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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 18, 2021 9:30am-10:01am BST

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a sun—soaked sandwich and a day when being a golf fan was about as fun as it gets. when being a golf fan but while they basked in the heat, others were trying to keep their cool. after starting with a two—shot lead, louis oosthuizen began in his usual unflappable style. but soon he had company — another former champion, jordan spieth, piling on the pressure. and so did collin morikawa as three of them became locked in a thrilling battle. hopes of a home winner are fading. paul casey and the pinpoint—precise andy sullivan the best of the bunch. but they are seven shots back. while rory mcilroy is 11 back after a round which began promisingly before falling away. but at the top of the leaderboard, late drama. spieth missed a tiddler at the last and oosthuizen edged clear of morikawa. he's led after every round so far. could this once again be his year? and so louis oosthuizen takes a slender one—shot lead into the final day.
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this enthralling open remains tantalisingly poised. andy swiss, bbc news, sandwich. and the action doesn't stop there on a busy day of sport. silverstone is set to host the biggest crowd at a sporting event since before the pandemic began. a 140,000 are expected at the track for the british grand prix this afternoon... and lewis hamilton will be desperate to keep his title hopes alive, as lydia campbell reports. away from the fans, and soon there will be a lot more of them, as silverstone welcomes the biggest crowd at a sporting event in the uk since the start of the pandemic. just happy to be out and about and at a sport event, i've missed it. yeah, feels great. it's the first time i've been here as well, so i don't know what it was like, but it's nice
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at the moment, yeah. the uk has been building up to this. there were 15,000 people on centre court to watch the wimbledon finals, 60,000 at wembley to witness the final of the european championship, and now, 140,000 at silverstone. a critical part of the events research programme is that everybody here is either had a negative lateral flow test in the 48 hours before they arrive, or they are second vaccine jab plus two weeks. we've stopped at nothing to make sure this is a safe as it possibly can be. and for places like silverstone, allowing a capacity crowd has allowed them to think about the future. this was really a crunch moment for silverstone. if they couldn't get fans in, it could have been they didn't have any more money, they'd be broke, and that would be a desperate time for the track. and what about the racing? that's what the crowds are here for after all. max verstappen was literally on fire at the start of the new sprint qualifying on saturday. that must have helped him as he overtook lewis hamilton before the first turn,
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and that's how they finished. verstappen pipping hamilton at the pole ahead of the main race today. but while hamilton couldn't quite deliver for his fans on saturday, they were still happy to see him. with today's crowd set to take the number of spectators over the three days to more than 300,000, many more people across the country will be hoping that scenes like these will soon be a normality again. lydia campbell, bbc news. there could be a few sore heads in st helens this morning, because for the first time in more than a decade, saints have won rugby league's challenge cup. they beat castleford at a searing—hot wembley yesterday — joe lynskey watched that one. 115,000 brought the noise
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from the north. after so long in the silence for rugby league, it means so much. this is their sport's showpiece match. castleford and st helens are two of the oldest clubs. they know games can change with the bounce of the ball. saints got the first score with help from the post, but castleford responded with something extraordinary. castleford fans are leaping to the air! —— castleford fans leap into the air! in castleford, this sport's at the heart of the town, but a fierce half in the heat would drain them in the second. st helens were here as favourites, now they'd surged through the gaps and into the lead. after 13 years without it, one of this sport's giants
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had its oldest prize. yeah, it's been a long time coming and obviously a number of years before we've been able to get back here and win it again. so, it was one really tough game today, obviously the heat i think played its part. you could see that in the second half, for both teams, but it's very special for me to call myself the captain of this team and obviously to lift this trophy. this has been rugby league's toughest year, but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in itself. it is st helens who go home singing. joe lynskey, bbc news. tadej pogacar looks set to retain he tour de france title this evening, as the race concludes in paris — thats after he kept his substantial lead intact after yesterday's 20th stage. the tradition is that no one challenges the yellow jersey in paris, but there's still chance for mark cavendish to make history on the champs elleyses. as drew savage reports. after 2,054 miles of dominating the tour de france, tadej pogacar finished stage 20 with a lead of more than five minutes. today he'll be drinking champagne on the road to paris. others will be relieved it's over.
