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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 18, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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following a major u—turn, the prime minister is now self—isolating, after contact with the health secretary who has coronavirus. downing street had initially said that he and the chancellor
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would go on working, as part of a daily testing pilot scheme — prompting condemnation from labour. hundreds of thousands of people are having to self—isolate because of the prime minister's reckless decisions. he expects them to follow the rules. as soon as the rules apply to him, what does he do? he tries to wriggle out. we did look briefly at the idea of cars taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily, but i think it is far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. we'll be asking what the government's handling of this might do to public confidence, as england prepares to drop most legal covid restrictions in a matter of hours. also on the programme... more rain and flooding hits western europe. germany's chancellor angela merkel calls the devastation �*surreal�*. feelings run high in tokyo, with protests against the olympic games — as athletes and staff test positive for covid.
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hamilton is going to try again! and lewis hamilton wins the british grand prix, after putting rival max verstappen out of the race on the very first lap. good evening. as england prepares for most legal covid restrictions to be lifted tomorrow, the prime minister is self—isolating after contact with the health secretary who tested positive. downing street did a rapid u—turn this morning, saying initially that boris johnson and the chancellor rishi sunak would keep working, through a pilot scheme, as long as they tested negative every day. but with hundreds of thousands of people having to self—isolate after a positive contact, they were met with a barrage of criticism, and mrjohnson this
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afternoon conceded it was �*important that everybody sticks to the same rules.�* here's our political correspondent nick eardley. life might be feeling a bit more normal, but the impact of the pandemic is far from over. hundreds of thousands of people have been told to self—isolate in recent days. and now track and trace has hit the heart of government. the prime minister and chancellor are self—isolating after the health secretary tested positive for covid yesterday. boris johnson posted this video on twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily, but i think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. the prime minister will now spend the next week here, his country retreat at chequers. that wasn't always the plan, though. this morning, number 10 said the prime minister wouldn't have to self—isolate because downing street
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was part of a trial to allow people to keep working if they provided a daily negative test. a cabinet minister was sent out to defend the plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor, can conduct the most essential business but at other times of the day, they won't be mixing with people outside of their own households. about an hour after this, amid accusations of double standards, downing street changed its mind. in york today, sympathy was in short supply. everyone is getting pings. we are all sticking to it. they are just writing the law for themselves, isn't it? which hasjust been, itjust sums it up, the whole thing, doesn't it? we've all done everything we should have done, and we have done, - but i do feel they should have done the same as us _ if we are all in this together, they have to be leading by example, don't they? labour's leader unimpressed too. the only reason he has u—turned on this is because he has been busted.
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it's like bank robbers who got caught and now they are offering the money back. one rule for them, another for everyone else. it is contemptuous of the british public. this has been a pretty messy start to a week where government communication is going to be key. most legal restrictions will be lifted in england tomorrow, but ministers don't want this to be a free for all. they will still be urging caution and for people to behave responsibly. the vaccine roll—out has given ministers confidence to open up. but there's an expectation that cases will rise. i think it's almost certain that we will get to 1,000 hospitalisations per day. it will almost certainly get to 100,000 cases a day. the real question is, do we get to double that, or even higher? and that's where the crystal ball starts to fail. as england prepares to take a big step, as some warn about becoming too relaxed too soon,
