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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 18, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. more rain and flooding hit western europe. on a visit to germany's worst—hit region, chancellor angela merkel expresses horror at the devastation. translation: i came here to get a real picture, - and i have to say it's a really surreal and eerie situation. it's terrifying. an investigation by 16 media organisations claims that human rights activists, journalists and lawyers were targeted by authoritarian governments using spyware. a rapid u—turn from the uk prime minister and chancellor, announcing they will now self—isolate after receiving covid test and trace alerts. we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot
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scheme which allows people to test daily, but i think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. and feelings run high in tokyo, with protests against the olympic games as athletes and staff test positive for covid. hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world. i'm martine croxall. the german chancellor says the world must hurry in the battle against global warming. after visiting some of the areas worst hit by last week's deadly flash floods, she also expressed shock at what she called "surreal destruction". more heavy rain has caused further flooding in southern germany and austria. our europe correspondent
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jenny hill reports. "we really need help here," she says. and outside the village shop, you can see why. as in so many other parts of western germany, people in bad munstereifel still can't quite believe what happened. we met gertrude here. volunteers have brought food, water. she told us she spent the night alone, upstairs, as water flooded into her house. "i've never seen anything like it, never. "it leaves you speechless." "gertrude," he says, "the two of us will never see this place come back to what it was. we will never see it again. it's no longer my home. it's terrible."
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earlier, angela merkel came to see for herself. this is the town of schuld, where whole houses were destroyed. translation: it's shocking. i'm tempted to say the german language has no words to describe the destruction that's occured here. but i can also see huge comfort in the way that people have come together to help each other. the water's subsiding in western germany, but overnight, more flooding in other parts of the country, high water in bavaria, saxony. in austria, too, towns and cities deluged. in bad munstereifel, they're doing their best to clear up. translation: people have | lost their lives, their houses, there are no more roads, but there is huge solidarity. they're going to need it in the weeks to come. we're seeing this kind of destruction all over west germany, and what's particularly hard for people in places like this to bear is that it could be weeks or maybe months before they get back
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electricity, connection. in one part of the region, the authorities are saying that gas for heating and hot water won't be back until well into the autumn. germany is mourning its dead. for the survivors, this ordeal is far from over. jenny hill, bbc news, bad munstereifel. here in the uk, as england prepares for most covid restrictions to be lifted on monday, the prime minister is self—isolating following contact with the health secretary, sajid javid, who has coronavirus. downing street initially said both borisjohnson and the uk chancellor, rishi sunak, would be part of a pilot scheme allowing them to keep working. but a barrage of criticism was followed by a rapid u—turn, and now downing street has pulled out of the pilot scheme entirely. this report from our political corresponent nick eardley. life might be feeling a bit more normal, but the impact of the pandemic is far from over. hundreds of thousands
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of people have been told to self—isolate in recent days. and now track and trace has hit the heart of government. the prime minister and chancellor are self—isolating after the health secretary tested positive for covid yesterday. boris johnson posted this video on twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily, but i think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. the prime minister will now spend the next week here, his country retreat at chequers. that wasn't always the plan, though. this morning, number 10 said the prime minister wouldn't have to self—isolate because downing street was part of a trial to allow people to keep working if they provided a daily negative test. a cabinet minister was sent out to defend the plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor, can conduct the most essential business but at other times of the day, they won't be mixing with people outside
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of their own households. about an hour after this, amid accusations of double standards, downing street changed its mind. in york today, sympathy was in short supply. everyone's been getting pinged the last few weeks. everyone's sticking to it. they're just writing the law for themselves, isn't it? which hasjust been, itjust sums it up, the whole thing, doesn't it? we've all done everything we should have done, and we have done, - but i do feel they should have done the same as us _ if we're all in this together, they have to be leading by example, don't they? labour's leader unimpressed too. the only reason that he's u—turned on this is because he has been busted. it's like bank robbers who got caught and now they're offering the money back. one rule for them, another for everybody else. it's contemptuous of the british public. this has been a pretty messy start to a week where government communication is going to be key. most legal restrictions will be
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lifted in england tomorrow, but ministers don't want this to be a free for all. they will still be urging caution and for people to behave responsibly. the vaccine roll—out has given ministers confidence to open up. but there's an expectation that cases will rise. i think it's almost certain that we will get to 1,000 hospitalisations per day. it'll almost certainly get to 100,000 cases a day. the real question is, do we get to double that, or even higher? and that's where the crystal ball starts to fail. as england prepares to take a big step, as some warn about becoming too relaxed too soon, a reminder that opening up isn't without risk. nick eardley reporting. the australian government has cancelled the visa of british right—wing commentator katie hopkins and she will now be deported. it comes after ms hopkins made comments about breaching the rules of the country's mandatory hotel quarantine system.
