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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 18, 2021 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc news. our top stories... uk health secretary sajid javid confirms he has coronavirus — and the prime minister and chancellor have been alerted by the covid contacts app — as england prepares to ease restrictions further. a clean—up operation is underway in the areas of germany and belgium worst affected by unprecedented flooding. 180 people have died. scotland is bringing in the same quarantine rules as england and wales for travellers returning from france. fully—vaccinated people will have to self—isolate for ten days — unlike with other amber—list countries.
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and 140,000 fans are expected at silverstone for the british grand prix, the nation's biggest sporting event since the start of the pandemic. hello, and welcome to bbc news. downing street has confirmed that the prime minister and the chancellor will not be self—isolating after coming into contact with the health secretary, sajid javid — who has tested positive for coronavirus. both borisjohnson and rishi sunak are to take part in a pilot programme in which daily testing replaces self—isolation. mrjavid tested positive yesterday after a meeting at downing street on friday. the news comes a day ahead of most covid restrictions being lifted in england. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardly has this report. downing street on friday.
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the health secretary outside number 10, where he held talks with the prime minister. last night, though, sajid javid confirmed he had coronavirus, after a second test. i was feeling a bit groggy last night, so i took a lateralflow test this morning and it's come out positive. so i'm now self—isolating at home with my family until i get the result of a pcr test. i'm grateful that i've had two jabs of the vaccine, and so far my symptoms are very mild. he'll now have to self—isolate and there are questions over whether others might be told to stay at home, too. it comes ahead of a crucial week in which almost all legal restrictions in england will be lifted. from tomorrow, social distancing will be officially scrapped. there will be no limits at events and legally you won't have to wear a face covering. although in some places, they will still be recommended. but the number of cases is increasing. there were more than 54,000 in the last 24—hour period. and some have warned about being too relaxed in the coming days and weeks.
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next week will be a significant moment in the sometimes slow road out of lockdown in england, but it won't be back to normality overnight. face coverings will still be recommended in some places, and there will still be an emphasis on caution. and the number of positive cases we're seeing, like the health secretary's, is a reminder that even if many restrictions are going, the virus hasn't disappeared. this is wales yesterday — people taking advantage of the weather after restrictions and gatherings outside were lifted. there are more freedoms coming for people across the uk, but that doesn't come without risk. nick eardley, bbc news. the search continues for hundreds of missing people in western europe after record rainfall caused devastating flooding. more than 170 people have been killed across germany and belgium. chancellor merkel is due to visit
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affected areas later today. mud sloshing in ahrweiler, everything, everyone, is covered in thick, sticky mud. there's no power, nowhere to buy food, not much mobile reception. but they're doing what they can. willie told us they've never seen anything like it here, not even in his parents' grandparents' time. "the water rose two metres in 15 or 20 minutes," he told us. "people tried to save their things, went into their basements and, unfortunately, got trapped. i was lucky," he said, "i could get out the back of my basement." around 100 people have died in this district alone. many more are still missing. there was so little time to run, people tell us. look at the force of this flood. and the damage it left behind.
