excited, they are giddy about going despite all of these things around it. . , ,., y y despite all of these things around it. . , ,., , , ., despite all of these things around it. absolutely, they are happy, the lovely feeling _ it. absolutely, they are happy, the lovely feeling you _ it. absolutely, they are happy, the lovely feeling you forget, - it. absolutely, they are happy, the lovely feeling you forget, we - it. absolutely, they are happy, the lovely feeling you forget, we have | lovely feeling you forget, we have all forgotten about that. this, a lot of people are visiting friends and family, it is wonderful to see. people being reunited with relatives they haven't seen for a long time. finally, what do you want to see happen now? we finally, what do you want to see happen now?— finally, what do you want to see ha- ien now? ~ ., , ., happen now? we need to see more stabili , happen now? we need to see more stability. a — happen now? we need to see more stability, a framework _ happen now? we need to see more stability, a framework that - happen now? we need to see more stability, a framework that does - stability, a framework that does work because it is very complicated. passengers cannot keep travelling with so much uncertainty, we need the testing to come down, we would really like to see coming back from a green country that you can do that if you are fully jabbed without the need to test also.— if you are fully jabbed without the need to test also. otherwise what is the ioint need to test also. otherwise what is the point in — need to test also. otherwise what is the point in the _ need to test also. otherwise what is the point in the green _ need to test also. otherwise what is the point in the green list? - need to test also. otherwise what is the point in the green list? justin i the point in the green list? justin and i doubt some of the lists that have changed, the balearic islands went from green to amber this week, but bulgaria goes on the green list, and if you are heading away on holiday, do enjoy it. no doubt you have saved for it, you are really up
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for having fun, and that is the most important thing. i will be looking at flights to bulgaria this afternoon. nina, you are wearing a mask in the airport because they are asking you to is that right? yes, you will hear about it throughout the morning, but it remains at the discretion of travel providers to ask you to wear a mask. they are not enforcing it here, but they are encouraging people to do so, and by and large, everyone i have seen here this morning is abiding by that. 0k, nina, thank you very much. we will be back with you in the very quiet airport. the balearic islands joined the amber list in the early hours of this morning. 0ur correspondent nick beake is in ibiza. nick, what's the reaction been there? really lovely morning here, you can see the sun just rising over the hills. very peaceful and quiet, and of course you cannot say that all the time about ibiza. but everyone who was out last night i think is probably sleeping it off now,
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including those young brits who are here on holiday, we might not see them for a few hours until they surface. but certainly lots of people who were expecting to be working up today on the island for another day of holiday, they have had to go home. we have seen them race on to try to beat the new quarantine rules that have come in affecting this particular island. just a reminder, affecting this particular island. justa reminder, it affecting this particular island. just a reminder, it affects lots of people here who have just had one jab of the covid vaccine. the problem is, they had not left before, or got back before 4.00am this morning, they would have the quarantine for ten days. some people had to cut short their holidays, spend extra cash on changing their flights so they could get back in time, they have been talking to tour operators trying to change the departure, and also for businesses here, they are really disappointed because it was just a little over two weeks ago when ibiza and the other islands here went on to the uk's green list, so people will rejoice in, thinking it would not be a completely normal summer season
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but a much better one. and now things have changed, lots of people here we have been talking to, hotels, restaurant tours, all the rest of it, they don't quite know how many brits will be coming here to enjoy themselves for the coming weeks and months. so as we have been saying for so long now, uncertain terms. thank you very much for that, nick. lots of information to take on today, but one positive thing, we have lots of people out and about, and for the majority of them, looks like a beautiful day. we are willing to try to explain today what is allowed, where, what has changed, and also a little bit of reflection, let us know how you feel about things as well. all that to come for you throughout the programme this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. check good morning. bbc london and
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bbc south—east today are joining forces to keep you up—to—date with the latest news. nationally 88% of people have had their first the latest news. nationally 88% of people have had theirfirstjab. the data from nhs england show half of londoners have not had a second dose. 81% of eligible adults have had their first days and 63% a second. there are a lot more cases. that is when we are going to see everybody vaccinated.— that is when we are going to see everybody vaccinated. there will be a bii everybody vaccinated. there will be a big difference _ everybody vaccinated. there will be a big difference between _ everybody vaccinated. there will be a big difference between having - everybody vaccinated. there will be i a big difference between having mild symptoms and staying at home for a week. being in intensive care for a couple of weeks. it is imperative you have vaccines to protect yourself and those around you. 0peration brock has returned. the
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concrete barrier aims to help traffic flowing in both directions and reduce disruption for local communities. it is a precautionary move ahead of tourist traffic returning. thousands of golfers have witnessed the crowning of the new open champion. 32,000 spectators were at the course in kent. it is showcasing kent, east kent, and the local area. it is about more than just this week. people will recognise the location and clearly will come back over time to enjoy a fabulous environment we have in the county. fabulous environment we have in the coun . ., ._ fabulous environment we have in the coun . ., ., , fabulous environment we have in the coun _., ., , ., ., county. quiet may not be a word commonly _ county. quiet may not be a word commonly associated _ county. quiet may not be a word commonly associated with - county. quiet may not be a word commonly associated with the i county. quiet may not be a word - commonly associated with the capital but once did he has been awarded urban quiet part status. it is the
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first park in europe to be given the honour. there he is described as wild and natural with plenty of opportunities to find refuge. now the weather. another very warm day across london and the south—east. plenty of sunshine right from the word go. today will feel very warm. as we get further into the afternoon there is a likelihood we might see there is a likelihood we might see the odd isolated shower or two. temperatures can get up to 28 celsius, cooler on the coast. chavez could lingerfor a celsius, cooler on the coast. chavez could linger for a time. celsius, cooler on the coast. chavez could lingerfor a time. not everyone will see one. it could be heavy and sharp in places if you see one. temperatures not getting much below 14 celsius. for the rest of the week high pressure continuing to be in charge of the weather as we look towards the middle and end of
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the week. we are likely to keep hold of their warmth and brightness as we look ahead to thursday and friday. still the chance of an isolated shower. see you this afternoon. good morning. we had a packed programme this morning. we are going to be speaking to the vaccines minister to talk about some of the changes that have come into effect today, how you are feeling about those. also we're going be talking about the situation yesterday where it seemed there was a government u—turn, he called it the fastest government u—turn in history where we heard that the prime minister and rishi sunak would be taking part in a pilot scheme where they would not have too self—isolate but are they ourselves isolating. we will be
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speaking to so many people throughout the programme. —— itself isolating. we will be speaking to many people joined the programme. from today facemask will no longer legally be required in public spaces in england. jayne mccubbin is at manchester piccadilly station this morning. jayne, how are people feeling there? good morning to you, good morning, everybody. there is a fairly mixed bag for you. it is quite inside the concourse. it is not crowded. plenty of people are still wearing masks and plenty of people are exercising their legal right not to wear a mask. when i have spoken to those people, there's not wearing a mask
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have either not worn a mask for a very long time because they do not believe in the efficacy of masks, thatis believe in the efficacy of masks, that is their belief. there are just a few who think, do you know what? i have had enough. i am wearing a mask for 15 hours a day and i have had enough. we went to try to take the temperature, hp msa and see how people are feeling about a subject that was trending last night on social media. it was a hugely important and divisive issue. have a look at this. we learn a lot by observing how these characters build their social groups, just through touch. they're building bonds, they're building relationships, through touch.
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it's essential. it's fundamental. it's the glue that holds these social groups together, notjust primates, all mammals. evolution has shaped us to need people, proximity, touch. if you've been groomed by someone, you're more likely to be kind to them back, so sharing food, etc. these characters have worked it out and we are carrying on the good message. apart from these last 18 months. well, in the first time in human evolution, that system has been switched off. now the government in england says we need to switch it back on. we have transformed this society for the worst. but the issue is divisive. allow the people of this country to work forwards towards freedom day, which i devoutly say will come on july the 19th. it won't feel like freedom day for those who have to isolate, when they're having to cancel their holiday. for the 3.8 million clinically extremely vulnerable people, the prospect of a so—called freedom day next week is actually anything but. we have got to have a turning point, we have got to recapture _ a spirit of freedom. many gps warned against moving
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on without mitigation. but from today, almost all legal restrictions on social contact and masks are over. the crowded lift, sam... yep. are you ready for it? yeah, i think so. are you? yeah. can we imagine coming back to those days? i think a lift is going to be weird. mask on or off? 0n. always. mask on, mask off? yeah. i prefer it when other people wear a mask. | mask off, to be honest. it's one of those things we're going to learn to live with. we're going to have this for ever. somejust can't wait to jump off on terminus day but others are concerned. these three are all used to the kind of restrictions some here have come to view as tyranny. from where i come from in singapore, it is actually illegal not
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to wear a mask outdoors. they send out robots to catch people not wearing masks. when i came to manchester and i was told that you didn't have to wear a mask outdoors, i felt illegal. so in hong kong, even outside of a pandemic, people will wear masks, just as a sort of courtesy... it's just a common courtesy. ..to stop spreading their illness around to other people. i want to read you this tweet that went viral a couple of days ago. "0njuly the 19th, i will not socially distance, i will not wear a mask. you are free to do those things or hide at home if you want but you have no right to demand that i cower in fear with you, life is for living." what do you think of that? i think there is a difference between precaution, taking precautions and living in fear. very interesting. i won't hide myself inside a room. i wear a mask, i go out everywhere, i still enjoy my freedom. i think it's sort of common sense.
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back here in an already divided country, the mask has become yet another symbol of our divisions. some hope, wish, pray for a united summer of love. the last time these friends were here in nantwich's studio nightclub, it was just a few days before lockdown mark one. we're back. it's a—coming. it is. from monday, it is coming. i know, i'm so excited. i need to move on, i need to get back out. totally. to think we were here last march and now we're stood back- in it, this is real. it's real. i've got goose bumps. honestly, honestly. when these pictures were taken, the vaccine was a pipe dream. today, over two thirds of the adult
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population have had both jabs but that means a third have not. infection rates are rising. is there an anxiety? a little bit. i will probably still be wearing a mask. you're double jabbed and ready to go. well and truly, yeah. i want to stay negative for as long as possible. i've heard this could be the third summer of love. the prime minister says england's easing of lockdown is cautious but irreversible. we will be back talking about all sorts of things this morning. if you want to get in touch you know how to do it. it is monday morning. how are you feeling about the different changes? i am feeling 0k. you feeling about the different changes? i am feeling ok. i watched about 4 million hours of sport. it
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was a three screen weekend. mothers. ——. 0f ——. of us. we had lewis hamilton on. there were 140,000 fans at silverstone to see lewis hamilton fight back from a ten—second penalty and win the british grand prix. his win wasn't without controversy though. this collision with max verstappen on the opening lap ended verstappen's race. hamilton was punished for his part but battled back to take the lead with just a couple of laps remaining. it's hamilton's 8th win in the british grand prix and cuts verstappen's championship lead to eight points. after that crash, max verstappen was treated in hosptial where he tweeted... "watching the celebrations while still in hospital is disrespectful and unsportsmanlike behaviour. " here is what hamilton said after the race. i could see he was not going to concede.
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so, anyway, he cut across me and we collided. i was quite frustrated because we have to give space for one another. but anyway, so then i knew i had the penalty and i was just like, you know what? i'm going to give it absolutely everything for the team and for the fans here and we'll see where we get and just never gave up. the american collin morikawa is this year's 0pen champion after a flawless final round at royal st george's. morikawa, who isjust 24, was making his debut at the championship but held off the nerves to win by two strokes. he lifts the famous claretjug, to go with his victory in the us pga which he won last year on his debut there. i just love playing golf. this is what we love to do. we embrace these moments — we really get energy from this. i get energy. i'm excited about being in contention. the fans out here made me excited about playing golf. itjust pushes you to be your best self. i went out there and tried to play my best.
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thankfully, it was enough for today. england have levelled their men's t20 series with pakistan with victory at headingley. there were some huge shots from england's batsmen, including this giant six from liam livingstone to help them post 200 in their 20 overs. pakistan couldn't get close enough, falling 45 runs short. the series decider is at old trafford tomorrow. britain's mark cavendish came agonisingly close to breaking the all—time record for tour de france stage wins but fell just short on the race's final stage in paris. cavendish, in the green, eventually finished third. slovenia's tadej pogacar was crowned the overall winner for the second year running. we will be talking to him on the programme at half past eight stop.
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the american tennis star coco gauff has pulled out of the olympics after testing positive for coronavirus. her announcement came after six athletes and two staff members from the british athletics team were put into isolation after someone on their flight to tokyo tested positive. various members of south africa's team have also tested positive. the games officially start on friday. i wonder if we are going to be hearing a little bit more of that over the next few days. we will be hearing of all places, i am sure. sorry it is a bit depressing, isn't it? it is going to happen, there will be more cases and people having to go into isolation. ijust think for team gb, don't go near anyone. let's say 20 years down the line, if you win a medal at these games, it is still an olympic medal. we will remember it as very different from
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the others we know, the idea of performing in front of an empty stadium must be very strange. when we look back on it, you will look at the olympics and think it is really special because of the challenges everyone has had to face to get there. rory mcilroy was talking yesterday about finishing the open and now he is going to the olympics. he said he is not looking forward to the olympics because it is a really weird situation to bn. you are speaking to mark cavendish later, is great. —— weird situation to be in. it's been scorchio this weekend so we thought we'd put carol on the roof this morning. it was hot this weekend. yesterday was the hottest day of the year so far. the temperature at heathrow
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reached 31 celsius. it has been quite a warm night stop in the highlands, the temperature is 6.5 celsius but in the isle of wight it is currently 21 degrees. the forecast for today is another hot and sunny one for the bulk of the uk, even after the cold start. we have a weather front crossing the far north of the country producing some cloud. it is breaking up and we will continue —— as it will continue to do so. towards the end of their working week there is a chance of seeing low pressure coming our way into the south breaking down into the dry and sunny conditions we have. there is some cloud and patchy mist and fog around. all of that will lift and break. more cloud in the north—east of scotland. for the
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rest of the uk it will be dry, hot and sunny stop in the afternoon we could catch the odd shower. there could catch the odd shower. there could be thunder. as we head through this evening and overnight, any showers will fade. a bit more cloud coming in across parts of the north and west. missed here and there and another warm night. temperatures in the low to high teens. tomorrow there will be a lot of loose guide. where there is mist and patchy fog, that will lift. we are back into some sunshine. later in the afternoon and early evening there will be some showers, potentially heavy and thundery. the temperatures once again 30 degrees. 0n heavy and thundery. the temperatures once again 30 degrees. on wednesday a bit of a change. it willjust be
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—— parts of the north and east will see cloud. some of the cloud will erode during the day and there is the risk of the odd heavy, under a shower. if you want something cooler, head to the coast. in a sea breeze that will take the temperature down a bit. we are looking at temperatures remaining in the mid to high 20s. at the end of the mid to high 20s. at the end of the week we will start to see things change with the chance of rain coming into the south—west and seven counties and temperatures going down to where they should be at this stage injuly. it is a long way off and that could still change. thank you. while many may be celebrating greater freedoms from today, for the 3.7 million people in england, who are classed as clinically vulnerable, the lifting of social restrictions is worrying. the department for health says they should take extra precautions to keep themselves safe.
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0ur health correspondent katherine da costa has been speaking to some of those affected. right now i'm feeling quite hopeless for the first time in my life. it's been a long 16 months and there doesn't seem an end to this. we're not out of the woods yet. who knows how long it's going to be before we can get back to some sort of normality? mentally, it's been tough, _ being different from everybody else. being scared to be out. 28—year—old holly from leicester suffers from cystic fibrosis. six years ago, she had a double lung transplant and takes immunosuppressants to stop her body rejecting them. she's been shielding since the first lockdown in march last year. i've been exceptionally lucky that my parents have been able to shield with me, so i haven't been completely isolated on my own. it's had a huge impact on my mental health. i've had days where i'vejust cried. it's been really tough,
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logging on to social media and seeing my friends all go out to parties and restaurants and enjoying themselves and it's not that i don't want them to do that, ijust really wish i could do it with them safely. holly says she'd feel more confident if masks had remained compulsory in essential places, like supermarkets, health care settings and public transport. do you think there's been enough guidance and support for people with a weakened immune system? we've been told to try to avoid people who have not yet had both doses of the vaccine or any doses. well, that's very difficult. they've told us to go shopping if we like at quieter times. it's now the summer holidays, i don't know when those quieter times are going to be. i've got so much life still that i want to live and make most of the gift of life i've been given. so i am just going to have to stay home, shielding really but without the support. it's difficult.
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i feel very abandoned right now. chris sandon's garden has become his sanctuary for the last 16 months. the 79—year—old from sheffield is currently undergoing chemotherapy after his prostate cancer returned. the treatment has knocked out his immune system, so he's having to be extremely careful. we were advised when we first started shielding that we weren't to go out to shops or pharmacies. we had to keep ourselves very safe and basically we were sort of locked away. we couldn't meet the grandchildren and give them a hug, you know, all this sort of thing. it impacts on your mental being and your health generally and you just get very, very down. chris and his wife should have been off to the cotswolds today but they cancelled their holiday, fearing the risks were just too great. i can't take the risks to go and mix indoors in a crowded hotel with other people who probably will not be wearing masks, and neither will the staff. i have had nothing directly from the nhs
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or the government advisers, to me, as a clinically vulnerable person. i think the message could be much stronger and more detailed to help people in my situation. 39—year—old delyth parton from west bromwich had her third child in the first lockdown last march. delyth has lupus and takes immunosuppressants to stop her body attacking itself. it has meant shielding away from friends and family. i've found it really hard without my parents and my support bubble. my husband is brilliant. a new baby on your own. five of us stuck in a small house for the best part of a year with no respite, it's been horrible, it's been awful. as a music teacher and professional singer, delyth's desperate to get back to the job she loves. booster shots and antiviral treatments may be on the way but right now she is concerned about surging infection rates.