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she was in the country to appear in a celebrity verion of the reality show big brother, but she was dumped from the show on sunday. home affairs minister karen andrews said she hoped hopkins would be —— miss hopkins's actions were a slap in the face for millions of us truly is in lockdown and that she hoped mrs hopkins would be deported "imminently". activists, journalists and politicians around the world may have been spied on using mobile phone malware that is intended to be used against criminals and terrorists — according to a massive data leak. reports suggest widespread misuse of spyware sold and developed by an israeli surveillance company. the company in question have strongly denied the allegations against them and say their technology is only sold to the law enforcement and intelligence agencies of vetted governments. for more on this, we're joined by our cyber reporterjoe tidy. joe, we have heard about this nso group before, but it seems that the scale of the use of these spy tools
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is much more widespread than we realised? ., ,, ., ~ ., , . realised? yeah, nso make no secret ofthe realised? yeah, nso make no secret of the power — realised? yeah, nso make no secret of the power of _ realised? yeah, nso make no secret of the power of its _ realised? yeah, nso make no secret of the power of its spy _ realised? yeah, nso make no secret of the power of its spy tools. - realised? yeah, nso make no secret of the power of its spy tools. it - realised? yeah, nso make no secret of the power of its spy tools. it is - of the power of its spy tools. it is this pegasus software that they use to effectively hack anyone phone that they want to. they are selling the tools to governments in their words to take down terrorist cells and paedophile rings. that sort of serious high—level criminalisty these tools are being used for. and it is very powerful software, so sometimes politics is a phone call, you don't even need to click on anything or download anything. this slavery can be on your phone or camera, your microphones, everything you do, all your e—mails and messages, everything you type on your e—mail or keyboard is all being sent back to the attacker, which should be a law enforcement operation, but this report from a french be organisation says they found the list of 50,000 phone
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numbers they claim is from the nso's operation for some they are segmented from the anise of servers. this is something nso is denying. they say these phone numbers contain many, many people who are in their view innocent people, so for example activists, human rights activists or critics of governments around the world, of oppressive regimes, or journalists, and according to their statistics, of these 50,000, they have done a lot of work with other media organisations, including the guardian, they found 180 journalists in 21 different countries who were on this list, so these are people who have been selected for potential targeting with nso spyware between 2016 and june 2021, and those include reporters in azerbaijan, hungary, india, morocco and some reporters from many instream international news organisations like, for example, reuters, ap and cnn. ~ ., ,, nso cnn. what moore has nso said? nso has denied this _ cnn. what moore has nso said? nso has denied this and _ cnn. what moore has nso said? nso has denied this and all— cnn. what moore has nso said? nso has denied this and all previous - has denied this and all previous allegations that they are selling
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their tools to the wrong governments, to governments who are misusing the tools and notjust trying to take down the criminals as they put it, nso says it denies all negations and says this list of numbers is not from their operation. they like to have his eyes and a so—so sister technology solitude law and intelligence agencies of that it governments for the sole purpose of saving lives, preventing crime and terror acts and they're also saying might even sue for defamation against the organisations who are running these stories and these investigations and allegations against them for some meanwhile we know that other organisations that have been following this from the beginning, they promised more to come throughout the week. jae. beginning, they promised more to come throughout the week. joe, thank ou ve come throughout the week. joe, thank you very much- — come throughout the week. joe, thank you very much- joe _ come throughout the week. joe, thank you very much. joe tidy. _ with just days until the opening of the tokyo olympics, a growing number of athletes and officials have tested covid—positive or been forced to self—isolate. in the olympic village, two players and a coach for the south africa men's football team have the virus.
