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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  July 19, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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this is bbc news, with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. athletes continue to arrive in tokyo ahead of this week's olympics. more test positive for covid. as further flooding hits western europe, german chancellor angela merkel expresses horror at the devastation. a major media investigation reports the targeting of human rights activists, journalists and lawyers by authoritarian governments using spyware. and as covid restrictions are lifted across england, there are warnings it could be too much too soon.
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the tokyo olympics get under way this week but there is already a growing number of athletes and officials testing covid—positive or being forced to self—isolate. in the olympic village, two players and a coach for the south africa men's football team have the virus. eight members of team gb athletics team are also in isolation after being in close contact with positive cases. and us tennis player coco gauff has announced she is not going to tokyo after testing positive. despite the worsening covid situation and strong public opposition to the games, the governor of tokyo has told the bbc it would have been worse to cancel. from tokyo, rupert wingfield—hayes reports. with five days to go, the anti—olympic protests
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are not going away. this one is outside the hotel where ioc president thomas bach is staying. their message to him is pretty blunt. over at the olympic village, three covid cases have now been confirmed. across the city, 1,400 new cases on saturday. despite this, when i sat down with the governor of tokyo, she told me the games must go ahead. translation: i believe that not holding the olympics is even - sadder than holding it during these dire times. i do not want to show the world that we have lost to covid—i9. there is still meaning in holding the olympics in tokyo, despite the current situation. this was wembley stadium in london a week ago. but, with just 20% of japanese vaccinated, there will be no scenes like this in tokyo's olympic stadium.
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governor koike concedes ifjapan had moved faster on vaccines, things might have been different. translation: | agree, i it would have been better. if we had a faster vaccination rollout, we may have been able to have spectators at the olympics. but the speed of vaccine rollout has now increased immensely. not fast enough. this is kyoto, japan's ancient capital and number one tourist site. by now, this place should have been thronged with hordes of tourists from all over the world. forjapan, that was to be the big payoff. invest billions and billions in hosting the olympics and then millions of travellers will come from all over the world to your great cultural institutions, spending lots of money. as you can see, there is nobody here. shop owners here have seen sales fall by more than 90%.
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translation: it is - the government's fault. look at the other countries, like the uk and taiwan. they seem to be doing well. but look at japan. i cannot believe we call ourselves a developed country. back in tokyo, hundreds of athletes are now arriving each day. it is now clear that some of them will be carrying covid. the ioc�*s assertion that the games represent zero risk to public health is already starting to look flimsy. let's get more from our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes in tokyo. i think that point you make there at the end, rupert, is going to be critical in terms of how many come in, whether they are athletes or officials, and then prove to be tested positive. just as an example, can you explain a little more about the team gb situation? there are quite a lot of people affected, at least.— affected, at least. that's ri . ht, affected, at least. that's right, david. _ affected, at least. that's right, david. since - affected, at least. that's right, david. since last. affected, at least. that's - right, david. since last night we have learned that eight members of team gb were in close contact with someone on
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board their flight from london to tokyo, someone who tested positive for covid. these are not members of the team who have tested positive, but they were sitting on the plane close to someone who is not related to someone who is not related to the team gb members at all but who later on arrival in japan tested positive. and because of that, they have been isolated as well and they will have to have two negative pcr tests before they are allowed to return to training. so that is very disruptive. and we understand — the times newspaper is reporting that among those eight there are a number of team gb metal hopes. so this is tremendously disruptive to those athletes as they arrive in tokyo, and it shows just how really complicated and difficult this situation is, trying to negotiate the regulations, the quarantine. these athletes will want to get adjusted, acclimatised and training as soon as possible, but when they