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a reminder that opening up isn't without risk. and there is a symbolism in the fact that as the government reaches the fifth and final stage of its road map, huge moment in thejourney outside of lockdown, the prime minister can't be here. three ministers at the heart of the response are being forced to stay—at—home. they will work from home, as so many of us have got used to over the last year or so, but this isn't the start to a crucial week that the government wanted. such unease at the way that today has panned out and number ten has pulled out of that pilot scheme altogether tonight. more freedoms are coming. tomorrow in england, a slightly different pace in parts of the uk. but as downing street knows all well —— my well tonight, life isn't back to normaljust all well —— my well tonight, life isn't back to normal just yet. let's take a look at the latest uk government coronavirus figures — 48,161 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period and 25 deaths. that takes the average
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cases per day in the past week to 115,242, with just under 4,000 people currently in hospital with covid. nearly 46.3 million people have now had theirfirstjab — that'sjust short of 88% of all uk adults. and nearly 36 million people — 68% of all adults — have had two jabs. our medical editor fergus walsh is here. so england prepares to unlock tomorrow — where do you think we are in tackling the virus? we are navigating uncertain waters as this third wave rises. 0n the lifting of restrictions, the government says if not now then when? we will have the school holidays, so that will help curb transmission in the young. wait until the autumn and then you hit the flu season, but removing social distancing controls is a gamble. predictions we have heard that we could hit 2000 daily hospital admissions. that would still be half the level that we had at the winter
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peak, but in a worst—case scenario, could be even higher. there is uncertainty about how people will respond to these new freedoms. many will be cautious, but if we have crowding in pubs and nightclubs with no thought to social distancing, then that could risk super spreader events. in previous waves, of course, lockdown is where used to suppress the virus. now the vaccines are being relied upon. they do give are being relied upon. they do give a very high level of protection but it is not 100% and it is unclear what level of protective immunity there is in the population from vaccines and previous infection. so it is hard to predict when this wave will peak. but if we have a look at the changes that are coming in england tomorrow, there will be no longer any limit on how many people can meet. face coverings will no longer be required by law, although the government expects them to be used in crowded spaces. some transport operators will have them as a condition of travel. the work from home guidance will end.
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nightclubs, theatres and cinemas will be fully open. and pubs and restaurants will no longer be table service only. so we are switching from legal controls in england to personal responsibility. thank you very much. let's take a look at how other parts of the uk plan to change restrictions. from tomorrow, the whole of scotland will be at what scottish government calls level zero. pubs and restaurants will be able to open until midnight, but nightclubs will remain closed. there will still be limits on indoor and outdoor social gatherings, and face coverings will continue to be mandatory in shops and on public transport. in wales, most covid rules are set to be scrapped from the 7th of august, but face coverings will still be required in most indoor public places. and in northern ireland, restrictions will be eased further on the 26th ofjuly, if approved at a review on thursday. with the travel rules changing tomorrow for people returning from some major holiday destinations, there's been
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a scramble to rearrange plans to return home. travellers arriving from france, which is on the amber list, will need to quarantine for ten days — regardless of their vaccination status. and the previously green list islands of mallorca, menorca and ibiza, will now move on to the amber list — it means compulsory quarantine for adults who are not double jabbed. 0ur europe correspondent nick beake is on ibiza and reports on the impact on holiday makers there. it was fun while it lasted. their stay on party island is ending sooner than expected, a final drink before heading back to the uk to beat the latest quarantine rule change. we have to pay for the extra flight, miss two days holidayjust to come home on sunday so we can go to work and we can live our lives as normal. and what do you think about that? i'm not happy. i'd rather be here for two more days. we've had a great time. ibiza's great. i'd rather be here all week,
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but what can you do, eh? in the old days in ibiza, they'd be queuing for the clubs. these days, it's for a covid test to get home. nearly all the young british tourists we've met have only been given theirfirstjab, and so have had to act fast to avoid ten days in isolation when they return. another summer of uncertainty is also hitting businesses on the island. just two weeks ago, they were rejoicing when ibiza went onto the uk's green watchlist. but now it's off it, and so they're bracing themselves for a big slump in the number of brits arriving. some of the biggest venues on the island, already working with strict covid—safe measures, are finding it impossible to plan ahead. i mean, at the moment, concerns over health are all— powerful, and government are using it as a really blunt instrument. and they're making decisions that, you know, frankly, they're just crippling for businesses, they're crippling for customers. the chopping and changing... it's notjust this hotel, the whole island lives or dies
