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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 18, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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weather for a few more days, but eventually, we will probably see low pressure move in to bring some thundery rain, but there is some uncertainty about when that will happen. the german chancellor angela merkel visits the region of western germany hit by devastating floods. she says the world must hurry in its fight against global warming and pledges aid for rebuilding the area quickly. translation: it aid for rebuilding the area quickly. translation:— aid for rebuilding the area quickly. translation: it all suggests it has somethin: translation: it all suggests it has something to _ translation: it all suggests it has something to do _ translation: it all suggests it has something to do with _ translation: it all suggests it has something to do with climate - translation: it all suggests it has | something to do with climate change. we have to hurry, we have to get a move on in the fight against climate change. move on in the fight against climate chan . e. ~ , ., change. the prime minister and chancellor _ change. the prime minister and chancellor have _ change. the prime minister and chancellor have made _ change. the prime minister and chancellor have made a - change. the prime minister and chancellor have made a rapid i change. the prime minister and - chancellor have made a rapid u-turn chancellor have made a rapid u—turn and will now sell isolate after being identified as contacts of the health secretary, who tested positive for coronavirus. we did
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look briefly _ positive for coronavirus. we did look briefly at _ positive for coronavirus. we did look briefly at the _ positive for coronavirus. we did look briefly at the idea - positive for coronavirus. we did look briefly at the idea of - positive for coronavirus. we did | look briefly at the idea of taking part in_ look briefly at the idea of taking part in the pilot scheme which allows— part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily but i think_ allows people to test daily but i think it's — allows people to test daily but i think it's far more important that everybody— think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. no deal— everybody sticks to the same rules. no deal in _ everybody sticks to the same rules. no deal in the zohar, but afghan and taliban negotiators issue a joint statement committing to further talks until agreement is reached. american golfer collin morikawa wins the claretjug on his open championship debut after a bogey free final round. —— injohar. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are chief business commentator at the independent, james moore, and the conservative commentator, tim montgomerie. he promised to bring ice lollies but
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he has actuallyjust bought the empty sticks to provoke me! the front pages tomorrow. the strains on �*freedom day�* — the front of the financial times focuses on the three senior cabinet ministers, including the prime minister, who are isolating. the paper says it highlights the impact of the infection surge in england just as restrictions are being lifted. same story leads the metro as the pm is confined to his country mansion — suggesting borisjohnson was shamed into today's u—turn the mail asks �*now will boris see sense on pingdemic?�* — with the paper saying i.7m are self—isolating after being contacted by the app. �*trying to dodge' the rules is the focus for the i. alongside a timeline outling the u—turn, the i includes a warning from professor neil fergusson predictiong there could be 100,000 new covid cases a day in the coming weeks meanwile, meanwhile, reports of calls to ease rules for double jabbed
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on the front of the telegraph. it also reports on recommendations for all children to receive jabs by the end of the year. so let's begin. starting with the metro, sajid javid having a hug with the prime minister, tim. a lot of people will not feel a great deal of freedom on so—called freedom day day tomorrow. no, this isn't what the government expected. we have had the rise in infections in recent times, a lot of people in the nhs are worried about it. all this pinging taking place, and lots of businesses struggling to meet their basic objectives. marks and spencer today warned of having to cut its opening hours simply because it doesn't have enough staff in stores to meet the basic demands. i think generally, there has been surprised at the continued anxiety
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among the population about covid. i think most tory mps think it's time to move on, that we have to get on with life, we have to start living with this virus. the public are still quite anxious about it, hence the opposition for example to not wearing masks on public transport and other crowded places. you wonder, james, _ and other crowded places. you wonder, james, who _ and other crowded places. you wonder, james, who came up with this idea, with a couple of days before the restrictions lift, it looked to a lot of people like the chancellor and the prime minister were saying, well, the rules don't apply to us? this has been a bit of a theme. we have _ this has been a bit of a theme. we have seen— this has been a bit of a theme. we have seen the matt hancock scandal dyin- have seen the matt hancock scandal dying down, where he disobeyed social— dying down, where he disobeyed social distancing, and before that there _ social distancing, and before that there was— social distancing, and before that there was the dominic cummings jaunt to barnard _ there was the dominic cummings jaunt to barnard castle. i don't know if it is a _
