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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 18, 2021 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines: more rain and flooding hits western europe. on a visit to germany's worst—hit region, chancellor angela merkel expresses horror at the devastation. | translation: it all suggests it has| something to do with climate change. icame i came here to get a real picture and i have to say it is a really surreal and eerie situation, it's terrifying. an investigation by 16 media organizations claims that human rights activists, journalists and lawyers were targeted by authoritarian governments using spyware. the prime minister and chancellor have made a rapid u—turn, announcing they will now self—isolate, after being identified as contacts of the health secretary, who's tested positive for coronavirus. we did look briefly at the idea of taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily but i think it's far more important that
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everybody sticks to the same rules. two athletes and an official at the tokyo olympic village have tested positive for coronavirus just days before the start of the games. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are james moore, chief business commentator at the independent and the conservative commentator, tim montgomerie. tomorrow's front pages. the strains on freedom day — the front of the financial times focuses on the three senior cabinet ministers, including the prime minister, who are isolating. the paper says it highlights the impact of the infection surge in england just as restrictions are being lifted. same story leads the metro as the pm is confined to his country mansion, suggesting borisjohnson was shamed into today's u—turn.
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the mail asks "now will boris see sense on pingdemic?" with the paper saying 1.7 million are self—isolating after being contacted by the app. with 500,000 people pinged by the nhs covid app in the last week, according to the front of the express, which also reports on pm being contacted by test & trace. the times suggests some scenarios predict 200,000 cases a day by mid—august. the mirror pictures borisjohnson in his isolation video this afternoon — with the headline �*now he begs: please be cautious�*. and finally the telegraph highlights calls for the rules to be eased for people who have been double jabbed. it also suggests all children could receive jabs by the end of the year. let's start with the express, james. a backlash forces boris u—turn. you wonder who came up with this idea so close to so—called freedom day. it’s
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close to so—called freedom day. it�*s absolutely crazy. a headline like that in the express, which is usually arguably the government's most ardent supporter, a case for the telegraph may be, but for a headline like that to appear in the express, not something the government wanted to see in downing street. not good for them. the problem is, it emphasises the old one rule for us, one rule for them thing. it is not so much a u—turn as a handbrake turn, it was done so quickly. it has echoes of matt hancock, for example, when he was breaking social distancing rules, and dominic cummings at barnard castle. this is causing a lot of anger and resentment. earlier on, some people in york who were showing that. they had to act quickly to nip it in the bud. the problem is the
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impression is likely to linger. looking at the daily mirror, tim. pm's freedom day u—turn, now he begs, please be cautious. from tomorrow in england, why do government remain so tone deaf about this sort of thing? i government remain so tone deaf about this sort of thing?— this sort of thing? i think the government _ this sort of thing? i think the government has _ this sort of thing? i think the government has handled - this sort of thing? i think the i government has handled today incredibly badly. it's very rare indeed — incredibly badly. it's very rare indeed to— incredibly badly. it's very rare indeed to find twitter united. it is normally— indeed to find twitter united. it is normally the place we go to fight and argue — normally the place we go to fight and argue and call each other terrible — and argue and call each other terrible names unfortunately. but when _ terrible names unfortunately. but when i _ terrible names unfortunately. but when i woke up this morning and saw twitier— when i woke up this morning and saw twitter really united, whether you are a _ twitter really united, whether you are a covid, lockdown sceptic, whether— are a covid, lockdown sceptic, whether you are labour or conservative, everyone didn't like the idea _ conservative, everyone didn't like the idea the chancellor and the prime — the idea the chancellor and the prime minister seemed to be living in a different world than the rest of us _ in a different world than the rest of us in — in a different world than the rest of us in terms of the rules that were _ of us in terms of the rules that were applied. but i still have a lot of sunport— were applied. but i still have a lot