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are associated like this with someone on an aircraft, they have to go into isolation. that is very, very disruptive. an overall in the last few days we have seen that notjust on arrivals but inside the so—called bubble, there are dozens of people who have tested positive. according to japanese media, 55 people inside the olympic bubble have tested positive for covid since first ofjuly. so this is a very, very complicated and difficult situation for the japanese authorities in the olympic authorities to manage, to keep anybody who is suspected of having covid separate from everybody else in isolation, to make sure that we don't have a spreader event, to make sure that we don't have a cluster developing inside the olympic bubble. i cluster developing inside the olympic bubble.— cluster developing inside the olympic bubble. i wonder where that leaves _ olympic bubble. i wonder where that leaves thomas _ olympic bubble. i wonder where that leaves thomas bach's - that leaves thomas bach's statement that these games will be safe and secure, even if it is a perception, the perception at the moment is that these games are anything but. certainly that is the
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perception among many people watching here injapan, who have been deeply sceptical for months that this was a good idea to go ahead with the games. also, you know, we haven't started the games yet. it doesn't start until friday. this is all happening in the pre— games period, when the activity in the olympic village is not as intense as it will be starting from friday onwards. and so it does not bode well for controlling things. on the other hand, the olympic authorities say that they have got this under control, that this testing programme is working and that is why they are finding out about these cases, and that is why they are getting people into isolation, that this does not represent a threat to the olympics at this stage. and i think that is a fair comment, but i —— certainly mr thomas bach's statement that there is zero risk, i don't think anyone agrees with that. even the governor i spoke to in my interview, she says no—one thinks there is zero risk. it
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isjust a shame that thinks there is zero risk. it is just a shame that the anticipation building is about numbers of covid cases possible rather than the games at this point. thank you very much, the very latest from rupert in tokyo. the german chancellor says the world must hurry in the battle against climate change. after visiting some of the areas worst hit by last week's deadly flash—floods, she expressed her shock at what she called surreal destruction. more heavy rain has caused further flooding in southern germany and austria. our europe correspondent jenny hill reports "we really need help here," she says. and outside the village shop, you can see why. as in so many other parts of western germany, people in the town of bad munstereifel still can't quite believe what happened. we met gertrude here. volunteers have brought food, water.
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she told us she spent the night alone, upstairs, as water flooded into her house. translation: i've never seen anything like it, never. - it leaves you speechless. "gertrude," he says, "the two of us will never see this place come back to what it was. we will never see it again. it's no longer my home. it's terrible." earlier, angela merkel came to see for herself. this is the town of schuld, where whole houses were destroyed. translation: it's shocking. i'm tempted to say the german language has no words to describe the destruction that's occured here. but i could also see huge comfort in the way that people have come together to help each other. the water is subsiding
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in western germany, but overnight, more flooding in other parts of the country. high water in bavaria, saxony. in austria, too, towns and cities deluged. in bad munstereifel, they're doing their best to clear up. translation: people have | lost their lives, their houses. there are no more roads. but there is huge solidarity. they're going to need it in the weeks to come. we're seeing this kind of destruction all over west germany, and what is particularly hard for people in places like this to bear is that it could be weeks, maybe months, before they get back electricity, connection. in one part of the region, the authorities are saying that gas for heating and hot water won't be back until well into the autumn. germany is mourning its dead. for the survivors, this ordeal is far from over. jenny hill, bbc news, bad munstereifel. activists, journalists
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and politicians around the world may have been spied on using mobile phone malware that is intended to be used against criminals and terrorists, according to a massive data leak. reports suggest widespread misuse of spyware sold and developed by an israeli surveillance company. the company in question have strongly denied the allegations against them and say their technology is only sold to the law enforcement and intelligence agencies of vetted governments. we can now speak to bill marczak, who is senior research fellow at citizen lab. bill was the first person to discover an iphone hack used by the israeli cyber—warfare company nso group which was used to infect targets with pegasus spyware through links in sms text messages. thank you very much indeed for joining us, bill. can you just explain how readily this can be done, first of all?—
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done, first of all? well, nso grou done, first of all? well, nso grow) sells _ done, first of all? well, nso group sells the _ done, first of all? well, nso group sells the pegasus - done, first of all? well, nso - group sells the pegasus spyware to dozens of governments all around the world, and originally it required the target to click on a link to facilitate the hacking of the phone. but nowadays the spyware system uses what is called a zero click technique, meaning that the government can hack the phone without the target having to take any action. your phone can be sitting on the table, one minute it is fine, the next minute it is compromised. the next minute it is comromised. �* . , compromised. bright, and this would appear— compromised. bright, and this would appear to _ compromised. bright, and this would appear to have - compromised. bright, and this would appear to have already. would appear to have already affected a number of journalists and, as you say, activists, running well into 100 certainly and may be many more besides. in a sense it raises partly the question of as to whose responsibility it is. we have nso saying that our contract stipulates it can only be used for a serious crime and terrorism. be used for a serious crime and terrorism-— terrorism. yes. well, ultimately _