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to barnard castle. i don't know if it is a u—turn, it is more of a handbrake _ it is a u—turn, it is more of a handbrake turn, just don't have as much _ handbrake turn, just don't have as much oil— handbrake turn, just don't have as much oil as vin diesel in fast and furious _ much oil as vin diesel in fast and furious nine _ much oil as vin diesel in fast and furious nine. —— as much style. when you have _ furious nine. —— as much style. when you have almost everyone being affected — you have almost everyone being affected by this ping issue, it didn'l— affected by this ping issue, it didn't look at all good.- affected by this ping issue, it didn't look at all good. let's look at the daily _ didn't look at all good. let's look at the daily mail. _ didn't look at all good. let's look at the daily mail. now _ didn't look at all good. let's look at the daily mail. now will - didn't look at all good. let's look at the daily mail. now will boris | at the daily mail. now will boris see the sense on pingdemic? a huge number of people, kids in schools, some schools have pretty much given up some schools have pretty much given up before the end of term... businesses, as tim just said, really struggling to keep open, keep functioning. not least the nhs. a prediction of an even bigger surge in case numbers coming. this issue or shop openings — in case numbers coming. this issue or shop openings is _
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in case numbers coming. this issue or shop openings is going _ in case numbers coming. this issue or shop openings is going to - in case numbers coming. this issue | or shop openings is going to become a problem. it's notjust shops, you are talking about the lorries that deliver? a nationwide shortage of lorry drivers, something like 2000 short at the moment. if you play into the fact they can't get staff into the fact they can't get staff into the fact they can't get staff into the shops, no lorry drivers because they are getting pinged, you start to wonder when we will see shortages on the supermarket shelves, and people will notice that and won't be happy. what shelves, and people will notice that and won't be happy.— and won't be happy. what do you think the government _ and won't be happy. what do you think the government will - and won't be happy. what do you think the government will decide | and won't be happy. what do you i think the government will decide to do, tim? we are seeing a lot of changes tomorrow. even more freedoms come august 8th, if you are double jabbed. how sensitive can we allow the test and trace app to continue to be under the circumstances? i to be under the circumstances? i don't think we can allow it to be as sensitive — don't think we can allow it to be as sensitive. james talked about the dangers— sensitive. james talked about the dangers of shortages hitting shops
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and he's _ dangers of shortages hitting shops and he's absolutely right. i was talking — and he's absolutely right. i was talking to — and he's absolutely right. i was talking to a pub landlord today who is already— talking to a pub landlord today who is already seeing various breweries stopping _ is already seeing various breweries stopping for him. i didn't get a delivery— stopping for him. i didn't get a delivery of a beer for example on friday. _ delivery of a beer for example on friday. this — delivery of a beer for example on friday, this is only going to get worse — friday, this is only going to get worse if— friday, this is only going to get worse if people continue to be asked to self—isolate when actually the risk of _ to self—isolate when actually the risk of carrying the virus and infecting _ risk of carrying the virus and infecting other people is quite small — infecting other people is quite small. the government has already said people who have been double jahhed _ said people who have been double jabbed will not necessarily have to self—isolate from the middle of august — self—isolate from the middle of august. you asked what the government should do next. i think they should bring that forward very dramatically to tomorrow, ideally. they should act quickly because otherwise we are going to have some very severe _ otherwise we are going to have some very severe shortages. we can do without, — very severe shortages. we can do without, some of us can do without beer arriving — without, some of us can do without beer arriving in without, some of us can do without beerarriving in a pub, but the cascade — beerarriving in a pub, but the cascade effect on medical deliveries on the _ cascade effect on medical deliveries on the other essential supplies, petrol. — on the other essential supplies, petrol. it — on the other essential supplies, petrol, it could mean the economy grinding _ petrol, it could mean the economy grinding to — petrol, it could mean the economy grinding to a halt in much more significant _ grinding to a halt in much more
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significant ways. so we are not that far away— significant ways. so we are not that far away from a potential crisis situation — far away from a potential crisis situation if this pingdemic, as we lightly— situation if this pingdemic, as we lightly call it, gets a lot worse. let's _ lightly call it, gets a lot worse. let's look— lightly call it, gets a lot worse. let's look at the financial times, tim. isolation on freedom day, talking about the food supplies you just mentioned... harry bo, the sweet manufacturer, trying and struggling to get supplies. inconsequential unless you make those sweets, but lorry drivers, shortages as well... so many issues colliding all at once. the impact of brexit too coming into play now. tote brexit too coming into play now. we are brexit too coming into play now. - are learning once more, our economy operates in incredibly interconnected ways. when one partner stops functioning, we see the cascade effect beginning to affect other parts of the economy