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of support for the general approach the government is taking to lifting restrictions. at some point, we do, as a society, — restrictions. at some point, we do, as a society, have to get used to living _ as a society, have to get used to living with — as a society, have to get used to living with this virus. and choosing to list— living with this virus. and choosing to list the — living with this virus. and choosing to list the rules at a time when the schoote— to list the rules at a time when the schools are — to list the rules at a time when the schools are not going to be meeting, at a time _ schools are not going to be meeting, at a time when the weather is on our side in _ at a time when the weather is on our side in the _ at a time when the weather is on our side in the fight, is i think the right— side in the fight, is i think the right time _ side in the fight, is i think the right time to lift restrictions. i don't — right time to lift restrictions. i don't think we should be lifting the mask— don't think we should be lifting the mask bah— don't think we should be lifting the mask ban on public transport, but i think— mask ban on public transport, but i think overall the government is getting — think overall the government is getting the balance right. the test & trace getting the balance right. the test a trace alerts _ getting the balance right. the test & trace alerts have _ getting the balance right. the test & trace alerts have reached - getting the balance right. the test & trace alerts have reached about| & trace alerts have reached about half a million. surely that has to be looked at if the economy is to open again, if now is the right time? ~ . ., ., , open again, if now is the right time? ~ . . ., , ., ~ ., time? we are already talking about reduced opening — time? we are already talking about reduced opening hours _ time? we are already talking about reduced opening hours in _ time? we are already talking about reduced opening hours in shops, i reduced opening hours in shops, marks and spencerfor reduced opening hours in shops, marks and spencer for example talked about this. we also have the issue
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of shortages of lorry drivers. this is a really big issue. we were 10,000 short before this happened. if you are getting people pinged, and there is already a shortage of lorry drivers, you can see problems are starting to emerge in supply chains. we heard the story about haribo sweets. i am a firm advocate for masks. i don't understand the complaint. it is a seat belt. if you are clinically vulnerable, as i am, are clinically vulnerable, as i am, a mask protects not only yourself but others. so i appreciate people wearing them. the problem with the ping. wearing them. the problem with the ping, you can apparently be pinged if your neighbour has had a close contact, because you are living next door even though you have a wall separating you. it is not the best
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app. we know about this, there has been an appalling amount of money put into this and it is still doing strange things. they probably have to look at this at some point, because if you start getting shortages on supermarket shelves, people will get quite cross. let’s people will get quite cross. let's move onto _ people will get quite cross. let's move onto looking _ people will get quite cross. let's move onto looking at _ people will get quite cross. let's move onto looking at the - people will get quite cross. let's move onto looking at the olympics. the sports pages of the times james. team gb panic over isolation. a quick comment from you. five days out, people coming down with coronavirus before the olympics. well, yeah. the olympics, you do five years training for this thing, and now you are getting close contact with covid. .. and now you are getting close contact with covid... if and now you are getting close contact with covid. .. if you and now you are getting close contact with covid... if you catch it, you are in real trouble. the effect on athletic performance is quite considerable, as steve bruce mentioned with newcastle and the bad effect it had on newcastle united. this is a serious issue for an olympics which already is proving controversial.—
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olympics which already is proving controversial. how much of this is due to money _ controversial. how much of this is due to money that _ controversial. how much of this is due to money that they _ controversial. how much of this is due to money that they are - controversial. how much of this is due to money that they are going | due to money that they are going ahead irrespective of the conditions? it ahead irrespective of the conditions?— ahead irrespective of the conditions? , , , conditions? it is the biggest s-uortin conditions? it is the biggest sporting event _ conditions? it is the biggest sporting event in _ conditions? it is the biggest sporting event in the - conditions? it is the biggest sporting event in the world, j conditions? it is the biggest - sporting event in the world, the olympics — sporting event in the world, the olympics. therefore it attracts the biggest _ olympics. therefore it attracts the biggest amount of money. so i'm sure there _ biggest amount of money. so i'm sure there is— biggest amount of money. so i'm sure there is a _ biggest amount of money. so i'm sure there is a lot _ biggest amount of money. so i'm sure there is a lot of financial inducement, but i think we can be a bit more _ inducement, but i think we can be a bit more charitable than that, there are olympic athletes... as james has 'ust are olympic athletes... as james has just been_ are olympic athletes... as james has just been implying, years of training _ just been implying, years of training for this event. it's not as though— training for this event. it's not as though it — training for this event. it's not as though it is — training for this event. it's not as though it is like a football season, a normai— though it is like a football season, a normal sporting season whereby if you lose _ a normal sporting season whereby if you lose a _ a normal sporting season whereby if you lose a season, you can enjoy the next _ you lose a season, you can enjoy the next the _ you lose a season, you can enjoy the next. the olympic games really is only every— next. the olympic games really is only every four years. to deny 0lymuic— only every four years. to deny olympic athletes potentially at the height— olympic athletes potentially at the height of their game, not to participate, it's a big thing. japan has prepared an enormous village, new sports— has prepared an enormous village, new sports arenas for this event, so i new sports arenas for this event, so i can— new sports arenas for this event, so i can completely understand why they are determined to go ahead. and i