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how do you feel about so—called freedom day? you can already see it. a lot less masks in shops now, people are sort of on top of each other. let's alljust keep a lid on it, just for a little bit, and let's alljust keep each other safe because that's the kindest thing we can do for each other and then everybody can enjoy freedoms and we'll be out of this a lot sooner than if we keep... if we go absolutely nuts as soon as the restrictions come off. katherine da costa, bbc news. lots to talk about today. dr rosemary leonard, who joins us in the studio. let's talk about people in the critical category. ids, let's talk about people in the critical category.— let's talk about people in the critical category. a lot of people are very scared _
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critical category. a lot of people are very scared and _ critical category. a lot of people are very scared and will- critical category. a lot of people | are very scared and will continue critical category. a lot of people i are very scared and will continue to keep themselves... there are some people who still need to take care, evenif people who still need to take care, even if they had been double vaccinated.— even if they had been double vaccinated. , . ., ., vaccinated. there is a huge range of oiinions. vaccinated. there is a huge range of opinions- some _ vaccinated. there is a huge range of opinions. some people _ vaccinated. there is a huge range of opinions. some people going - vaccinated. there is a huge range of opinions. some people going into i vaccinated. there is a huge range of opinions. some people going into a| opinions. some people going into a nightclub thinking, what impact will that have on the rest of us? 0thers that have on the rest of us? others with mixed messages and different opinions of mask wearing and what reactions will be. 0thers looking at so—called freedom day and thinking it is not freedom for us. wrapped around this are projections of where we might be in terms of daily cases in the weeks to come. the we might be in terms of daily cases in the weeks to come.— we might be in terms of daily cases in the weeks to come. the cases will io in the weeks to come. the cases will go sky-high. — in the weeks to come. the cases will go sky-high. i _ in the weeks to come. the cases will go sky-high. i am — in the weeks to come. the cases will go sky-high, i am sure. _ in the weeks to come. the cases will go sky-high, i am sure. this - in the weeks to come. the cases will go sky-high, i am sure. this is i in the weeks to come. the cases will go sky-high, i am sure. this is a i go sky—high, i am sure. this is a disease predominantly of the young. it is predominantly in young people, those under 25. if they want to go out and enjoy themselves in a nightclub they had to be aware they
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will probably come into contact with the virus. the number of people who will have alerts will be enormous. hundreds of thousands of people will be told to self—isolate. i see it as a mess waiting to happen. {elite be told to self-isolate. i see it as a mess waiting to happen. give us our a mess waiting to happen. give us your opinion _ a mess waiting to happen. give us your opinion on — a mess waiting to happen. give us your opinion on how— a mess waiting to happen. give us your opinion on how it _ a mess waiting to happen. give us your opinion on how it affects i your opinion on how it affects younger people. the government is clear that differentiations are made with age. it clear that differentiations are made with aie. ., , , clear that differentiations are made with ae. . , , ., clear that differentiations are made withaie. . , ,., ., , with age. it generally is a fairly minor illness _ with age. it generally is a fairly minor illness among _ with age. it generally is a fairly minor illness among young i with age. it generally is a fairly i minor illness among young people. there are a few young people who, out of the blue, it hits them very hard, and then we had to consider long covid. they could remain unwell for months afterwards. we had to learn to live with the virus, that is true. letting it spread like wildfire in young people like this may be a misjudged. mask
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wildfire in young people like this may be a misjudged. may be a mis'udged. mask wearing, still a huie may be a misjudged. mask wearing, still a huge topic— may be a misjudged. mask wearing, still a huge topic of _ may be a misjudged. mask wearing, still a huge topic of debate - may be a misjudged. mask wearing, still a huge topic of debate today, . still a huge topic of debate today, where do you sit on that at the moment? i where do you sit on that at the moment?— where do you sit on that at the moment? , , ., ., moment? i will still be wearing a mask in enclosed _ moment? i will still be wearing a mask in enclosed public- moment? i will still be wearing a mask in enclosed public spaces. | moment? i will still be wearing a i mask in enclosed public spaces. in health care settings we are still making masks mandatory. we have got vulnerable people coming in and we had to protect them. certainly in enclosed spaces, inside, i will still wear a mask. enclosed spaces, inside, iwill still wear a mask.— enclosed spaces, inside, iwill still wear a mask. there is a change over the last _ still wear a mask. there is a change over the last day _ still wear a mask. there is a change over the last day or— still wear a mask. there is a change over the last day or so _ still wear a mask. there is a change over the last day or so that - still wear a mask. there is a change over the last day or so that will i over the last day or so that will mean nhs staff contacted by test and trace may not have too self—isolate. take us through what details you know about that.— know about that. from what i understand. _ know about that. from what i understand, if— know about that. from what i understand, if your _ know about that. from what i understand, if your role i know about that. from what i understand, if your role is i know about that. from what i i understand, if your role is seen to be critical, saving lives, it could put others at risk, you could be exempt but it has to go through a risk management process and has to
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be cleared by the director of public health. there are numerous hoops. you can go back to work but we are trying to make it so you cannot go back to work. trying to make it so you cannot go back to work-— back to work. there might be a differentiation _ back to work. there might be a differentiation between - back to work. there might be a differentiation between you i back to work. there might be a| differentiation between you and someone who works in intensive care, for example. sat; someone who works in intensive care, for example-— for example. say one of the practice nurses those — for example. say one of the practice nurses those of _ for example. say one of the practice nurses those of sick, _ for example. say one of the practice nurses those of sick, not _ for example. say one of the practice nurses those of sick, not doing i for example. say one of the practice nurses those of sick, not doing a i nurses those of sick, not doing a smear test, nurses those of sick, not doing a smeartest, is nurses those of sick, not doing a smear test, is that putting someone's life at risk? yes, it is. not doing a test for someone who might have a malignant melanoma, that puts someone's life at risk. what you're feeling in the gp world about the number of cases and people who are struggling with covid symptoms are where we might be two, three, four weeks down the line
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question we are seeing young people struggling a bit. the question we are seeing young people struggling a bit-— struggling a bit. the bigger issue is the huge _ struggling a bit. the bigger issue is the huge number _ struggling a bit. the bigger issue is the huge number of _ struggling a bit. the bigger issue is the huge number of people i struggling a bit. the bigger issue is the huge number of people on| is the huge number of people on waiting list. the huge number of people on waiting list with long covid. we have a clinic that the waiting lists are huge. it is dealing with the backlog that is building up and continuing to build thatis building up and continuing to build that is the real problem. thus building up and continuing to build that is the real problem.— that is the real problem. thus a sense. there _ that is the real problem. thus a sense. there are _ that is the real problem. thus a sense. there are so _ that is the real problem. thus a sense. there are so many i that is the real problem. thus a i sense. there are so many changes today. really mixed feelings. what are your thoughts about today and your advice to people?— are your thoughts about today and your advice to people? continue to take care and _ your advice to people? continue to take care and young _ your advice to people? continue to take care and young people. i your advice to people? continue to i take care and young people. everyone is desperate for some freedom but the virus has not gone away. with the virus has not gone away. with the loosening up of all the regulations, we will see a huge spike in cases. let hope vaccinations mean people are protected and we don't see a big
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rise in hospital admissions. it rise in hospital admissions. it looks like the boosterjab in september will become an important part of your work. we september will become an important part of your work-— part of your work. we have had guidelines _ part of your work. we have had guidelines coming _ part of your work. we have had guidelines coming out. - part of your work. we have had guidelines coming out. giving i part of your work. we have had i guidelines coming out. giving this to jabs and flu jabs. we do not know the logistics of how we will be giving the covid vaccine, the booster vaccine and ideally we would like to be doing at the same time. it looks muddled as to how we can do that. in the autumn my life has been taken over with putting yet more needles in arms. thank you for running through some of those issues. get in contact with us and tell is how you are feeling about some of the changes are taking place. e—mail us or we are on social media. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning. bbc london and bbc south east today are joining forces at breakfast to keep you up to date with the latest news. more than a third of londoners still haven't had their first coronavirus vaccine dose, making it the area with the lowest uptake in england. nationally, 88% of people have had their firstjab.the data from nhs england shows that over half of londoners have not had a second dose. while in the south east, 81% of eligible adults have had their first dose and 63% their second. there will be a lot more cases probably towards wintertime, which is when we will need everybody vaccinated, because what we do not want is people getting really ill and ending up in the icu. it is betterfor people to
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and ending up in the icu. it is better for people to isolate at home for a couple of weeks rather than going into intensive care, so it is imperative that you get your vaccines. 0peration brock has returned tojunctions eight and nine of the m20 after being installed over the weekend. the concrete barrier aims to help keep traffic flowing in both directions and to reduce disruption for local communities. authorities say it's a precautionary move ahead of tourist traffic returning. thousands of golf fans at royal st george's in sandwich have witnessed the crowning of a new 0pen champion. 32,000 spectators were at the kent course to watch american collin morikawa claim the title. the local authority says the staging of golf�*s oldest major has been a huge boost. i think it is showcasing kent, east kent and indeed the local area, it is about more than just this week, people will recognise the location and clearly will come back over time to enjoy the fabulous environment that we have here in the county.
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now, "quiet" may not be a word commonly associated with the capital, but hampstead heath has just been awarded urban quiet park status. it's the first park in europe to be given the honour. 0rganisers quiet parks international described the heath as "wild" and "natural," with "plenty of opportunities to find refuge "from city noise." and now the weather with gillian brown. hello there, good morning. well, another very warm day today across london and the south—east. plenty of sunshine right from the word go today. it's going to feel warm again, but i think as we get further into the afternoon, there is a likelihood that we mightjust see the odd isolated shower or two. temperatures could get up to 28 celsius, a little cooler along the coast. and through the day into this evening, again those showers could lingerfor a time. not everyone will see one, but if you do, they could be heavy and sharp in places. again, a very warm night to come, feeling pretty muggy, temperatures not getting much below 14 celsius. as we look ahead to the rest of the week, high pressure continues
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to be in charge of our weather as we look towards the middle to the end of the week. likely to keep hold of this warmth and brightness until we look towards thursday or friday. still the chance of an odd isolated shower, but we will keep you up—to—date, and i will see you soon. that's all from us for now. we're back in half an hour's time. have a good morning.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today — cheering. back in business as legal restrictions on masks and social contact are lifted in england. i've had my vaccines. i want to have a good time, hon. so excited, can't wait for it. it is a relief. such a long time. but the prime minister urges caution as scientists warn cases could surge to 200,000 a day. more than half a million pinged by track and trace, as nhs staff are told they could be spared isolation in england amid fears of staff shortages. lewis hamilton celebrates winning the british grand prix, in front of 140,000 fans, but his championship rival accuses him of being "disrespectful" and "unsportsmanlike."
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good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london, where the sun is beating down. it has been a one night for most of us, a hot and sunny day, this morning's cloud breaking up, but there's the chance we might catch the odd heavy thundery showers later, but most of us will miss them. all the details coming up. good morning. it's monday, july 19th. our top story — 16 months after they were first introduced, most legal restrictions on social contact have been lifted in england. groups of any size can now meet inside and outdoors, guidance to work from home has been scrapped, and face coverings are no longer required by law, although people will still be encouraged to wear them in shops and on public transport. borisjohnson urged the public to be cautious, insisting that the delta covid variant remained extremely contagious. a warning, ourfirst report from luxmy gopal contains flashing images. the moment they've been waiting for for over a year.
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cheering. the final stage of unlocking in england, with social distancing rules dropped. 1,000 people packed into this club in central london, with many more lining up outside. cheering. they've waited 16 months. what's a little longer? there's so many people there, and we're just so pumped to get in there. it's been a year and a half, now we are ready all to dance. i've had my vaccines. i want to have a good time, hon. so excited. so excited! i can't wait for it. it'sjust, like, a relief after such a long time just to have freedom. nightclubs are one of the few businesses that have had to stay closed throughout the whole pandemic, among the last to reopen. loud music plays. and this is what many have waited so long for, and what the nightlife industry has
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so desperately needed. some feel the sector has been sidelined. the last year has been hell on earth. i mean, it's been very, very difficult. if you look at what happened last week with the football compared with what is happening tonight, and you think, why were we treated differently? all we are doing is taking the screens out, putting them into storage. it's more sedate, but no less celebratory, at this pub in west london, where they are preparing for an end to table service only and mandatory masks. i can't wait to enjoy doing ourjob, ratherthan sort of having to basically be a policeman the whole time, and lecturing people on what they can and can't do, where they can and can't go, the masks they wear, what they touch, where they sanitise, where they track and trace. it's going to be strange for us to adapt again, and the notion of people coming into the pub, being able to go to the table themselves without being directed. as of midnight in england, nearly all legal restrictions on social contact have been removed.
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face coverings are no longer required by law, but are still recommended in crowded, enclosed spaces. meanwhile, scotland has moved to what's known as level zero. limits on social gatherings remain, with face coverings still mandatory in shops and on public transport. in northern ireland, the latest phase of unlocking is expected next week, while in wales, most covid rules are to be scrapped from the 7th of august, though face coverings will still be required in many indoor public places. there is concern about restrictions easing at a time when covid cases in the uk are rising. we're at the point where 10% to just over of intensive care beds in england are occupied by people who have got covid. so there has been a significant increase in pressure on intensive care services over the last few weeks. with experts warning that cases could surge further, and with a third of adults not yet fully vaccinated, the worry is, at what price this new freedom? luxmy gopal, bbc news.
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luxmy is at a supermarket in london for us this morning. luxmy, how are they adapting to the changes? perspex screens we have become used to over the past year are still here in iceland, but gone are the signs requesting that customers on social distance or wear masks because of course that is no longer mandatory. however, iceland, like other supermarket chains in england, say they will continue encouraging customers to wear masks to keep each other safe, and we can speak to the store manager simon now. how do you and your colleagues feel about customers no longer having to wear masks? because matt gono is mainly about protecting others —— mask wearing is mainly about protecting
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others. if wearing is mainly about protecting others. . , ., , wearing is mainly about protecting others. . , ., ., ., wearing is mainly about protecting others. , ., ., ., ., others. if customers do not want to wear a mask. _ others. if customers do not want to wear a mask, we _ others. if customers do not want to wear a mask, we will— others. if customers do not want to wear a mask, we will do _ others. if customers do not want to wear a mask, we will do our- others. if customers do not want to wear a mask, we will do our best i others. if customers do not want to j wear a mask, we will do our best to stay out of the way. our team will wear masks to protect each other. how do your staff feel about the fact that customers do not have to wear masks any more? do they feel more vulnerable, threatened by it? some are a bit nervous, if i honest, that people wearing masks. we will keep a bit of distance from those customers, we want to give our team safe where we can. find customers, we want to give our team safe where we can.— customers, we want to give our team safe where we can. and you say some of our safe where we can. and you say some of your staff — safe where we can. and you say some of your staff will _ safe where we can. and you say some of your staff will continue _ safe where we can. and you say some of your staff will continue wearing i of your staff will continue wearing masks, but others want, what is the balance beam? i masks, but others want, what is the balance beam?— balance beam? i think moore will wear masks. _ balance beam? i think moore will wear masks, they _ balance beam? i think moore will wear masks, they are _ balance beam? i think moore will wear masks, they are used i balance beam? i think moore will wear masks, they are used to i balance beam? i think moore will i wear masks, they are used to wearing masks now. some will not, but the majority will keep wearing them. and majority will keep wearing them. and social distancing is one of the things that is no longer required by law. what is the approach to that in this store? ~ .. ,, , ., this store? where we can, we keep a distance from — this store? where we can, we keep a distance from our— this store? where we can, we keep a distance from our customers - this store? where we can, we keep a distance from our customers and i this store? where we can, we keep a i distance from our customers and team members. we are lucky to have a large store here in iceland and fulham, so we have got some more space we can move around in. hagar
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fulham, so we have got some more space we can move around in. how are ou were space we can move around in. how are you were to — space we can move around in. how are you were to encourage _ space we can move around in. how are you were to encourage customers i space we can move around in. how are you were to encourage customers to i you were to encourage customers to try to keep a distance, are you to live it up to individuals? we try to keep a distance, are you to live it up to individuals?- live it up to individuals? we will leave it up _ live it up to individuals? we will leave it up to — live it up to individuals? we will leave it up to individuals, i live it up to individuals? we will leave it up to individuals, we i live it up to individuals? we will| leave it up to individuals, we will not get involved with people who do not get involved with people who do not want to stick it to some of the things we have set out in the store. simon, thank you very much for filling as n. a note on social distancing, the governments as well thatis distancing, the governments as well that is no longer legally required, they are saying that, they are trying to remind people of the risks of close contact particularly when it comes to people who are clinically extremely vulnerable and those who have not been at doubly jabs, have not had both their vaccinations. thank you very much, luxmy, lots to pick up on the back of that. england may be unlocking, but three senior members of the cabinet, including the prime minister, are self—isolating. let's get the latest on that from our political correspondent jonathan blake, who is in downing street for us this morning. jonathan, talk us through what has happened. if you needed a reminder that
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although legal restrictions are being lifted today in england, it doesn't mean a return to normal, the government has provided its own after health secretary sajid javid tested positive for coronavirus. both the prime minister and the chancellor were contacted by nhs test and trace and told to isolate, having come into contact with him. and they are now doing that, but only after an initial decision yesterday morning to allow them to take part in a pilot scheme which would have seen them able to carry on working, even though they have been told to isolate was reversed, after something of a backlash, labour leader and the criticism of the government on that, and this morning sir keir starmer accusing ministers of acting as if there's one rule for them and one rule for else, describing the whole thing is if you. boris johnson attempted else, describing the whole thing is if you. borisjohnson attempted to play it down, in a video he posted on twitter last night, saying they briefly looked into that but decided the best thing was to do as everybody else who has been contacted by test and trace has had to do, and i saw it. so that is the
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situation this morning, a reminder if one were needed that step four on the road map does not represent a return to normal. the government is urging people to be cautious and take responsibility for their own actions, and reminding people, too, that cases of coronavirus will continue to rise, but it is because of the vaccination programme appearing where quieter is that the government feels they are able to take this decision on the balance of risks. jonathan, thank you very much for that. we'll be speaking to the vaccines minister, nadhim zahawi, at 7.30 this morning. we will also speak tojonathan ashworth of the labour party in a couple of minutes. scotland moves to level zero of covid restrictions today. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw is in ayrshire. james, talk us through the changes there. we are trying to get a handle on all these changes happening in various places. talk us through what is happening there. it will be a
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beautiful day here in largs on the west coast of scotland. a lot of people will be coming from glasgow enjoying the fantastic weather we are going to have, but in fact the situation here is not going to change very much in terms of covid restrictions comparing this week to last week. so there will be some restrictions are still on the number of people who can meet indoors in private homes, who can eat in public indoor spaces, and an outdoor spaces, only 15 people from 15 how swords can meet together, and they have to maintain a metre of physical distance from other groups. a the most important difference is the fact that people will have to carry on wearing masks and a lot of settings in scotland, so that is on public transport, shops, in many enclosed public spaces, and at work as well. , so it was for the next
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three weeks, scotland will relax restrictions on the 9th of august even more, at least for the next three weeks, there are going to be very big differences in terms of how covid is managed here in scotland compared to england. james, thank you, we will speak to you later. more cases of the virus have been reported among athletes and officials at the tokyo 0lympics. six athletes and two staff members from team gb are self—isolating after coming into close contact with someone who tested positive. the games begin in four days' time. let's get the latest from our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes. rupert, how worrying is this for organisers? not great news was foreign they have theirs to go until the opening ceremony. we now have confirmation that 58 people inside the so—called 0lympic bubble have tested positive for covid since the beginning of the
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month, that includes three south african team members actually inside the olympic village, who were confirmed yesterday. in addition, as you said, id members of team gb, who have not been confirmed as covid positive but are self—isolate and, because on the plane over here, they had close contact with somebody who is positive, so it is very disruptive to all of these athletes who are being affected. the olympic organisers say nothing to worry about yet, do not panic, this is the system working. 60,000 people coming here, there are bound to be some cases, but we are identifying them and isolating them. but i think a lot of other people are looking at this and thinking, is this a disaster in the beginnings of being made, and are we going to have some sort of really bad cluster outbreaks sometime in the next few weeks, does that going to dramatically affect the olympics? thank you very much indeed for that, we will keep everybody right up to date with it.
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now, we all know a cat has nine lives, but what about a dog? well, if they do, 0llie the springer spaniel seen here, has used up at least one of his, that's because he disappeared after going for a dip in the sea off porthcrawl this weekend. he was found, more three hours later, a staggering three miles away, that's five kilometres. rnli lifeboat crews were sent to pick him up after he was spotted by a kayaker out at sea. i remember a similar study a few years ago, and it was a spaniel. maybe they love to swim. the owner thankfully got the dog back, good news all round. a very hot weekend, carol has details on that and what is good to happen as well, good morning.
