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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 18, 2021 6:00pm-7:00pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the german leader angela merkel visits the region worst—affected by devastating floods. the says the world must act faster in its battle against global warming. translation: it all suggests that it has something to do i with climate change. we have to hurry. we have to get a move on in the fight against climate change. and i'm kasia madera live in sinzig in western— and i'm kasia madera live in sinzig in western germany, one of the towns that felt_ in western germany, one of the towns that felt the _ in western germany, one of the towns that felt the full force of the floods _ that felt the full force of the floods. well, now the clean—up operation — floods. well, now the clean—up operation is under way. in the face of a growing outcry, the uk prime industry chancellor reversed plans to carry on working
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rather than self—isolate after receiving and official coronavirus alert. we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot scheme, which allows people to test daily, but i think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. two athletes and an official at the tokyo olympic village have tested positive for coronavirus just five days before the start of the games. the afghan government withdraws its diplomatic staff from the pakistani capital islamabad after an attack on friday on the ambassador's doctor. we will be live in kabul —— the ambassador's daughter. hello and welcome to audiences in the uk and around the world.
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we in the uk and around the world. will start in germa chancellor we will start in germany, where the chancellor angela merkel has called for the world to speed up its battle against global warming. she also promised financial aid after the floods in germany and parts of western europe which have killed more than 180 people. mrs merkel has been visiting some of the worsted areas in germany today. —— worst hit areas. more heavy rain has caused further flooding in southern germany and austria overnight. let's cross to my colleague kasia madera, who's in the german town of sinzig. sinzig is one of those hounds in this area that caught the full force of the floods. all of this was underwater. residents telling me that the water levels reached at one point that first balcony, so everything on the ground floor completely submerged, basements completely submerged, basements completely destroyed, garages totally gutted, homes broken. now
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this rescue operation is under way, but this is just one block and one street in one town. this repeated time and time again this region. the german chancellor angela merkel has been visiting this part of the country to offer her support. translation: i came here to get a real picture, - and i have to say it's a really surreal and eerie situation. it's terrifying. there are no words in the german language for the devastation that has been wrecked. yet it is also incredibly comforting to see how people are sticking together, how they are helping each other, the solidarity that is there. the chancellor also spoke about how erie destruction was, how surreal this all is, and when you see people's belongings just on the streets here, it really is heartbreaking, people trying to salvage what little they can. someone they're trying to dry out their family photos. someone they're trying to dry out
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theirfamily photos. and someone they're trying to dry out their family photos. and that's... they are lucky to have that. we have seen so much devastation here. we have also seen a lot of solidarity, though, volunteers coming from neighbouring towns that were not affected, just pulling up their sleeves and getting involved in helping, helping those who have lost so much. we spoke to one resident whose house was completely destroyed. she told us a little bit of what she experienced. everything we had, it is here, is full of mud. the flood basically destroyed everything we had. and now you've got an army of volunteers helping you. who are these people? a lot of them, i don't know. they came on the streets. they asked if we need help. we need help. the basement is full of water. we have a lot of bottles from the nearby bottle factory, so it is really a mess. and you've got a little boy. where are you living now? what do you do? at the moment, we live
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in an apartment of 15 square metres. we have a bed of one metre, 40, steeping — we have a bed of one metre, 40, sleeping with three people. so it is doable, but it is really hard. were you ever expecting anything like this to happen? and when it comes to the warning system, did you... you evacuated, didn't you? yeah, we did. in the middle of the night, we decided to go, and actually ten minutes later, we would not have been able to leave the house. so we evacuated, the three of us, and we never expected something like that to happen. never. the last big flood was four or five metres less than now, it was not even next to our house, and now everything is destroyed. how does it feel to see your house like this? it makes us cry every time we see it, it makes us cry
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whenever someone asks. we try to go and to move forward and to not _ we are deeply shocked. we are under shock and we do not know... we just try to move on, we just try to be calm with our boy. and we do not know if we can come back to our house and we built so much, we invested so much, and we tried to build a home. now our home is destroyed. that is just one resident. you that isjust one resident. you can hear her pain and her sadness of everything that she has lost. that has been if a fight so much across this area. we talked about the warning system. a lot of question marks over whether it was effective enough. she had received a warning, many residents had to, but they did not realise how severe the flooding was. that was just complete the unexpected, and people are potentially did not reexecute seemingly enough, the warning system was amplified enough, they had not had enough —— don't explain for
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stability thing talked about was climate change. —— the other thing. angela merkel touched on that when she was talking touched on that when she was talking to residents earlier today. translate mac on the whole all these vents are we are seeing in germany and the force which what they are occurring, it also suggest it has something to do with climate change. we have to hurry, we have to get a move _ we have to hurry, we have to get a move on _ we have to hurry, we have to get a move on in— we have to hurry, we have to get a move on in the fight against climate change _ move on in the fight against climate chan . e. �* . move on in the fight against climate chance. �* . ~ ~ change. angela merkel there, the german chancellor, _ change. angela merkel there, the german chancellor, talking - change. angela merkel there, the german chancellor, talking about| german chancellor, talking about climate change, and this is a debate that has really come to the forefront in this country. i want to put some of which he said to my guestsjoining us live put some of which he said to my guests joining us live from put some of which he said to my guestsjoining us live from berlin, a climate change activists, she set “p a climate change activists, she set up the movement here in germany, the movement that has been propelled by greta thunberg. you'rejoining us, you're from berlin, you are seeing what is happening here in western germany. give us your reaction? when angela merkel talked about all these