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think— are determined to go ahead. and i think it's _ are determined to go ahead. and i think it's good that they are trying _ think it's good that they are trying. it's going to be difficult, butjust— trying. it's going to be difficult, butjust as the trying. it's going to be difficult, but just as the euros turned out to be a success, wembley on the final night _ be a success, wembley on the final night excepted, we can still hope the olympics can be a success too. tim, _ the olympics can be a success too. tim, talk— the olympics can be a success too. tim, talk to — the olympics can be a success too. tim, talk to us about the daily telegraph, rishi sunakfaces tim, talk to us about the daily telegraph, rishi sunak faces a tim, talk to us about the daily telegraph, rishi sunakfaces a blow from inflation. i telegraph, rishi sunak faces a blow from inflation.— from inflation. i am old enough to remember — from inflation. i am old enough to remember when _ from inflation. i am old enough to remember when inflation - from inflation. i am old enough to remember when inflation was - from inflation. i am old enough to remember when inflation was a i from inflation. i am old enough to - remember when inflation was a thing, when too much money is chasing too few goods in the economy. at the moment we are not noticing it, but one effect will be a lot of the government debt, about a quarter, is linked to the overall retail price index. with that going up, the telegraph is warning us that could cost £10 billion extra for the chancellor of the exchequer. and thatis chancellor of the exchequer. and that is £10 billion of course that can't go to the national health service, that can't go to policing,
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can't go to the other things we all care about. james is an economic commentator, he will be more expert than me, but we should worry a great deal about inflation and the knock—on effect is that it will represent in the economy, with interest rates and the government's ability to fund public services. james, bring your expertise to bear. the bank of england are telling us this will— the bank of england are telling us this will be temporary. global energy— this will be temporary. global energy prices have been a lot higher~ — energy prices have been a lot higher. i'm not sure the extra production— higher. i'm not sure the extra production of oil is necessarily something to be celebrated, the way temperatures are going at the moment. _ temperatures are going at the moment, but opec has released the valve. _ moment, but opec has released the valve. if— moment, but opec has released the valve. if you — moment, but opec has released the valve, if you like. russia have started — valve, if you like. russia have started to _ valve, if you like. russia have started to produce more. so this has the potential to maybe reduce prices a bit and _ the potential to maybe reduce prices a bit and lower some of the inflationary pressures. if the bank of england is wrong about this, and inflation _ of england is wrong about this, and inflation stays high, then it will have _ inflation stays high, then it will have to — inflation stays high, then it will have to stop putting interest rates
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up, have to stop putting interest rates up. and _ have to stop putting interest rates up, and that's going to effect nearly— up, and that's going to effect nearly all— up, and that's going to effect nearly all of rishi 's debt. a good example — nearly all of rishi 's debt. a good example of why the chancellor, not one of— example of why the chancellor, not one of the — example of why the chancellor, not one of the easiestjobs in government, especially at the moment _ government, especially at the moment. a £10 billion headache for him. , ., ., moment. a £10 billion headache for him. , . ., ., , him. they are all volunteers, politicians. — him. they are all volunteers, politicians, must _ him. they are all volunteers, politicians, must remember. him. they are all volunteers, - politicians, must remember that. the times, pressure grows on the fa over the chaos at wembley. the scale of the chaos at wembley. the scale of the breaches and alleged corruption among officials at the euro 2020 final. �* , ., , among officials at the euro 2020 final. ~ , ., , ., , among officials at the euro 2020 final. , ._ , �* final. astonishing, really. didn't see this coming. _ final. astonishing, really. didn't see this coming. you _ final. astonishing, really. didn't see this coming. you have - final. astonishing, really. didn't see this coming. you have to i final. astonishing, really. didn't| see this coming. you have to ask yourself why. this is the first major final since yourself why. this is the first majorfinal since before i was born, and i am not exactly young. so you really do have to ask why nobody saw this happening, why there were not measures in place. it's not a very