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geraint thomas had hoped to challenge him but a crash and a others will be relieved it's over. geraint thomas had hoped to challenge pogacar but a crash and a dislocated shoulder ended that. next for him the tokyo 0lympics. thomas stayed in the race to help his team—mate richard carapaz richard carapaz finish third overall for britain's ineos grenadiers team. while chris freeman's return from injury was almost scuppered by a crash on day one. he's done well to make it this far. most riders will take it easy on the final stage. the belgian wout van aert will be going for another stage victory, this time on the champs—elysees, but to do it he'll have to beat the tour�*s comeback king. victory in paris for mark cavedish would secure the sprinter�*s green jersey and set a new all—time record of 35 stage wins. the preparation is now over for the british and irish lions. they thrashed the stormers 49—3 in theirfinal warm—up match before the first test against south africa next weekend. the lions did fall behind early, but quickly turned things around. exeter�*s sam simmonds was just one of seven try scorers, but the headlines were saved for tour captain alun wynjones — he came off the bench, to complete an incredible return to action, just three weeks after
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dislocating his shoulder. but wales were well beaten by a strong argentina side in their second test match in cardiff. the visitors dominated throughout to finish 31 points to 11 winners. wales coach wayne pivac said he was without 27 players for the game, because of injuries and lions commitments in south africa. that's all the sport for now. now on bbc news, the papers. the hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers are bringing us. —— what the papers are bringing us. with me arejournalist and author shyama perera, and former conservative adviser mo
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hussein. as health secretary sajid javid tests positive for covid, the observer highlights the plea from top scientists, not to "let the virus rip" on monday. with that in mind, the mirror leads on calls by a scientists for monday to be dubbed �*freedumb day'. the health secretary's positive covid test is also the lead for the express, with the paper carrying warnings from business leaders that they expect staffing chaos to continue as workers continue to be �*pinged' by the nhs test and trace app. the mail speculates on the number of senior cabinet members who might have to self—isolate as a result of sajid javid's positive test — it's emerged that the health secretary spent time with the prime minister yesterday. the telegraph leads on claims that ministers have decided only to offer covid vaccines to the most vulnerable uk children over 12 years old, rather than a wider roll—out. that story also on the digitalfront page of the independent — conversely, the paper saying that the government is under pressure to providejabs
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for all uk teenagers. the times picks up on the number of staff off work due to being buzzed by the test and trace app — the paper uses the example of parts of the london underground which were forced to close over the weekend due to a lack of staff. so let's begin. let's start with what the mail on sunday are calling the pingdemic. the reality that several cabinet members may have to end up having to isolate but not all because of this trial that some of them will be able
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that's right. we've held a lot about the pandemic and now we have to get used to the pingdemic. 0ver the pandemic and now we have to get used to the pingdemic. over half a million people have been pinged in the last few weeks ago. the health secretary having have a double jab is no worryingly testing positive bit with mild symptoms. we have heard this morning that the prime minister and chancellor have been pinged as well but will not be self isolating but taking part in this pilot scheme with a test every day. i understand this is extended to transport for london and border force. there is a case for the country to keep it running, people to be able to do these essential jobs. however ijust think to be able to do these essential jobs. however i just think there's an opportunity to lead by example. when you have growing frustration that people who have had the jab eye
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still being penned from a month longer —— might still being pinged for a month longer i think this would have been a chance for the chancellor and pro—minister to self—isolate and show they could do their jobs self—isolate and show they could do theirjobs effectively self—isolate and show they could do their jobs effectively as self—isolate and show they could do theirjobs effectively as a prime minister did before. if they can do it everyone else can. that minister did before. if they can do it everyone else can.— it everyone else can. that will “ar with some — it everyone else can. that will 'ar with some people ifd it everyone else can. that will 'ar with some people if their i it everyone else can. that willjar- with some people if their businesses have been affected just as things are starting to open up because of the need to isolate and then the sea at the very top the prime minister and the chancellor not having to isolate because they are able to participate in a trial. but the flip side is i suppose if you allow people to go into work when they have been pinged there will be others in the workplace who feel uneasy especially if they have vulnerable family and friends to come into contact with at home. absolutely. what we end up with yet