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on what happens to tourism. despite all the travel changes, more than 20 planes touched down today, bringing british holiday—makers determined to get their summer break. we've had our test, so it's fine that we can come. - we've had our test, we'll have a good time here. l getting back might be tricky because obviously if we got| covid while we're here, _ we'll be staying in a hotel and have to quarantine for two weeks| and we have to pay for that. but because we all work from home, we're able to, like, _ hopefullyjust go home _ and quarantine from home and still work from home and should be fine. but new arrivals will find that covid cases are also on the rise in the balearics. still plenty of selfies, but dancing, strictly speaking, remains banned. like tourist destinations across europe, they're waiting and watching to see what happens next. nick beake, bbc news, ibiza. marks and spencer says it may shorten opening hours because the number of staff being pinged by the nhs
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app is, in its words, "growing exponentially". morrisons says it is also seeing a rise in notifications, but it has controls in place to allow all of its stores to remain open. the german chancellor angela merkel has expressed shock at what she called �*surreal destruction�* caused by flash flooding on a visit to one of the worst hit towns — schuld in the west of germany. at least 184 people have died in germany and belgium. there�*s still heavy rain across the region, and it�*s now focused on parts of southern germany and austria. with more, here�*s our europe correspondentjenny hill. we really need help here, she says. outside the village shop, you can see why. as in so many other parts of western germany, people in this town still can�*t quite believe what happened. we met gertrude here. volunteers have brought food, water. she told us she has spent the night alone, upstairs, as waterflooded
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into her house. i�*ve never seen anything like it, never. it leaves you speechless. gertrude, he says. the two of us will never see this place come back to what it was. we will never see it again. it is no longer my home. it�*s terrible. earlier, angela merkel came to see for herself. this is the town of schuld, where whole houses were destroyed. translation: it shocking. i�*m tempted to say the german language has no words to describe the destruction here. but i also see huge comfort in the way that people have come together to help each other. the water is subsiding in western germany, but overnight, more flooding in other
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parts of the country. high water in bavaria, saxony, in austria as well, towns and cities deluged. translation: people have lost their lives, their - houses, there are no more roads, but there is huge solidarity. they are going to need it in the weeks to come. we are seeing this kind of destruction all over west germany, and what is particularly hard for people in places like this to bear is that it could be weeks or maybe months before they get back electricity connection. in one part of the region, authorities are saying that gas for heating and hot water won�*t be back until well into the autumn. germany is mourning its dead. for the survivors, this ordeal is far from over. jenny hill, bbc news. it�*s just days before the opening
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of the tokyo olympics, and a growing number of athletes and officials have tested covid—positive, or been forced to self—isolate. in the olympic village, two players and a coach for the south africa men�*s football team have the virus — and six team gb athletes and two staff members are also isolating at their training camp, after a person tested positive on their flight to japan. despite the worsening covid situation in the city, and widespread public opposition to the games, the governor of tokyo has told the bbc it would have been worse to cancel. from tokyo, rupert wingfield—hayes reports. with five days to go, the anti—olympic protests are not going away. this one is outside the hotel where ioc president thomas bach is staying. their message to him is pretty blunt. over at the olympic village, three covid cases have now been confirmed. across the city, 1,400 new cases on saturday.
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despite this, when i sat down with the governor of tokyo, she told me the games must go ahead. translation: i believe that not holding the olympics is even - sadder than holding it during these dire times. i do not want to show the world that we have lost to covid—19. there is still meaning in holding the olympics in tokyo, despite the current situation. this was wembley stadium in london a week ago. but with just 20% of japanese vaccinated, there will be no scenes like this in tokyo�*s olympic stadium. the governor concedes ifjapan had moved faster on vaccines, things might have been different. translation: i agree. it would have been better if we had a faster vaccination roll—out, we may have been able to have spectators at the olympics. but the speed of vaccine roll—out has now increased immensely. not fast enough.