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the water's receding, but the number of dead is expected to continue to rise. search and rescue, it's feared, will soon be a recovery operation. so many people just want to help, donations piling up, overwhelming the volunteers at this makeshift warehouse. translation: i can't imagine what it must be like to be affected. - that's why i'm here — to help people. in ahrweiler, across the region, lives turned upside down. also das wasser ist... this is amelie. "the water," she told us, "came from the playground to our house, but luckily just the ground floor. my gran and granddad were affected, though. they're staying with us now." as the waters slowly subside, they reveal the extent of the damage done. the task of rebuilding this region seems overwhelming. so much of its vital infrastructure — bridges, roads, railways —
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is completely gone. hard to imagine the time, the money it'll take to get this region back on its feet. jenny hill, bbc news, ahrweiler. 0ur correspondent is at a donation centre. he gave us a sense of the scale of the rescue operation. there is a search — scale of the rescue operation. there is a search operation _ scale of the rescue operation. there is a search operation out _ scale of the rescue operation. there is a search operation out right - scale of the rescue operation. ti” is a search operation out right now, right beside this building. there is a centre where all of the emergency services are gathered. there are about 3—400 emergency service vehicles out there, hundreds of ambulances from different organisations. army vehicles as well. they are being deployed constantly, looking for people. i talk to some of those rescue workers last night and they were telling me that the difficulty is that the longer this goes on, rather than looking for people to rescue, they are looking for bodies. that is the tragic reality. time is of the
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essence, and the difficulty is that we have no idea how many people might still be out there because a lot of the roads are impassable, you can't get through them, they have collapsed, and a lot of the bridges have gone as well. so it is a difficult situation for those rescue workers who are looking for people still out there.— still out there. damien mcguinness there. landslides caused by heavy rains in the indian city of mumbai have killed at least twenty people. twelve of the victims died when a compound wall collapsed on their homes in the chembur district. there were other fatalities in the suburb of vikhroli. 15 other people were rescued in a different neighbourhood of the city. rescue operations continue in both areas, as more people may be trapped in the rubble. many metropolitan train services are suspended because of waterlogged tracks. from monday, the balearic islands of ibiza, majorca and menorca will move from the uk government's green travel watchlist to amber overnight. this means that british tourists who are not fully vaccinated, will have to quarantine when
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travelling to and from the island. it could be a big blow to the local economy which relies heavily on tourists from the uk. 0ur reporter nick beake is in ibiza. the beaches here on the island have been filling up, but unfortunately lots of young brits have been packing up, ready to go home. they've had to cut their holiday short because they have to beat the new quarantine rules that come in at 4am tomorrow morning. in practical terms, it's meant that lots of people, while they've been on holiday, have had to change their flight, bring it earlier, and they've been talking to their tour operator in some cases to do that. they've had to take their pcr test to get home much earlier. so a lot of people have been really disappointed. the problem is that lots of young people we've been talking to have had one jab but not two jabs. that's the issue here. also, for people coming back from france, returning to the uk, even if they're double—jabbed, from tomorrow they'll have to self—isolate. that's because there are concerns over the rise of the beta variant in france. that, of course, was first seen in south africa.
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meanwhile, back on this island, businesses are pretty concerned about what's going to happen because the brits are their best customers. just two weeks ago, they were rejoicing when the island went on the uk's green watch list. now they're not sure what's going to happen. having said all of that, there are more than 20 flights arriving from the uk today, but i think businesses here will be watching anxiously to see how many people get off the planes, how many people have decided that they're still going to come here on holiday despite the fact that they may have to quarantine when they get back to the uk. let's go back to our top story. downing street has revealed that the prime minister and chancellor have been contacted by nhs test and trace. instead of self isolating, both boris johnson trace. instead of self isolating, both borisjohnson and rishi sunak will take part in a daily testing pilot scheme which allows them to continue to work from downing street. the shadow health secretary,
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jonathan ashworth, criticised those in the government that weren't isolating all the time after being contacted, saying the pilot scheme meant it felt like ministers were operating under different rules to the general public.— the general public. there will be arents the general public. there will be parents watching _ the general public. there will be parents watching the _ the general public. there will be | parents watching the programme the general public. there will be - parents watching the programme this morning who have had to struggle with their children sent home as part of the bubbling system, businesses that have had to struggle because their staff have been pinged and they've had to isolate themselves, who will be waking up to this news, thinking, "my word, yet again it is one were sunni rule for them and anotherfor the again it is one were sunni rule for them and another for the rest of us." people will be asking how they have access to the special vip test and release system that applies to them but doesn't apply to the rest of us. butjust beggars belief. responding on behalf of the government, the housing secretary refuted claims that rules were different for ministers and members of the public, and said it is important that people continue to
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isolate if alerted by the app or test and trace teams before it is scrapped. test and trace teams before it is scra ed. . . ., ., scrapped. the advice that we have received in — scrapped. the advice that we have received in the _ scrapped. the advice that we have received in the recent _ scrapped. the advice that we have received in the recent past - scrapped. the advice that we have received in the recent past has - scrapped. the advice that we have i received in the recent past has been that it _ received in the recent past has been that it will— received in the recent past has been that it will be better to wait. this period _ that it will be better to wait. this period of— that it will be better to wait. this period of six weeks. to make sure that more — period of six weeks. to make sure that more people are double vaccinated. that gives them more protection — vaccinated. that gives them more protection for themselves, and decreases the amount of transmission that will— decreases the amount of transmission that will happen as a result. that is the _ that will happen as a result. that is the plan, — that will happen as a result. that is the plan, but of course we keep these _ is the plan, but of course we keep these things under review.- these things under review. robert jen rick, there. _ these things under review. robert jen rick, there. police _ jen rick, there. police investigating violence police investigating violence and violence disorder at last sunday's euro final between england and italy have released images of ten men they want to speak to.