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good look for the met either. what good look for the met either. what kind of oversight _ good look for the met either. what kind of oversight is _ good look for the met either. what kind of oversight is going to be required of the fa? the met are responsible for the on the day matched controls and security, aren't they?— matched controls and security, aren't the ? , ~ ., ., aren't they? yes, the metropolitan police have — aren't they? yes, the metropolitan police have questions _ aren't they? yes, the metropolitan police have questions to _ aren't they? yes, the metropolitan police have questions to answer, l aren't they? yes, the metropolitan l police have questions to answer, but this report _ police have questions to answer, but this report on the front of the times— this report on the front of the times is— this report on the front of the times is clear. the first questions need _ times is clear. the first questions need to— times is clear. the first questions need to be — times is clear. the first questions need to be answered, we should stress _ need to be answered, we should stress these are just allegations that people paid to keep everyone in that people paid to keep everyone in that stadium safe, to ensure people without _ that stadium safe, to ensure people without tickets couldn't enter the stadium. — without tickets couldn't enter the stadium, took bribes and allowed people _ stadium, took bribes and allowed people for example to get through the disabled entrance. stories that illegal— the disabled entrance. stories that illegal drugs were openly used in the seats, of the people that got into the — the seats, of the people that got into the stadium. just as england,
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great _ into the stadium. just as england, great britain and ireland sorry, are hoping _ great britain and ireland sorry, are hoping to— great britain and ireland sorry, are hoping to have a joint bid for the world _ hoping to have a joint bid for the world cup— hoping to have a joint bid for the world cup in the future, this is a terrible — world cup in the future, this is a terrible look for us. we are not going _ terrible look for us. we are not going to — terrible look for us. we are not going to get that great prize, the second _ going to get that great prize, the second biggest sports festival in the world, if the authorities say is notable _ the world, if the authorities say is notable to— the world, if the authorities say is not able to police supposedly the most _ not able to police supposedly the most important stadium and most prestigious stadium in our national sporting _ prestigious stadium in our national sporting life. prestigious stadium in our national sporting life-— sporting life. let's finish with the metro, sizzling _ sporting life. let's finish with the metro, sizzling on _ sporting life. let's finish with the metro, sizzling on the _ sporting life. let's finish with the metro, sizzling on the hottest i sporting life. let's finish with the | metro, sizzling on the hottest day of the year. some people cooling down in the centenary square fountain in birmingham. 31.6 degrees in some places, tim. increasingly, we have to remind ourselves that we are facing more and more of these temperatures because of global warming. it really is not something a lot of people enjoy, and you are amongst them. i a lot of people en'oy, and you are amongst them._ a lot of people en'oy, and you are amongst tnom._ amongst them. i am a real boring weather person, _ amongst them. i am a real boring weather person, i'm _ amongst them. i am a real boring weather person, i'm afraid. i i amongst them. i am a real boring i weather person, i'm afraid. i would
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much _ weather person, i'm afraid. i would much rather— weather person, i'm afraid. i would much rather have drizzle, drizzle, drizzle. _ much rather have drizzle, drizzle, drizzle, than sizzle, sizzle, sizzle _ drizzle, than sizzle, sizzle, sizzle. james and i were talking about— sizzle. james and i were talking about climate change in relation to the flooding of germany in the last hour~ _ the flooding of germany in the last hour~ yes. — the flooding of germany in the last hour. yes, we do have to take action on climate _ hour. yes, we do have to take action on climate change but it has to be intelligent. china is proposing to build _ intelligent. china is proposing to build an— intelligent. china is proposing to build an enormous number of coal-fired _ build an enormous number of coal—fired power stations. so yes, we need _ coal—fired power stations. so yes, we need to— coal—fired power stations. so yes, we need to be greener much more quickly— we need to be greener much more quickly but — we need to be greener much more quickly but we have to do it in an intelligent— quickly but we have to do it in an intelligent way so we don't bankrupt our economy at the expense of china, with china _ our economy at the expense of china, with china continuing to build coal—fired power stations, that would — coal—fired power stations, that would mean there is no real benefit in the _ would mean there is no real benefit in the war— would mean there is no real benefit in the waragainst would mean there is no real benefit in the war against climate change. so, in the war against climate change. so. yes. _ in the war against climate change. so. yes. we — in the war against climate change. so, yes, we need to act to keep cool but we _ so, yes, we need to act to keep cool but we need — so, yes, we need to act to keep cool but we need to act intelligently. cop 26 — but we need to act intelligently. cop 26 coming up in glasgow in november. james, we need to show we mean business? i november. james, we need to show we mean business?— mean business? i think we do. the fact china is _ mean business? i think we do. the fact china is building _ mean business? i think we do. the fact china is building coal-fired i fact china is building coal—fired power stations is deeply
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regrettable. but at the same time i don't think that's an excuse for us not to do anything. i think every country on earth has to play their part. we should be setting an example, we are hosting cop 26, the run—up hasn't gone well because we were talking about a new coal mine in cumbria, which seemed crazy. so i think we do have to set an example and we do have to do our part. we shouldn't worry about what other countries do, we should do our bit. good to have you without looking at the papers again, thank you very much. next, it's the film review.
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hello, and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode,

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