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events having something to do with climate change, are you disappointed that she did not go in stronger? i that she did not go in stronger? i mean, right now, we'rejust discussing the events, the floods, catamitous — discussing the events, the floods, calamitous standing she is not tavihg — calamitous standing she is not laying out the more larger here, soi here, so i can understand —— so i can— here, so i can understand —— so i can understand. climate change is expecting. — can understand. climate change is expecting, escalating, so that is where _ expecting, escalating, so that is where we — expecting, escalating, so that is where we are, and the government needs— where we are, and the government needs to _ where we are, and the government needs to get going in terms of climate — needs to get going in terms of climate action. the needs to get going in terms of climate action.— needs to get going in terms of climate action. , ., ., ., climate action. the state governor for this particular _ climate action. the state governor for this particular state _ climate action. the state governor for this particular state we - climate action. the state governor for this particular state we are - climate action. the state governor for this particular state we are in, | for this particular state we are in, rhineland, it is a state where the governor has been very vocal about climate change. is that something thatis climate change. is that something that is echoed by other state governors?— that is echoed by other state governors? that is echoed by other state covernors? ., ., , ., governors? right now, as we are, the climate strike — governors? right now, as we are, the climate strike movement _ governors? right now, as we are, the climate strike movement has - governors? right now, as we are, the climate strike movement has been . climate strike movement has been striking _ climate strike movement has been striking for— climate strike movement has been striking for two and a half years straight — striking for two and a half years straight. basically every democrat ieader— straight. basically every democrat ieader in— straight. basically every democrat leader in this country is suggesting we should — leader in this country is suggesting we should do more about climate
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change. — we should do more about climate change, but the climate crisis will not be _ change, but the climate crisis will not be stopped by words or empty promises — not be stopped by words or empty promises. what we need to see is action— promises. what we need to see is action and — promises. what we need to see is action and germany, but the state in the provinces, drastically failing and reaching the paris target and sticking _ and reaching the paris target and sticking to a 1.5 to be pathway, that is— sticking to a 1.5 to be pathway, that is where we are at. that is why we keep— that is where we are at. that is why we keep striking out. do that is where we are at. that is why we keep striking out.— we keep striking out. do you think that when germans _ we keep striking out. do you think that when germans and _ we keep striking out. do you think that when germans and other - we keep striking out. do you thinkl that when germans and other parts we keep striking out. do you think- that when germans and other parts of the country, when they witness the scenes that we are seeing here — we are also seeing more flooding in further southern parts of the country — do you think it will amplify and add to the debate coming up amplify and add to the debate coming up to the elections? of course we have got the other state here in western germany that was hugely affected when it comes to this particular flood. affected when it comes to this particularflood. is this affected when it comes to this particular flood. is this something that you feel will feed into the elections, the federal elections, that will be taking place towards
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the end of september? yes. the end of september? yes, definitely. — the end of september? yes, definitely, and _ the end of september? yes, definitely, and also - the end of september? yes, definitely, and also we - the end of september? yes, definitely, and also we as i the end of september? yes, definitely, and also we as climate activists _ definitely, and also we as climate activists will make sure. eventually we are _ activists will make sure. eventually we are talking of germany that is one of— we are talking of germany that is one of the — we are talking of germany that is one of the richest country on earth, and for— one of the richest country on earth, and for a _ one of the richest country on earth, and for a long time people discussed ciimate _ and for a long time people discussed climate change here as an issue that would _ climate change here as an issue that would not _ climate change here as an issue that would not concern them, an issue of the others, — would not concern them, an issue of the others, of the future, now we are seeing — the others, of the future, now we are seeing one of the richest parts of the _ are seeing one of the richest parts of the world getting hit this hard, it is hitting home, so of course some — it is hitting home, so of course some parts— it is hitting home, so of course some parts of the debate will drastically be... it will be talked about— drastically be... it will be talked about differently, because right now we are _ about differently, because right now we are not— about differently, because right now we are not talking about the costs of actions — we are not talking about the costs of actions any more, we are talking at the _ of actions any more, we are talking at the cost — of actions any more, we are talking at the cost of inaction, and effectively but we are seeing now with the — effectively but we are seeing now with the density damage that is happening right now, we cannot afford _ happening right now, we cannot afford inaction any longer, and thus lrecoming _ afford inaction any longer, and thus becoming not only clear to our leaders — becoming not only clear to our leaders but it also is for people who are — leaders but it also is for people who are going boating in september, and we _ who are going boating in september, and we are _ who are going boating in september, and we are very much counting on them _ and we are very much counting on them to— and we are very much counting on them to make sure that they are voting _ them to make sure that they are voting in— them to make sure that they are voting in favour of a future of
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climate — voting in favour of a future of climate action, but that is also we are fighting for is a movement. gk, are fighting for is a movement. 0k, luisa neubauer, _ are fighting for is a movement. ok luisa neubauer, who organised the friday for future meant, luisa neubauer, who organised the friday forfuture meant, greta thunberg's movement, organised that here in germany, thank you so much forjoining us live from berlin. back here in western germany and as you can see, the clean—up operation isjust beginning. it you can see, the clean—up operation is just beginning. it will take a very long time for any semblance of normality to return here and it will be really fascinating to see whether that discussion about climate change, how will impacts the elections that will be taking place towards the end of september, of course the green party is very organised here, it is got a strong voice, but it did dip in the polls at the beginning of the year, so we will be interesting to see how what we are seeing here reflects back on that, but as angela merkel said, back here on the ground, where people are just looking through, there try to rescue what they can, this is a clean—up operation. so
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much destruction. and like i say, this isjust one block much destruction. and like i say, this is just one block on one street in one town. this is happening throughout this region in western germany. throughout this region in western german . ., ., ~ , throughout this region in western german . ., ., ,, , . germany. kasia, thank you very much indeed. germany. kasia, thank you very much indeed- kasia — germany. kasia, thank you very much indeed. kasia madera _ germany. kasia, thank you very much indeed. kasia madera reporting - indeed. kasia madera reporting there. let's take a look at some of the other regions in europe. hundreds of caravans in belgium's ardennes area were damaged when the nearby river burst its banks also many owners left looking for their properties and salvaging what they could. in the austrian town of... torrential rain sent floodwater rushing through the town centre, dragging cars and debris along. and in parts of sicily�*s capital palermo, sudden thunderstorms and heavy rains which at the italian island closed roads, drivers trapped in their cars and had to be rescued by the fire regrade in dinghies —— fire brigade.