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this is kyoto, japan�*s ancient capital and number one tourist site. by now, this place should have been thronged with hordes of tourists from all over the world. forjapan, that was to be the big payoff. invest billions and billions in hosting the olympics and then millions of travellers will come from all over the world to your great cultural institutions, spending lots of money. as you can see, there�*s nobody here. shop owners here have seen sales fall by more than 90%. translation: it is - the government's fault. look at the other countries like the uk and taiwan. they seem to be doing well. but look at japan, i cannot believe we call ourselves a developed country. back in tokyo, hundreds of athletes are now arriving each day. it�*s now clear that some of them will be carrying covid. the ioc�*s assertion that the games represent zero risk to public health is already starting to look flimsy.
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rupert wingfield—hayes, in tokyo. with all the sport now, here�*s lizzi greenwood—hughes at the bbc sport centre. thanks, rita. good evening. lewis hamilton insists he always races fairly after max verstappen accused him of driving dangerously. hamilton won a dramatic british grand prix — despite being penalised for causing the championship leader to crash out. our correspondentjoe wilson reports on a race to remember at silverstone. silverstone and a crowd from a pre—covid scale, 140,000. and organised relation to be checked for tests. many were supporting the reigning world champion. lewis hamilton started second on the grid in his black mercedes, aware that red bull�*s max verstappen ahead of him had a faster car and that he had to make an impression quickly. first and second in
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the drivers�* championship, battling for the lead in the british grand prix until this. on the inside, and a touch. max verstappen is out of the race, and that�*s a big crash. the most important thing was that max verstappen was ok. of course, he was out of the race. lewis hamilton�*s assessment was that verstappen moved into him. red bull said that hamilton was fully to blame. intense discussions followed. who wrote this plot? when the race resumed, it was decided that hamilton was at fault, a ten—second penalty taken in the pits. but he was soon moving, past lando norris here into third. hamilton�*s team—mate lead him to enter second to challenge for the lead. charles leclerc in the red ferrari seemed to move aside. hamilton through. fans in the stands, film stars in the pits, lewis hamilton crossing the line in first, a hollow victory, claimed verstappen�*s team. the drivers continue to comment on
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social media. verstappen said it was unsportsmanlike. hamilton maintained that he will always raise hard but fair. spectators leaving may still be discussing what happened on the first lap, but the outcome of this race has dramatically changed the dynamic of the championship in lewis hamilton�*s favour. joe wilson, bbc news, silverstone. the young american collin morakawa has won golf�*s open championship by two shots, comfortably holding off his rivals with a faultless final round at royal st george�*s in kent. our correspondent andy swiss reports. debuts just don�*t get any better. most golfers spend their entire career trying to win the open, but collin morakawa proved he is not most golfers. he began the day behind low use stays on. this is spectacular- _ behind low use stays on. this is spectacular. this _ behind low use stays on. this is spectacular. this is _ behind low use stays on. this isj spectacular. this is spectacular. behind low use stays on. this is i spectacular. this is spectacular. a spectacular _ spectacular. this is spectacular. a spectacular run — spectacular. this is spectacular. a spectacular run of _ spectacular. this is spectacular. a spectacular run of birdies - spectacular. this is spectacular. a spectacular run of birdies and - spectacular. this is spectacular. a| spectacular run of birdies and then he was four shots clear. a victory procession? not quite asjordan
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spieth made a charge and close the gap tojust one. spieth made a charge and close the gap to just one. but while this might be collin morakawa�*s first open, it will not be his last. hopes of a british challenge did not quite materialise. scotland�*s robert macintyre the best of a bunch after another fine round. macintyre the best of a bunch after anotherfine round. but no macintyre the best of a bunch after another fine round. but no one could stop collin morakawa. after being tear down the final hole, he tapped in for triumph. open champion at just 24 and after last year�*s championship was cancelled, he said the fans had made it all the sweeter. , , the fans had made it all the sweeter-— the fans had made it all the sweeter. , ., ., ., sweeter. this is by far one of the best moments _ sweeter. this is by far one of the best moments of— sweeter. this is by far one of the best moments of my _ sweeter. this is by far one of the best moments of my life, - sweeter. this is by far one of the best moments of my life, to - sweeter. this is by far one of the best moments of my life, to see| best moments of my life, to see everyone out here. look at all these fans. let�*s hear it for you guys. you guys have been amazing. this fans. let's hear it for you guys. you guys have been amazing. this has been a open — you guys have been amazing. this has been a open of— you guys have been amazing. this has been a open of glorious _ you guys have been amazing. this has been a open of glorious conditions - been a open of glorious conditions and some equally glorious golf and it has ended with victory for one of the sport�*s newest and brightest