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quite dramatically. —— when one part stops functioning. although the government approach is risky in some people's eyes, this is why we have to get on with getting back to some kind of normality, getting an appreciation of risk. every time we leave our house, even in circumstances when there isn't a pandemic, we take a risk. the average death rate in the uk at the moment is below the average for other similar years. moment is below the average for othersimilaryears. so moment is below the average for other similar years. so we have to get used to living with the virus. now is the best time to lift restrictions, when the weather at least gives us some advantage against the virus. we have the break in schools which also gives us an advantage in tackling the virus. this is a time when we can move more to that stage that people call herd immunity, so we can live with this virus and get on with life. i'm glad sometimes i am a pundit and not in government. certainly i'm glad at
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the moment. these decisions are very hard but overall i think the government is getting the balance right. tote government is getting the balance riuht. ~ .., government is getting the balance riuht. ~ , government is getting the balance rirht.~ , right. we could see the delayed death of two — right. we could see the delayed death of two people _ right. we could see the delayed death of two people who - right. we could see the delayed death of two people who had i right. we could see the delayed| death of two people who had not right. we could see the delayed - death of two people who had not had cancer treatments and things like that during the pandemic. absolutely.— that during the pandemic. absolutely. that during the pandemic. absolutel . , ., absolutely. sadly that will come into the statistics _ absolutely. sadly that will come into the statistics soon. - absolutely. sadly that will come into the statistics soon. in - absolutely. sadly that will come into the statistics soon. in the i into the statistics soon. in the telegraph, all children could be jabbed by the end of the year. we have spoken to a lot of scientists on bbc news in the last 16 months, very few people suggesting children under 11 should need to be jabbed. not struggling too greatly with covid, but of course there is the risk of long covid even if the disease itself is not severe at the time. �* ., ,., disease itself is not severe at the time. �* ., ., time. i'm not so sanguine about reducin: time. i'm not so sanguine about reducing the _ time. i'm not so sanguine about reducing the restrictions - time. i'm not so sanguine about reducing the restrictions at - time. i'm not so sanguine about reducing the restrictions at the l reducing the restrictions at the moment. certainly a strong advocate of wearing masks. if you take the
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pingdemic if you like, they got it the wrong way round, a test and release strategy but wear a mask, because you are notjust protecting yourself, you are protecting others. when it comes to the vaccination, in the us they are going to just above 12—year—olds. if it's safe, it's probably wise, because if you look at the hospitalisation statistics, it's younger people unvaccinated who are making up a bigger proportion of the hospitalisation statistics than we had last time. so i think there is a case we can make all pushing the vaccination younger. we know covid spreads very well in high school. if you have high school aged kids as i have, getting an e—mail saying there is a case and the class has to self—isolate. .. saying there is a case and the class has to self—isolate... there is something to be said for lowering the age of the vaccine and getting it around high school kids at least.
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long covid, when i had it last march, it knocked me flat for two months. i am clinically extremely vulnerable so perhaps not surprising. but the long covid and the extended recovery you get, and some people have had it a lot longer than i had, it's not nice, it's nasty. than i had, it's not nice, it's nas . ., ~ ., ., ., nasty. you never know how long it will last, i — nasty. you never know how long it will last, i hope — nasty. you never know how long it will last, i hope you _ nasty. you never know how long it will last, i hope you are _ nasty. you never know how long it will last, i hope you are feeling . nasty. you never know how long it will last, i hope you are feeling a i will last, i hope you are feeling a lot better. a comment quickly on the financial times' picture story. meeting flood victims. destruction is how angela merkel described it. i is how angela merkel described it. i know, it's unbelievable. pictures that have — know, it's unbelievable. pictures that have hit us particularly strongly— that have hit us particularly strongly in the past few days. i saw a metal— strongly in the past few days. i saw a metal skit— strongly in the past few days. i saw a metal skit being tossed down a german— a metal skit being tossed down a german street as if it was a piece of plastic — german street as if it was a piece of plastic. the power of water out of plastic. the power of water out of control— of plastic. the power of water out of control is — of plastic. the power of water out of control is a very frightening thing — of control is a very frightening thing -- _ of control is a very frightening thing -- a _ of control is a very frightening thing. —— a metal skit. germany has very powerful — thing. —— a metal skit. germany has very powerful rivers which underpins