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eight members of team gb athletics team are also in isolation, after being in close contact with positive cases. and us tennis player coco gauff has announced she's not going to tokyo, after testing positive for the virus. despite the worsening covid situation in the city and widespread public opposition to the games, the governor of tokyo has told the bbc it would have been worse to cancel. from tokyo, rupert wingfield—hayes reports. with five days to go, the anti—olympic protests are not going away. this one is outside the hotel where ioc president thomas bach is staying. their message to him is pretty blunt. over at the olympic village, three covid cases have now been confirmed. across the city, 1,400 new cases on saturday. despite this, when i sat down with the governor of tokyo, she told me the games must go ahead. translation: | believe that - not holding the olympics is even sadder than holding it during these dire times.
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i do not want to show the world that we have lost to covid—19. there is still meaning in holding the olympics in tokyo, despite the current situation. this was wembley stadium in london a week ago. but with just 20% of japanese vaccinated, there will be no scenes like this in tokyo's olympic stadium. governor koike concedes ifjapan had moved faster on vaccines, things might have been different. translation: i agree. it would have been better if we had a faster vaccination roll—out, we may have been able to have spectators at the olympics. but the speed of vaccine roll—out has now increased immensely. not fast enough. this is kyoto, japan's ancient capital and number one tourist site. by now, this place should have been thronged with hordes of tourists from all over the world. forjapan, that was to be the big payoff.
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invest billions and billions in hosting the olympics, and then millions of travellers will come from all over the world to your great cultural institutions, spending lots of money. as you can see, there's nobody here. shop owners here have seen sales fall by more than 90%. translation: it is - the government's fault. look at the other countries, like the uk and taiwan. they seem to be doing well. but look at japan. i cannot believe we call ourselves a developed country. back in tokyo, hundreds of athletes are now arriving each day. it's now clear that some of them will be carrying covid. the ioc�*s assertion that the games represent zero risk to public health is already starting to look flimsy. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. to discuss all this, i'm joined now by professorjules boykoff, a former us footballer and an expert
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on the olympics from the pacific university of oregon. thank you very much forjoining us. five days out from the opening ceremony, we have got covid cases, people isolating. how concerned should athletes be?— people isolating. how concerned should athletes be? went on the big oruanisers should athletes be? went on the big organisers said _ should athletes be? went on the big organisers said they _ should athletes be? went on the big organisers said they wanted - should athletes be? went on the big organisers said they wanted to - should athletes be? went on the big organisers said they wanted to bring j organisers said they wanted to bring olympic fever to tokyo, i cannot imagine this is what they had in my —— when old intake organisers. athletes are stressed out. i have been speaking to tokyo about athletes and they are not feeling good about what is happening right now, especially with the cases popping up now, especially with the cases popping up inside the olympics village on a commission outside, in wider tokyo, where we are seeing what looks to be a fifth wave of the coronavirus, so these are very stressful times for athletes, but also for everyday people in tokyo and widerjapan. irate also for everyday people in tokyo and widerjapan.— also for everyday people in tokyo and widerjapan. we have been told re eatedl and widerjapan. we have been told repeatedly by _ and widerjapan. we have been told repeatedly by the — and widerjapan. we have been told repeatedly by the ioc _ and widerjapan. we have been told repeatedly by the ioc that - and widerjapan. we have been told repeatedly by the ioc that these - and widerjapan. we have been told | repeatedly by the ioc that these are going to be safe, secure games. how reassured are you by the provisions that have been put in place? this a that have been put in place? as a scholar of the _ that have been put in place? as a scholar of the olympic _ that have been put in place? is —. scholar of the olympic games, i've seen a lot of statements from the international and the committee over