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here in the uk, therejust a here in the uk, there just a few hours to go till most covid researchers are lifted in england, but there has been an outcry today when the pregnancy or in the chancellor decided to carry on working rather than self—isolate after they were sent alert by the official current nervous app because they had come into close contact with the health secretary, who was recently diagnosed with covid —— the official current nervous app. initially, borisjohnson and rishi sunak said they had become part of a pilot scheme. that meant they could avoid self isolation, but after a backlash, they quickly reversed that decision. the prime minister has posted this message on twitter. hi, folks. like so many hundreds of thousands of other people across the country, i've been pinged, i've been asked to self—isolate by the test, trace and isolate system after i have been in contact with somebody who has covid — in this case, the health secretary,
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sajid javid — and we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily, but i think it is far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules, and that is why i'm going to be isolating until the 26th ofjuly, monday, the 26th of july, and i really... i know how frustrating it all is, but i really do urge everybody to stick with the programme and take the appropriate course of action when you're asked to do so by nhs test and trace. borisjohnson there. our political correspondent nick eardley has been exciting —— explaining to me what led to a change of heart from the prime minister. eight o'clock this morning, we all got a statement saying that the prime minister and the chancellor had been in contact with the health secretary before he got his positive test, but they would be exempt. 157 minutes later, two
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and a half hours later, we got a completely different statement, saying that they would now self—isolate, the prime minister at chequers, the chancellor in his flat in downing street. i think it is pretty clear this has happened because there was pretty unanimous, pretty speedy outrage at the fact that two senior ministers not having to isolate. we have seen this scheme used before. her member, the cabinet office minister michael gove used it 0ffice minister michael gove used it last much. —— last month. but the outrage was such that the feeling in government was they simply had to change their mind. and we get a flavour of perhaps some of that hitting home in a tweet from the chancellor, who said it has to be pretty clear that there isn't one rule for us and one rule for everybody else. and it's all about symbolism. and the symbolism tomorrow, which is supposed to be freedom day in england, with the lifting of restrictions, is that, actually, on freedom day, the prime minister is going to be self—isolating in chequers.
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we are going to have this extraordinary situation where, on the day and the week where the government is trying to sell a nuanced message that legal restrictions are almost completely gone but you still need to be cautious, three of the key players, three of the key ministers in the government's response to covid are going to be spending time at home — the prime minister, the health secretary and the chancellor. the symbolism of that is huge. some have dubbed this a day where freedom returns. it won't for these three ministers, because they will be self—isolating. it's also worth just pondering on the fact that tomorrow in england, all legal restrictions are lifted apart from one, which is the legal requirement to stay at home if you're contacted by test and trace. that's nick eardley, our political correspondent. find that's nick eardley, our political correspondent.— that's nick eardley, our political correspondent. and a look at our latest headlines _ correspondent. and a look at our latest headlines on _ correspondent. and a look at our latest headlines on bbc- correspondent. and a look at our latest headlines on bbc news. l on a visit to areas of germany worst—hit by devastating floods, chancellor angela merkel has called
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for the world to speed up efforts to tackle climate change. in the face of a growing outcry, the uk prime minister and chancellor have reversed plans to carry on working — rather than self—isolate — after receiving an official coronavirus alert. the afghan government has withdrawn its diplomatic staff from the pakistan capital of islamabad following an attack on friday on the ambassador�*s daughter. it on the ambassador�*s daughter. is the latest sign oi troubled it is the latest sign of the troubled relationship between the neighbours. 0ur afghanistan and pakistan correspondent, secunder kermani, joins me from kabul. and just explain first of all what happened to. and just explain first of all what happened to— and just explain first of all what happened to. well, this incident took place _ happened to. well, this incident took place on — happened to. well, this incident took place on friday _ happened to. well, this incident took place on friday afternoon, | happened to. well, this incident - took place on friday afternoon, when the ambassador, the afghan ambassador to pakistan's daughter in the capital islamabad was kidnapped and assaulted for sub she was
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travelling in a taxi when another passenger got into the vehicle, started beating her and calling her father a communist. she lost consciousness. when she came to, she was in a residential area of the city, her hands and feet were tight and she was badly injured for top now, this incident has sparked anger in afghanistan, feeding into already intense relationship between the two countries. in the last few hours the afghan foreign mistry has announced is recalling all senior deponents from pakistan until it says their security concerns are addressed, including putting on trial this response before incident. the pakistani foreign ministry has responded, saying that that decision is regrettable. in point of the prime minister has ordered all resources be utilised to apprehend those responsible and also ordered security for afghan diplomats in pakistan to be beefed up. and pakistan to be beefed up. and meanwhile. — pakistan to be beefed up. and meanwhile, peace _ pakistan to be beefed up. and meanwhile, peace talks continue in
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qatar. ., ., , , ., ., qatar. yeah, absolutely, and that violence--- _ qatar. yeah, absolutely, and that violence... peace _ qatar. yeah, absolutely, and that violence... peace talks _ qatar. yeah, absolutely, and that violence... peace talks in - qatar. yeah, absolutely, and that violence... peace talks in qatar, l violence... peace talks in qatar, violence... peace talks in qatar, violence still on the ground ongoing in afghanistan, and that violence, that television insurgency is really the root of these tensions between afghanistan and pakistan, the context to this incident, or the reaction to it, partly, at least, because afghan officials have long accused the pakistani intelligence services of tacitly supporting the taliban and of supporting their insurgency, providing them with safe havens. we've heard comments from the afghan president in recent days, couldn't sizing pakistan positive behaviour. pakistan's prime minister and ran con has responded, saying it is unfair to scapegoat pakistan for the five and still ongoing on the ground in afghanistan despite us peace talks taking place. secunder, thank you very much indeed. secunder kermani in kabul. _ let's talk more about those talks.