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a-ain absolutely. what we end up with yet again is _ absolutely. what we end up with yet again is more confusion and mixed messaging — again is more confusion and mixed messaging. i think sajid javid was part of— messaging. i think sajid javid was part of that daily testing pilot but i'm not_ part of that daily testing pilot but i'm not aware that the prime minister_ i'm not aware that the prime minister of the chancellor are so they will— minister of the chancellor are so they will be joining it as of today, presumably. i'm not sure how reliable — presumably. i'm not sure how reliable that can be. i have to say that only — reliable that can be. i have to say that only yesterday i was doing the lateral— that only yesterday i was doing the lateral flow test in the morning to id lateral flow test in the morning to go to— lateral flow test in the morning to go to a _ lateral flow test in the morning to go to a wedding and i spent most of the wedding slightly worried that this wasn't good enough and the reason _ this wasn't good enough and the reason is — this wasn't good enough and the reason is i — this wasn't good enough and the reason is i had a friend who did the same _ reason is i had a friend who did the same thing — reason is i had a friend who did the same thing last week for a wedding where _ same thing last week for a wedding where everybody had clear tests, these _ where everybody had clear tests, these lateral flow test, but there was a _ these lateral flow test, but there was a super spreader who had not been _ was a super spreader who had not been picked up the test and the ball .one been picked up the test and the ball gone down with —— they have all gone down _ gone down with —— they have all gone down with— gone down with —— they have all gone down with covid. the very fact that the chancellor has beenjabbed twice and still— the chancellor has beenjabbed twice and still managing to get covid, and
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the prime _ and still managing to get covid, and the prime minister has got himself into a _ the prime minister has got himself into a model and he can't bear the thought— into a model and he can't bear the thought of— into a model and he can't bear the thought of isolating again although actually— thought of isolating again although actually all he has to do is pick up actually all he has to do is pick up a phone — actually all he has to do is pick up a phone he — actually all he has to do is pick up a phone. he doesn't have to sit opposite — a phone. he doesn't have to sit opposite people in order to speak and meet — opposite people in order to speak and meet with them but if he can't do it why— and meet with them but if he can't do it why on — and meet with them but if he can't do it why on earth would anybody else? _ do it why on earth would anybody else? �* , ., ., ., do it why on earth would anybody else? �*, ., ., ., ., else? let's turn our attention to the observer — else? let's turn our attention to the observer which _ else? let's turn our attention to the observer which resonates i else? let's turn our attention to i the observer which resonates along those lines with health chiefs saying to the prime minister don't let covid rip. that is the headline, just the day before the rules of due to be relaxed, the biggest single relaxation of rules since the key men. , , . , men. yes, indeed. -- since the rules all came in- — men. yes, indeed. -- since the rules all came in- we _ men. yes, indeed. -- since the rules all came in. we can't _ men. yes, indeed. -- since the rules all came in. we can't keep _ men. yes, indeed. -- since the rules all came in. we can't keep on - men. yes, indeed. -- since the rules all came in. we can't keep on living | all came in. we can't keep on living under this never—ending restrictions under this never—ending restrictions under there are costs of mental
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health and children's education and the backlog in the nhs, all of which need to be taken seriously. we will need to be taken seriously. we will need to be taken seriously. we will need to find a way of living with this disease. having said that, with 50,000 new cases per day it does slightly feel that the government mantra of data not dates has been cast aside just for this much lauded freedom day tomorrow and i think if there was more thought given and probably you have seen a bit of this, the narrative and rhetoric from the government has changed in the last few weeks and days and there is much more talk around legal requirements lifting but actually facemasks for example still recommended on transport and returning to work should be gradual and this idea of personal responsibility being taken and crucially we were told any lifting of restrictions would be a reversible and you hear that a lot less now from government ministers. i think the reality is kicking and
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there is a risk involved here. there always will be a risk but it feels at the moment with the numbers with er it is probably bigger than people in government calculated when they made the road map. the in government calculated when they made the road map.— in government calculated when they made the road map. the view on the front -a . e made the road map. the view on the front page of — made the road map. the view on the front page of the _ made the road map. the view on the front page of the sunday _ made the road map. the view on the front page of the sunday mirror, - front page of the sunday mirror, they are seeing in this —— they say instead of freedom they should be calling it freedumb day. it is calling it freedumb day. it is almost the — calling it freedumb day. it is almost the tetralogy - calling it freedumb day. it is almost the tetralogy will stop you couldn't _ almost the tetralogy will stop you couldn't make up the way the government are running less but they seem _ government are running less but they seem to _ government are running less but they seem to be _ government are running less but they seem to be making it up. —— tautology~ _ seem to be making it up. —— tautology. eitherwe seem to be making it up. —— tautology. either we take responsibility for ourselves and other— responsibility for ourselves and other government give us hard and fast guidelines we can follow because _ fast guidelines we can follow because the confusion that is insured — because the confusion that is insured for several weeks, not just