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terrorism. yes. well, ultimately it - terrorism. yes. well, ultimately it is - terrorism. yes. well, ultimately it is the i ultimately it is the responsibility of the company, nso group, and the responsibility of israel's government, the ministry of defence, which is regulating the export of these tools. it is their responsibility to sit nso down and say look, if you sell this to saudi arabia, if you sell this to the uae or bahrain or these other repressive governments, what do you think they are going to do with that? well, maybe they will go after some criminals and terrorists, but the main concern with these governments like saudi arabia is trying to figure out what their critics up figure out what their critics up to, trying to ensure the survival of the monarchy. he is speaking truth to power, what are they planning next and how can we subvert them? you mention — can we subvert them? you mention some _ can we subvert them? you mention some of - can we subvert them? you mention some of the - can we subvert them? you j mention some of the other countries there, some of the others that have been alleged to be doing the same things are india, morocco, mexico, rwanda even, hungary as well. it is quite a list, isn't it? we shouldn't be too surprised, though, should we? i mean, this is frankly what many
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governments will do. well, i think there _ governments will do. well, i think there are _ governments will do. well, i think there are two - governments will do. well, i think there are two main - think there are two main takeaways from this report here. the first one is, you know, i think people are quite surprised by the scale of this. some of the leaked data has around 50,000 phone numbers on there, which may have been selected for targeting. so that level of scale is really, i think, beyond what many people think, beyond what many people think and envision. nso group says from time to time, oh, a very small number of targets, this is for the osama bin ladens of the world. so i think this sheer scale and just the number of countries in which this is being abused, for example india represent itself as a democracy. yet we see cases where politicians, judges, journalists and others are being spied on by the government.— are being spied on by the covernment. ~ . ., , government. what, if anything, can be done _ government. what, if anything, can be done about _ government. what, if anything, can be done about this? - government. what, if anything, can be done about this? i - can be done about this? i suppose highlighting it is the most powerful weapon that human
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rights activists and the like would have.— rights activists and the like would have. . , , would have. certainly bringing liuht to would have. certainly bringing light to this — would have. certainly bringing light to this is _ would have. certainly bringing light to this is incredibly - light to this is incredibly important. and i think bringing pressure on the various stakeholders who can make a difference. for example, the israeli government. i think it is probably not an exaggeration to say that it is quite embarrassing for the israeli government and the ministry of defence to have this huge deluge of information, showing very, very damning abuse of surveillance tools, coming up and reflecting badly on the state of israel and on the ministry of defence. so i hope that this avalanche of publicity around this report will spur them to take stronger action in raining these companies in.- action in raining these companies in. action in raining these comanies in. ., i. companies in. right, and you mentioned — companies in. right, and you mentioned these _ companies in. right, and you mentioned these companies. j companies in. right, and you l mentioned these companies. is nso seen as the elite of the elite in this regard for other plenty of other places that governments and countries might turn to? , ., governments and countries might turn to? ,., , ., governments and countries might turn to? , ., ., , turn to? right, so israel does have a very — turn to? right, so israel does have a very robust _ turn to? right, so israel does have a very robust cyber- have a very robust cyber industry and ns0 group is certainly at the forefront, at least in terms of the media
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presence of this industry. but we at citizen lab released a report a few weeks ago looking at another very concerning company, also based in israel, and we found evidence that there spyware was being used to targetjournalists, activists and civil society all around the world. so it is not that there are just one or a small number of bad apples in this industry. the problem is with the industry and the lack of regulation. untilthat the industry and the lack of regulation. until that changes— may be nso group goes away but they will be ten other nso to take its place. they will be ten other n50 to take its place.— they will be ten other n50 to take its place. thank you very much indeed _ take its place. thank you very much indeed for _ take its place. thank you very much indeed for that. - stay with us on bbc news. still to come: as anti—games protests continue, more olympic athletes and officials are either infected with coronavirus or are in quarantine, just five days before the games officially begin.