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stars. england�*s cricketers have levelled their t20 series with pakistan at1 all with a game left to play. after setting a total of 201 at headingley, england�*s spin bowlers then stifled pakistan�*s reply and they were all out for 155. the deciding match is on tuesday. and that�*s the sport. back to you, rita. there�*s more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. now on bbc one it�*s time for the news where you are. goodbye. more now on the easing of coronavirus restrictions in england tomorrow. earlier, my colleague martine croxall spoke to paul hunter, who�*s professor of medicine at the university of east anglia — and asked him how wise he thought it was to lift restrictions when case numbers were continuing to rise. the problem is that the vaccine roll—out is understandably slowing
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down. it�*s been slowing down for about two weeks. the longer believe it�*s before we make the final relaxations, the people who are vaccinated at the start of the epidemic, their protection will actually be starting to rain now, at least for some of them, and we know this is happening because it�*s been reported in israel that even after six months, we are starting to see declining protection. so if we don�*t do it now, when are we going to do it because neck if we delay locked down anything until september, the schools will be back and we will see further decline and probably further waning of immunity if we then wait until people are but it�*s taking us into december. maybe we will be seeing influenza around, and if you catch flu and covered at the same time, that doubles your risk of dying. so there isn�*t a good time
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to, and a safe time to ease lockdown, but it probably is the safest time to do that now as we are moving into the summer and the schools will be closing next week then later on in the autumn. we have had pep-up — then later on in the autumn. we have had pop-up vaccination _ then later on in the autumn. we have had pop-up vaccination centres - had pop—up vaccination centres encouraging more people to get vaccinated. what is the most likely, the highest likely figure that we are going to get in terms of those who will be vaccinated given that we are not vaccinating the entire population, are because neck there isn't even a — population, are because neck there isn't even a suggestion _ population, are because neck there isn't even a suggestion at - population, are because neck there isn't even a suggestion at the - isn�*t even a suggestion at the moment that we will be vaccinating children under 11. at the moment, we�*ve got to about 50% of the entire population that�*s getting on, about two thirds of the adult population. hopefully, we can get that up to maybe 80%. i think that is going to be tough. the last few percentages are always tough and public health
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campaigns. the more hard to reach individuals. campaigns. the more hard to reach individuals-— individuals. how are we doing with vaccination — individuals. how are we doing with vaccination supply _ individuals. how are we doing with vaccination supply because - individuals. how are we doing with vaccination supply because neck i individuals. how are we doing with - vaccination supply because neck some people wonder whether the ups take rate has something to do with us not having enough. i rate has something to do with us not having enough-— having enough. i have not heard any evidence that _ having enough. i have not heard any evidence that that _ having enough. i have not heard any evidence that that is _ having enough. i have not heard any evidence that that is in _ having enough. i have not heard any evidence that that is in fact - having enough. i have not heard any evidence that that is in fact the - evidence that that is in fact the case. you know, i couldn�*t swear to that at the moment. in case. you know, i couldn't swear to that at the moment.— case. you know, i couldn't swear to that at the moment. in terms of the idea that the — that at the moment. in terms of the idea that the government _ that at the moment. in terms of the idea that the government had - that at the moment. in terms of the idea that the government had a - idea that the government had a u—turn today can i going to be be drawn into the politics of it, but how wise is it to replace proper self isolation in terms of being in close contact with someone who has tested positive for this daily negative test that the prime minister was going to undertake. yeah, i mean, as we move out of the