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afghan peace talks have continued for a second day in the gulf state of qatar as the violence intensifies across afghanistan. the country's minister for peace told the bbc they hoped afghan officials and the taliban would clarify their ideas on key issues to help chart set a road map to end the conflict. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet has more from doha. the fact they are sitting here is seen as a positive sign, as the war intensifies on both sides and both sides are either trying to recapture or gain territory on the ground. the head of the government delegation just walked past us, and i said, "are you going to be able to finish today?" and he said, "we have to finish today." there's huge pressure on all sides, including the qatar mediation team, to come up with something from this round of high—level talks. they're aiming for this joint declaration on the way forward, and they want it to be on three issues, constitution, power—sharing and confidence building. the taliban have reservations
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about this, though. their main priority is the establishment, they say, of an islamic system in afghanistan, so they are reluctant to discuss a political road map with a government which wants to protect a different system, which has an elected parliament, elected president and is now what is existing in afghanistan now. lyse doucet reporting. with just days to go until the opening ceremony of the olympics, there's a deepening sense of crisis about the olympic games injapan — with new coronavirus cases identified now among athletes inside the olympic village. three members of the south african football association have tested positive. a statement by the team manager reads... ..adding that, as a result, the entire team has been quarantined and will not be allowed to train. they are due to play their opening match on thursday.
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but are there more cases? earlier, 0lympic officials had reported the first infections among competitors staying at the village, but didn't make clear if they were referring to the south africans. team gb has confirmed that six athletes and two coaches from the athletics team have been forced to isolate as they were identified as close contacts. all eight team members have tested negative. for more on the situation, here's dan 0rlowitz, who's a sports journalist for the japan times. the protocols are different for each discipline, for each competition, but the efforts are being made as much as possible to ensure that medals are not awarded by default. so if an athlete has to miss his or her competition because of a positive covid test, their spot in the final or semifinal would go to the next best—placed athlete, for example, and everything
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would roll up, but officials are certainly hoping there will not be many cases of that once the competition starts. these games have never been overwhelmingly popular since the start of the pandemic. public opinion has been pretty equally split between hosting, postponing or cancelling, so there hasn't been a clear consensus, but what we're seeing over the last few days is a growing feeling of anger among the public, especially in light of ioc president thomas bach's comments. he seemed somewhat tone—deaf to the concerns of the japanese public. they were promised that these would be 100% safe, that there would not be 100% safe, that there would not be any infections coming into the country, and that's proven to be not so true. there is a lot of anxiety, a lot of nervousness. the question now remains whether these are a few isolated cases or if this is the start of something bigger. thai police have used force to break up a protest against the government's handling of the covid crisis.
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hundreds defied covid restrictions to protest the government's ending of the pandemic. cases arising in thailand, as elsewhere in southeast asia. the protests are being fuelled by general anger at the prime minister there. the pope has told worshippers to "switch off" and take a break. his message came as pope francis delivered his weekly address from a window overlooking st peter's square, in his first public appearance since undergoing intestinal surgery. the 84—year—old returned to the vatican on wednesday after 11 days in hospital following an operation translation: let us put a halt to the frantic running around . dictated by our agendas. let us learn how to take a break, to turn off the mobile phone, to contemplate nature, to regenerate ourselves talking to god.
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to formula one now, and lewis hamilton has won the british grand prix in a dramatic race at silverstone — the eighth time he has won his home grand prix. hamilton was involved in a collision with his main rival max, verstappen, in the first lap of the race, which resulted in the red bull driver having to retire and hamilton having to serve a ten—second penalty. but the mercedes star was able to fight back and take the lead in the penultamate lap. the slovenian writer has won the tour de france... all i today were on the sprint finish, with britain's mark cavendish looking to set a new record for stage wins, but he fell short in the end, unable to win the
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final sprint along the tops of these a. __ final sprint along the tops of these a. —— champs elys e. you are watching bbc news. in a few moments, viewers on bbc one willjoin us for a round—up with reeta chakrabarti, but first, it's time for a look at the weather with susan. hello. this weekend has brought lots of sunshine and lots of warmth to the uk. and there's more to come on into the week ahead as well, as high pressure keeps our weather largely settled. saturday saw a new record high temperature in northern ireland. there was more cloud around here, though, on sunday, and that is because despite having high pressure, we have still managed to work the remnants of a weak cold front into the north of the uk, through sunday, hence a cooler day for scotland and northern ireland and some more cloud around here. a little bit of that cloud will trickle down the north sea coast overnight as well. a pleasant enough night for going to sleep, though,
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for scotland and northern ireland, unlike the rather sticky, humid conditions which will persist across england and wales. monday, a lot of fine weather to come, a lot of sunshine, some cloud will bother the north sea coasts through the day, but it should look brighter, particularly for northern scotland and northern ireland, and it will become warmer once again, temperatures two or three degrees up on sunday. england and wales perhaps two or three degrees down but still very warm with temperatures in the high 20s. as high pressure sticks around, very little difference in our scenario for tuesday, still plenty of fair weather to come, plenty of warmth, slim chance of a shower across eastern england. it could produce quite a bit of rain if we do see a shower, but it is a very small risk. we have got temperatures again, though, widely in the mid to high 20s. wednesday, high pressure sitting firmly in place, a little bit of north sea cloud, perhaps a bit of fair weather cloud inland, but a lot of sunshine and a lot of warmth — warmth building for glasgow and belfast through the middle of the week.
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temperatures 26, 27 degrees here. thursday, it's looking very similar yet again. sunshine dominating the picture, a little bit of fair weather cloud here or there, and in that sunshine, temperatures mid to high 20s. the end of the week, though, does pose a question mark in terms of our forecast. big areas of high pressure, always slightly unpredictable to break down how quickly they will clear away, maybe friday, but certainly on into next weekend, it looks like the picture will become dramatically different as low pressure sweeps into the uk, ushers in cooler air and i think we will see some pretty big thunderstorms for a time as well.