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industrial— very powerful rivers which underpins industrial and regional base. but my goodness, _ industrial and regional base. but my goodness, frightening when you see that. goodness, frightening when you see that i_ goodness, frightening when you see that i wish — goodness, frightening when you see that. i wish the german people and the belgian people every player, realty. _ the belgian people every player, really. is — the belgian people every player, really, is the very horrible process of recovering dead bodies that have been in _ of recovering dead bodies that have been in water for some time, continues _ been in water for some time, continues. —— every prayer continues. -- every prayer people are unaccounted _ continues. -- every prayer people are unaccounted for. _ continues. -- every prayer people are unaccounted for. angela - continues. -- every prayer people i are unaccounted for. angela merkel making the point it is connected to climate change. she making the point it is connected to climate change.— making the point it is connected to climate change. she is right. act on it fast and act _ climate change. she is right. act on it fast and act now. _ it fast and act now. climate scientists have been saying for years this is going to happen and now we are seeing it. notjust in germany, they still have wildfires burning like crazy in the western us. we have to take action on this. there is no time, we have to take action. ~ ., �* ., , ,
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action. the metro, britain sizzles on the hottest _ action. the metro, britain sizzles on the hottest day _ action. the metro, britain sizzles on the hottest day of _ action. the metro, britain sizzles on the hottest day of the - action. the metro, britain sizzles on the hottest day of the year. i action. the metro, britain sizzles i on the hottest day of the year. the picture in century square, the fountain in birmingham, the mercury hitting 31.6 degrees. for some people, james, again, questions about how much is connected to climate change. scientists would argue a great deal of it, and we will see more and more of it. and along with it, at times, lane. someone sent me an e—mail saying, enjoy— someone sent me an e—mail saying, enjoy the _ someone sent me an e—mail saying, enjoy the beautiful weather. no, someone sent me an e—mail saying, enjoy the beautifulweather. no, i am staying in. -- enjoy the beautifulweather. no, i am staying in-_ am staying in. -- at times, some rain. m am staying in. -- at times, some rain- my son _ am staying in. -- at times, some rain. my son and _ am staying in. -- at times, some rain. my son and my— am staying in. -- at times, some rain. my son and my wife - am staying in. -- at times, some rain. my son and my wife have i am staying in. -- at times, some l rain. my son and my wife have pale skin and they _ rain. my son and my wife have pale skin and they are _ rain. my son and my wife have pale skin and they are staying _ rain. my son and my wife have pale skin and they are staying inside - rain. my son and my wife have pale skin and they are staying inside the whole _ skin and they are staying inside the whole time — skin and they are staying inside the whole time when it gets like this. i looked _ whole time when it gets like this. i looked at _ whole time when it gets like this. i looked at the bbc weather app and i saw it— looked at the bbc weather app and i saw it will— looked at the bbc weather app and i saw it will not get cool until friday _ saw it will not get cool until friday it _ saw it will not get cool until friday. it will be 27, 28, 29 for the next — friday. it will be 27, 28, 29 for the next four days. act on climate
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change. _ the next four days. act on climate change, please. the next four days. act on climate change. please-— the next four days. act on climate change, please. how did you manage to stay cool. — change, please. how did you manage to stay cool, tim. _ change, please. how did you manage to stay cool, tim. i— change, please. how did you manage to stay cool, tim. i ate _ change, please. how did you manage to stay cool, tim. i ate those - to stay cool, tim. i ate those lollipops! _ to stay cool, tim. i ate those lollipops! i— to stay cool, tim. i ate those lollipops! i have _ to stay cool, tim. i ate those lollipops! i have to _ to stay cool, tim. i ate those lollipops! i have to agree - to stay cool, tim. i ate those | lollipops! i have to agree with james, i am a boring lollipops! i have to agree with james, iam a boring englishman. the metro talked about sizzle, sizzle, sizzle. my preferred drizzle, drizzle, drizzle. i don't sleep well in weather like this. a return to more english weather will be very welcome from my perspective. i more english weather will be very welcome from my perspective. i have a do and welcome from my perspective. i have a dog and she — welcome from my perspective. i have a dog and she is _ welcome from my perspective. i have a dog and she is black, _ welcome from my perspective. i have a dog and she is black, so _ welcome from my perspective. i have a dog and she is black, so we - welcome from my perspective. i have a dog and she is black, so we need i welcome from my perspective. i have a dog and she is black, so we need a| a dog and she is black, so we need a night stream to go and stand in. i join her today, it was so unbearably hot. thank you both. an insight into how i spent my sunday morning! james and tim will be back again in three quarters of an hour for more stories being covered by the newspapers and the website. next, it's click.