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pandemic, covid is going to be with us forever, and i don�*t think anybody really doubts that any more. the head of the world health organization has said that the head of the european centre for disease control, chris what he said that�*s an aside that some point, we treat it like any other virus and there won�*t be any other needed for self isolation and. i think how we see the outbreak continuing over the next few weeks will hopefully allow us to make that decision. at the moment, i think we�*ve still got to be a bit cautious, but my personal expectation is that at some point, we will be wanting people to be self isolating if there had been contacts. although clearly commit their symptomatic, they will be self isolating whilst they are still alice. . . , isolating whilst they are still alice. ., ., ., alice. that was professor paul hunter speaking _ alice. that was professor paul hunter speaking to _ alice. that was professor paul hunter speaking to martin - alice. that was professor paul hunter speaking to martin a i alice. that was professor paul i hunter speaking to martin a little earlier. time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. for the majority of us, sunday was another hot and sunny day, indeed, it was the hottest day of the year
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so far for both england and wales. 30.2 celsius the new mark for wales, that was recorded in cardiff, and 31.6 celsius at london�*s heathrow, that�*s also the uk�*s highest temperature of the year so far, along with england�*s highest temperature. now, you can see the extent of the day�*s sunshine. we do have some cloud coming round our area of high pressure into northern areas of scotland. and overnight, that cloud could be thick enough for an odd passing spot of rain through for western aisles and the highlands, but otherwise, it�*s a dry night with largely clear skies. it is a night, though, those temperatures are going to struggle to come down, so an uncomfortable night for sleeping. temperatures, 17 in cardiff by the end of the night, 18 in london. a bit fresher for scotland and northern ireland. temperatures for england and wales in the countryside will be a few degrees cooler than the cities as well. a warm start to the day nevertheless on monday. it is another fine, sunny, very warm, if not hot day coming up, but again, northern scotland will see some slightly thicker cloud. here there will be some sunny spells coming through that — temperatures into the low 20s. further south, though,
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for england and wales, high 20s, even into the low 30s for the hottest areas. that heat could just trigger one or two isolated thunderstorms. the jet stream pattern at the moment is blocked, and this undulating pattern here is a ridge, that�*s what�*s building our area of high pressure. this pattern is not going to change very much, and what that means is we are going to continue that run of high—pressure and settled weather. for tuesday, little overall change in the weather picture. again, it�*s another largely hot and sunny day. again, through the afternoon, there could be an odd isolated thunderstorm building, but most of us will stay dry. temperatures, again, high 20s to low 30s in england and wales. in scotland, we are starting to see the temperatures come up a little bit as well through the central belt, and that is a trend, actually, for scotland and northern ireland. mid—week onwards, we will start to see those temperatures rising once again, so we will get increasingly warm if not hot here as well. temperatures wednesday afternoon, then, again, high 20s to low 30s for england and wales. 26 celsius there in belfast, 27 celsius in glasgow,
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so it is getting warmer as well. now, towards the end of the week, we will probably keep the dry weather for a few more days, but eventually, we will probably see low pressure move in to bring some thundery rain, but there is some uncertainty about when that will happen. the german chancellor angela merkel visits the region of western germany hit by devastating floods. she says the world must hurry in its fight against global warming and pledges aid for rebuilding the area quickly. translation: it aid for rebuilding the area quickly. translation:— aid for rebuilding the area quickly. translation: it all suggests it has somethin: translation: it all suggests it has something to _ translation: it all suggests it has something to do _ translation: it all suggests it has something to do with _ translation: it all suggests it has something to do with climate - translation: it all suggests it has | something to do with climate change. we have to hurry, we have to get a move on in the fight against climate change. move on in the fight against climate chan . e. ~ , ., change. the prime minister and chancellor _ change. the prime minister and chancellor have _ change. the prime minister and chancellor have made _ change. the prime minister and chancellor have made a - change. the prime minister and chancellor have made a rapid i change. the prime minister and - chancellor have made a rapid u-turn chancellor have made a rapid u—turn and will now sell isolate after being identified as contacts of the
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health secretary, who tested positive for coronavirus. taste health secretary, who tested positive for coronavirus. we did look

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