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it is hot already for many of us, a bit more cloud across the north of scotland, temperatures not quite as high as yet for you. but the forecast for today is a hot and sunny one. the other thing to bear in mind as pollen levels are high across the uk, except for northern scotland, where they are moderate. so northern scotland we are starting off with a bit more cloud, broken and will continue to break up tomorrow you might cling on to some across the far north—east. patchy fog across northern ireland this morning will tend to lift and you will see a bit more sunshine, but for the bulk of the uk, it will be dry and sunny. the translator as temperatures do increase that we will see some heavy showers, some of which will be thundery, most of us will not, but our temperature range 14 to about 30 celsius. it will be a hot day for the bulk of the uk.
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through this evening on overnight, any residual showers will tend to fade, a little bit of mist as well, and it will be another one night, difficult for sleeping. tomorrow, we start off with a lot of blue skies, cloud and mist lifting and breaking, and again, the chance that we could well catch a heavy shower, somewhere in the south—east quarter for example, which could also prove thundery. but like today, most of us will miss them, and tomorrow's temperatures 14 in the north to about 29 or 30 coming down towards the south. thank you, carol, we will see you later this morning. looks lovely on the roof of broadcasting house. the time is 7.15. "putting their foot down on the accelerator and throwing off "the seat belts." that's how the labour party has described
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the government's lifting of restrictions in england. we're joined now by the shadow health secretary, jonathan ashworth. ijust want i just want to start with one piece of news that came over in the last few hours. from today, double vaccinated front line nhs and social care staff in england who have been told to self—isolate will be permitted to attend work in exceptional circumstances. they will have testing instead. what is your reaction to that, is that the right thing to do? in reaction to that, is that the right thing to do?— reaction to that, is that the right thinitodo? . . ,., . , thing to do? in the circumstances, i can understand _ thing to do? in the circumstances, i can understand that _ thing to do? in the circumstances, i can understand that change - thing to do? in the circumstances, i can understand that change in i can understand that change in policy. it is a crisis in the nhs, because of the covid admissions which are increasing quite rapidly, and of course because they have got staff who have had to isolate, it means cancer operations are getting cancelled, liver transplant operations cancelled last week in birmingham. this is a real crisis in the nhs, so as long as our nhs staff are properly protected with ppe, and i would actually argue they should have the higher grade ppe masks, something i have calling forfor something i have calling forfor some months now, then i think that a
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sensible approach for the nhs. because we have got... we already have so many vacancies across the nhs anyway, close to 100,000, we don't want to be losing more people from the front line at this time of increasing pressure. brute from the front line at this time of increasing pressure.— from the front line at this time of increasing pressure. we know there are so many — increasing pressure. we know there are so many changes _ increasing pressure. we know there are so many changes today, - increasing pressure. we know there are so many changes today, would. increasing pressure. we know there i are so many changes today, would you still go ahead with these big changes? we know your views on masks, but the other changes for example, no need to actually social distance any more, numbers of people being able to meet, would you change those all have those stay the same quest banana we think. —— would you change those or the same? we quest banana we think. -- would you change those or the same? we would have been more _ change those or the same? we would have been more cautious, _ change those or the same? we would have been more cautious, unlocked i have been more cautious, unlocked locked in stages. a day of uncertainty for thousands of people getting on buses and trains, not knowing if other passengers will be wearing masks, so we would keep my wearing, we think that is an important intervention. we would maintain the rate for people to work from home as well, so we have less
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people out and about. and of course, we would give people decent sick pay of the need to isolate and we would encourage and help premises properly ventilate. i think, encourage and help premises properly ventilate. ithink, given encourage and help premises properly ventilate. i think, given where we are with infection rates rising so rapidly, which we know puts pressure on the nhs, which we know it will lead to long covid, but we know that because we have a partially vaccinated population, could mean we see a new variant emerge because of the pressure, the selection pressure, put on the virus. all of these decisions have to be kept under review constantly by ministers. borisjohnson and sajid javid said this would be irreversible. i think that is a foolish and irresponsible thing to have promised. i think we could well see restrictions imposed.— see restrictions imposed. would you have ke it see restrictions imposed. would you have kept the _ see restrictions imposed. would you have kept the rules _ see restrictions imposed. would you have kept the rules around - see restrictions imposed. would you have kept the rules around social- have kept the rules around social distance and? —— social distancing? we would have done ventilation,
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masks, working from home, but on social distancing and what part of the economy we would open and not open, we would keep that under constant review. i do not think this is the end of the road, has boris johnson has said. he said this will be a reversible, i do not think you can make that promise to the british people. all of these measures and changes have to be kept under review, and i implore ministers to watch the data like a hawk, the hospital admission data, and continue to monitor this, because we are in a very serious situation. flan are in a very serious situation. can i also are in a very serious situation. can i also ask— are in a very serious situation. can i also ask you _ are in a very serious situation. can i also ask you about travel? we saw changes over the weekend to proposals, people coming back from france will have to self—isolate. would you suggest that other countries should be on that list? i countries should be on that list? i think all of these things have to be kept under review constantly. you've mentioned under _ kept under review constantly. you've mentioned under review, _ kept under review constantly. you've mentioned under review, but - kept under review constantly. you've mentioned under review, but would i mentioned under review, but would you suggest that they should be? if you suggest that they should be? if there are problems in other
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countries with for example the beta variant which i think is the variant in france, they should be added to the list. that is why france was added to the list, that variant can get around the vaccines, which is why france was added to the list. but this is a grim reminder that this is a global problem, and unless you vaccinate to the world as well as vaccinate the people in your own country, this thing just bounces back at us in different ways. from what ou back at us in different ways. from what you know. — back at us in different ways. from what you know, which _ back at us in different ways. from what you know, which other- back at us in different ways. from what you know, which other countries are you suggesting should be added? to be honest, i have not looked at the data in all the other countries, because my focus is the domestic health service, but i'm sure there will be other countries where if the beta variant is growing, it will need to be looked at. you mentioned that ou need to be looked at. you mentioned that you think— need to be looked at. you mentioned that you think the _ need to be looked at. you mentioned that you think the rules _ need to be looked at. you mentioned that you think the rules we _ need to be looked at. you mentioned that you think the rules we have i need to be looked at. you mentioned that you think the rules we have to i that you think the rules we have to be changed, and if they had to be changed back again, you would support that? i changed back again, you would suraport that?— changed back again, you would support that? i don't think this is a reversible. _ support that? i don't think this is a reversible, as _ support that? i don't think this is
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a reversible, as sajid _ support that? i don't think this is a reversible, as sajid javid - support that? i don't think this is a reversible, as sajid javid and i a reversible, as sajid javid and borisjohnson promised, because it is growing so fast. the thing with covid, it grows really quickly, and other countries that threw off all the restrictions, like the netherlands, and now infection rates went up almost on a vertical access. 50 they started closing things like so they started closing things like nightclubs. israel have brought back mask wearing and are looking at going back into a long time, and thatis going back into a long time, and that is one of the most vaccinated countries in the world. so you cannot say this is a reversible. if you put precautions in place now like mask wearing and work from home, you can hopefully avoid restrictions in the future. it is summertime _ restrictions in the future. it is summertime now, _ restrictions in the future. it is summertime now, which is a benefit, and also schools are out, so if you don't do it now, when would you do it? ., ., , ., don't do it now, when would you do it? , ., ., don't do it now, when would you do it? schools will have an impact on transmission _ it? schools will have an impact on transmission rates. _ it? schools will have an impact on transmission rates. the _ it? schools will have an impact on transmission rates. the problem i it? schools will have an impact on | transmission rates. the problem is as we go back into september, given we are not vaccinating all our adolescents, then you put huge pressure on the system again in september, at a time when you are
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beginning to see other respiratory viruses as well such as flu and other viruses emerge. we are also calling on the government to invest in the nhs to prepare for winter, but also invest in your testing capacity, so as well as testing for covid as we get into winter, we can test for flu and other respiratory viruses. it is possible to do that, but we need to make some investments now. . ., ., but we need to make some investments now. ,, ., ., ., ,, . ., , now. shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth, _ now. shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth, thank - now. shadow health secretary jonathan ashworth, thank you | now. shadow health secretary i jonathan ashworth, thank you for jonathan ashworth, thank you for your time on breakfast. jonathan ashworth, thank you for your time on breakfast.— jonathan ashworth, thank you for your time on breakfast. thank you. thank ou your time on breakfast. thank you. thank you for— your time on breakfast. thank you. thank you for getting _ your time on breakfast. thank you. thank you for getting in _ your time on breakfast. thank you. thank you for getting in contact - your time on breakfast. thank you. thank you for getting in contact all| thank you for getting in contact all of you today, telling us how we're feeling about the changes, what sort of things you're planning on changing as well. jane has said, today for me is another day in the calendar, with 50,000 new cases per day and rising, i shall continue as before, when a new mass, social distancing, etc. simon says, at some point we'll need to take a risk. todayis point we'll need to take a risk. today is as good or bad as another day. we were talking about
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nightclubs, brian says, i think he is looking on the funny side, we have been a lockdown for 18 months, and nobody has bothered to learn any new moves for the dance floor. and this is from alison, also e—mailing today, she says for a lot of us clinically vulnerable people, this is a scary time. just want others to remember kindness. we'll have to move forward with respect, as not everyone is moving at the same pace. a good thought to leave on. do get in touch with us, i know there are really mixed feelings out there today. the time is 7.23. after 16 months of empty dancefloors, nightclubs in england reopened at midnight. let's speak to the night time economy adviser for greater manchester, sacha lord about the challenges facing the industry. i don't know if you saw our peace at the beginning of this programme, but some people clearly out there and enjoying themselves. do you have concerns, though? flan enjoying themselves. do you have concerns, though?— enjoying themselves. do you have concerns, though? can i 'ust pick up on something *
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concerns, though? can i 'ust pick up on something the h concerns, though? can ijust pick up on something the shadow _ concerns, though? can ijust pick up on something the shadow health - on something the shadow health ministerjust mentioned then? today is not unlocking everything. we have been gradually unlocking. if you think back to the 12th of april, nonessential detail open. 17th may, hospitality opened with measures in place. but i have never been sold into this idea of freedom day. for me, it is not freedom day, we do not have our freedom back. me, it is not freedom day, we do not have ourfreedom back. i think me, it is not freedom day, we do not have our freedom back. i think today is more personal choice day. we heard from reviews to date how many people, it is divided, across the whole of the uk. some people want their freedom whole of the uk. some people want theirfreedom back, some people still want to be isolated with measures in place, and i think that is right, i think that is the right approach. is right, i think that is the right a- roach. , ., , is right, i think that is the right a--roach. , ., , ., approach. tell us a little bit about those nightclubs _ approach. tell us a little bit about those nightclubs opening. - approach. tell us a little bit about those nightclubs opening. will- those nightclubs opening. will hospitality staff, for example, in those clubs, be safe and feel safe? firstly, when i woke up this morning, i was not one of those people dancing at one minute past
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12, but i have to say it was nice to see people back on the dance floor, and let's not forget, in nightclubs, one of the planning conditions is very good ventilation, and that is something that sage themselves has said, well ventilated area so some of the most safest venues to go to, as our officers as well. so it was good to see, again when i woke up this morning, i saw some people saying, if i go to a venue and i see staff wearing masks, i'm going to write a bad review. that to me is despicable. customers should not be thinking like that. these venues have been closed for 17, 18 months, those people are going to read a bad review because they don't like someone's personal choice. it is really not on. we have to live with this now moving forward, it is not going to go away, some people will be wearing masks, some will not, some will want to socially distance, some will want to socially distance, some will want to socially distance, some will not. it is down to everyone's personal preferences. j
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everyone's personal preferences. i am just wondering how feasible that is in a nightclub. if you don't want to not be socially distance, you don't go? it to not be socially distance, you don't no? , to not be socially distance, you don't go?— to not be socially distance, you don'tuo? ,, ., . , don't go? it is personal choice, but it is unlikely _ don't go? it is personal choice, but it is unlikely you _ don't go? it is personal choice, but it is unlikely you will— don't go? it is personal choice, but it is unlikely you will be _ don't go? it is personal choice, but it is unlikely you will be able - don't go? it is personal choice, but it is unlikely you will be able to - it is unlikely you will be able to socially distance and a nightclub. —— in a nightclub. socially distance and a nightclub. -- in a nightclub.— socially distance and a nightclub. -- in a nightclub. let's look at the night-time — -- in a nightclub. let's look at the night-time economy _ -- in a nightclub. let's look at the night-time economy in _ -- in a nightclub. let's look at the night-time economy in a - -- in a nightclub. let's look at the night-time economy in a general. night—time economy in a general sense of smell. it has been so long now. will the industry recover? it now. will the industry recover? it is on a cliff edge. in greater manchester, we employed 420,000 people in the night—time economy pre—covid. we are waiting to see how many redundancies have been made. nine out of ten businesses were gearing up to open on the 21st of june. we know why that didn't happen, and i think that was probably the right decision at that point. the businesses that have been
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operating with measures in place have been operating at a loss, on the whole, or barely breaking even. so these businesses have accrued so much debt, rent arrears, bounce back loans, borrowed money from friends, family, so hopefully today is day one where they can start to hear money coming through the tills, and it is going to take at least three to four years to get back to pre—pandemic levels. and when i say pre—pandemic, i am talking about paying off all the dead these people have accrued. harri paying off all the dead these people have accrued-— have accrued. how have they found -alannin ? have accrued. how have they found planning? because _ have accrued. how have they found planning? because we _ have accrued. how have they found planning? because we know - have accrued. how have they found planning? because we know things| planning? because we know things have changed, how has that been for them? it have changed, how has that been for them? ., , , ., have changed, how has that been for them? .,, , ., ., , them? it has been an absolute nightmare. _ them? it has been an absolute nightmare, flip-flopping - them? it has been an absolute nightmare, flip-flopping a - them? it has been an absolute l nightmare, flip-flopping a lovely nightmare, flip—flopping a lovely place. furlough has been fantastic, people have been taken off furlough and put back on again —— flip—flopping all over the place. i don't know if you remember about the way back after the first lockdown, we were given three days to gear up. you cannot open a pub or restaurant with three days notice. you have got
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to rotor staff, put all the new measures in place, by the food, restock, it was just... measures in place, by the food, restock, it wasjust... i think measures in place, by the food, restock, it was just... i think so many times during the last 18 months, we have seen how the government are really not understood the night—time economy, with the 10pm curfew is a perfect example, pushing hundreds of thousands of people out on the streets at exactly the same time. that did far more bad than good, that helped spread the virus. we saw ridiculous substantial meal rules, the scotch egg, i don't know if you remember, the high court to compel them to drop that which saves many businesses and jobs across the whole of the uk. so time and time again, we have seen so many mistakes. i don't know if you feel the same as me, louise, but when we saw the images at the g7... the same as me, louise, but when we saw the images at the g7. . .— saw the images at the g7. .. sacha, sor , we
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saw the images at the g7. .. sacha, sorry. we are _ saw the images at the g7. .. sacha, sorry, we are running _ saw the images at the g7. .. sacha, sorry, we are running out - saw the images at the g7. .. sacha, sorry, we are running out of - saw the images at the g7. .. sacha, sorry, we are running out of time, | sorry, we are running out of time, we will have to leave it there. thank you for your time this morning. we will be speaking to the vaccines most of the nadhim zahawi very shortly. —— vaccines minister. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. bbc london and bbc south east today are joining forces at breakfast to keep you up to date with the latest news. more than a third of londoners still haven't had their first coronavirus vaccine dose — making it the area with the lowest uptake in england. nationally, 88% of people have had their firstjab. the data from nhs england shows that over half of londoners have not had a second dose. while in the south east, 81% of eligible adults have had their first dose and 63% their second. there are going to be a lot more cases probably towards wintertime, and that's when we are going to need everybody vaccinated, because what we don't want is people getting real ill and having to be
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admitted to hospital and icu. however, it's going to be a big difference in terms of getting covid and having mild symptoms and staying at home for a week versus getting covid and going into a&e and ending up in the intensive care unit for a couple of weeks. so it's imperative that you get your vaccines, protect yourself and those around you. campaigners have submitted a petition calling for free school buses in brighton, saying many families are struggling to afford travel. brighton and hove city council says children living more than three miles away from their school and those on free school meals already get a free bus pass. but campaigners say the cost is affecting school choices for families who aren't eligible. thousands of golf fans at royal st george sin sandwich have witnessed the crowning of a new open champion. 32,000 spectators at the kent course saw american collin morikawa claim the title. the local authority says the staging of golf s oldest major has been a huge boost.