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the years that are absolutely not true. it is in their self—interest to assure over and over again that these will be safe and secure games, but we're already that they are not necessarily safe and secure games. the international and the committee has a lot of money writing on the semantics and i think that is from the key driving factor moving forward with them —— on these olympics. 74% of the ioc revenues come from rectally from broadcaster fees, which means they are perfect we have to have a made—for—tv event with nobody in the stands, so long as those broadcaster fees continue to roll into their coffers, so they can say a lot from behind the podium, but the realities don't make reality as money is there much writing this process. is reality as money is there much writing this process.— reality as money is there much writing this process. is that why the governor — writing this process. is that why the governor of _ writing this process. is that why the governor of tokyo _ writing this process. is that why the governor of tokyo said - writing this process. is that why the governor of tokyo said he i writing this process. is that why - the governor of tokyo said he would have been far worse to cancel the games at this point? the have been far worse to cancel the games at this point? the governor of to 0 is games at this point? the governor of tokyo is relatively _ games at this point? the governor of tokyo is relatively powerless - games at this point? the governor of tokyo is relatively powerless in - tokyo is relatively powerless in this situation. in fact, the prime minister stated publicly that he did not have the power to cancel the olympic games and he was absolutely
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correct. if you look at the host city contracts that tokyo signed with the international olympics committee, it states very clearly that only one entity can cancel, and that only one entity can cancel, and thatis that only one entity can cancel, and that is the international elliptic committee, so, really, local officials are powerless. this point to a bigger issue on the olympics, will you might call a democracy deficit. , , will you might call a democracy deficit. , ., , will you might call a democracy deficit. , . , ., deficit. just finally, then, what more could — deficit. just finally, then, what more could they _ deficit. just finally, then, what more could they be _ deficit. just finally, then, what more could they be doing, - deficit. just finally, then, what i more could they be doing, given deficit. just finally, then, what - more could they be doing, given that the games are going to go ahead, to try to keep athletes safe? it is try to keep athletes safe? it is incredibly _ try to keep athletes safe? it is incredibly difficult _ try to keep athletes safe? it s incredibly difficult right now. after all, incredibly difficult right now. afterall, if incredibly difficult right now. after all, if you listen to medical professionals who have beenjumping up professionals who have beenjumping up and down, clambering for these games to be cancelled, they will tell you that the international olympic committee cosmic preparations are absently not up to stuff a stub they�* re preparations are absently not up to stuff a stub they're not been assigned to the practices. if you're an athlete and you're heading to tokyo, you need to do all of the things that you can do to keep yourself safe, isolate as much as possible, wash your hands like mad, wear a mask at all times except when you're sleeping and eating, but otherwise you're in a difficult
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situation, but it is thanks the ioc. professorjules boykoff from the university of oregon, thank you very much forjoining us.— you're watching bbc news. the headlines: the german leader angela merkel has visited the region worst—affected by devastating floods. she says the world must act faster in its battle against global warming. an investigation by 16 media organisations claims that human rights activists, journalists and lawyers have been targeted by authoritarian governments using spyware. afghan peace talks have ended in the gulf state of qatar with a joint commitment by the taliban and an afghan government delegation to speed up talks and to continue the high—level negotiations until a settlement is found. they also said they'd work to provide humanitarian assistance throughout afghanistan. but the announcement contained few details or signs of any possible break—throughs. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is covering the talks in doha and says the two sides have been far apart on all the major issues.