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the prime minister is now self—isolating after contact with the health secretary, who has coronavirus. but downing street had initially said he and the chancellor would go on working as part of a pilot scheme, prompting condemnation from labour. hundreds of thousands of people are having to self—isolate because of the prime minister's reckless decisions. he expects them to follow the rules. as soon as the rules apply to him, what does he do chris mikey tries to wriggle out. we apply to him, what does he do chris mikey tries to wriggle out.— mikey tries to wriggle out. we did look briefly at _ mikey tries to wriggle out. we did look briefly at the _ mikey tries to wriggle out. we did look briefly at the idea _ mikey tries to wriggle out. we did look briefly at the idea of - mikey tries to wriggle out. we did look briefly at the idea of cars - look briefly at the idea of cars taking — look briefly at the idea of cars taking part in the pilot scheme which — taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily, but i which allows people to test daily, but i think— which allows people to test daily, but i think it is far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules _
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we'll be asking what the government's handling of this might do to public confidence, as england prepares to drop most legal covid restrictions tomorrow. also on the programme: sun, sea, and quarantine as the rules change for those returning from the balearic islands. more rain and more flooding hits western europe. german chancellor angela merkel calls the devastation �*surreal�*. hamilton is going to try again, this time on the inside... and lewis hamilton wins - the british grand prix after putting rival max verstappen out of the race on the very first lap. good evening. the prime minister is now self—isolating following contact with the health secretary, who has coronavirus. downing street had to do a rapid u—turn after initially
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saying that borisjohnson and the chancellor, rishi sunak, would be part of a pilot scheme allowing them to keep working if they tested negative every day. but with hundreds of thousands of people having to self—isolate after a positive contact, they were met with a barrage of criticism, and mrjohnson this afternoon conceded it was �*important that everybody sticks to the same rules.�* it comes as almost all legal covid restrictions are due to be lifted in england tomorrow. here's our political correspondent nick eardley. life correspondent nick eardley. might be feeling a bit normal, life might be feeling a bit more normal, but the impact of the pandemic is farfrom normal, but the impact of the pandemic is far from over. normal, but the impact of the pandemic is farfrom over. hundreds of thousands of people have been told to self—isolate in recent days. now track and trace has hit the heart of government. the prime minister and chancellor are self isolating after the health secretary tested positive for covid yesterday. borisjohnson tested positive for covid yesterday. boris johnson posted tested positive for covid yesterday. borisjohnson posted this video on twitter. taste boris johnson posted this video on twitter. ~ ., ., ~'
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boris johnson posted this video on twitter. ~ , , ., twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of cars _ twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of cars taking _ twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of cars taking part _ twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of cars taking part in - twitter. we did look briefly at the idea of cars taking part in the - idea of cars taking part in the pilot scheme which allows people to test daily, but i think it's far more important that everybody sticks to the same rules. the more important that everybody sticks to the same rules.— to the same rules. the prime minister will _ to the same rules. the prime minister will now _ to the same rules. the prime minister will now spend - to the same rules. the prime minister will now spend the l to the same rules. the prime i minister will now spend the next week here, his country retreat at chequers. but that wasn't always the plan. this morning, numberten chequers. but that wasn't always the plan. this morning, number ten said the prime minister wouldn't have to self—isolate because of a pilot scheme in downing street which allows participants to keep working if they do a daily test. the cabinet minister was sent out to defend the plan. it minister was sent out to defend the lan. , , minister was sent out to defend the lan, , , ., minister was sent out to defend the lan. , , ., ~ plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor _ plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor can _ plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor can conduct _ plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor can conduct the - plan. it ensures that the pm, the chancellor can conduct the most| chancellor can conduct the most essential business but at other times of the day, they won't be mixing with people outside of their own households.— mixing with people outside of their own households. there was criticism from politicians _ own households. there was criticism from politicians and _ own households. there was criticism from politicians and businesses - own households. there was criticism from politicians and businesses who | from politicians and businesses who face significant disruption. less than an hour later, the government backed down. in york today, sympathy was in short supply. it
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backed down. in york today, sympathy was in short sopply-— was in short supply. it was sort of comical, was in short supply. it was sort of comical. the _ was in short supply. it was sort of comical, the fact _ was in short supply. it was sort of comical, the fact that _ was in short supply. it was sort of comical, the fact that it _ was in short supply. it was sort of comical, the fact that it was - was in short supply. it was sort of comical, the fact that it was borisj comical, the fact that it was boris and rishi, it was, wasn't it? everyone is thinking the same. you have got a bit of common sense and everyone is thinking, they have done thatjust everyone is thinking, they have done that just for themselves so they don't have to isolate.— don't have to isolate. we've all done everything _ don't have to isolate. we've all done everything we _ don't have to isolate. we've all done everything we should - don't have to isolate. we've all| done everything we should have don't have to isolate. we've all - done everything we should have done, and we _ done everything we should have done, and we have _ done everything we should have done, and we have done, but i do feel they should _ and we have done, but i do feel they should have — and we have done, but i do feel they should have done the same as us. labour's _ should have done the same as us. labour's leader was also critical. the only reason he has done a u—turn is because he has been busted. it is like bank robbers who got caught and now they are offering the money back. one rule for them, anotherfor everyone else. it is contemptuous of the british public. this everyone else. it is contemptuous of the british public.— the british public. this has been a re the british public. this has been a pretty messy _ the british public. this has been a pretty messy start _ the british public. this has been a pretty messy start to _ the british public. this has been a pretty messy start to a _ the british public. this has been a pretty messy start to a week - the british public. this has been a. pretty messy start to a week where government communication is going to be key. most legal restrictions will be key. most legal restrictions will be lifted in england tomorrow, but ministers don't want this to be a free for all. they will still be urging caution and for people to behave responsibly. in leeds today, people were making the most of the weather, but with more freedoms