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i think it's showcasing kent, east kent and indeed the local area. it's about more than just this week. people will recognise the location and clearly will come back over time to enjoy the fabulous environment that we have here in the county. now "quiet" may not be a word commonly associated with the capital, but hampstead heath has just been awarded urban quiet park status. it's the first park in europe to be given the honour. organisers quiet parks international described it as somewhere with plenty of opportunities to find refuge from city noise. and now the weather with gillian brown. hello there, good morning. well, another very warm day today across london and the south—east. plenty of sunshine right from the word go today. it's going to feel warm again, but i think as we get further into the afternoon, there is a likelihood that we mightjust see the odd isolated shower or two. temperatures could get up to 28 celsius, a little cooler along the coast. and through the day into this
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evening, again those showers could lingerfor a time. not everyone will see one, but if you do, they but if you do, could be heavy and sharp in places. again, if anyone nights to come, feeling pretty muggy, attempt is not getting much below 14 celsius. as we look ahead to the rest of the week, high pressure continued to be in charge of our weather as we look towards the middle to the end of the week. likely to keep hold of this warmth and brightness as we look towards thursday or friday. still a chance of an odd isolated shower, but we will keep you up—to—date and i will see you soon. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we promised we would speak to the vaccines minister,
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nadhim zahawi. hejoins us now. can we start about whether this is the right decision. i am sure you saw the right decision. i am sure you saneremy hunt saying it was slashing red with cases reaching 50,000. people have called this decision reckless. is 50,000. people have called this decision reckless.— decision reckless. is it? with resect decision reckless. is it? with respect to — decision reckless. is it? with respect to jonathan - decision reckless. is it? with. respect to jonathan ashworth, decision reckless. is it? with - respect to jonathan ashworth, we have offered the first days of the vaccine to almost 88% of adults in the uk. 68% of those adults now have two doses. as well as the other precautionary measures we are taking around the borders with the red, amber and around the borders with the red, amberand green around the borders with the red, amber and green lists and the clear guidance that it is expected and recommended that people take both personal and corporate responsibility to wear masks in
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crowded indoor spaces. responsibility to wear masks in crowded indoorspaces. i responsibility to wear masks in crowded indoor spaces. i have seen tfl, transport for london and others, supermarkets, very clearly and take that corporate responsibility and use that guidance really well. it is a cautious move to bringing back normality to our lives by getting businesses back on their feet. lives by getting businesses back on theirfeet. and of course lives by getting businesses back on their feet. and of course as lives by getting businesses back on theirfeet. and of course as i have experienced in my own constituency, i visited a small coffee shop owner who has had staff commit suicide because of the anguish and strain of the lockdown. there are mental health issues associated with the severity of the lockdown we have all had to endure and i think it is the right to do. as chris whitty has said, there is no perfect time. schools are run holidays and brings
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down the infection number and a high level of vaccination, 88% of all adults with one dose. we think it is the right time to cautiously proceed but continue to be careful. this is the most infectious respiratory disease that is aerosol transmitted that man has experienced and it is only right to do the right thing on this. it only right to do the right thing on this. , , ., ., this. it is right you are urging caution. does _ this. it is right you are urging caution. does it _ this. it is right you are urging caution. does it feel- this. it is right you are urging caution. does it feel like - caution. does it feel like irreversible relaxations to you? that is what the prime minister called it a three weeks ago. infer? called it a three weeks ago. very much in the _ called it a three weeks ago. very much in the sense _ called it a three weeks ago. very much in the sense that _ called it a three weeks ago. very much in the sense that as - called it a three weeks ago. - much in the sense that as we continue to vaccinate. by the middle of september, now we have met our target of offering the vaccine to all adults, target of offering the vaccine to alladults, by target of offering the vaccine to all adults, by the middle of september all adults over 18 who had the vaccine first dose now will have had their second days as well and we
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are being washes in terms of self isolation. —— being cautious. the nhs has saved over 8000 lives, 600,000 people isolating at the back—end of last year alone. it is right to be careful that it is also right to be careful that it is also right to be careful that it is also right to get the country back together, opening up and is close to normality as possible because there are other ailments that the health care system has to deal with. the mental anguish of lockdown has taken its toll on the nation. find mental anguish of lockdown has taken its toll on the nation. andn mental anguish of lockdown has taken its toll on the nation.— its toll on the nation. and i ask about the _ its toll on the nation. and i ask about the uncertainty - its toll on the nation. and i ask about the uncertainty reflected j its toll on the nation. and i ask i about the uncertainty reflected by some of our viewers getting in contact? —— can i ask? some of our viewers getting in contact? -- can i ask?- some of our viewers getting in contact? -- can i ask? let's take liverpool— contact? -- can i ask? let's take liverpool as _ contact? -- can i ask? let's take liverpool as an _ contact? -- can i ask? let's take liverpool as an example - contact? -- can i ask? let's take liverpool as an example where l contact? -- can i ask? let's take l liverpool as an example where the delta variant is spreading quickly. does it mean from today in
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liverpool, could a large group of friends in different households meet in a restaurant, could they go together in a nightclub? do you understand why people looking at the government guidance, why they are unsure about what they can cannot do today? absolutely. guidance covers the whole of england. i think it is the whole of england. i think it is the right thing to do, to have that clarity. part of getting lives back to normality is asking both companies, corporate institutions like transport for london and other transport systems around the country and personal responsibility to be taken because i think that is the right thing to do. to taken because i think that is the right thing to do.— right thing to do. to think carefully _ right thing to do. to think carefully would _ right thing to do. to think carefully would be - right thing to do. to think carefully would be my - right thing to do. to think- carefully would be my advice. you make your own decision? you carefully would be my advice. you make your own decision? you look at what supermarkets _ make your own decision? you look at what supermarkets have _ make your own decision? you look at what supermarkets have done, - make your own decision? you look at what supermarkets have done, what| what supermarkets have done, what transport for london has done and other parts of the transport system,
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the metra mayors are doing, they are being sensible and saying in crowded indoor spaces you should wear a mask. that is what we will do on transport systems, where a mask. this is a highly infectious respiratory disease. we all had to work together. the largest mobilisation in peacetime history, 88% level adults already. we will not stop there. we want to get to 90% stop you had mentioned the vaccine. 9096 stop you had mentioned the vaccine. , ., ., , , , ., 9096 stop you had mentioned the vaccine. , ., , ., vaccine. understandably you are roud of vaccine. understandably you are proud of the _ vaccine. understandably you are proud of the vaccine _ vaccine. understandably you are proud of the vaccine roll-out - vaccine. understandably you are l proud of the vaccine roll-out stop vaccine. understandably you are i proud of the vaccine roll-out stop i proud of the vaccine roll—out stop i want to about practicalities. what about face coverings and facemasks estimate some shops are asking people to still wear them. the british retail consortium has talked about violence towards shop staff.
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how can staff safely ask people to wear face coverings when recommendations from the government say it is down to you the choice you make and down to the businesses to make and down to the businesses to make the decisions. can you see why there is uncertainty and a lack of clarity on the issue which could cause problems from today? to your viewer and the _ cause problems from today? to your viewer and the question _ cause problems from today? to your viewer and the question that - cause problems from today? to your viewer and the question that has - viewer and the question that has been sent in, no one working in any environment should face any abuse or dare i say violence. that is completely unacceptable. it is right people take corporate responsibility and think for themselves about their own business and how they think they need to protect the staff and of course the customers. i think many supermarkets are doing that. the example i gave of the transport system and the metro mayors as well, i think it is right we move from
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government by diktat, because we are wanting to get our lives back to normality and get people to take personal responsibility, yes, but also corporate responsibility. if you go into a shop and the shop owner says he wants you to wear a mask, you should respect that. if you go on public transport and the system is you to wear a mask, you should wear a mask. you do not know if someone on a crowded carriage next year maybe immuno suppressed or immunocompromised. it is right to be responsible and do that. b, lat immunocompromised. it is right to be responsible and do that.— responsible and do that. a lot of --eole responsible and do that. a lot of people say _ responsible and do that. a lot of people say it _ responsible and do that. a lot of people say it does _ responsible and do that. a lot of people say it does not _ responsible and do that. a lot of people say it does not feel- responsible and do that. a lot of people say it does not feel like l people say it does not feel like freedom day, it feels like returning to be a hermit day. there is lots to talk about. more broadly, there are people who are concerned about what will happen in the next few weeks.
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significant scientists are making predictions about where we might be in terms of cases and what might the pressure he on the nhs in the weeks to come. what will happen if we are in that situation? are you saying there could be further locked and if there could be further locked and if the numbers go the wrong way? you remember the numbers go the wrong way? 9571. remember when the numbers go the wrong way? 9571. rememberwhen i took the numbers go the wrong way? 9571. remember when i took thisjob on a remember when i took this job on a november of last year, 99% of mortalities, we were seeing very high numbers injanuary because infection rates and then hospitalisation and death were very closely linked. 99% of mortality came from the first phase anyone over the age of 50. over 90% in each and every one of those categories have been double vaccinated. we have severely weakened the link between infections ending up in hospital and then because we focused on the most
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vulnerable. we will do that again in early september. you vulnerable. we will do that again in early september.— vulnerable. we will do that again in early september. you are confident restrictions will _ early september. you are confident restrictions will not _ early september. you are confident restrictions will not return? - early september. you are confident restrictions will not return? i - early september. you are confident restrictions will not return? i do - restrictions will not return? i do not want to _ restrictions will not return? i do not want to see _ restrictions will not return? i gr not want to see restrictions returning. that is why i am planning for this to campaigning early september. we had to some point transition the virus from pandemic to endemic status. this is what taking the personal responsibility, working together, making sure we protect ourselves through the vaccination programme. i do protect ourselves through the vaccination programme. i do not want to run out of— vaccination programme. i do not want to run out of time, _ vaccination programme. i do not want to run out of time, i _ vaccination programme. i do not want to run out of time, ijust _ vaccination programme. i do not want to run out of time, i just want - to run out of time, ijust want clarity. you'd think the nhs can cope with the projection of 200,000 cases? cope with the pro'ection of 200,000 cases? , ,., cope with the pro'ection of 200,000 cases? , i. . cope with the pro'ection of 200,000 cases? , . ., ., cases? sorry, you cut out. ifi am still online. — cases? sorry, you cut out. ifi am still online, there _ cases? sorry, you cut out. ifi am still online, there will _ cases? sorry, you cut out. ifi am still online, there will be - cases? sorry, you cut out. ifi am still online, there will be a - cases? sorry, you cut out. ifi am still online, there will be a spike l still online, there will be a spike in infection rates because of the step four opening but a link with
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serious infection and hospitalisation and death has been severely weakened. that is the right thing to do now. there is no perfect time to do this. in summer, when the schools are out, is a good time. having schools out at the moment will have downward pressure on the rated infection. we have to remain vigilant. i think we are doing the right thing to get as close to normal as possible as quickly as possible. normal as possible as quickly as ossible. ~ ., ., ., possible. where are we at two with the potential— possible. where are we at two with the potential vaccination _ possible. where are we at two with the potential vaccination being - the potential vaccination being given to those under 18 and schoolchildren?— given to those under 18 and schoolchildren? ., , ., schoolchildren? really important . uestion. schoolchildren? really important question. have _ schoolchildren? really important question. have now— schoolchildren? really important question. have now had - schoolchildren? really important question. have now had advice i schoolchildren? really important. question. have now had advice from thejc vi. we will have a covid meeting and i will make a statement to parliament. they looked at
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vulnerable children and they will recommend vulnerable children should be protected, children living with vulnerable adults should also be protected and 17—year—olds, who are close to their 18th birthday should also be protected. we are keeping under review healthy children. we have some good data from america on first days in healthy children that they are keeping it under review. there is a rare signal of myocarditis emerging. at the moment the strongest advice is to protect the strongest advice is to protect the most vulnerable children in society. the most vulnerable children in socie . ., �* .«r ., , ., society. you're making a statement later? i will— society. you're making a statement later? i will make _ society. you're making a statement later? i will make a _ society. you're making a statement later? i will make a statement - society. you're making a statement later? i will make a statement in i later? i will make a statement in parliament _ later? i will make a statement in parliament later _ later? i will make a statement in parliament later today. - later? i will make a statement in parliament later today. you - later? i will make a statement in parliament later today. you on i later? i will make a statement in l parliament later today. you on self isolation for _ parliament later today. you on self isolation for the _ parliament later today. you on self isolation for the prime _ parliament later today. you on self isolation for the prime minister - parliament later today. you on self| isolation for the prime minister and rishi sunak. lots of people getting into contact with us. do you think
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it looked disingenuous of the prime minister to say, you looked briefly at the idea of them taking the pilot scheme. in under three hours there was a complete u—turn. i will scheme. in under three hours there was a complete u-turn._ was a complete u-turn. i will tell ou, let was a complete u-turn. i will tell you. let me _ was a complete u-turn. i will tell you. let me try — was a complete u-turn. i will tell you. let me try to _ was a complete u-turn. i will tell you, let me try to share - was a complete u-turn. i will tell you, let me try to share with - was a complete u-turn. i will tell you, let me try to share with you | was a complete u-turn. i will tell. you, let me try to share with you a bit of the background stop the pilot to instead self isolating to take a daily test, a lateral flow test has been running since december in the cabinet office. a number of organisations has subscribed to it. that was considered. the prime minister rightly weighing up that many businesses commit many hundreds of thousands of people are self isolating because they had been in contact with someone who had tested positive, as he had because of the health secretary and the chancellor. health secretary and the chancellor. he took the right decision that the
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right message to send to the country is he should self—isolate and followed the rules. more importantly is what we have been spending our time talking about, getting step four carefully and cautiously moving forward, working with business to make sure they get their businesses back operating profitably and of course supported by the government and people cautiously getting their lives back to normality. irate and people cautiously getting their lives back to normality.— and people cautiously getting their lives back to normality. we are out of time. there _ lives back to normality. we are out of time. there is _ lives back to normality. we are out of time. there is lots _ lives back to normality. we are out of time. there is lots to _ lives back to normality. we are out of time. there is lots to talk - of time. there is lots to talk about. we will leave you to get on. thank you for talking to us. now the sport with sally. morning. did lewis hamilton cross a line yesterday? a controversial win in the british grand prix. still a winner. lewis hamilton fought back from a ten—second penalty to win the british grand prix in front of 140,000 fans at silverstone.
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it was a controversial win though. this was a collision with championship rival max verstappen on the opening lap, which ended verstappen's race. hamilton was punished for his part but came back to take the lead with just a couple of laps remaining. it's hamilton's 8th win in the british grand prix and cuts verstappen's championship lead to eight points. after that crash, max verstappen was treated in hosptial for precautionary checks where he tweeted... "..watching the celebrations while still in hospital is disrespectful and unsportsmanlike behaviour. " here is what hamilton said after the race. i could see he was not going to concede. so, anyway, he cut across me and we collided. i was quite frustrated because we have to give space for one another. but anyway, so then i knew i had the penalty and i was just like, you know what? i'm going to give it absolutely everything for the team and for the fans here and we'll
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see where we get and just never gave up. britain's mark cavendish came agonisingly close to breaking the all—time record for tour de france stage wins but fell just short on the races final stage in paris. cavendish, in the green, eventually finished 3rd. slovenia's tadej pogacar was crowned the overall winner for the second year running. we will be talking to him just after half past eight. the american collin morikawa is this year's open champion after a flawless final round at royal st george's. morikawa, who isjust 24, was making his debut at the championship but held off the nerves to win by two strokes. he lifts the famous claretjug, to go with his victory in the us pga which he won last year on his debut there. i just love playing golf. this is what we love to do. we embrace these moments — we really get energy from this. i get energy. i'm excited about being in contention. the fans out here made me excited about playing golf. itjust pushes you to
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be your best self. i went out there and tried to play my best. thankfully, it was enough for today. england have levelled their men's t20 series with pakistan with victory at headingley. there were some huge shots from england's batsmen, including this giant 6 from liam livingstone — to help them post 200 in their 20 overs. pakistan couldn't get close enough, falling 45 runs short. the series decider is at old trafford tomorrow. the american tennis star coco gauff has pulled out of the olympics after testing positive for coronavirus. her announcement came after six athletes and two staff members from the british athletics team were put into isolation after someone on their flight to tokyo tested positive. various members of south africas team have also tested positive. the games officially start on friday. you can imagine for all the teams out there now, it is time to be
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supersuper out there now, it is time to be super super cautious and careful, isn't it? thank you very much. you have mark cavendish on the way. looking forward to that. what a weekend it was. it looks lovely this morning. let's have a look at the scene in central london where it looks like it will be another warm day. i am not the expert. that was excellent. it is hot already. chances are where you are it was also a warm or hot start to the day. the exception is the very far north of scotland where there is more cloud around and temperatures have fallen as low as 6 degrees overnight. the forecast for today is a hot and sunny one. worth mentioning if you have an allergy, particularly to grass pollen levels are high more or less across the
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board, except in the north of scotland where they are moderate stop high pressure will be with us through much of the week. looks like it could change as we head into next weekend as low pressure comes our way bringing rain. that could change in the next few days. today we have ploughed in the north and patchy fog in northern ireland dissipating. —— we have cloud. it will be hot, up to 30 degrees. in the north it will be cooler. head towards the coast if you can because sea breezes could develop. this evening and overnight, any showers that are left will tend to fade with dry weather and clear skies. loud returning in northern areas and we will see miss. —— ploughed returning. tomorrow we
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start with low cloud and misty patches which will break up and lift. it could linger in the far north—east of scotland. we could see heavy showers develop, some of them thundery. most of us will stay dry. temperatures 14 to 28, 29, even 30. into wednesday better the change. not only will the north start with cloud, there will be some in the east as well. it will break to allow sunny spells to develop. once again, the risk of a heavy shower. it will be barely isolated and thundery. temperatures up to 28 degrees. there could be rain in the south—west and returning temperatures to where they
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should be at this stage injuly. it does look like a really gorgeous morning. that is the picture for many of us across the uk. nice day for a wedding. is there something i don't know about? from today, couples in england will be able to say 'i do' in front of more guests, as restrictions on the number of people attending weddings ease. fiona lamdin is with one bride and herfive bridesmaids, as they get ready for her big day. good morning. good morning. what a day to get married. this bridal party had been here since six o'clock. let me show you the breakfast they had been having. this sums up the covid times. a second alongside hand gel. this is who then will be marrying stop good morning.