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after the talks, she asked both sides why there were no details of a road map on the future of afghanistan. i think that it is well—known, it is well—known, because in some of the topics which were our priority and their priority, and seconds, that was something that was discussed but not agreed. but, anyway, we would discuss it in coming meetings. it seems agreed that we both agree that there should be a political solution. that is it? we talked about a lot of ideas like that. - and i think it is a good - opportunity, as i mentioned. you're not disappointed ? about what? well, because there could've been much more detail... i would have expected i the war to end tonight... but we had good, l fruitful discussions. ok, thanks. the afghan government has re—called its diplomatic staff from neighbouring pakistan, following an attack on friday
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on the ambassador�*s daughter in the capital, islamabad. it's the latest sign of the troubled relationship between the two neighbours. our afghanistan and pakistan correspondent secunder kermani has more from kabul. well, this incident took place on friday afternoon, when the afghan ambassador to pakistan's daughter in the capital islamabad was kidnapped and assaulted. she was travelling in a taxi when another passenger got into the vehicle, started beating her and calling herfather a communist. she lost consciousness. when she came to, she was lying in a residential area of the city, her hands and feet had been tied and she was quite badly injured. now, this incident has sparked anger in afghanistan, feeding into, as you say, an already tense relationship with the two countries. in the last few hours, the afghan foreign ministry has announced that it's recalling all senior afghan diplomats from pakistan, it says, until their security concerns are addressed, including putting on trial
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those responsible for this incident. the pakistani foreign ministry has responded, saying that that decision is regrettable. it points out that prime minister imran khan has ordered all resources be utilised to apprehend those who are responsible and also ordered security for afghan diplomats in pakistan to be beefed up. secunder kermani in kabul. let's get some of the day's other news now. thai police have used force to break up a protest against the government's handling of the covid crisis. infections are currently running at record levels in thailand, putting pressure on the country's hospitals. protestors defied rules prohibiting gatherings of more than five people, to call for the thai prime minister to resign. colombia's armed forces have seized 1.5 tonnes of cocaine, after intercepting a speedboat off its caribbean coast. the military say the drugs were thrown into the sea by the occupants, when they realised they were being chased. five people have been arrested.
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south africa's president, cyril ramaphosa, hasjoined in a clean—up operation following days of violence that left more than 200 people dead. protests broke out after the former president, jacob zuma, began a 15—month jail sentence for contempt of court over a corruption trial. as south africans mark mandela day, mr ramaphosa urged people to honour the legacy of the country's former leader by helping to rebuild. with the british travel rules changing tomorrow for people returning from some major holiday destinations, there's been a scramble to rearrange plans to return home. travellers arriving from france, which is on the amber list, will need to quarantine for ten days regardless of their vaccination status. and the previously green list islands of mallorca, menorca and ibiza will now move on to the amber list — it means compulsory quarantine for adults who are not double—jabbed. our europe correspondent nick beake is on ibiza to assess the impact on holiday makers there. it was fun while it lasted.
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their stay on party island is ending sooner than expected, a final drink before heading back to the uk to beat the latest quarantine rule change. we have to pay for the extra flight, miss two days holidayjust to come home on sunday so we can go to work and we can live our lives as normal. and what do you think about that? i'm not happy. i'd rather be here for two more days. we've had a great time. ibiza's great. i'd rather be here all week, but what can you do, eh? in the old days in ibiza, they'd be queuing for the clubs. these days, it's for a covid test to get home. nearly all the young british tourists we've met have only been given theirfirstjab, and so have had to act fast to avoid ten days in isolation when they return. another summer of uncertainty is also hitting businesses on the island. just two weeks ago, they were rejoicing when ibiza went onto the uk's green watchlist. but now it's off it,
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and so they're bracing themselves for a big slump in the number of brits arriving. some of the biggest venues on the island, already working with strict covid—safe measures, are finding it impossible to plan ahead. i mean, at the moment, concerns over health are all— powerful, and governments are using it as a really blunt instrument. and they're making decisions that, you know, frankly, they're just crippling for businesses, they're crippling for customers. the chopping and changing... it's notjust this hotel, the whole island lives or dies on what happens to tourism. despite all the travel changes, more than 20 planes touched down today, bringing british holiday—makers determined to get their summer break. we've had our test, so it's fine that we can come. - we've had our test, we'll have a good time here. l getting back might be tricky because obviously if we got| covid while we're here, _ we'll be staying in a hotel and have to quarantine for two weeks| and we have to pay for that. but because we all work from home, we're able to, like, _ hopefullyjust go home _ and quarantine from home and still
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work from home and should be fine. but new arrivals will find that covid cases are also on the rise in the balearics. still plenty of selfies, but dancing, strictly speaking, remains abandoned. like tourist destinations across europe, they're waiting and watching to see what happens next. nick beake, bbc news, ibiza. to formula one now, and lewis hamilton has won the british grand prix in a dramatic and controversial race at silverstone — the eighth time he has won his home grand prix. hamilton was involved in a collision with his main rival max verstappen in the first lap of the race, which resulted in the red bull driver having to retire and hamilton forced to serve a ten—second penalty. but the mercedes star was able to fight back and take the lead in the penultimate lap. american golfer collin morikawa has won the claretjug on his open championship debut. the 24—year—old ended on 15—under par at royal st george's at sandwich in southern england to beat fellow american jordan spieth by two shots.