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comes risk. the government expects cases to rise in the coming weeks, but how high? h cases to rise in the coming weeks, but how high?— but how high? i think it is almost certain we _ but how high? i think it is almost certain we will— but how high? i think it is almost certain we will get _ but how high? i think it is almost certain we will get to _ but how high? i think it is almost certain we will get to 1000 - certain we will get to 1000 hospitalisations per day. it will almost certainly get to 100,000 cases per day. the real question is, do we get to double that or even higher? and that is where the crystal ball starts to fail. the vaccine roll-out _ crystal ball starts to fail. the vaccine roll-out is _ crystal ball starts to fail. the vaccine roll—out is giving ministers confidence, but it hasn't change the fact that three will spend the first day without legal restrictions in self isolation. nick eardley, bbc news. let's take a look at the latest uk government coronavirus figures. 48,161 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period, and 25 deaths. that takes the average cases per day in the past week to 45,242, with just under 4,000 people currently in hospital with covid. nearly 46.3 million people have now had theirfirstjab — that's just short of 88% of all uk adults. and nearly 36 million people —
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68% of all adults — have had two jabs. 0ur medical editor, fergus walsh, is with me. where do you think we are in tackling the virus as we prepare delete might prepare for the big unlocking tomorrow? irate delete might prepare for the big unlocking tomorrow?— delete might prepare for the big unlocking tomorrow? we are heading into uncertain — unlocking tomorrow? we are heading into uncertain waters _ unlocking tomorrow? we are heading into uncertain waters as _ unlocking tomorrow? we are heading into uncertain waters as this - unlocking tomorrow? we are heading into uncertain waters as this third - into uncertain waters as this third wave rises around us, and paradoxically, with cases, hospital admissions and deaths all rising, this is the moment the government in england is choosing to remove remaining restrictions, but the government says if not now, then when? if we waited till the autumn, we would have the influenza season, the virus would have a greater chance to spread, and there is this firebreak of the school holidays, but there is huge uncertainty about how bad this third wave could get. a couple of things that are uncertain is, how will people behave? will they be cautious, given back their
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freedoms, orwill they be cautious, given back their freedoms, or will people crowd together in pubs and nightclubs and we risk super spreader events? in previous waves, lockdowns were used to control cases. now we are very much relying on the vaccine, and we know the vaccines are effective at protecting people from serious illness, but we are not sure how effective. so, ending social distancing rules will give the virus greater chances to spread, so this is a gamble, but let's have a look at what the changes are in england from tomorrow. there will be no limits on meeting. face coverings will not be required by law, although some transport operators will have them as a condition of travel, some supermarkets will require them. then also working from home guidance will end, and night clubs, theatres and cinemas will all be fully open, and pubs and restaurants will no longer be table service only, so we are switching
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from government rules to personal responsibility. {lilia from government rules to personal responsibility-— responsibility. ok, many thanks. feruus responsibility. ok, many thanks. fergus walsh— responsibility. ok, many thanks. fergus walsh there. _ responsibility. ok, many thanks. fergus walsh there. with - responsibility. ok, many thanks. fergus walsh there. with travell fergus walsh there. with travel rules changing tomorrow for people returning from some major holiday destinations, there has been a scramble to rearrange plans to return home. people arriving from france, which is on the amber list, will need to quarantine for ten days, regardless of their vaccination status. and the previously green list islands of mallorca, menorca and ibiza will now move onto the amber list. it means compulsory quarantine for those over 18 who are not double—jabbed. 0ur europe correspondent nick beake is on ibiza to assess the impact on holiday makers there. it was fun while it lasted. their stay on party island is ending sooner than expected, a final drink before heading back to the uk to beat the latest quarantine rule change. we have to pay for the extra flight, miss two days holidayjust to come home on sunday so we can go to work and we can live our lives as normal.
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and what do you think about that? i'm not happy. i'd rather be here for two more days. we've had a great time. ibiza's great. i'd rather be here all week, but what can you do, eh? in the old days in ibiza, they'd be queuing for the clubs. these days, it's for a covid test to get home. nearly all the young british tourists we've met have only been given theirfirstjab, and so have had to act fast to avoid ten days in isolation when they return. another summer of uncertainty is also hitting businesses on the island. just two weeks ago, they were rejoicing when ibiza went onto the uk's green watchlist. but now it's off it, and so they're bracing themselves for a big slump in the number of brits arriving. some of the biggest venues on the island, already working with strict covid—safe measures, are finding it impossible to plan ahead. i mean, at the moment, concerns over health are all— powerful, and government are using it as a really blunt instrument. and they're making decisions that, you know, frankly, they're just crippling for businesses, they're crippling for customers.
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the chopping and changing... it's notjust this hotel, the whole island lives or dies on what happens to tourism. despite all the travel changes, more than 20 planes touched down today, bringing british holiday—makers determined to get their summer break. we've had our test, so it's fine that we can come. - we've had our test, we'll have a good time here. l getting back might be tricky because obviously if we got| covid while we're here, _ we'll be staying in a hotel and have to quarantine for two weeks| and we have to pay for that. but because we all work from home, we're able to, like, _ hopefullyjust go home _ and quarantine from home and still work from home and should be fine. but new arrivals will find that covid cases are also on the rise in the balearics. still plenty of selfies, but dancing, strictly speaking, remains abandoned. like tourist destinations across europe, they're waiting and watching to see what happens next. nick beake, bbc news, ibiza.