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seco in hand. you have had it done beautifully. —— prosecco. the seco in hand. you have had it done beautifully. -- prosecco.— beautifully. -- prosecco. the lead u . beautifully. -- prosecco. the lead u- has beautifully. -- prosecco. the lead up has been _ beautifully. -- prosecco. the lead up has been really _ beautifully. -- prosecco. the lead up has been really stressful - beautifully. -- prosecco. the lead up has been really stressful with l up has been really stressful with covid _ up has been really stressful with covid and — up has been really stressful with covid and everything. we postponed last year. _ covid and everything. we postponed last year, we were planning injuly last year, we were planning injuly last year— last year, we were planning injuly last year but thought we would be smart _ last year but thought we would be smart and — last year but thought we would be smart and do it later, thinking it would _ smart and do it later, thinking it would be — smart and do it later, thinking it would be over and done with. here we are on— would be over and done with. here we are on freedom day. it has been amazing — are on freedom day. it has been amazing stop and guidance on everything changing, we never knew to last _ everything changing, we never knew to last week. you everything changing, we never knew to last week-— to last week. you will be able to dance. to last week. you will be able to dance- 0ur _ to last week. you will be able to dance. our guests _ to last week. you will be able to dance. our guests will _ to last week. you will be able to dance. our guests will be - to last week. you will be able to dance. our guests will be able l to last week. you will be able to | dance. our guests will be able to minule dance. our guests will be able to mingle with _ dance. our guests will be able to mingle with drinks _ dance. our guests will be able to
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mingle with drinks in _ dance. our guests will be able to mingle with drinks in hand. - dance. our guests will be able to mingle with drinks in hand. i- dance. our guests will be able to | mingle with drinks in hand. i have family— mingle with drinks in hand. i have family who — mingle with drinks in hand. i have family who have not seen each other for years. _ family who have not seen each other for years. a — family who have not seen each other for years, a year family who have not seen each other foryears, a yearand family who have not seen each other for years, a year and a half now. it will be _ for years, a year and a half now. it will be amazing with all the family coming _ will be amazing with all the family coming together.— will be amazing with all the family coming together. what are you most lookin: coming together. what are you most looking forward _ coming together. what are you most looking forward to? _ coming together. what are you most looking forward to? celebrating - coming together. what are you most looking forward to? celebrating with | looking forward to? celebrating with friends and family. _ looking forward to? celebrating with friends and family. i _ looking forward to? celebrating with friends and family. i know— looking forward to? celebrating with friends and family. i know it - looking forward to? celebrating with friends and family. i know it is - looking forward to? celebrating with friends and family. i know it is all i friends and family. i know it is all about— friends and family. i know it is all about the — friends and family. i know it is all about the wedding ceremony for me it is about— about the wedding ceremony for me it is about sharing it family and friends _ is about sharing it family and friends. , ., ., ., friends. let me share it with one of our friends. let me share it with one of your friends. _ friends. let me share it with one of your friends, katie. _ friends. let me share it with one of your friends, katie. they _ friends. let me share it with one of your friends, katie. they are - friends. let me share it with one of your friends, katie. they are both | yourfriends, katie. they are both midwives and both work together. coming over to you mckay t, tell us your story. you did not think he would get here today.— your story. you did not think he would get here today. what has happened? _ would get here today. what has happened? i— would get here today. what has happened? i have _ would get here today. what has happened? i have had - would get here today. what has happened? i have had the - would get here today. what has i happened? i have had the hardest would get here today. what has - happened? i have had the hardest two weeks _ happened? i have had the hardest two weeks one _ happened? i have had the hardest two weeks. one friend said her daughter had coded — weeks. one friend said her daughter had coded. i had to isolate her in my bedroom. —— had covid. every day
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i my bedroom. —— had covid. every day l was _ my bedroom. —— had covid. every day l was waiting — my bedroom. —— had covid. every day i was waiting for the lateral flow to come — i was waiting for the lateral flow to come back positive but we managed to come back positive but we managed to scrape _ to come back positive but we managed to scrape through and none of us caught— to scrape through and none of us caught it — to scrape through and none of us cauaht it. ., ., .., to scrape through and none of us cau ht it, ., ., .., ., to scrape through and none of us cauaht it. ., ., ., ., caught it. you all came out of isolation _ caught it. you all came out of isolation on... _ caught it. you all came out of isolation on... literally - caught it. you all came out of| isolation on... literally friday. tell us about _ isolation on... literally friday. tell us about the _ isolation on... literally friday. tell us about the hen - isolation on... literally friday. tell us about the hen do. - isolation on... literally friday. | tell us about the hen do. there isolation on... literally friday. - tell us about the hen do. there was no dancing then but there will be dancing tonight. brute no dancing then but there will be dancing tonight.— no dancing then but there will be dancing tonight. we were told off a little bit for — dancing tonight. we were told off a little bit for dancing _ dancing tonight. we were told off a little bit for dancing at _ dancing tonight. we were told off a little bit for dancing at the - dancing tonight. we were told off a little bit for dancing at the table . little bit for dancing at the table but today we can let our hair down and have _ but today we can let our hair down and have fun really. it is but today we can let our hair down and have fun really.— and have fun really. it is freedom da . and have fun really. it is freedom day- there _ and have fun really. it is freedom day- there are — and have fun really. it is freedom day. there are no _ and have fun really. it is freedom day. there are no restrictions - and have fun really. it is freedom day. there are no restrictions on | day. there are no restrictions on anything. covid is still affecting wedding guests. some gas cannot handle, can they?— wedding guests. some gas cannot handle, can they? people have texted us in the week— handle, can they? people have texted us in the week cancelling. _ handle, can they? people have texted us in the week cancelling. having - handle, can they? people have texted us in the week cancelling. having to i us in the week cancelling. having to isolate _ us in the week cancelling. having to isolate or— us in the week cancelling. having to
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isolate or testing positive. my daughter was not allowed to go out with friends on friday. she could not go _ with friends on friday. she could not go to— with friends on friday. she could not go to the beach and she was not happy— not go to the beach and she was not happy about it that it was one of those _ happy about it that it was one of those things. i said, please don't io those things. i said, please don't go out _ those things. i said, please don't go out if— those things. i said, please don't go out. if one of your friends test positive, — go out. if one of your friends test positive, he — go out. if one of your friends test positive, he will not be able to go to the _ positive, he will not be able to go to the wedding and nor will be. sean is good _ to the wedding and nor will be. sean is good and — to the wedding and nor will be. sean is good and we are going to get married — is good and we are going to get married that is what we are waiting for. ~ , married that is what we are waiting for. . , , ., for. we will be here 'ust after nine o'clock for. we will be here 'ust after nine cum and _ for. we will be here 'ust after nine o'clock and we _ for. we will be here 'ust after nine o'clock and we will _ for. we will be here just after nine o'clock and we will see _ for. we will be here just after nine o'clock and we will see these - for. we will be here just after nine l o'clock and we will see these lovely flowers being your hair. just before we go, let's come and see the two of you together, so we can imagine... this is sean, meet sean. finally after one year of waiting and not knowing what is going on, today you will finally be marrying this man will finally be marrying this man will stop brilliant.
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i absolutely love the cardboard cutout of sean. a lovely day for it as well. thank you for all your correspondence coming in today as well. lots of varied opinions regarding what is happening today. bobby says, i have not been able to go ballroom dancing since march last year. it is great exercise and very sociable. we are delighted we can now resume. another says, i am self isolating and have been in contact with someone with covid. i feel we are heading into hunger games territory. are heading into hunger games territo . �* ., , territory. another says she will wear a mask — territory. another says she will wear a mask while _ territory. another says she will wear a mask while shopping i territory. another says she will| wear a mask while shopping but territory. another says she will - wear a mask while shopping but not at work _ wear a mask while shopping but not at work in — wear a mask while shopping but not at work. in this heat i will choose not to _ at work. in this heat i will choose not to back — at work. in this heat i will choose not to back come winter and cold season _ not to back come winter and cold season i— not to back come winter and cold season i will properly wear one again — season i will properly wear one again we _ season i will properly wear one again. we had to trust the vaccine to keep _ again. we had to trust the vaccine to keep it— again. we had to trust the vaccine to keep it at bay. you can e—mail us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk,
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or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories stay with us. headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today — cheering. back in business as legal restrictions on masks and social contact are lifted in england. but the prime minister urges caution as scientists warn cases could surge to 200,000 a day. the legal requirement to wear a mask
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on public transport is gone, but the recommendation and expectation is still there. most people coming off trains at manchester piccadilly this morning are still wearing one. this airport is only at 10% capacity, i look at why. good morning. from heartbreak and injury to a record—equalling win — we'll speak to mark cavendish fresh from the tour de france. it is already very warm in london, after a warm start hot and sunny, butjust after a warm start hot and sunny, but just the chance after a warm start hot and sunny, butjust the chance we could catch a heavy thundery showers in the afternoon. but most of us will miss them. all the details coming up. good morning. it's monday, july 19th. our top story. 16 months after they were first introduced, most legal restrictions on social contact have been
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lifted in england. groups of any size can now meet inside and outdoors, guidance to work from home has been scrapped and face coverings are no longer required bylaw — although people will still be encouraged to wear them in shops and on public transport. borisjohnson urged the public to be cautious, insisting that the delta covid variant remained extremely contagious. a warning, ourfirst report from luxmy gopal contains flashing images. the moment they've been waiting for for over a year. cheering. the final stage of unlocking in england, with social distancing rules dropped. 1,000 people packed into this club in central london, with many more lining up outside. they've waited 16 months. what's a little longer?
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there's so many people there, and we're just so pumped to get in there. it's been a year and a half, now we are ready all to dance. i've had my vaccines. i want to have a good time, hon. so excited. so excited! i can't wait for it. it'sjust, like, a relief after such a long time just to have freedom. nightclubs are one of the few businesses that have had to stay closed throughout the whole pandemic, among the last to reopen. loud music plays. and this is what many have waited so long for, and what the nightlife industry has so desperately needed. some feel the sector has been sidelined. the last year has been hell on earth. i mean, it's been very, very difficult. if you look at what happened last week with the football compared with what is happening tonight, and you think, why were we treated differently? all we are doing is taking the screens out, putting them into storage. it's more sedate, but
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no less celebratory, at this pub in west london, where they are preparing for an end to table service only and mandatory masks. i can't wait to enjoy doing ourjob, ratherthan sort of having to basically be a policeman the whole time, and lecturing people on what they can and can't do, where they can and can't go, the masks they wear, what they touch, where they sanitise, where they track and trace. it's going to be strange for us to adapt again, and the notion of people coming into the pub, being able to go to the table themselves without being directed. as of midnight in england, nearly all legal restrictions on social contact have been removed. face coverings are no longer required by law, but are still recommended in crowded, enclosed spaces. meanwhile, scotland has moved to what's known as level zero. limits on social gatherings remain, with face coverings still mandatory in shops and on public transport. in northern ireland, the latest phase of unlocking is expected next week, while in wales, most covid rules are to be scrapped from the 7th of august, though face coverings will still be required in many indoor public places.
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there is concern about restrictions easing at a time when covid cases in the uk are rising. we're at the point where 10% to just over of intensive care beds in england are occupied by people who have got covid. so there has been a significant increase in pressure on intensive care services over the last few weeks. with experts warning that cases could surge further, and with a third of adults not yet fully vaccinated, the worry is, at what price this new freedom? luxmy gopal, bbc news. luxmy is at a supermarket in london for us this morning. luxmy, how are they adapting to the changes? the perspex streams we have become used to seeing over the past year or so, these are going to stay in place to protect customers and staff here
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at the iceland store in fulham. but what is gone is the signage, the signage around requiring customers to wearface coverings signage around requiring customers to wear face coverings and to social distance, because of course those are no longer mandatory. however, iceland, like most other supermarkets in england is encouraging customers to continue wearing masks and face coverings, and let's see if we can speak to one of the customers here now. you are wearing a mask today even though it is no longer required, why have you decided to do that?— decided to do that? infection rates on the rise. _ decided to do that? infection rates on the rise. l— decided to do that? infection rates on the rise, i feel— decided to do that? infection rates on the rise, i feel much _ decided to do that? infection rates on the rise, i feel much safer- decided to do that? infection rates on the rise, i feel much safer in i decided to do that? infection rates on the rise, i feel much safer in an enclosed area wearing a mask, and thatis enclosed area wearing a mask, and that is purely and simply it.- that is purely and simply it. thank ou ve that is purely and simply it. thank you very much. — that is purely and simply it. thank you very much. we _ that is purely and simply it. thank you very much, we will _ that is purely and simply it. thank you very much, we will let - that is purely and simply it. thank you very much, we will let you i that is purely and simply it. thank. you very much, we will let you carry on with your shopping. that is a reason for wearing masks, and a few other customers have had the same reason to continue wearing it. however, i would say is about 50—50 from the customers i have seen today in terms of those choosing to
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continue wearing face coverings and not. but the supermarket, like many others, as saying they will not bar customers from coming in if they are not wearing a mask, but what they will do isjust not wearing a mask, but what they will do is just encourage customers to do so. thank you very much, luxmy. england may be unlocking but three senior members of the cabinet, including the prime minister, are self—isolating. let's get the latest on that from our political correspondent, jonathan blake, who is in downing street for us this morning. we spoke to the vaccines minister nadhim zahawi. yes, there is no sense of a return to normal, no sense of a return to normal, no sense of a return to normal, no sense of putting the pandemic behind us, the government is urging people to be cautious this morning. nevertheless, this is a very significant day in the road map out of lockdown in england, when, as you have been hearing, or legal restrictions we have been living with in our daily lives for so long now will be lifted and replaced with guidance. so the government is
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hoping that people will be cautious and that people will exercise their own judgment. and that people will exercise their ownjudgment. there has been a question about whether this is the right thing to do this, given the number of cases of coronavirus are rising, but vaccines minister nadhim zahawi speaking on breakfast this morning has said that yes, cases will continue to rise, but when it comes to lifting restrictions, if not now, when?— comes to lifting restrictions, if not now, when? , ., , , ~ not now, when? there will be a spike in infection rates _ not now, when? there will be a spike in infection rates because _ not now, when? there will be a spike in infection rates because of - not now, when? there will be a spike in infection rates because of the i in infection rates because of the steps for opening, but that a link with serious infection and hospitalisation and death has been severely weakened. and i think that is the right thing to do now, as chris whitty has said, there is no perfect time to do this, but in the summer when schools are out is a good time because having schools out at the moment will have a downward pressure on the aaah number. —— r
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number. pressure on the aaah number. -- r number. ., , . number. the government has received advice from the _ number. the government has received advice from the jcvi _ number. the government has received advice from the jcvi that _ number. the government has received advice from the jcvi that children i advice from thejcvi that children are deemed to be vulnerable to coronavirus should be vaccinated, and also children living with vulnerable adults should be vaccinated. we will have a statement on that later. the government has also announced nhs staff who are contacted by test and trace having come into contact with somebody tested positive for a covid will be allowed to continue working if they get a negative test, relieving some of the pressure on the nhs at the moment. labour has highlighted this morning that the government might have to go back on its word that the process is cautious but irreversible.— process is cautious but irreversible. �* ., , . , ., , irreversible. all of these decisions have to be — irreversible. all of these decisions have to be kept —
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irreversible. all of these decisions have to be kept under _ irreversible. all of these decisions have to be kept under review- have to be kept under review constantly by ministers. boris johnson and sajid javid said this would be irreversible, i think that is a foolish and irresponsible thing to have promised, i think we could well see restrictions are imposed. this is undoubtedly a significant day in the government has met response to coronavirus, but there are uncertain times ahead, feels like a precarious moment in our path through the pandemic. jonathan, thank you for that. the time is 8.10. a lot happening, lots of big interviews for you this morning, thank you for sending in your comments about how you're feeling this morning. we will hopefully get through some of your career is at least with professor linda bauld, who will be here later on. so many things to talk about about the impact of what these changes might mean for everyone as well. and also, we have mark cavendish coming your way in about 20 minutes, amazing performance of the tour de france,
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he is now level with the highest number of statements, it will be talking to cell in about 20 minutes, probably a bit exhausted after the tour de france came to an end yesterday. now, we all know a cat has nine lives, but what about a dog? well, if they do, ollie the springer spaniel seen here, has used up at least one of his, that's because he disappeared after going for a dip in the sea off porthcrawl this weekend. forget the dog, we are going to go to carol now. it was sunny and hot for many of us over the weekend, good morning everybody. worth mentioning if you have an allergy to grass pollen, the levels today are high, across much of the uk, but moderate across the far north of scotland. yesterday was the hottest day of this year so far.
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temperatures soared to 31.6 celsius at heathrow, and as a result of a nightly temperatures did not follow way too much. for many of us, we are starting the day to day in the mid teens to the low 20s. the exception to that is across the far north of scotland where there is a bit more class. so the forecast for today is hot and also sunny. as ever, one or two exceptions, and that is across the far north of scotland, and also later in the day across parts of the south, will mightjust see the odd shower. if you catch one, it could be heavy or even thundery, but most of us will miss them all together, and have a dry and sunny day despite how you are starting perhaps a bit more cloud in the north and west. we have some patchy fog in northern ireland this morning. all of that will be lifted. temperatures range from about 13 in the far north to 28 or even 30 celsius in the south—east. eventually through this evening, any residual showers will fade, a lot of dry weather around,
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some clear skies, and again we will see some cloud coming in across the north and also the west. maybe a little bit of nastiness as well. but another uncomfortable night for sleeping, temperatures easily staying in double figures for most of the uk. so tomorrow, we start off on the one once again, with a fair bit of sunshine. where we have cloud and mist, that whole thin and break, then we see sunny spells develop. but rather like today, once again the chance we might see the odd shower, which could be heavy, and could also be thundery. but most of us will miss them. tomorrow more likely in the south—east quarter in the uk. temperatures again ranging from 14 to about 28 or 30 celsius. not until we get to the end of this week into the weekend that we think of the weather may break down from the south—west, as low pressure comes on, but that could easily change. a lot to play for. thank you very much, carol. see you later.