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he becomes the only golfer ever to win two of the sport's four major tournaments on his debut. this is bbc news. hello again. for the majority of us, sunday was another hot and sunny day. indeed, it was the hottest day of the year so far for both england and wales. 30.2 celsius the new mark for wales — that was recorded in cardiff — and 31.6 celsius at london's heathrow, that's also the uk's highest temperature of the year so far, along with england's highest temperature. now, you can see the extent of the day's sunshine. we do have some cloud coming round our area of high pressure into northern areas of scotland. and overnight, that cloud could be thick enough for an odd passing spot of rain through for western aisles and the highlands, but otherwise, it's a dry night with largely clear skies. it is a night, though, where those temperatures are going to struggle to come down, so an uncomfortable
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night for sleeping. temperatures, 17 in cardiff by the end of the night, 18 in london. a bit fresher for scotland and northern ireland. and temperatures for england and wales in the countryside will be a few degrees cooler than the cities as well. a warm start to the day nevertheless on monday. it is another fine, sunny, very warm, if not hot day coming up, but again, northern scotland will see some slightly thicker cloud. here, there will be some sunny spells coming through that — temperatures into the low 20s. further southwards, though, for england and wales, high 20s, even into the low 30s for the hottest areas. and that heat could just trigger one or two isolated thunderstorms. the jet stream pattern at the moment is blocked, and this undulating pattern here is a ridge. that's what's building our area of high pressure. this pattern is not going to change very much, and what that means is we're going to continue that run of high pressure and settled weather. for tuesday, little overall change in the weather picture. again, it's another largely hot and sunny day. again, through the afternoon, there could be an odd isolated thunderstorm building, but most of us will stay dry.
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temperatures, again, high 20s to low 30s in england and wales. in scotland, we're starting to see the temperatures come up a little bit as well through the central belt, and that is a trend, actually, for scotland and northern ireland. mid—week onwards, we will start to see those temperatures rising once again, so it will get increasingly warm if not hot here as well. temperatures wednesday afternoon, then, again, high 20s to low 30s for england and wales. 26 celsius there in belfast, 27 celsius in glasgow, so it is getting warmer as well. now, towards the end of the week, we will probably keep the dry weather for a few more days, but eventually, we will probably see low pressure move in to bring some thundery rain, but there is some uncertainty about when that will happen.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: more rain and flooding hits western europe. on a visit to germany's worst—hit region, chancellor angela merkel expresses horror at the devastation. | translation: it all suggests it has| something to do with climate change. icame i came here to get a real picture and i have to say it is a really surreal and eerie situation, it's terrifying. an investigation by 16 media organizations claims that human rights activists, journalists and lawyers were targeted by authoritarian governments using spyware. the prime minister and chancellor have made a rapid u—turn, announcing they will now self—isolate, after being identified as contacts of the health secretary, who's tested positive for coronavirus. we did look briefly at the idea of taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily but i think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules.
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two athletes and an official at the tokyo olympic village have

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