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the german chancellor angela merkel has expressed shock at what she called �*surreal destruction' caused by flash flooding on a visit to one of the worst hit towns — schuld, in the west of germany. at least 184 people have died in germany and belgium. there's still heavy rain across the region, and it is now focused on parts of southern germany and austria. with more, here's our europe correspondentjenny hill. we really need help here, she says. 0utside we really need help here, she says. outside the village shop, you can see why. as in so many other parts of western germany, people in this town still can't quite believe what happened. we met gertrude here. volunteers have brought food, water. she told us she has spent the night alone, upstairs, as waterflooded into her house. i've never seen anything like it, never. it leaves
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you speechless. gertrude, he says. the two of us will never see this place come back to what it was. we will never see it again. it is no longer my home. it's terrible. earlier, angela merkel came to see for herself. this is the town of schuld, where whole houses were destroyed. translation: it schuld, where whole houses were destroyed. translation: it shocking. i'm tem ted destroyed. translation: it shocking. i'm tempted to — destroyed. translation: it shocking. i'm tempted to say _ destroyed. translation: it shocking. i'm tempted to say the _ destroyed. translation: it shocking. i'm tempted to say the german - i'm tempted to say the german language has no words to describe the destruction here. but i also see huge comfort in the way that people have come together to help each other. ., , , , , other. the water is subsiding in western germany, _ other. the water is subsiding in western germany, but - other. the water is subsiding in l western germany, but overnight, other. the water is subsiding in - western germany, but overnight, more flooding in other parts of the country. high water in bavaria, saxony, in aust rear as well, towns
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and cities deluged. translation: people have lost their lives, the houses, their normal roads, but there is huge solidarity. thea;r houses, their normal roads, but there is huge solidarity. they are auoin to there is huge solidarity. they are going to need — there is huge solidarity. they are going to need it _ there is huge solidarity. they are going to need it in _ there is huge solidarity. they are going to need it in the _ there is huge solidarity. they are going to need it in the weeks - there is huge solidarity. they are going to need it in the weeks to l going to need it in the weeks to come. we are seeing this kind of destruction all over west germany, and what is particularly hard for people in places like this to bear is that it could be weeks or may be months before the get back electricity connection. in one part of the region, authorities are saying that gas for heating and hot water won't be back until well into the autumn. germany is mourning its dead. forthe the autumn. germany is mourning its dead. for the survivors, this ordeal is farfrom over. jenny dead. for the survivors, this ordeal is far from over. jenny hill, dead. for the survivors, this ordeal is farfrom over. jenny hill, bbc news. the presenter and comedian tom o'connor has died in hospital at the age of 81. he was given his own
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series after finding fame on the talent show opportunity knocks. he also hosted gameshows including name that tune. tom o'connor had been living with parkinson's disease for more than a decade. for many children, the pandemic—hit school year draws to a close this week and the summer holidays beckon, but bbc research has shown a sharp rise in the numbers being home—educated. council records show over 40,000 more children being home—schooled between september last year and this april. that's a 75% increase compared with the average in the previous two years. our education correspondent, elaine dunkley, reports. for naomi and her son, zion, the pandemic has led to some life changing decisions. the first lockdown gave this family in manchester the chance to experience learning at home. they've now decided to formally opt out of school and home educate. last week, we were doing your human rights, so today, who wants to go
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first and give me one of your human rights? naomi had concerns about the curriculum, and says her son's culture and rastafarian identity was not recognised in school. the teacher even approached me and asked me to cut his hair. they used to send me letters home, three pictures with three boys. all of the boys have got crew cuts, and they told me that this is how his hair is supposed to be. i noticed how isolated he was becoming, and ijust thought, that's not good for his mental health. 0k. marvellous, 0k. naomi has noticed positive changes in zion's confidence and learning. she's now set up an online group to help others wanting to home educate. we are learning together. if he doesn't know something, we'll go and look it up together if i can't answer it. he's much more confident in himself, and i think it's because of the fact that he's getting a lot of praise. to home educate, families in england must first inform the school, then the local authority's notified in orderfor a child to be deregistered. the north west of england has seen the biggest
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increase in children being formally taken out of school. in rochdale, before the pandemic, an average of 91 children were being electively home educated. the past year has seen an additional 192. i think some families do not want local authority or agency involvement, and again, we have to kind of respect that, but in _ the same respect, we've got to think about those families, where they do need that support. with an increase in the number of families going down the home education route, the government wants to introduce a register and says it will help with safeguarding and monitoring of children who are no longer in the school system. hannah has been home educating for two years and is sceptical about the register. if it becomes where . they are putting us on a register to keep tabs on us, to try and fit. us into those boxes, try— l and get us to do a set curriculum i and tell us when we should be home educating, i think that's _ where problems are going to arise. we are just normal-
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people, normal, everyday mums and dads. it's more fun. it isn't like you just sit at a desk and you have to do what they've given you. it's way less boring. the government says a register is about safeguarding and support, but families like these say they are being penalised for what they feel is best for their children. elaine dunkley, bbc news. with all the sport now, here's lizzi greenwood—hughes at the bbc sport centre. thanks. good evening. lewis hamilton's hunt for an 8th world title is back british grand prix — recovering from a time penalty after wiping out his rival max verstappen and giving the thousands of fans watching at silverstone one of the best races in years. our correspondent joe wilson reports. silverstone and a crowd on a pre—thing—mac scale, 100 and 40,000 —— a scale from before covid. many
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were supporting the reigning world champion. lewis hamilton started second on the grid in his black mercedes, aware that red bull's max verstappen ahead of him had a faster car and that he had to make an impression quickly. first and second in the drivers�* championship, battling for the lead in the british grand prix until this. fin battling for the lead in the british grand prix until this.— grand prix untilthis. on the inside, grand prix untilthis. on the inside. and _ grand prix untilthis. on the inside, and a _ grand prix untilthis. on the inside, and a touch, - grand prix untilthis. on the inside, and a touch, max i grand prix until this. on the - inside, and a touch, max verstappen is out of the race, and that�*s a big crash. is out of the race, and that's a big crash. ., , is out of the race, and that's a big crash. .,, ,., ., ., , crash. the most important thing was that max verstappen _ crash. the most important thing was that max verstappen was _ crash. the most important thing was that max verstappen was ok. - crash. the most important thing was that max verstappen was ok. of- that max verstappen was ok. of course, he was out of the race. hamilton�*s assessment was that verstappen moved into him. intense discussions followed. who wrote this plot? when the race resumed, it was decided that hamilton was at fault, a ten second penalty taken in the pits, but he was soon moving, past lando norris here into third. hamilton�*s to make lead him to enter second to challenge for the lead. the red ferrari seem to move aside. hamilton through. fans in the