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from today, face masks will no longer be legally required in public spaces in england, but they are still being recommended on public transport and in shops. jayne mccubbin is at manchester piccadilly station gauging reaction for us. what are people choosing to do there? most people this morning, as we see them stream off the trains behind me, most people are still masked up. let mejust make a behind me, most people are still masked up. let me just make a few observations this morning. have a look down here, and you will see that the signage still says, wear a face covering. we have been well and won all day, but we have come up you wish public so you can see what we are talking about. the signage on the floor still says social distance. but my goodness, what a lot of mixed messages there are four people. because even though the government is saying you legally can take this off now, the operators are saying different things. the
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recommendations are saying different things. this is a divisive subject, it has really divided people. have a look at this. we it has really divided people. have a look at this-— look at this. we learn a lot from observing _ look at this. we learn a lot from observing how _ look at this. we learn a lot from observing how these _ look at this. we learn a lot from observing how these characters| look at this. we learn a lot from i observing how these characters build their social groups. just through touch. they are building bombs, they are building relationships through touch. it’s are building relationships through touch. �*, ,, ., it are building relationships through touch-_ it is- touch. it's essential. it is fundamental. _ touch. it's essential. it is fundamental. it- touch. it's essential. it is fundamental. it is- touch. it's essential. it is fundamental. it is the i touch. it's essential. it is. fundamental. it is the glue touch. it's essential. it is- fundamental. it is the glue that holds these social groups together, not just holds these social groups together, notjust primates, all mammals. evolution has shaped us to needy people, proximity, touch. if evolution has shaped us to needy people, proximity, touch.- people, proximity, touch. if you have been _ people, proximity, touch. if you have been groomed _ people, proximity, touch. if you have been groomed by - people, proximity, touch. if you have been groomed by some i people, proximity, touch. if you have been groomed by some of| people, proximity, touch. if you i have been groomed by some of it, so you are more likely to be kind to them back, so sharing food etc, these characters have worked it out and we are carrying on the good message. and we are carrying on the good messaue. �* and we are carrying on the good messaue. ~ ., , [w message. apart from these last 18 months. message. apart from these last 18 months- well. _ message. apart from these last 18 months. well, for _ message. apart from these last 18 months. well, for the _ message. apart from these last 18 months. well, for the first - message. apart from these last 18 months. well, for the first time i message. apart from these last 18 months. well, for the first time in | months. well, for the first time in human evolution, _ months. well, for the first time in human evolution, that _ months. well, for the first time in human evolution, that system i months. well, for the first time in human evolution, that system has been switched off. more? human evolution, that system has been switched off.— been switched off. now the government _ been switched off. now the government in _ been switched off. now the government in england i been switched off. now the| government in england says been switched off. now the i government in england says we been switched off. now the - government in england says we need to switch it back on. we government in england says we need to switch it back on.— to switch it back on. we have transformed _ to switch it back on. we have transformed the _ to switch it back on. we have transformed the society i to switch it back on. we have transformed the society for l to switch it back on. we have i transformed the society for the
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worse — transformed the society for the worse. �* , , , , worse. but the issue is divisive. allow the _ worse. but the issue is divisive. allow the people _ worse. but the issue is divisive. allow the people of _ worse. but the issue is divisive. allow the people of this - worse. but the issue is divisive. allow the people of this country worse. but the issue is divisive. i allow the people of this country to work forwards _ allow the people of this country to work forwards towards _ allow the people of this country to work forwards towards freedom i allow the people of this country to i work forwards towards freedom day which _ work forwards towards freedom day which will— work forwards towards freedom day which will come _ work forwards towards freedom day which will come in _ work forwards towards freedom day which will come in july _ work forwards towards freedom day which will come injuly19. - work forwards towards freedom day which will come injuly19. it- work forwards towards freedom day which will come in july 19. [it fartill- which will come in july 19. it will not feel like _ which will come in july 19. it will not feel like freedom _ which will come in july 19. it will not feel like freedom day i which will come in july 19. it will not feel like freedom day for i which will come in july 19. it will i not feel like freedom day for those who have to isolate, when they have to cancel their holiday. for who have to isolate, when they have to cancel their holiday.— to cancel their holiday. for the 3.8 million extremely _ to cancel their holiday. for the 3.8 million extremely vulnerable i to cancel their holiday. for the 3.8 i million extremely vulnerable people, the prospect of a so—called freedom date next _ the prospect of a so—called freedom date next week is actually anything but. we _ date next week is actually anything but. ~ ., date next week is actually anything but. . ., ., ., ., , but. we have got to have his turning oint, we but. we have got to have his turning point. we have _ but. we have got to have his turning point, we have got _ but. we have got to have his turning point, we have got to _ but. we have got to have his turning point, we have got to recapture i but. we have got to have his turning point, we have got to recapture the | point, we have got to recapture the spirit of freedom. —— a turning point. spirit of freedom. -- a turning oint. , , , ., ., ., , point. many gps warned against movin: point. many gps warned against moving on _ point. many gps warned against moving on without _ point. many gps warned against moving on without mitigation, l point. many gps warned against l moving on without mitigation, but from today, almost all legal restrictions on social contact and masks are over. the crowded lift, are you ready for it? i masks are over. the crowded lift, are you ready for it?— are you ready for it? i think so. can ou are you ready for it? i think so. can you imagine _ are you ready for it? i think so. can you imagine going - are you ready for it? i think so. can you imagine going back- are you ready for it? i think so. can you imagine going back to | are you ready for it? i think so. i can you imagine going back to those days. i can you imagine going back to those da s. h, , can you imagine going back to those da s. , ., ., , days. i can feel lift is going to be weird. days. i can feel lift is going to be weird- she _ days. i can feel lift is going to be weird. she was _ days. i can feel lift is going to be weird. she was that _ days. i can feel lift is going to be weird. she was that i _ days. i can feel lift is going to be weird. she was that i think i days. i can feel lift is going to be weird. she was that i think the i weird. she was that i think the
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lift. a, ,~ weird. she was that i think the lift. ., ., ,| weird. she was that i think the lift-— l preferi weird. she was that i think the i lift._ i prefer and lift. mask on, always. i prefer and other people _ lift. mask on, always. i prefer and other people wear _ lift. mask on, always. i prefer and other people wear a _ lift. mask on, always. i prefer and other people wear a mask. i lift. mask on, always. i prefer and other people wear a mask. maskl lift. mask on, always. i prefer and i other people wear a mask. mask off, to be honest- — other people wear a mask. mask off, to be honest. we _ other people wear a mask. mask off, to be honest. we are _ other people wear a mask. mask off, to be honest. we are going - other people wear a mask. mask off, to be honest. we are going to i other people wear a mask. mask off, to be honest. we are going to have i to be honest. we are going to have this forever, we have to learn to live with it. this forever, we have to learn to live with it— this forever, we have to learn to live with it. , ., ., live with it. some 'ust cannot wait to 'um live with it. some 'ust cannot wait to jump off, — live with it. some 'ust cannot wait tojump off. but_ live with it. some just cannot wait to jump off, but others _ live with it. some just cannot wait to jump off, but others are i to jump off, but others are concerned. these people are all used to the kind of restrictions some here have come to view as tyranny. where i come from in singapore, it is illegal not to wear a mask outdoors. so when i came to manchester and i was told that you did not have to wear a mask outdoors, ifelt did not have to wear a mask outdoors, i felt illegal. did not have to wear a mask outdoors, ifelt illegal. in did not have to wear a mask outdoors, ifelt illegal. in hong konr, outdoors, ifelt illegal. in hong kong. even— outdoors, ifelt illegal. in hong kong, even outside _ outdoors, ifelt illegal. in hong kong, even outside of- outdoors, ifelt illegal. in hong kong, even outside of the i outdoors, i felt illegal. in hong i kong, even outside of the pandemic, people _ kong, even outside of the pandemic, people will— kong, even outside of the pandemic, people will wear masks just as a sort of— people will wear masks just as a sort of courtesy. stop spreading their— sort of courtesy. stop spreading their owns— sort of courtesy. stop spreading their owns events to other people. |
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their owns events to other people. i want their owns events to other people. want to their owns events to other people. i want to review the street that went viral just a want to review the street that went viraljust a couple of days ago. on july 19, viraljust a couple of days ago. on july19, i viraljust a couple of days ago. on july 19, i will not socially distance, i will not wear a mask. you are free to do those things or hide at home if you want, but you have no right to demand that i cower in fear with you, life is for living. what do you think of that? i think there's a difference between taking precautions and in fear. i find it interesting, seeing i will not hide — find it interesting, seeing i will not hide myself inside a room, i wear_ not hide myself inside a room, i wear a _ not hide myself inside a room, i wear a mask everywhere, i still enjoy— wear a mask everywhere, i still enjoy my— wear a mask everywhere, i still enjoy my freedom. i wear a mask everywhere, i still enjoy my freedom.— wear a mask everywhere, i still enjoy my freedom. i think it is 'ust common sense. i enjoy my freedom. i think it is 'ust common sense. but i enjoy my freedom. i think it is 'ust common sense. but here's i enjoy my freedom. i think it is 'ust common sense. but here's an e enjoy my freedom. i think it isjust common sense. but here's an in l enjoy my freedom. i think it isjust| common sense. but here's an in an already divided _ common sense. but here's an in an already divided country, _ common sense. but here's an in an already divided country, the - common sense. but here's an in an already divided country, the mask. already divided country, the mask has become yet another symbol of our division. some hope, wish, pray, for a uniting sum of love. —— summer. the last time these friends were here in this nightclub was just a
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few days before the first lockdown. we are back! it’s few days before the first lockdown. we are back!— few days before the first lockdown. we are back!_ and - few days before the first lockdown. j we are back!_ and from we are back! it's coming. and from monda , we are back! it's coming. and from monday. it — we are back! it's coming. and from monday. it is _ we are back! it's coming. and from monday, it is coming. _ we are back! it's coming. and from monday, it is coming. i— we are back! it's coming. and from monday, it is coming. i know, - we are back! it's coming. and from monday, it is coming. i know, i'm. we are back! it's coming. and from. monday, it is coming. i know, i'm so excited. i need _ monday, it is coming. i know, i'm so excited. i need to _ monday, it is coming. i know, i'm so excited. i need to move _ monday, it is coming. i know, i'm so excited. i need to move on, - monday, it is coming. i know, i'm so excited. i need to move on, i- monday, it is coming. i know, i'm so excited. i need to move on, i need l excited. i need to move on, i need to get— excited. i need to move on, i need to get back— excited. i need to move on, i need to get back out. to excited. i need to move on, i need to get back out-— to get back out. to think we were here last march, _ to get back out. to think we were here last march, and _ to get back out. to think we were here last march, and now- to get back out. to think we were here last march, and now we - to get back out. to think we were | here last march, and now we have stood back on it, i have got goose bumps. stood back on it, i have got goose bum s. ~ , stood back on it, i have got goose bums. ~ , , . , bumps. when these pictures were taken, the — bumps. when these pictures were taken, the vaccine _ bumps. when these pictures were taken, the vaccine was _ bumps. when these pictures were taken, the vaccine was a - bumps. when these pictures were taken, the vaccine was a pipe - bumps. when these pictures were i taken, the vaccine was a pipe dream. today, over two thirds of the adult population have had both jabs, but that means a third have not and infection rates are rising. is there an anxiety? abs, infection rates are rising. is there an anxiety?— an anxiety? a little bit. a little bit. iwill an anxiety? a little bit. a little bit. i will probably _ an anxiety? a little bit. a little bit. i will probably still - an anxiety? a little bit. a little bit. i will probably still be - bit. i will probably still be wearing a mask.— bit. i will probably still be wearinaamask. ., . ., , wearing a mask. you are double 'abbed wearing a mask. you are double jabbed and _ wearing a mask. you are double jabbed and ready _ wearing a mask. you are double jabbed and ready to _ wearing a mask. you are double jabbed and ready to go. - wearing a mask. you are double jabbed and ready to go. well. wearing a mask. you are double| jabbed and ready to go. well and trul , jabbed and ready to go. well and truly. yeah- _ jabbed and ready to go. well and truly. yeah. i _ jabbed and ready to go. well and truly, yeah. i want _ jabbed and ready to go. well and truly, yeah. i want to _ jabbed and ready to go. well and truly, yeah. i want to stay - jabbed and ready to go. well and l truly, yeah. i want to stay negative as long _ truly, yeah. i want to stay negative as long as— truly, yeah. i want to stay negative as long as possible. i�*ve truly, yeah. i want to stay negative as long as possible.— as long as possible. i've had this could be the _ as long as possible. i've had this could be the third _ as long as possible. i've had this could be the third summer- as long as possible. i've had this could be the third summer of. as long as possible. i've had this i
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could be the third summer of love. —— i've heard. the prime minister says england's using of lockdown is cautious but irreversible. this issue is a hot topic, trending on social media last night and this morning, so many of you getting in touch. let me give you an idea of the melee of mixed messages people are waiting up to this morning. nationally, in england the rule has gone. —— are waking up to. not so in scotland, wales and northern ireland, still very much in place. sadiq khan in london has the power, it has used that power, to keep the rules in place on the transport for london network, so you still have to wear a mask there unless you are exempt. regionally, here in manchester, andy burnham has said that he would like to exercise the power, but he doesn't have it. so he has been able to keep masks in place as a requirement of carriage on trams, but he does not have that power over train operators. avanti
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power over train operators. ava nti west power over train operators. avanti west coast staff down here are not willing masks on the concourse, they decided they don't want to. network rail staff have been told they really should, and they are. just so many mixed messages. this is what the passengers told us when we spoke to them on their route this morning. the wife's had a transplant, and her immune system is not good, so i don't want to risk anything. i’m immune system is not good, so i don't want to risk anything. i'm not auoin to don't want to risk anything. i'm not going to wear _ don't want to risk anything. i'm not going to wear a _ don't want to risk anything. i'm not going to wear a mask— don't want to risk anything. i'm not going to wear a mask by _ don't want to risk anything. i'm not going to wear a mask by choice, i going to wear a mask by choice, because — going to wear a mask by choice, because i— going to wear a mask by choice, because i feel like i personally am double _ because i feel like i personally am double vaccinated, i have had covid twice, _ double vaccinated, i have had covid twice, so— double vaccinated, i have had covid twice, so i— double vaccinated, i have had covid twice, so i feel like there's a point — twice, so i feel like there's a point now_ twice, so i feel like there's a point now we have to reach where we do or— point now we have to reach where we do orjust _ point now we have to reach where we do orjust get on. point now we have to reach where we do orjust get on! point now we have to reach where we do orjust get om— do or 'ust get on. i have to wear my mask do orjust get on. i have to wear my mask all the — do orjust get on. i have to wear my mask all the time, _ do orjust get on. i have to wear my mask all the time, obviously - do orjust get on. i have to wear my mask all the time, obviously keep l do orjust get on. i have to wear myj mask all the time, obviously keep it on on body trims, and also at work. legally you don't have to only trains in england from today. well, i've onl trains in england from today. well, i've only had _ trains in england from today. well, i've only had to _ trains in england from today. well, i've only had to be _ trains in england from today. well, i've only had to be one _ trains in england from today. -ii i've only had to be one injection at the moment, so even when i had my second, i'm still going to wear my mask for a while anyway. it’s
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second, i'm still going to wear my mask for a while anyway.— mask for a while anyway. it's so horrible to _ mask for a while anyway. it's so horrible to wear. _ mask for a while anyway. it's so horrible to wear. it _ mask for a while anyway. it's so horrible to wear. it makes - mask for a while anyway. it's so horrible to wear. it makes you | mask for a while anyway. it's so i horrible to wear. it makes you feel sweaty, _ horrible to wear. it makes you feel sweaty, especially in this heat. we work— sweaty, especially in this heat. we work full— sweaty, especially in this heat. we work full days in a restaurant, and we are _ work full days in a restaurant, and we are sweating away with a mask on. i we are sweating away with a mask on. | -et we are sweating away with a mask on. i get why— we are sweating away with a mask on. i get why people wouldn't appreciate you not wearing one, though. i would feel awkward not where and when. i've never liked them, they have always _ i've never liked them, they have always been a bit sticky around the face _ always been a bit sticky around the face. ~ ., always been a bit sticky around the face. . . . always been a bit sticky around the face. ~ . . . ., . face. what about the idea of wearing a mask for other _ face. what about the idea of wearing a mask for other people? _ face. what about the idea of wearing a mask for other people? i _ face. what about the idea of wearing a mask for other people? i would - a mask for other people? i would wear one on _ a mask for other people? i would wear one on public— a mask for other people? i would wear one on public transport - a mask for other people? i would | wear one on public transport still. i've wear one on public transport still. i've got— wear one on public transport still. i've got my— wear one on public transport still. i've got my mask, in my bag and ready— i've got my mask, in my bag and ready to — i've got my mask, in my bag and ready to go _ i've got my mask, in my bag and ready to go-_ i've got my mask, in my bag and read to no. �* . ., , ready to go. and i have to say, this mornin: , ready to go. and i have to say, this morning. most _ ready to go. and i have to say, this morning, most people _ ready to go. and i have to say, this morning, most people streaming i ready to go. and i have to say, this. morning, most people streaming off the trains behind me, most of them are still wearing a mask, then you chat to those that are not, they have not won a mask for quite a long time. let me speak to david sidebottom from transport focus, what do you think about these mixed messages now. iline what do you think about these mixed messages now-— messages now. one of the things we have seen right _ messages now. one of the things we have seen right about _ messages now. one of the things we have seen right about the _ messages now. one of the things we have seen right about the pandemicl have seen right about the pandemic through our research, people want
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very clear concise information. that has helped to build confidence as people come back to using public transport, both in the sense of what they can expect in what is expected of me. i would say to passengers, carry a mask you never know when you need one. we need people back on public transport as quickly as possible. public transport as quickly as ossible. ., ~ public transport as quickly as ossible. . ,, , ., public transport as quickly as ossible. . ,, . ,, . . possible. thank you, i appreciate it. andy burnham _ possible. thank you, i appreciate it. andy burnham and _ possible. thank you, i appreciate | it. andy burnham and manchester possible. thank you, i appreciate - it. andy burnham and manchester said it. andy burnham and manchester said it is a mask of solidarity to keep wearing this on public transport, but really come in most parts of england at least, it is down to exercise whatever you want to do and exercise whatever you want to do and exercise yourjudgment. back to you guys. let's speak to two of our regular guests about how all these changes will affect us. joining me now are professor linda bauld and professor calum semple. let's start with you, professor calum semple, because we have had various productions from scientists, what would you say at this point.