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officers have condemned what they call the disgraceful scenes witnessed at wembley stadium. london's hosting of the match saw ugly scenes, which included some ticketless fans storming the grounds in an attempt to watch the game. afghan peace talks continue for a second day today in the gulf state of qatar as the violence intensifies across afghanistan. the afghan state minister for peace, sayed sadat mansour naderi, told the bbc they hoped both sides would clarify their ideas on key issues to help chart a road map to a political solution to end the war. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet reports from doha. well, this is day two and expected to be the last day of these high—level political talks here in doha. around that, there's pressure on both sides, from afghans most of all, from afghanistan's neighbours and allies, that both sides have to show that they are committed to a negotiated way out of this war that continues to intensify on the ground. so today's talks are going to focus on coming up with some kind of a joint statement, that they will agree to focus on three key areas going forward. one is about building trust, another is to discuss a road map to afghanistan's
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political future, and also an islamic constitution. the taliban insists there has to be changes to the existing afghan constitution, and on top of that there has to be a clear sense that this process isn't going to suddenly stop and then be another long pause, there has to be a continuous process. both sides say that the vibes are positive here and at this stage of the war it is also understood that good vibes are not enough. there has to be a sense that they can close what are now wide gaps between their ideas on how afghanistan should move forward politically to achieve what they all say they want to achieve which is a durable political solution, and all the while, the worry grows in afghanistan that if this process fails, this devastating war is going to get much worse.
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more coronavirus cases have been identified at the olympics village in the last hour. earlier in the day, others tested positive for the virus. i think the volume of testing that is being done by the organisers means there are going to be cases. they are doing tens of thousands of tests on people coming into the games from abroad, so it's no real surprise that we've had these cases. as i say, i expect they will be more over the next few days as the game starts, purely because of the volume of the people coming into the country from overseas.
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an estimated 140,000 people are expected at silverstone to watch the british grand prix this afternoon — the biggest crowd at a sporting event since the start of the pandemic. ticket holders will have to provide proof of a negative lateral flow test or double vaccination. britain's lewis hamilton will start second on the grid, as he tries to catch the championship leader max verstappen. let's speak now to the virologist dr naomi forrester—soto, of keele university. how, if at all, can they make an event of this scale, 140,000 people, covid safe? it’s event of this scale, 140,000 people, covid safe? �* , ., event of this scale, 140,000 people, covid safe? �* , . ., , covid safe? it's a really good question- — covid safe? it's a really good question- i — covid safe? it's a really good question. i think— covid safe? it's a really good question. i think the - covid safe? it's a really good question. i think the simple l covid safe? it's a really good - question. i think the simple answer is that— question. i think the simple answer is that they— question. i think the simple answer is that they cannot. even people who are double _ is that they cannot. even people who are double vaccinated are able to -et are double vaccinated are able to get the _ are double vaccinated are able to get the virus and potentially transmit it, so there really is no way that— transmit it, so there really is no way that they can make it 100% covid safe _ way that they can make it 100% covid safe you _ way that they can make it 100% covid safe you are — way that they can make it 100% covid safe. you are much less likely to end up— safe. you are much less likely to end up with _ safe. you are much less likely to end up with severe disease and end ”p end up with severe disease and end up in— end up with severe disease and end up in hospital if you are double