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stands, film stars in the pits, lewis hamilton crossing the line in first, a hollow victory, claimed that verstappen�*s team. spectators leaving may still be discussing what happened on the first lap, but the outcome of this race has dramatically changed the dynamic of the championship, in lewis hamilton�*s favour. joe wilson, bbc news, silverstone. this year�*s open golf champoinship has been won by the young american — colin morikawa. he held his nerve on the final round to overtake long time leader louis oosthuizen and hold—off his rivals. our correspondent andy swiss has been watching for us at royal st george�*s in kent. yes, lizzie, what drama we�*ve had here, and what a day for colin morikawa. in the last few minutes, he has clinched victory on the 18th green in front of thousands of fans, a terrific moment for the 24—year—old american who was making his debut here at the open, but has
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played like a seasoned campaigner, and you could see just what it meant to him. remember, we began the day with louis oosthuiizen leading, but he was soon overtaken by morikawa, who produced a stunning run of birdies. in fact, who produced a stunning run of birdies. infact, at who produced a stunning run of birdies. in fact, at the halfway point, he led by four shots, and we thought we were looking at a victory procession. but then jordan thought we were looking at a victory procession. but thenjordan spieth produced a stunning run of birdies to close the gap to just one shot, but morikawa has been so calm, so composed, and he held his nerve to hold offjordan spieth by two shots and round off what has been an extraordinary open debut. britain�*s mark cavendish will have to wait if he�*s to break the record for the most career stage wins at the tour de france. he did enough to win the green jersey for this year�*s best sprinter but was beaten on the line
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in the final stage in paris. the overall tour de france title went to tadej pogacar for the second year in a row. and england�*s cricketers have levelled their t20 series with pakistan. there�*s more on the bbc sport website. back to you. that�*s it for now. i�*m back with the next news at 10. you�*re watching the bbc news. tens of thousands of pilgrims have arrived in the saudi arabian city of mecca for a downsized hajj. as sophia tran—thomson reports, restrictions are tight as the kingdom is hoping to repeat
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last year�*s success that saw no coronavirus outbreaks during the muslim ritual. the annual hajj pilgrimage, one of the five pillars of islam. all muslims are expected to retrace the prophet mohammed�*s final pilgrimage at least once in their lives if they have the means to do so. the event is usually one of the world�*s largest annual gatherings and would normally see 2.5 million muslims from around the world converge on mecca. this year, just 60,000 healthy and vaccinated saudi residents, chosen through a lottery from almost 600,000 applicants, will take part. strict social distancing measures are in place and a hajj smart pass is being used to allow contact—free access and transportation to the various religious sites and accommodation. technology will also play a part, with the deployment of robots to dispense bottles of sacred water
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from the grand mosque and others to dispense disinfectant. while a large proportion of security will take place remotely, and most of the marshals who would normally be on site will be in a call centre instead. translation: we help them if they're lost or need urgent | medical help or can�*t find a toll operator. it�*s taken complicated and costly planning, but hosting the hajj is a matter of prestige for saudi rulers. barring overseas pilgrims will cost the kingdom around $12 billion this year and impact hundreds of thousands of jobs in the holy city. but the hajj is a gathering which could easily become a coronavirus super—spreader event, and with around 14 out of 34 million saudis still unvaccinated, it�*s a risk the kingdom isn�*t willing to take. sophia tran—thompson, bbc news.
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the french directorjulia ducourneau has won the palme d�*or at the cannes film festival for her movie about a serial killer, titane. she�*s only the second female director to win one of the film world�*s most prestigious awards. but the announcement didn�*t quite go according to plan, as tim allman explains. can you tell me which prize is the first prize? yes, ican. a big night and a big moment, that came just a bit earlier than intended. the film that won the palme d�*or is titane. wait, wait, no! spike lee, chairman of this year�*s jury, announcing the winner of the palme d�*or a little ahead of schedule... cue a fair dose of confusion and a few red faces. fast forward a couple of hours, throw in a hollywood sex symbol, and try again. you're ready? i am ready. it's now? yes.
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0k. the palme d'or — titane. directorjulia ducourneau still looked a little overwhelmed, even if she knew she was going to win ahead of time. and why not? she is only the second woman to ever be awarded the palme d�*or. titane has been described as outlandish, grizzly, yet comic. it is the story of a female serial killer, said to be one of the most shocking films ever shown at the festival. there was this moment where i felt i was in the twilight zone, so i didn�*t believe it at all. so, somehow, there was the same tension as if he hadn�*t said anything. elsewhere, the award for the best actress went to norway�*s renate reinste for her part in the worst person in the world. and america�*s caleb landryjones was named best actor
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for the film nitram. but the big winner wasjulia ducourneau, who said her evening had been perfect because it was imperfect. tim allman, bbc news. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with susan. hello. this weekend has brought lots of sunshine and lots of warmth to the uk. and there�*s more to come on into the week ahead as well, as high pressure keeps our weather largely settled. saturday saw a new record high temperature in northern ireland. there was more cloud around here though on sunday, and that is because despite having high pressure, we have still managed to work the remnants of a weak cold front into the north of the uk, through sunday, hence a cooler day for scotland and northern ireland and some more cloud around here. a little bit of that cloud will trickle down the north sea coast overnight as well. a pleasant enough night for going to sleep though for scotland and northern ireland, unlike the rather sticky, humid conditions which will persist across england and wales. monday, a lot of fine weather to come, a lot of sunshine, some cloud will bother the north sea
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coast through the day but it should look brighter, particularly for the northern scotland and northern ireland and it will become warm up once again, temperatures two or three degrees up on sunday. england and wales perhaps two or three degrees down but still very warm with temperatures in the high 20s. as high pressure sticks around, very little difference in our scenario for tuesday, still plenty of fair weather to come, the slim chance of a shower across eastern england. it could produce quite a bit of rain if we do see a shower but it is a very small risk. we have got temperatures widely in the mid to high 20s. wednesday, high—pressure sitting firmly in place, a little bit of north sea cloud, perhaps a bit of fair weather cloud inland but a lot of sunshine and a lot of warmth and that is building for glasgow and belfast through the middle of the week. temperatures 26, 27 degrees here. thursday it is looking very similar yet again. sunshine dominating the picture, a little bit of fair weather cloud
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here or there and in that sunshine, temperatures mid to high 20s. the end of the week though does pose a question mark in terms of our forecast. big areas of high pressure, always slightly unpredictable to break down how quickly they will clear away, maybe friday but certainly on into next weekend, it looks like the picture will become dramatically different as low pressure sweeps into the uk, ushers in cooler air and i think we will see some pretty big thunderstorms for a time as well.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the german leader angela merkel visits the region worst—affected by devastating floods — she says the world must act faster in its battle against global warming. translation: it all suggests that it has something to do i with climate change. we have to hurry. we have to get a move on in the fight against climate change. the uk from industry and chancellor have announced a rapid u—turn and say they will suffer as after being identified as contacts of the health secretary, who has tested positive for the coronavirus. —— self—isolate after. we did look briefly at the idea of us taking part in the pilot scheme, which allows people to test daily, but i think it's far more

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