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silverstone is the home of british motorsports and i'm here at the britcar championship. but this is a race with a difference, as one team is made up entirely of drivers who have some form of disability, but thanks to a bit of technology, they have serious hopes of taking home the silverware. more on that in a few minutes but where's spencer? i said silverstone! are you lost? no, i've had an invitation that i could not refuse from another race outfit here at goodwood. now, we've got the whole circuit to ourselves today
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so i'm going to be on this track later, putting some brand—new assistive tech to the test...at racing speeds! just don't go breaking anything. i'll try not to. here at silverstone, things are busier and noisier and that's because everyone here is racing for real, and we've been invited into team brit's garage. so paul is over there having a nose about and hopefully can tell us more. nosing about is what i do best. and here at the home of british motor racing in silverstone, there's certainly lots to see. but specifically, i'm here to meet team brit — a competitive motorsport team with a difference. they're made up of six disabled drivers using bespoke, specially—adapted cars to compete in races against nondisabled drivers
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on a level playing field. my visit came during testing ahead of the latest round of the britcar championship. aaron morgan is one of team brit's two drivers in the endurance event, driving an aston martin gtii. aaron became a wheelchair user in 2006 following a motocross accident. the disabled drivers on the team use control systems developed by engineers in—house. these are completely sort of bespoke, completely developed from the ground up by team brit. they and the other engineers within the team said, right, we've got this problem, this is what we need to achieve, and this is the solution they come up with and it's by far the best in the world. the control�*s linked to a system of actuators and sophisticated electronic systems to drive the vehicles. aaron, can you just explain to me a little bit about how the hand controls work and how you use them to drive the car? yeah, of course. so, with the accelerator,
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you just pull this paddle here, and obviously, you know, there's various levels of throttle you can apply there. on the other side is the brake paddle which works in exactly the same way so you can modulate it. and then these grey buttons inside the steering wheel operate the gears. now, the way the car's set up, you have the up shift on the left side, so while you're on full throttle with your right hand, you've then got your left hand to change the gears and then it's vice—versa for braking as well. so while you're braking with your left hand, you can go down the gears with your right hand. the key thing about these controls is they are designed to be used by drivers with a range of impairments. these could be driven by someone with only the use of one arm, for example. aaron's teammate in this event is autistic and the car remains drivable by him in the usual way as the adaptations coexist alongside the regular controls. hand controls per se aren't new. i use them to drive my car. but these are quite different to what you might find on a road car as they're tuned for a racing environment. but a racing team is more thanjust the drivers
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and building systems like this into already finely tuned machines isn't the straightforward process. and so you obviously work with different iterations of these controls. how does that process work and how did you get to where you are now? well, first of all we start with looking at the drivers and seeing what their needs are, you know, what their disabilities and what physical limitations they've then got. and then we start, from there, with the ergonomics of the control system that we're designing, and by that i mean the paddles that are on the steering wheel. and when we started designing this, we started with a very different steering wheel to the one we've got now so we're constantly improving it and developing it based on driver feedback. definitely challenges there and a lot of that's integrating our system with the car system. cars aren't particularly good at tolerating other things being added into the network. and so we do have that challenge but we love it, you know, it's part of what we do and it's why we do it. team brit's ultimate aim is to make racing history and take a team to the world—famous le mans 24—hour endurance race, becoming the first ever british
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all disabled team to do so. this is a look of part amazement and part terror. i'm a passenger in a modified chevrolet corvette c8 stingray, but it's who is driving, and how he's driving, that is blowing my mind. we have met sam schmidt before. he's a racing driver who was paralysed in an accident in 2000, and five years ago he took us for a ride through las vegas in a car that allowed him to drive using just his head and his mouth. so, the steering system, it's an ir camera system on whichever way you turn your head steers the car. he'll turn his head angle into a steering angle. the gas and brake, it's a sip and puff system, so we have a tube connected to a pressure sensor. positive pressure, blowing, that's your accelerator pedal. negative pressure, sipping, that's your brake pedal. the sam car is legal to drive in the us and sam has a drivers license, and since 2016,