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vaccinated, but it's still not going to be _ vaccinated, but it's still not going to be 100% safe. find vaccinated, but it's still not going to be 100% safe.— to be 10096 safe. and we've seen obviously with _ to be 10096 safe. and we've seen obviously with the _ to be 10096 safe. and we've seen obviously with the situation - to be 10096 safe. and we've seen obviously with the situation with | obviously with the situation with the health secretary sajid javid, having been fully vaccinated, and still having been able to contract the virus, but the crucial thing is that the symptoms are much more mild, aren't they? is it as much of a concern from a virology point of view if the virus is spreading among people at a crowd in silverstone, if someone does happen to test positive there, if people aren't getting seriously ill?— there, if people aren't getting seriously ill? ideally, yes, that would be the _ seriously ill? ideally, yes, that would be the case, _ seriously ill? ideally, yes, that would be the case, but - seriously ill? ideally, yes, that would be the case, but we - seriously ill? ideally, yes, that would be the case, but we still seriously ill? ideally, yes, that- would be the case, but we still have enough _ would be the case, but we still have enough people who are not vaccinated. we are allowing people in with _ vaccinated. we are allowing people in with a _ vaccinated. we are allowing people in with a negative lateral flow test you are _ in with a negative lateral flow test you are not vaccinated. they are at quite _ you are not vaccinated. they are at quite a _ you are not vaccinated. they are at quite a big — you are not vaccinated. they are at quite a big risk of getting severely ill, quite a big risk of getting severely iii, and _ quite a big risk of getting severely iii, and at— quite a big risk of getting severely ill, and at least the evidence... i sought— ill, and at least the evidence... i sought from _ ill, and at least the evidence... i sought from the states today, people who are _ sought from the states today, people who are not vaccinated are ending up in hospital— who are not vaccinated are ending up in hospital in— who are not vaccinated are ending up in hospital in higher numbers than they were —
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in hospital in higher numbers than they were back in the first outbreak back in_ they were back in the first outbreak back in march, are the first few waves — back in march, are the first few waves so— back in march, are the first few waves so i_ back in march, are the first few waves. so i think there is still a risk to— waves. so i think there is still a risk to people, even if you don't think— risk to people, even if you don't think you — risk to people, even if you don't think you are invincible, which a lot of— think you are invincible, which a lot of young people do, there is still quite — lot of young people do, there is still quite a big risk in the potential for getting covid and then also tohq _ potential for getting covid and then also long covid, which we know affect _ also long covid, which we know affect quite a lot of people who even _ affect quite a lot of people who even get — affect quite a lot of people who even get a mild disease.- affect quite a lot of people who even get a mild disease. there was a trial event in — even get a mild disease. there was a trial event in the _ even get a mild disease. there was a trial event in the netherlands - even get a mild disease. there was a trial event in the netherlands not - trial event in the netherlands not that long ago, a music festival, 20,000 people attended. a similar situation. and yet, of those 20,000, thousand subsequently tested positive. and as much as people want to get back to big crowd events and a feeling of normality, that sort of points to the fact that it is almost impossible to hold events of that scale without there being some likelihood or inevitability of virus spreading. find likelihood or inevitability of virus sreadin. . ., , spreading. and particularly with the rise of the delta _ spreading. and particularly with the rise of the delta variant _ spreading. and particularly with the rise of the delta variant which - spreading. and particularly with the rise of the delta variant which is - rise of the delta variant which is more _ rise of the delta variant which is
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more transmissible. that has dramatically changed the risk factors, — dramatically changed the risk factors, i_ dramatically changed the risk factors, i think, dramatically changed the risk factors, ithink, in my dramatically changed the risk factors, i think, in my opinion. dramatically changed the risk factors, ithink, in my opinion. but ithink— factors, ithink, in my opinion. but i think it _ factors, ithink, in my opinion. but i think it has — factors, ithink, in my opinion. but i think it has changed, and it means that even— i think it has changed, and it means that even things that may be have been _ that even things that may be have been tested and thought to be safe before _ been tested and thought to be safe before it _ been tested and thought to be safe before it may not be as safe now because — before it may not be as safe now because there is a more transmissible than we had expected. we must _ transmissible than we had expected. we must leave it there. we could talk so much about this but we are out of time. thank you very much. tens of thousands of pilgrims have arrived in the saudi arabian city of mecca for a downsized hajj ? which formally starts on sunday. as sophia tran—thomson reports, restrictions are tight ? as the kingdom is hoping to repeat last year s success — that saw no coronavirus outbreaks during the five—day muslim ritual. the annual hajj pilgrimage, one of the five pillars of islam. all muslims are expected to retrace