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i see you coming down the ladder now. that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. aha, step for man, one giant leap for mankind.— for mankind. a catastrophic enaine for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire _ for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is _ for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being - for mankind. a catastrophic engine fire is being blamed| engine fire is being blamed tonight— engine fire is being blamed tonight for the first crash on the 30 — tonight for the first crash on the 30 year history of concord, the 30 year history of concord, the world's only supersonic airlinen _ the world's only supersonic airliner. it the world's only supersonic airliner. ., , ., ., airliner. it was one of the most vivid _ airliner. it was one of the most vivid symbols - airliner. it was one of the most vivid symbols of. airliner. it was one of the | most vivid symbols of the violence _ most vivid symbols of the violence and _ most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred - most vivid symbols of the violence and hatred that i most vivid symbols of the i violence and hatred that tore apart — violence and hatred that tore apart the _ violence and hatred that tore apart the state _ violence and hatred that tore apart the state of— violence and hatred that tore | apart the state of yugoslavia, but now. _ apart the state of yugoslavia, but now. a _ apart the state of yugoslavia, but now, a decade _ apart the state of yugoslavia, but now, a decade later, - apart the state of yugoslavia, but now, a decade later, it's. but now, a decade later, it's been — but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly- but now, a decade later, it's been painstakingly rebuilt. but now, a decade later, it's. been painstakingly rebuilt and opens— been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again _ been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. _ been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today.— been painstakingly rebuilt and opens again today. there's been a 5096 opens again today. there's been a 50% decrease _ opens again today. there's been a 5096 decrease in _ opens again today. there's been a 5096 decrease in sperm - a 50% decrease in sperm quantity and an increase in malfunctioning sperm, unable to swim properly. malfunctioning sperm, unable to swim properly-— swim properly. thousands of households _ swim properly. thousands of households across _ swim properly. thousands of households across the - swim properly. thousands of.
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households across the country are suspiciously quiet this lunchtime as children vary their noses in the final instalment of harry potter. this is bbc world news. i'm david eades. the latest headline: as anti—games protests continue, more olympic athletes and officials are either infected with coronavirus or are in quarantine, just five days before the games officially begin. the german leader, angela merkel, has visited the region worst affected by devastating floods. she says the world must act faster in its battle against global warming here in england, as most covid restrictions have been lifted at midnight, the prime minister is self—isolating following contact with the health secretary sajid javid who has coronavirus. downing street initially said both borisjohnson
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and the uk chancellor rishi sunak, would be part of a pilot scheme allowing them to keep working. but a barrage of criticism was followed by a rapid u—turn, and now downing street has pulled out of the pilot scheme entirely. this report from our political corresponent nick eardley. life might be feeling a bit more normal, but the impact of the pandemic is farfrom over. hundreds of thousands of people have been told to self—isolate in recent days. and now track and trace has hit the heart of government. the prime minister and chancellor are self—isolating after the health secretary tested positive for covid yesterday. boris johnson posted this video on twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily, but i think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. the prime minister will now spend the next week here,
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his country retreat at chequers. that wasn't always the plan, though. this morning, number ten said the prime minister wouldn't have to self—isolate because downing street was part of a trial to allow people to keep working if they provided a daily negative test. a cabinet minister was sent out to defend the plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor, can conduct the most essential business but at other times of the day, they won't be mixing with people outside of their own households. about an hour after this, amid accusations of double standards, downing street changed its mind. in york today, sympathy was in short supply. everyone's been getting pinged the last few weeks. everyone's sticking to it. they're just writing the law for themselves, isn't it? which hasjust been, itjust sums it up, the whole thing, doesn't it? we've all done everything we should have done, and we have done, but i do feel they should have done
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the same as us. if we're all in this together, they have to be leading - by example, don't they? labour's leader unimpressed too. the only reason that he's u—turned on this is because he has been busted. it's like bank robbers who got caught and now they're offering the money back. one rule for them, another for everybody else. it's contemptuous of the british public. this has been a pretty messy start to a week where government communication is going to be key. most legal restrictions will be lifted in england tomorrow, but ministers don't want this to be a free—for—all. they will still be urging caution and for people to behave responsibly. the vaccine roll—out has given ministers confidence to open up. but there's an expectation that cases will rise. i think it's almost certain we will get to 1,000 hospitalisations per day. it'll almost certainly get to 100,000 cases a day. the real question is, do we get to double that, or even higher? and that's where the crystal ball starts to fail. as england prepares
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to take a big step, as some warn about becoming too relaxed too soon, a reminder that opening up isn't without risk. nick eardley, bbc news. we have a similar story but perhaps not on the same scale. israel has recorded a four—month high in new daily coronavirus cases, going from almost none at all a few weeks ago to more than 800 a day — although the number of serious cases remains low. the country vaccinated its adult population at the world's fastest rate, and there's now a rush to immunise the young, with no firm decision yet on whether to bring back major restrictions. here's our middle east correspondent tom bateman. there are some nerves, a bit of comfort, and lots of relief, too. israel is racing to vaccinate its teenagers. this boy is only 12 and getting his second dose.