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the system has been fine tuned so that it's now not only safe and responsive enough to drive at road speeds, but at race speeds. 123, 128... 128, wow. er... in fact, sam has taken this car up to 201mph. not today, though. anyway, the reality is that operating equipment without using arms or legs has many more applications than just on the racetrack. where i also see this technology being very beneficial is in the workplace. industrial applications, forklifts, harvesters, trains, i mean, it's kinda scary but i could operate a train, you know, sitting in my living room with this technology so i would really like to see disabled veterans
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and people of all disabilities have an opportunity to go back to work and, you know, many of them just want to be a productive member of society and haven't been given the opportunity or the technology to do it. can ijust say, that was incredible. you are just incredible. i think really you should try the car from over here with my controls. 0k. i'm happy to do that but not at that speed. well, this is a first. what an honour, what a thrill! what a potential humiliation! to drive the car, you're gonna point your nose where you wanna go. don't lean, leaning's not gonna work, you actually have to rotate your head. ready to give it a shot? i'm ready to give it a shot. i'm just gonna let it go and then start puffing. and, here's the thing, from pretty much the start
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of the first lap, i get it. it does take a lot of concentration but as long as i stay focused, sam's car looks after me. well, how was it? are you gonna take myjob away? uh, ha—ha, that was pretty emotional for me because actually it wasn't as hard as i thought it was going to be. and so it kinda shows how this kind of control system could be used by ordinary people who aren't mad racing drivers. i need a few more laps. honestly, that was incredible but also really hard, i'm actually a much better driver than that with normal controls, i promise you. i think that's a challenge then. why don't you do a lap with the normal controls, i'll use my controls.
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we'll see who's faster. umm. .. all right, wish me luck. see, in my mind, this isn't a foregone conclusion. in some ways, i have an advantage. i know this circuit and i'm using the same controls that i have for my entire adult life. all right. hi. well, how'd i do? 1.50... is that good? respectable. laughter. so let's see if sam can beat my flying lap of 1.50. well, the very best of luck, sir. confident? don't really need it, but 0k. laughter. i mean, it's honest! so... you know that bit about it not
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being a foregone conclusion? yeah, i don't stand a chance. right back at the first meeting we knew it was going to take months, we knew it was going to take a lot of commitment from the engineers, resources from arrow and my time, and they thought it was funny after an hour i said, look guys, i'm very interested but not unless we can do 100mph. spencer laughs you know? you won. congratulations, 1.45. i mean, there was kind of no contest, really, was it. how do you feel being able to do this? you know, it's so... i guess the best word i can use is freedom. i'm in total control and there's very few things in my life that i have control over, you know, and to be able to steer and gas and brakejust like the old days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring. i've gotta make a call now and let someone know how i did. thanks, spencer. uh—oh. hey, lara. yeah, sam beat me.
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not surprised, really, when you think about it. no, but did well. how do you feel? i feel inspired, very humble, a bit sick and glad it's over. anyway, i'll see you later. that is it for this week. thank you so much for watching. this is the short version of the show so the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon.
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cardiff reached 30.2, heathrow reached 31.6, the highest temperature so far this year in the uk. overnight tonight, clearskies in most areas, cloudy in scotland, a patch of rain in the highlands and the western isles. a warm night for sleeping, temperatures no lower than 17-18, sleeping, temperatures no lower than 17—18, and that's at the very end of the night in cardiff and london. tomorrow a warm start, sunshine from the word go, again more cloudy in northern scotland but even here, great. isolated thundery showers possible late in the day, but the most, dry, hotand possible late in the day, but the most, dry, hot and sunny. temperatures in the high 20s and low 30s in england and wales, generally the mid 20s in northern ireland and scotland. a fine and sunny and hot
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day, here to stay for most of us for most of the week.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. more rain and flooding hit western europe. on a visit to germany's worst—hit region, chancellor angela merkel expresses horror at the devastation. translation: i came here to get a real picture, - and i have to say it's a really surreal and eerie situation. it's terrifying. an investigation by 16 media organisations claims that human rights activists, journalists and lawyers were targeted by authoritarian governments using spyware. a rapid u—turn from the uk prime minister and chancellor, announcing they will now self—isolate after receiving covid test and trace alerts. we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot

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