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the prophet mohammed's final pilgrimage at least once in their lives if they have the means to do so. the event is usually one of the world's largest annual gatherings and would normally see 2.5 million muslims from around the world converge on mecca. this year, just 60,000 healthy and vaccinated saudi residents, chosen through a lottery from almost 600,000 applicants, will take part. strict social distancing measures are in place and a hajj smart pass is being used to allow contact—free access and transportation to the various religious sites and accommodation. technology will also play a part, with the deployment of robots to dispense bottles of sacred water from the grand mosque and others to dispense disinfectant. while a large proportion of security will take place remotely, and most of the marshals who would normally be on site will be in a call centre instead.
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translation: we help them| if they are lost or need urgent medical help or can't find their tour operator. it's taken complicated and costly planning, but hosting the hajj is a matter of prestige for saudi rulers. barring overseas pilgrims will cost the kingdom around $12 billion this year and impact hundreds of thousands of jobs in the holy city. but the hajj is a gathering which could easily become a coronavirus super spreader event, and with around 14 out of 34 million saudis still unvaccinated, it's a risk the kingdom isn't willing to take. sophia tran—thompson, bbc news. to the us, where residents of los angeles
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are once again being required to wearface masks indoors, following an increase in coronavirus cases amongst the non—vaccinated. it's the first area of its kind to restore such requirements in the us as russell trott explains. it's the most populous county in america. around 10 million people live in the los angeles area — half of them fully vaccinated. but that hasn't stopped an average of around 1,300 new coronavirus cases a day over the course of the last two weeks. that's an increase of more than 270% over the previous fortnight. and that's got the experts here worried. we're seeing a change in the epidemiology, notjust in los angeles and california in general but throughout the united states. we're not seeing as many elderly people get hospitalised and dying now. we're seeing it predominantly in younger people, and this is mainly because of two things. number one, younger people are not getting vaccinated nearly to the rate that older people are. and number two, younger people tend to take more risks than older people do. just over a month ago, they lifted the mask—wearing restrictions,
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but now they're reinstating them. so not wearing a mask inside is now out. health officials say the sudden rise in cases has left unvaccinated people at high risk, particularly given concerns about the so—called delta variant. they say the new order will remain in place until transmission rates go down and haven't ruled out tougher measures if they don't. russell trott, bbc news. 60 metres in northern ireland are asking for changes before october when an extended grace period ends. it currently allows for a lighter touch controls on some goods. our reporter sarah girvan has more. the six retailers named in this letter make up three quarters of northern ireland's grocery market. they say
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that unless something is done, when the grace period ends they will be hit by more checks on goods and more costs. that's because of the northern ireland protocol. it is part of the brexit deal and is aimed at avoiding a heart border on the island of ireland by effectively keeping northern ireland in the eu's single market for goods. the supermarkets gave a similar warning backin supermarkets gave a similar warning back injanuary supermarkets gave a similar warning back in january where there supermarkets gave a similar warning back injanuary where there were issues and getting some items to shelves in northern ireland. they say that since they're not enough has changed. i say that since they're not enough has changed-— has changed. i think that is what the frustration _ has changed. i think that is what the frustration and _ has changed. i think that is what the frustration and concern - has changed. i think that is what the frustration and concern of i has changed. i think that is what | the frustration and concern of the supermarkets is, that we haven't seen that movement to get a new way of trading between great britain and northern ireland under the protocol that removes friction. this northern ireland under the protocol that removes friction.— that removes friction. as well as northern ireland _ that removes friction. as well as northern ireland consumers - that removes friction. as well as i northern ireland consumers being impacted in terms of choice and cost, the retailers warned that red tape and falling profit margins could force them to move supply chains from britain to the eu. the