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there is no perfect time to do this, but the _ there is no perfect time to do this, but the timing is not great. we have cases— but the timing is not great. we have cases rising — but the timing is not great. we have cases rising so steeply, it'll take a lot— cases rising so steeply, it'll take a lot of— cases rising so steeply, it'll take a lot of self—control manage this. we know— a lot of self—control manage this. we know that the non—pharmaceutical interventions work, we know that hand _ interventions work, we know that hand hygiene, facemask wearing, social— hand hygiene, facemask wearing, social distancing, they were committed just a case of getting people _ committed just a case of getting people to adhere to it on their own behaviour— people to adhere to it on their own behaviour now, that will be really tricky _ behaviour now, that will be really tric . , ., , behaviour now, that will be really tric . , ., tricky. interesting to people on ublic tricky. interesting to people on public transport, _ tricky. interesting to people on public transport, many - tricky. interesting to people on public transport, many of - tricky. interesting to people on j public transport, many of them choosing to wear masks as well. linda, looking at those figures, we have heard figures bandied around of 200,000 infections, what do you say about that? i 200,000 infections, what do you say about that? ~ ., 200,000 infections, what do you say about that? ~' . . ., about that? i think we have had from the chief medical _ about that? i think we have had from the chief medical officer _ about that? i think we have had from the chief medical officer and - about that? i think we have had from the chief medical officer and others i the chief medical officer and others that we hold the up towards 50,000 a day, and 100,000 a day is certainly almost inevitable that we may get to that number, and that means 1000 to 2000 people being admitted to hospital every day. these are big numbers, and for callinan his clinical colleagues, huge questions about the pressure that will come on
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the nhs. -- about the pressure that will come on the nhs. —— callum and his clinical colleagues. some are welcoming these changes, others aren't readily cautious. ., changes, others aren't readily cautious. t, , ., changes, others aren't readily cautious. . , changes, others aren't readily cautious. t, , changes, others aren't readily cautious. . , . cautious. can you pick up that thou~ht cautious. can you pick up that thought about _ cautious. can you pick up that thought about pressure - cautious. can you pick up that thought about pressure on . cautious. can you pick up that| thought about pressure on the cautious. can you pick up that - thought about pressure on the nhs? that is absolutely the key, isn't it? very difficult to say presumably at what number the pressure is too much, what are your thoughts about that? , ., , ., much, what are your thoughts about that? , ., , ,, ,., that? the problem of pressures of this is unequal, _ that? the problem of pressures of this is unequal, some _ that? the problem of pressures of this is unequal, some places - that? the problem of pressures of this is unequal, some places will l that? the problem of pressures of. this is unequal, some places will be hit this is unequal, some places will be bit harder— this is unequal, some places will be hit harder than most, in some places are already— hit harder than most, in some places are already experiencing pressure in the nhs _ are already experiencing pressure in the nhs care units. the pressure is real, _ the nhs care units. the pressure is real, it _ the nhs care units. the pressure is real, it is _ the nhs care units. the pressure is real, it is interesting who is coming _ real, it is interesting who is coming at _ real, it is interesting who is coming at hospital, though, it is mostly— coming at hospital, though, it is mostly people under the age of 50 who have — mostly people under the age of 50 who have not been vaccinated, or were _ who have not been vaccinated, or were vaccinated so recently that it does _ were vaccinated so recently that it does not _ were vaccinated so recently that it does not have time to work. so the vaccine is making _ does not have time to work. so the vaccine is making a _ does not have time to work. so the vaccine is making a difference, - does not have time to work. so the vaccine is making a difference, so i vaccine is making a difference, so prison a movie that needs pressure on those younger people to go and get the vaccine if they can.- on those younger people to go and get the vaccine if they can. there a aradox get the vaccine if they can. there a paradox here. _ get the vaccine if they can. there a paradox here, we _ get the vaccine if they can. there a paradox here, we are _ get the vaccine if they can. there a paradox here, we are seeing - get the vaccine if they can. there a paradox here, we are seeing less l paradox here, we are seeing less death— paradox here, we are seeing less death and — paradox here, we are seeing less death and less elderly people, but younger— death and less elderly people, but younger people don't die, but the take up— younger people don't die, but the take up beds, and that is greater pressure. — take up beds, and that is greater pressure, because bed occupancy is high, _ pressure, because bed occupancy is high, and _ pressure, because bed occupancy is high, and take a lot of resources to
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take after~ — high, and take a lot of resources to take after. you get great results and save — take after. you get great results and save lives, but we also know that at _ and save lives, but we also know that at least half of them suffer a tissue _ that at least half of them suffer a tissue injury, damage to the lungs, kidney, _ tissue injury, damage to the lungs, kidney, brain, so these a large number— kidney, brain, so these a large number of— kidney, brain, so these a large number of people who should be doing a dayjob. _ number of people who should be doing a dayjob, should be economically viable. _ a dayjob, should be economically viable, some of which will be damaged and then have additional care needs going forward. professor linda bauld, — care needs going forward. professor linda bauld, let's _ care needs going forward. professor linda bauld, let's talk _ care needs going forward. professor linda bauld, let's talk a _ care needs going forward. professor linda bauld, let's talk a little - linda bauld, let's talk a little about the timing of this, it is summer, schools will be out, and is that to our advantage?— that to our advantage? those two thin . s are that to our advantage? those two things are at _ that to our advantage? those two things are at our _ that to our advantage? those two things are at our advantage, - that to our advantage? those two things are at our advantage, we l that to our advantage? those two - things are at our advantage, we know that people have now absorbed the message that the virus is airborne, so get outside and it is much easier to do that in the summer months, and we have also seen around the world that when schools are on holiday, although schools are not a main source of transmission, to contribute to numbers going down. so we hope numbers will decline, but not for a while yet. irate we hope numbers will decline, but not for a while yet.— not for a while yet. we spoke to nadhim zahawi _ not for a while yet. we spoke to nadhim zahawi earlier, - not for a while yet. we spoke to nadhim zahawi earlier, and -
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not for a while yet. we spoke to nadhim zahawi earlier, and he i not for a while yet. we spoke to i nadhim zahawi earlier, and he was talking about children and the advice from thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation, he said he will make a statement to parliament later but says the committee has recommended that children with medical conditions that make them vulnerable to covid—19 should be vaccinated along with those who live with clinically vulnerable people. we have been waiting for that advice for some time, haven't we? it waiting for that advice for some time, haven't we?— waiting for that advice for some time, haven't we? it has taken a while to come _ time, haven't we? it has taken a while to come through. - time, haven't we? it has taken a while to come through. i - time, haven't we? it has taken a while to come through. i am - time, haven't we? it has taken a - while to come through. i am pleased, pa rticuia riy _ while to come through. i am pleased, particularly for those children living — particularly for those children living with parents are vulnerable, i living with parents are vulnerable, i must _ living with parents are vulnerable, i must emphasise children are at rare risk— i must emphasise children are at rare risk of— i must emphasise children are at rare risk of severe disease, although— rare risk of severe disease, although some do get the inflammatory process afterwards. they are — inflammatory process afterwards. they are very hard to spot, so no easy— they are very hard to spot, so no easy way— they are very hard to spot, so no easy way to — they are very hard to spot, so no easy way to see how to target them. it is easy way to see how to target them. it is good _ easy way to see how to target them. it is good news that we have clarity on this— it is good news that we have clarity on this issue. a it is good news that we have clarity on this issue-— on this issue. a significant change in some ways- _ on this issue. a significant change in some ways. yes, _ on this issue. a significant change in some ways. yes, many - on this issue. a significant change i in some ways. yes, many countries around the — in some ways. yes, many countries around the world, _ in some ways. yes, many countries around the world, such _ in some ways. yes, many countries around the world, such as - in some ways. yes, many countries around the world, such as canada i in some ways. yes, many countries i around the world, such as canada and the us and parts of europe, already giving this maxim, the pfizer vaccine, to that age group. it is
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really good that the uk will start, and there will of course be questions asked about why that is not all teenagers, and i think there will still be a debate. you not all teenagers, and i think there will still be a debate.— will still be a debate. you might be best to pick — will still be a debate. you might be best to pick up _ will still be a debate. you might be best to pick up this. _ will still be a debate. you might be best to pick up this. we _ will still be a debate. you might be best to pick up this. we have - will still be a debate. you might be best to pick up this. we have had i best to pick up this. we have had this morning that nhs staff will not have to isolate in critical situations if they have come into contact with a positive case, they will have to have a testing regime, how will that affect the kind of day to day running, do you think, of the nhs? i to day running, do you think, of the nhs? “ to day running, do you think, of the nhs? ~ , ., , ., nhs? i think it is really important. we use this _ nhs? i think it is really important. we use this regime _ nhs? i think it is really important. we use this regime in _ nhs? i think it is really important. we use this regime in the - nhs? i think it is really important. we use this regime in the pilot - nhs? i think it is really important. i we use this regime in the pilot with the fire _ we use this regime in the pilot with the fire brigade and the police in the fire brigade and the police in the liverpool and other parts of the country _ the liverpool and other parts of the country, they tell me it has been a game _ country, they tell me it has been a game changer. it probably reduces unnecessary isolation of contact, possibly— unnecessary isolation of contact, possibly as high as 19 out of 20 people — possibly as high as 19 out of 20 people will not have to isolate unnecessarily. we collect test to release, — unnecessarily. we collect test to release, that is a game changer, so ithink— release, that is a game changer, so i think it _ release, that is a game changer, so i think it is — release, that is a game changer, so i think it is really good. we mentioned _ i think it is really good. we mentioned it _ i think it is really good. - mentioned it was a sort of pilot. do you think it might be rolled out another part the economy? what
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you think it might be rolled out another part the economy? what has been done before _ another part the economy? what has been done before was _ another part the economy? what has been done before was a _ another part the economy? what has been done before was a pilot, - another part the economy? what has been done before was a pilot, i - been done before was a pilot, i think— been done before was a pilot, i think we — been done before was a pilot, i think we need to move away from using _ think we need to move away from using that — think we need to move away from using that term. if you're using it for real, — using that term. if you're using it for real, not— using that term. if you're using it for real, not a pilot. we saw the hot water— for real, not a pilot. we saw the hot water that number ten got into over that _ hot water that number ten got into over that issue, you either do it properly— over that issue, you either do it properly now or you don't do it. we've _ properly now or you don't do it. we've talked before a little bit about the impact, notjust a health impact, there is the mental health impact, there is the mental health impact as well, a real sense today of newly mixed feelings today, what would your sort of message to people be? ~ ., would your sort of message to people be? . . ., . , would your sort of message to people be? . , ,.., be? what do are seeing behaviourally is the country — be? what do are seeing behaviourally is the country will _ be? what do are seeing behaviourally is the country will be _ be? what do are seeing behaviourally is the country will be divided - be? what do are seeing behaviourally is the country will be divided into - is the country will be divided into people who are more concerned unless concerned. i think the main message for me has three things, assess risk, understand where the risks are, for the public health guidance, try not to be a risky places, that is the first thing. secondly, use regular testing, is the first thing. secondly, use regulartesting, it is the first thing. secondly, use regular testing, it is available to everybody, the third thing is take up everybody, the third thing is take up the vaccine. three clear
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messages. up the vaccine. three clear messages-— up the vaccine. three clear messaues. . . . ~ . up the vaccine. three clear messaues. . ., ., " ., ,., ,., messages. we have talked about it so much, the messaging _ messages. we have talked about it so much, the messaging in _ messages. we have talked about it so much, the messaging in different - much, the messaging in different parts of the uk on facemasks, how does that land with people? i think there is a debate _ does that land with people? i think there is a debate about _ does that land with people? i think there is a debate about the - does that land with people? i think there is a debate about the factor i there is a debate about the factor is not going to be mandatory in many in england. most of us at the current time with infection rates so high would say still where one, the main message again from years, it is important to protect others, people who are clinically vulnerable you might encounter on a train or bus or indoors, wear a mask for them, not just for yourself.— just for yourself. what about you? it is easil just for yourself. what about you? it is easily key _ just for yourself. what about you? it is easily key day, _ just for yourself. what about you? it is easily key day, isn't _ just for yourself. what about you? it is easily key day, isn't it, - just for yourself. what about you? it is easily key day, isn't it, with i it is easily key day, isn't it, with all these changes? what are your messages to people watching this morning? i messages to people watching this mornin: ? ~ ., ., , ., messages to people watching this morninu? ~ ., ., , ., morning? i think: colony freedom day is a big risk- — morning? i think: colony freedom day is a big risk- it — morning? i think: colony freedom day is a big risk. it has _ morning? i think: colony freedom day is a big risk. it has to _ morning? i think: colony freedom day is a big risk. it has to be _ morning? i think: colony freedom day is a big risk. it has to be the _ is a big risk. it has to be the responsibility day. —— calling it freedom — responsibility day. —— calling it freedom day is a big risk. people who are — freedom day is a big risk. people who are required to wear masks at work, _ who are required to wear masks at work. they— who are required to wear masks at work, they need to be supported to do that, _ work, they need to be supported to do that, otherwise it becomes a health— do that, otherwise it becomes a health and safety issue. religious
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to talk to you. — health and safety issue. religious to talk to you, professor - health and safety issue. religious to talk to you, professor linda - to talk to you, professor linda bauld and professor calum semple, thank you very much for your time. —— really good to talk to you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. bbc london and bbc south east today are joining forces at breakfast to keep you up to date with the latest news. more than a third of londoners still haven't had their first coronavirus vaccine dose — making it the area with the lowest uptake in england. nationally, 88% of people have had their firstjab. the data from nhs england shows that over half of londoners have not had a second dose. while in the south—east, 81% of eligible adults have had their first dose and 63% their second. anjem choudary — the radical preacher — has had his public speaking ban lifted. choudary , from ilford in east london, was jailed
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for five and a half years for inviting support for the islamic state group. he was released on licence in 2018, the conditions of which have now come to an end. operation brock has returned to junctions 8 and 9 of the m20 after being installed over the weekend. the concrete barrier aims to help keep traffic flowing in both directions and to reduce disruption for local communities. campaigners have submitted a petition calling for free school buses in brighton, saying many families are struggling to afford travel. brighton and hove city council says children living more than three miles away from their school and those on free school meals already get a free bus pass. but campaigners say the cost is affecting school choices for families who aren't eligible. when making their school choice, when their children get into year 6, the overriding factor that they're having to consider is the cost of school travel and whether or not they can afford to send their child to the school they think will best suit their needs. thousands of golf fans
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at royal st george's, in sandwich, have witnessed the crowning of a new open champion. 32,000 spectators at the kent course saw american collin morikawa claim the title. the local authority says the staging of golf�*s oldest major has been a huge boost. with hot weather continuing, people have been finding novel ways of keeping cool. here's a man on a south eastern train heading into london yesterday. in case you're thinking of doing the same, the train company says the plug socket is for staff use only. and now the weather with gillian brown. hello there, good morning. another very warm day today across london and the south—east. plenty of sunshine right from the word go today, it's going to feel very warm again, but i think as we get further into the afternoon there is a likelihood we mightjust see the odd isolated shower or two, but temperatures could get up to 28 celsius, a little cooler along the coast. through the day into this evening, again showers could linger for a time, not everyone will see one, but if you do, they could be
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heavy and sharp in places. again, a very warm night to come, feeling pretty muggy, temperatures not getting much below 1a celsius. the rest of the week, high pressure continuing to be in charge of our weather as we look towards the middle to the end of the week. we are likely to keep hold of this warmth and the brightness until we look towards thursday and friday. still the chance of of an odd isolated shower. we'll keep you up today and i will you soon. we're back in half an hour's time. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. a massive weekend of sport. sally has been doing her best to fit everything in today. she will be speaking to one of the stars of the last few weeks. britain's mark cavendish won the green jersey at the final stage of the 2021 tour de france yesterday, but missed out
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on being crowned the all—time record stage winner as wout van aert recorded victory on the champs—elysees. it's the second time in his career that cavendish has triumphed in the battle for the points classification. hejoins me now from paris. morning to you. how are you? congratulations. thank you so much. how are you?— congratulations. thank you so much. how are you? delighted to be talking about ou. how are you? delighted to be talking about you- what _ how are you? delighted to be talking about you. what a _ how are you? delighted to be talking about you. what a comeback! - how are you? delighted to be talking about you. what a comeback! last i about you. what a comeback! last year, the tearful interviews when you did not know what was coming next, can you believe you are sitting here this morning talking about the fantastic tour you have had? i about the fantastic tour you have had? . ., ., , . , had? i could not quite believe i was talkin: had? i could not quite believe i was talking about _ had? i could not quite believe i was talking about being _ had? i could not quite believe i was talking about being at _ had? i could not quite believe i was talking about being at the - had? i could not quite believe i was talking about being at the start i talking about being at the start three weeks ago. it seems like an age since we were at the start. it has gone quite fast that it has been a hard three weeks. it is an absolute fairy tale, a dream come true. ., . . ~ .,
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true. you have battled back from illness and _ true. you have battled back from illness and injury, _ true. you have battled back from illness and injury, what - true. you have battled back from illness and injury, what has i true. you have battled back from illness and injury, what has the l illness and injury, what has the last year been like for you? i went from 2016, _ last year been like for you? i went from 2016, i — last year been like for you? i went from 2016, i got— last year been like for you? i went from 2016, | got the _ last year been like for you? i went from 2016, i got the yellow - last year been like for you? i went from 2016, i got the yellow jersey | from 2016, i got the yellowjersey in the tour de france might as well champion, the olympics, to not being able to win a race. i had a virus and suffered from clinical depression, i had a lot of injuries, career over, you know? nowi depression, i had a lot of injuries, career over, you know? now i have kids and first and foremost i want to inspire them. i have seen people riding bicycles since i started riding bicycles since i started riding my bike 15 years ago. the one thing i want to put out is you never give up you know? a lot of people in the last couple of years have had it harder than i have stop keep fighting and if you do not give up the good things will come from it.
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would you say the kids had been the key? they were on the podium yesterday, is that what changed for you? yesterday, is that what changed for ou? , ., , , yesterday, is that what changed for ou? ,., _ . yesterday, is that what changed for ou? .,. you? obviously, anybody he has got a famil , ou you? obviously, anybody he has got a family. you are _ you? obviously, anybody he has got a family, you are together _ you? obviously, anybody he has got a family, you are together through i you? obviously, anybody he has got a family, you are together through the i family, you are together through the good times and the bad. i had an incredible wife and four kids. it is pretty special, you know? they put things into perspective. cycling is myjob, it is what i dedicate my life too. i have got a perspective. it is not everything. i love them, they love me, you have to do what is best for them and set a good example. i best for them and set a good example-— best for them and set a good examle. . ., . ~ ., ,, best for them and set a good examle. . ., . ~ ., . example. i want to talk to you about the very end — example. i want to talk to you about the very end of _ example. i want to talk to you about the very end of the _ example. i want to talk to you about the very end of the race, _ example. i want to talk to you about the very end of the race, if- example. i want to talk to you about the very end of the race, if you i the very end of the race, if you don't mind. there was a little moment but you are a bit cross with yourself. just talk me through what was going on.
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yourself. just talk me through what was going on— was going on. obviously i have 1�*t-macro _ was going on. obviously i have lit-macro times _ was going on. obviously i have lit-macro times on _ was going on. obviously i have lit-macro times on the - 11r—macro times on the champs—elysees. it is the most prestigious finish in cycling. —— i have —— the team did an incredible job. i made a bad decision stop i left my lead out man. i thought i would find a better way but i did not. i let the boys down and ultimately i was boxed in. pretty much the tactics we use on other teams, it happened against us yesterday. i was disappointed. that is what it was like as a sportsman. the consolidation was i got to be on the podium in the greenjersey. hagar the podium in the green 'ersey. how much did you — the podium in the greenjersey. how much did you feel the weight of
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history on this tour? where the moments when you reflected on other riders and things have gone on the past? this riders and things have gone on the -ast? �*, riders and things have gone on the ast? �* , ., ., , ., ,, past? as the tournament progressed, like i said, when _ past? as the tournament progressed, like i said, when we _ past? as the tournament progressed, like i said, when we started _ past? as the tournament progressed, like i said, when we started in - like i said, when we started in brittany three weeks ago, i was happy to be here. the race i dedicated my life to has given me the life i have. i have so much respect for it. to be here one more time and winning a stage after everything that has happened, everything that has happened, everything i had been through, that was enough. that was more than enough, that is a bonus to win anything, to win four, the green jersey, it has not been easy but it has been beautiful.— has been beautiful. saying it was enou:h has been beautiful. saying it was enou . h to has been beautiful. saying it was enough to even _ has been beautiful. saying it was enough to even be _ has been beautiful. saying it was enough to even be there. - has been beautiful. saying it was enough to even be there. on i has been beautiful. saying it was enough to even be there. on thej enough to even be there. on the monday morning, as she reflected, are you going to have another go? ==
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are you going to have another go? -- ou are you going to have another go? -- you reflect. we will see. if i am honest, after every tour de france i am like, i do not know if i will do it again. maybe a couple of days after you miss it and you are looking forward to the next year. first, i want to spend some time with my family and take a break from racing for a few weeks. i want to relax, reflect on what we have done and see what has happened.- and see what has happened. louise has a question _ and see what has happened. louise has a question for— and see what has happened. louise has a question for you. _ and see what has happened. louise has a question for you. i _ and see what has happened. louise has a question for you. i exhausted| has a question for you. i exhausted all exhilarated now? ads, has a question for you. i exhausted all exhilarated now? pl. bit has a question for you. i exhausted all exhilarated now?— all exhilarated now? a bit of both. i finished three _ all exhilarated now? a bit of both. i finished three weeks _ all exhilarated now? a bit of both. i finished three weeks of- all exhilarated now? a bit of both. i finished three weeks of the i all exhilarated now? a bit of both. i finished three weeks of the tour, j i finished three weeks of the tour, my family is there and spent an evening with kids and i am probably more exhausted than i was after the three weeks. it is nice, it is good.
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it takes its toll on your body. we do it day in and day out. it is the most gruelling sport. i cannot do anything but you have to get back on anything but you have to get back on a bike. iam doing anything but you have to get back on a bike. i am doing a small race in belgium tomorrow.— a bike. i am doing a small race in belgium tomorrow. while you are en'o in: a belgium tomorrow. while you are enjoying a bit _ belgium tomorrow. while you are enjoying a bit of _ belgium tomorrow. while you are enjoying a bit of a _ belgium tomorrow. while you are enjoying a bit of a rest _ belgium tomorrow. while you are enjoying a bit of a rest over- belgium tomorrow. while you are enjoying a bit of a rest over the i enjoying a bit of a rest over the next few weeks, it is down in the studio. would you be watching the olympics? —— dan. the studio. would you be watching the olympics? -- dan— studio. would you be watching the olympics? -- dan. the men's road race, it olympics? -- dan. the men's road race. it is — olympics? -- dan. the men's road race. it is the _ olympics? -- dan. the men's road race, it is the first _ olympics? -- dan. the men's road race, it is the first medal— olympics? -- dan. the men's road race, it is the first medal that i olympics? -- dan. the men's road race, it is the first medal that can i race, it is the first medal that can be awarded in great britain have a strong team, as they have over most of the cycling events and other sports. i am of the cycling events and other sports. iam incredibly patriotically to represent my country is a massive thing.