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i am here today to go back to regular life and to say enough to coronavirus. the gold family children are here with their mum. "my dad told me he would never do anything that could hurt me, so i have nothing to worry about," says 12—year—old noah. a third of israelis are under 16. and the age group is a big part of the new covid caseload, due to the delta variant brought in from abroad. well, there is no way that anyone could be completely sure that travellers aren't taking the virus with them when they fly. but here, they've been trying to crack down as hard as they can at the airport. it has been controversial and difficult, though, as this country struggles with the surge of the new variant. it's israel's delta dilemma. he is very excited about going to see his grandparents
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and friends, and we're also excited. when was the last time you left the country? christmas in germany. in israel, life's been back to near—normal for months, but then came the delta surge. some blamed loopholes in air travel rules for it getting in. officials say that's now fixed. but in the face of the variant, the government so far is bringing back only modest restrictions. well, if you've landed at ben—gurion, you can't actually leave the airport now until you've done this. so, could more restrictions return here? the top government adviser tells me the vaccines work, but they're not bulletproof. have you changed your own behaviours from, say, four weeks ago? oh, yeah, i'm much more cautious. i'm much more reluctant to go into mass gatherings, in general enclosed, confined spaces. and i'm much more careful with my unvaccinated kids about selecting the confined
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indoor settings that they're going to spend time in. now, one of the world's most vaccinated populations finds itself a testing ground again. tom bateman, bbc news, jerusalem. so many different challenges and so many different countries. thai police have used force to break up large protests calling for the resignation of prime minister prayuth chan—ocha. hundreds of people were defying covid restrictions to take to the streets. cases have been rising sharply in thailand as in other parts of asia as well. the main story, the tokyo olympics get under way next week but there is already a growing number of athletes testing covid positive or being
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forced to isolate. many of them still arriving in the next few days into tokyo and the governor of the city has told the bbc it would be worth to cancel the games. hello again. sunday was the hottest day of the year so far in both england and wales. cardiff saw a maximum temperature of 30.2 degrees celsius, the new highest temperature of the year for wales. but it was a bit hotter at london's heathrow airport at 31.6, and that's the highest temperature we've seen in both england and the uk as a whole in 2021 so far. now, if you're heading outside over the next few hours, chances are you'll come across clear skies. the exception — northern scotland, where we could see an odd spot of rain for the western isles and the highlands, but otherwise it's dry. the other thing i'm sure you'll notice is just how warm a start to the day it's going to be. now, looking at the week ahead, high pressure's going to stay dominating the weather picture, and that means lots more of this hot and sunny weather, like it or not.
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now, there will be one or two isolated thundery showers building through the latter part of the afternoon and evening time, and after hot weather by day, it will stay very warm overnight as well. monday morning, then, sunny, warm start to the day. the exception — northern scotland, where we'll see some patchy cloud, but even here there will be some sunny spells. one or two thunderstorms popping up during the afternoon, not many of these. you'll be able to see the clouds from a mile away. but if you're unlucky, you could see a downpour. the highest temperatures — england and wales, high 20s to low 30s. and looking at the jet stream pattern, well, this explains why our weather's not going to change. we've got this blocked pattern. the uk's underneath this ridge, and that is what's causing us the fine weather. this kind of pattern isn't going to change very much day—to—day. and that means tuesday, we'll see more of that fine, sunny, very warm if not hot weather. but again, there could be one or two isolated storms popping up as we go through the afternoon. temperatures again high 20s to the low 30s, the heat wave continues. but it's starting to get a bit hotter again in northern ireland and also into parts of scotland. and that warming trend
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across these northern areas will continue into the middle part of the week again. so, plenty of sunshine around, one or two afternoon storms just about possible. most of you, though, will have another dry day on wednesday. and those temperatures, high 20s to low 30s, cardiff this time seeing some of the hotter weather. 26 in belfast, and 27 there in glasgow. as i say, this weather pattern's not going to change very quickly, but eventually low pressure will likely move in to bring some thundery rain. but there's a lot of uncertainty when exactly those cooler conditions will arrive.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the tokyo olympics get under way this week but there is already a growing number of athletes testing covid—positive or being forced to self—isolate. despite the strong public opposition to the games, the governor of tokyo has told the bbc it would have been worse to cancel the games. the german chancellor, angela merkel, has visited the region of western germany hit by devastating floods. she says the world must hurry in its fight against global warming and pledges aid for rebuilding the area quickly. more heavy rain has caused further flooding in southern germany and austria. nearly all of the coronavirus restrictions in england have been lifted for the first time since march last year. most social distancing rules are relaxed and face coverings are no longer required by law.

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