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government is expected to set out its preferred weight forward on the protocol on wednesday. sarah girvan, bbc news. a french director has won the palm d'orfor her movie about a serial killer. she is only the second female director to win one of the film world's most prestigious awards. but the announcement didn't quite go according to plan — as tim allman explains. can you tell me which prize is the first prize? yes, ican. a big night and a big moment, that came just a bit earlier than intended. the film that won the palme d'or is titane. wait, wait, no! spike lee, chairman of this year's jury, announcing the winner of the palme d'or a little ahead of schedule... cue a fair dose of confusion and a few red faces. fast forward a couple of hours, throw in a hollywood sex
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symbol, and try again. you're ready? i am ready. it's now? yes. 0k. the palme d'or — titane. directorjulia ducourneau still looked a little overwhelmed, even if she knew she was going to win ahead of time. and why not? she's only the second woman to ever be awarded the palme d'or. titane has been described as outlandish, grizzly, yet comic. it is the story of a female serial killer, said to be one of the most shocking films ever shown at the festival. there was this moment where i felt i was in the twilight zone, so i didn't believe it at all. so, somehow, there was the same tension as if he hadn't said anything. elsewhere, the award for the best actress went to norway's renate reinste for her part in the worst person in the world. and america's caleb landryjones was named best actor for the film nitram.
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but the big winner wasjulia ducourneau, who said her evening had been perfect because it was imperfect. tim allman, bbc news. that's it for the moment. don't forget you can reach me and most of the team here on social media. there is plenty more on the stories we have covered, analysis and other stories as well on the website, and if you are out and about, you can keep up—to—date on the bbc news app. thank you for watching. the sun is very strong, and the uv
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levels are about as high as they get. for england and wales and many parts, they are indeed very high today. the high pressure is with us, keeping things sunny and very warm. to the north, there is a weather front. you can see the wind is coming off the atlantic, so that means cooler conditions across parts of scotland, and also a little bit cooler for northern ireland. yesterday in county down we got up to 30.12 lcs. i don't think we're going to make that today. in belfast, it will be only around 22 celsius. glasgow hitting 20 celsius. 31 celsius will be reserved for more central and southern areas of the uk. early this evening, temperatures will still be well into the 20s across many areas of the country. a lot fresher in scotland. you can see
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11 there in glasgow. 12 expected in aberdeen. the high pressure is with us. we are right in the middle of the high pressure. in the middle of the high pressure. in the middle of the high pressure. in the middle of the high pressure, the winds tend to fall like there's very little cloud, so for some of us is going to feel every bit as hot. in fact, the heat might spark off one or two showers, because that is a possibility tomorrow. generally speaking, i think they will be more sunshine around tomorrow. here, temperatures up around tomorrow. here, temperatures up to 24 in glasgow and pushing the high 20s in the south. i think we will see exactly same pattern on tuesday. lots of sunshine in the uk. very light winds. feeling every bit as hot, and the possibility of these higher temperatures are sparking off one or two showers. wednesday is going to be another very, very warm day. temperatures in some spots again hitting high 20s. towards the end of the week, the temperatures will ease a little bit and there is
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just the chance we will get a little shower. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... uk health secretary sajid javid confirms he has coronavirus — and the prime minister and chancellor have been alerted by the covid contacts app — as england prepares to ease restrictions further. a clean—up operation is under way in the areas of germany and belgium worst affected by unprecedented flooding. more than 180 people have died. scotland, england and wales say travellers returning from france must self—isolate for ten days — unlike with other
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amber list countries. scotland, england and wales say travellers returning from france

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