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unfortunately, i am not going this time, the first time since i had been professional. i will definitely been professional. i will definitely be watching every sport at home and waving a flag from home. i be watching every sport at home and waving a flag from home.— waving a flag from home. i assure ou are waving a flag from home. i assure you are in — waving a flag from home. i assure you are in paris? _ waving a flag from home. i assure you are in paris? you _ waving a flag from home. i assure you are in paris? you look- waving a flag from home. i assure you are in paris? you look like i waving a flag from home. i assure| you are in paris? you look like you are sitting in front of a concrete slab. i am quite disappointed not to have the eiffel tower. it is slab. i am quite disappointed not to have the eiffel tower.— have the eiffel tower. it is french chic. well done. _ have the eiffel tower. it is french chic. well done. congratulations. | chic. well done. congratulations. s - eak to chic. well done. congratulations. speak to you _ chic. well done. congratulations. speak to you next _ chic. well done. congratulations. speak to you next time. - chic. well done. congratulations. speak to you next time. great i chic. well done. congratulations. i speak to you next time. great story. thank you very much. all morning we've been looking at the change in covid restrictions. let's look at how lockdown restrictions are being lifted elsewhere in the uk — paul martin is in wales and james shaw is in scotland. but first let's speak
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to chris page who's in belfast. what is going on there? morning. good morning. here in northern ireland a similar picture to england with regards to the spread of the coronavirus. a different one when it comes to restrictions. the number of positive tests has been rising fast and the number of hospitalisations and the number of hospitalisations and deaths has also been going up but more slowly. the man has taken a more cautious approach than boris johnson. if you are going to go shopping, you are still required to wear a facemask and social distancing is still in place and there are limits on socialising. the first minister will talk about easing restrictions next week. when it comes to removing all restrictions like england, we are looking at well into next month and
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very possibly into the autumn. now over to cardiff bay and paul martin. yes, no big bang removal of restrictions here in wales but there were significant changes over the weekend — were significant changes over the weekend. six people from six different— weekend. six people from six different households can now meet up indoors _ different households can now meet up indoors as— different households can now meet up indoors. as the sun came out, limits on outdoor— indoors. as the sun came out, limits on outdoor gatherings were removed. 0ver on outdoor gatherings were removed. over the _ on outdoor gatherings were removed. over the next the weeks there will be significant differences over the ruies— be significant differences over the rules in— be significant differences over the rules in wales and the rules in england — rules in wales and the rules in england at a time when thousands of people _ england at a time when thousands of people will be coming into wales on holiday _ people will be coming into wales on holiday. the next big date is august the 7th. _ holiday. the next big date is august the 7th, that is when the welsh government will look to move wales into alert _ government will look to move wales into alert level zero if it feels the public health situation and data allows _ the public health situation and data allows for— the public health situation and data allows for that. there will still be some _ allows for that. there will still be some restrictions, the more notable one being _ some restrictions, the more notable one being the one on facemask which will remain— one being the one on facemask which will remain compulsory in most public— will remain compulsory in most public indoor settings for the
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foreseeable future. to scotland now and james _ foreseeable future. to scotland now and james shaw is in ayrshire. it! will and james shaw is in ayrshire. will be a and james shaw is in ayrshire. it will be a full day here in largs, a coastal resort on the west coast of scotland. a lot of people will be coming here. it is the start of the traditional glasgow two week holiday, it would be very busy. one thing will not change and that is the fact that people will still have to wear masks in many settings, on public transport, in shops, in many indoor public places and also in workplaces. there will also be limits on the numbers of people who can gather in private homes, in public indoor places like pubs and restaurants and even outdoors. only 15 people from 15 households can gather together and they must stay separate from other groups. the next big set of changes in scotland will be on the 9th of august.—
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big set of changes in scotland will be on the 9th of august. thank you very much- — be on the 9th of august. thank you very much- that — be on the 9th of august. thank you very much. that gives _ be on the 9th of august. thank you very much. that gives us _ be on the 9th of august. thank you very much. that gives us a - be on the 9th of august. thank you very much. that gives us a clear. very much. that gives us a clear picture as to what is going on across the uk. it is going to be a "difficult summer" with covid cases in the uk possibly reaching 200,000 a day — that's the warning from professor neil ferguson who claims it will cause "major disruption" to the nhs. joining me now are two doctors with extensive experience working in intensive care units during the pandemic, dr kishan bodalia and dr shondipon laha from the intensive care society. thank you very much both of you for being with us this morning. louise is going to had to sit out while i speak to you on the sofa. let's come to you, what is the picture on your intensive care unit? what are you hearing from staff you are working with and across the medical profession?— with and across the medical rofession? , .. , with and across the medical rofession? , u, , ., profession? intensive care units are becomin: profession? intensive care units are becoming increasingly _ profession? intensive care units are becoming increasingly busy - profession? intensive care units are becoming increasingly busy across i becoming increasingly busy across the country, especially in the
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north—west where i work. many units are having to transfer patients out to be able to make sure they get the same kind of care. that is a combination of patients with covid coming in, patients who need planned surgery, a big backlog of those have built up over the last year or so. also patients who need emergency treatment. they seem to have escalated during the last 18 months as well. we are under extreme pressure at the moment. ads, as well. we are under extreme pressure at the moment.- as well. we are under extreme pressure at the moment. a lot of --eole pressure at the moment. a lot of people have _ pressure at the moment. a lot of people have got _ pressure at the moment. a lot of people have got in _ pressure at the moment. a lot of people have got in contact - pressure at the moment. a lot ofj people have got in contact today. pressure at the moment. a lot of i people have got in contact today. we saw people going into a nightclub, some choosing not to wear facemasks in shops and at the same label do it for a long period of time. are you worried about what will happen? are you concerned about case numbers? the number of people needing your help. i the number of people needing your hel. ., the number of people needing your hel, ., . ., . the number of people needing your
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hel, ., . ., the number of people needing your hel, ., .., . ., ., the number of people needing your hel. . .., . . ., ., help. i am concerned. i am going to be wearing — help. i am concerned. i am going to be wearing a _ help. i am concerned. i am going to be wearing a facemask _ help. i am concerned. i am going to be wearing a facemask and - help. i am concerned. i am going to be wearing a facemask and socially | be wearing a facemask and socially isolating. people must be responsible with the freedoms they have and ensure they get vaccinated. that is the underlying biggest message. everybody needs to be vaccinated. wearing facemasks and socially distancing where you can is key. the numbers will continue to rise and probably will continue to rise and probably will continue to rise after today.— rise and probably will continue to rise after today. there is a note of caution whether _ rise after today. there is a note of caution whether you _ rise after today. there is a note of caution whether you listen - rise after today. there is a note of caution whether you listen to i caution whether you listen to government ministers or people like professor chris whitty, who says we are not out of the woods yet. i completely agree with what the government is saying. they are empowering the public to take responsibility. they want us to be sensible — responsibility. they want us to be sensible. we need to be mindful of the elderly and vulnerable. where facemasks where appropriate, for example — facemasks where appropriate, for example if in public or around those groups— example if in public or around those groups of— example if in public or around those groups of people. how example if in public or around those groups of people-—
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example if in public or around those groups of people. how did apparently feel about the — groups of people. how did apparently feel about the announcement - groups of people. how did apparently feel about the announcement about i feel about the announcement about nhs workers might be able to avoid self isolation? is —— that is looked at by the public lead on how where you are based. has it been a problem in your area? you are based. has it been a problem in yourarea? it you are based. has it been a problem in your area?— in your area? it has been a problem with children. _ in your area? it has been a problem with children. less _ in your area? it has been a problem with children. less of— in your area? it has been a problem with children. less of a _ in your area? it has been a problem with children. less of a problem i with children. less of a problem with children. less of a problem with staff, they are very cautious about it. the important bit is the detail. we do not want to expose staff who we believe have covid to vulnerable patients and staff. the take a lot of time protecting patients from covid. if you catch that it makes you outcome worst stop on an intensive care unit, all your patients are vulnerable. we must be careful. ., ., , ., patients are vulnerable. we must be careful. ., ., . careful. could it impact on you and others? i completely _
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careful. could it impact on you and others? i completely agree - careful. could it impact on you and others? i completely agree with i careful. could it impact on you and i others? i completely agree with what sean said. others? i completely agree with what sean said- in — others? i completely agree with what sean said- in my _ others? i completely agree with what sean said. in my experience - others? i completely agree with what sean said. in my experience working| sean said. in my experience working on the _ sean said. in my experience working on the boards, staff having to isolate — on the boards, staff having to isolate meaning the workforce dramatically reduces stock in my role as— dramatically reduces stock in my role as a — dramatically reduces stock in my role as a junior doctor, we have had days— role as a junior doctor, we have had days where — role as a junior doctor, we have had days where all of a sudden five, ten doctors _ days where all of a sudden five, ten doctors across wards go sick and it is putting — doctors across wards go sick and it is putting a — doctors across wards go sick and it is putting a huge strain on services we provide — is putting a huge strain on services we provide. not is putting a huge strain on services we provide-— is putting a huge strain on services we rovide. ., ., , . ., ~' we provide. not only are you working the nhs side — we provide. not only are you working the ups side of — we provide. not only are you working the nhs side of things, _ we provide. not only are you working the nhs side of things, you - we provide. not only are you working the nhs side of things, you are i we provide. not only are you working the nhs side of things, you are alsol the nhs side of things, you are also a dj. you are going to be a warm up actfor a dj. you are going to be a warm up act forfat boy a dj. you are going to be a warm up act for fat boy strength is that right? i act for fat boy strength is that ri . ht? . . ., act for fat boy strength is that rirht? .., ., , act for fat boy strength is that riuht? ., , . right? i cannot believe it. -- fat boy slim. _ right? i cannot believe it. -- fat boy slim. is— right? i cannot believe it. -- fat boy slim, is that _ right? i cannot believe it. -- fat boy slim, is that right? - right? i cannot believe it. -- fat boy slim, is that right? pretty i right? i cannot believe it. -- fat i boy slim, is that right? pretty much overnight. _ boy slim, is that right? pretty much overnight, the response has been incredible — overnight, the response has been incredible. ~ �* , , ., overnight, the response has been incredible. ~ �* , ., overnight, the response has been incredible. �* , t, we incredible. we're seeing you now. we have been in — incredible. we're seeing you now. we have been in touch _ incredible. we're seeing you now. we have been in touch with _ incredible. we're seeing you now. we have been in touch with the _ incredible. we're seeing you now. we have been in touch with the team i incredible. we're seeing you now. we have been in touch with the team of i have been in touch with the team of fat boy—
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have been in touch with the team of fat boy slim, and he has asked me to be a special— fat boy slim, and he has asked me to be a special guest in his uk tour. i'm be a special guest in his uk tour. im also— be a special guest in his uk tour. i'm also going to be on the main stage _ i'm also going to be on the main stage at— i'm also going to be on the main stage at a — i'm also going to be on the main stage at a festival. it is a crazy year— stage at a festival. it is a crazy year stock _ stage at a festival. it is a crazy year stock new music i will be showcasing and there will be a brand—new event with international players _ brand—new event with international players and podcast unit. i brand-new event with international players and podcast unit. i suppose ou had players and podcast unit. i suppose you had two — players and podcast unit. i suppose you had two hats, _ players and podcast unit. i suppose you had two hats, dj _ players and podcast unit. i suppose you had two hats, dj hat— players and podcast unit. i suppose you had two hats, dj hat a - players and podcast unit. i suppose you had two hats, dj hat a medical| you had two hats, dj hat a medical at on as well. how do you manage those two things going on at the same time? i those two things going on at the same time?— those two things going on at the same time? . ., , , same time? i wanted to represent both physical _ same time? i wanted to represent both physical health _ same time? i wanted to represent both physical health and _ same time? i wanted to represent both physical health and mental. both physical health and mental health— both physical health and mental health and spreading positive messages. i have encouraged people to stay— messages. i have encouraged people to stay in— messages. i have encouraged people to stay in and work out. on social media _ to stay in and work out. on social media i_ to stay in and work out. on social media i am — to stay in and work out. on social media i am telling people to isolate and get _ media i am telling people to isolate and get the vaccinations. this is a
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powerful— and get the vaccinations. this is a powerful way of making people feel .ood powerful way of making people feel good and _ powerful way of making people feel good and delivering important messages on social media. we good and delivering important messages on social media. we did an outside broadcast _ messages on social media. we did an outside broadcast from _ messages on social media. we did an outside broadcast from coventry i outside broadcast from coventry hospital, a huge hospital with thousands of staff and more patients coming through. patients are talking about the impact of mental health issues, people with really serious health issues who have not been able to get the care. deepening the mental health pandemic will be a huge strain on the nhs and most of society as well? —— do you think? we society as well? -- do you think? we are society as well? —— do you think? we are starting to see it. the amount of people — are starting to see it. the amount of people going through mental health— of people going through mental health crises is increasing, going to emergency departments and seeing gps. emergency staff in the nhs has increased _ gps. emergency staff in the nhs has increased the burden looking after these _ increased the burden looking after
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these patients. the increased number of conversations you are having to have _ of conversations you are having to have the _ of conversations you are having to have the families of patients who are going — have the families of patients who are going to pass away. a hugely stressful— are going to pass away. a hugely stressful virgin. are going to pass away. a hugely stressfulvirgin. —— burden. then you have — stressfulvirgin. —— burden. then you have the _ stressfulvirgin. —— burden. then you have the long—term effects of things _ you have the long—term effects of things like — you have the long—term effects of things like covid, long covid where you are _ things like covid, long covid where you are breathless and in pain, inability— you are breathless and in pain, inability to— you are breathless and in pain, inability to go to work or see your loved _ inability to go to work or see your loved ones — inability to go to work or see your loved ones. it causes a massive mental— loved ones. it causes a massive mental health burden. we loved ones. it causes a massive mental health burden.— loved ones. it causes a massive mental health burden. we have had so many messages _ mental health burden. we have had so many messages from _ mental health burden. we have had so many messages from people _ mental health burden. we have had so many messages from people on - mental health burden. we have had so many messages from people on all- many messages from people on all sides of what they want to do and how they want to progress for society at the moment. what is your message forcibly he works at the nhs but also has his dj hat on? —— as somebody who works. but also has his dj hat on? -- as somebody who works.— but also has his dj hat on? -- as somebody who works. aside from followin: somebody who works. aside from following government _ somebody who works. aside from following government rules, i somebody who works. aside from i following government rules, people need to make health a priority. working out what works for them. in
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terms of physical health, it can be doing exercise, following exercise programmes online, going for walks. not running a marathon, taking a few steps outside. eating well is important. speaking to friends and adapting if you are isolating, you need to find a good balance in your life. ., ~' need to find a good balance in your life. . ~ i. ., ,, life. thank you for spending time with us today- — life. thank you for spending time with us today. thank _ life. thank you for spending time with us today. thank you - life. thank you for spending time with us today. thank you for i life. thank you for spending time i with us today. thank you for your hard work over the last 18 months or so. from today, double—vaccinated travellers from england, scotland and wales will be able to visit amber list destinations — excluding france — without the need to quarantine on their return. let's catch up with nina who is at manchester airport. like many issues at the moment, it seems very complicated. absolutely ri . ht seems very complicated. absolutely right stopped _ seems very complicated. absolutely right stopped i _ seems very complicated. absolutely right stopped i was _ seems very complicated. absolutely right stopped i was thinking - seems very complicated. absolutely right stopped i was thinking it i right stopped i was thinking it doesn't matter how many times you semi to an apple and i do not get to
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go on holiday at the end, it never gets less disappointing. —— you send me to an airport. this isjuly at one of the biggest airports in the country, a handful of passengers boarding at this time in the morning. they are running at a capacity of io%, 15%, despite many destinations going to amber lift countries. these are places for which the stipulation has changed when you return as of today. just a reminder of the countries on that list. lots of popular destinations, italy, spain and greece are on there. advice from england is that you can travel there, nonessential travel is allowed. in scotland and wales, the advice is to not travel.
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in northern ireland, completely avoid international travel if you can. when you get back you will not have to quarantine if you are double jabbed or under 18. have to quarantine if you are double jabbed or under18. do have to quarantine if you are double jabbed or under 18. do not forget the caveat around france. that is a strange change of rules for one particular nation and then you will have to test for up to four macro days of returning. little wonder that this has put people off travelling. we have been speaking to people on their way to a holiday about how it has affected mood. normally going on holiday is something to be excited about. this has been _ something to be excited about. this has been a — something to be excited about. this has been a stressful and anxious time _ has been a stressful and anxious time for— has been a stressful and anxious time for everybody. i am not sure i would _ time for everybody. i am not sure i would do _ time for everybody. i am not sure i would do it— time for everybody. i am not sure i would do it again knowing what i know _ would do it again knowing what i know now — would do it again knowing what i know now from this experience. feeling — know now from this experience. feeling really excited going away after lockdown. _
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feeling really excited going away after lockdown.— feeling really excited going away after lockdown. when it comes to extra testing. _ after lockdown. when it comes to extra testing, how _ after lockdown. when it comes to extra testing, how much - after lockdown. when it comes to extra testing, how much has - after lockdown. when it comes to extra testing, how much has it i after lockdown. when it comes to | extra testing, how much has it set you back? extra testing, how much has it set ou back? �* extra testing, how much has it set ou back? ~ :: ., ., you back? about £50 each. charlotte has to do as — you back? about £50 each. charlotte has to do as well _ you back? about £50 each. charlotte has to do as well when _ you back? about £50 each. charlotte has to do as well when we _ you back? about £50 each. charlotte has to do as well when we go - you back? about £50 each. charlotte has to do as well when we go back. | has to do as well when we go back. all income — has to do as well when we go back. all income on average, it is about 100 quid per passenger to take tests. —— all in, on average. it is the fact things keep changing and is not straightforward that is making people think, i might as well stay—at—home. people think, i might as well stay-at-home._ people think, i might as well stay-at-home. people think, i might as well sta -at-home. ~' ,, ., stay-at-home. unlike the us and euro e, stay-at-home. unlike the us and eumpe. the _ stay-at-home. unlike the us and eumpe. the uk — stay-at-home. unlike the us and europe, the uk does _ stay-at-home. unlike the us and europe, the uk does not - stay-at-home. unlike the us and europe, the uk does not have - stay-at-home. unlike the us and europe, the uk does not have a l stay-at-home. unlike the us and - europe, the uk does not have a clear traffic— europe, the uk does not have a clear traffic light _ europe, the uk does not have a clear traffic light system. the criteria in europe, _ traffic light system. the criteria in europe, it persistently applies to airlines — in europe, it persistently applies to airlines and passengers about where _ to airlines and passengers about where to— to airlines and passengers about where to go and there is unlikely to be any— where to go and there is unlikely to be any short—term changes. for the uk, there _ be any short—term changes. for the uk, there have been many changes.
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like france — uk, there have been many changes. like france. that has been typical over the _ like france. that has been typical over the last 12 months. the travel industry and _ over the last 12 months. the travel industry and passengers _ over the last 12 months. the travel industry and passengers are - over the last 12 months. the travel| industry and passengers are calling for simplicity. we sped to a family this morning who were meant to take their son's mate on holiday with them but a pcr test results did not arrive on time so he will had to stay at home. bulgaria is now on the green left. i said i quite fancied it myself. at the moment we have switched onto their red list. it is so important to follow our rules and that the country you are going to will allow you in stop very complicated. these people are absorbing the information and taking the tests will stop you wearing a mask because they are requiring you to do so at the moment in the
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terminal. at the moment it is at the discretion of transport providers and transport hubs. the advice at the moment is where one where there are lots of people and by and large everyone is complying with that, as always. 50 everyone is complying with that, as alwa s. . . , always. so check, check, check my check and check _ always. so check, check, check my check and check again. _ always. so check, check, check my check and check again. i _ always. so check, check, check my check and check again. i forgot - always. so check, check, check my check and check again. i forgot to l check and check again. i forgot to tell you jenny seagrave is coming up in a moment.
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good morning to you, it's monday, welcome to bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire, here are the latest headlines. borisjohnson urges us to act cautiously as nearly all legal limits on social contact in england are lifted — despite soaring levels of coronavirus. groups of any size can now meet inside and outdoors, guidance to work from home has been scrapped and face coverings are no longer required bylaw — although they're still recommended in some places. it's right to be careful, but it's also right to get our country back together, opening up, and as close to normality as possible. businesses hope the end of restrictions will lead to recovery but staff shortages due to self—isolation have hit many. all: three, two, one! cheering. nightclubs in england
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re—open their doors, welcoming their first clubbers

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