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because _ insured for several weeks, not just because of— insured for several weeks, not just because of freedom day being announced to us, the good thing of course _ announced to us, the good thing of course is _ announced to us, the good thing of course is that borisjohnson has dropped — course is that borisjohnson has dropped the idea of giving us such a chilean _ dropped the idea of giving us such a chilean speech which was going to be the high _ chilean speech which was going to be the high spot of freedom day. —— has winston _ the high spot of freedom day. —— has winston churchill speech. it has come _ winston churchill speech. it has come from _ winston churchill speech. it has come from someone called doctor david _ come from someone called doctor david nichol, a neurologist who says it should _ david nichol, a neurologist who says it should be — david nichol, a neurologist who says it should be termed freedumb day. and freedom isjust it should be termed freedumb day. and freedom is just another word for nothing _ and freedom is just another word for nothing left to lose, me and bobby mcgee _ nothing left to lose, me and bobby mcgee. ., ,., nothing left to lose, me and bobby mcgee. ., , .,, ., mcgee. there are some people who will have been _ mcgee. there are some people who will have been desperate _ mcgee. there are some people who will have been desperate for- mcgee. there are some people who will have been desperate for the - will have been desperate for the relaxation of these rules and they
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point to the fight hospitalisations and deaths are thankfully ignoring the the nobles we saw before —— they are thankfully no where near the levels they were before and it's not a case of us having to live under the set of restrictions forever and whatever the day is it will cause difficulties and actually people are starting in some cases, their patience with the restrictions is wearing thin. patience with the restrictions is wearing thin-— patience with the restrictions is wearin: thin. ., , . ., , wearing thin. that is certainly true and has been _ wearing thin. that is certainly true and has been the _ wearing thin. that is certainly true and has been the case _ wearing thin. that is certainly true and has been the case for - wearing thin. that is certainly true and has been the case for a - wearing thin. that is certainly true and has been the case for a while | and has been the case for a while and has been the case for a while and that's what makes herself isolation point really important. there are a lot of conservative backbench mps restive with the government restrictions and they will be looking at what is happening at who is isolating and who's not and how do i explain this to my
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constituents? is it going back to different rules applying to different rules applying to different people so i think that will be the ongoing debate around this. and the whole country has been through so much in the last 18 months are so so it is right it is relaxed but i think if the reality changes and cases go up again some controls should be in place for longer so we make sure this is the last lockdown and we are not back at square one in a few months. the sunday telegraph has this story about children and he will be eligible for a vaccine. —— and which children will be eligible for a vaccine. should you vaccinate them all orjust the most vaccine. should you vaccinate them all or just the most vulnerable? vaccine. should you vaccinate them all orjust the most vulnerable? brute all or 'ust the most vulnerable? we are all orjust the most vulnerable? we are seeing we will offer it to 12 to 15—year—olds who are themselves vulnerable — 15—year—olds who are themselves vulnerable children living in homes
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where _ vulnerable children living in homes where their carers are vulnerable and therefore always a level of risi
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5ure because nobody knows what is i’i l ht 5ure because nobody knows what is right and _ 5ure because nobody knows what is right and what is wrong and nobody in power— right and what is wrong and nobody in power is — right and what is wrong and nobody in power is able toju5t 5tick their necks— in power is able toju5t 5tick their necks out— in power is able toju5t 5tick their necks out and make some really hard neck5 out and make some really hard and fast _ neck5 out and make some really hard and fast and — neck5 out and make some really hard and fast and very clear deci5ion5. with— and fast and very clear deci5ion5. with that — and fast and very clear deci5ion5. with that in — and fast and very clear decisions. with that in mind, let'5 and fast and very clear decisions. with that in mind, let's turn our with that in mind, let's turn our attention to a completely different story because we had the extreme weather in london just under a week ago but the devastation of the heavy rain and flooding is causing in western germany and belgium and the deaths and the homes destroyed, and developed western europe. it's staggering to see this. this is in the sunday times. it’s staggering to see this. this is in the sunday times.— staggering to see this. this is in the sunday times. it's a really sad state of affairs _ the sunday times. it's a really sad state of affairs and _ the sunday times. it's a really sad state of affairs and really, - the sunday times. it's a really sad state of affairs and really, really i state of affairs and really, really shocking. more than a months worth of rain in 48 hours, so many lives lost and whole cities and peoples homes destroyed as well and very close to us. this has got a big enquiry written all over it. lots of
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questions asked in terms of what is the preparation done, do people know what to do when these things even happen? questions around what was the rule of the german government and what were the environmental services doing to get people read it? there is a really interesting line in this piece which says it is no use having massive computer models bit in what will happen if people do not know what to do in a flood. in the world be no living with lots of data and modelling and trying to get ahead of different issues, that's great and very helpful, but on a very practical level if you haven't communicated properly to people what they should be doing in this kind of scenario, as regular as it might be, then you see sadly the effects on the ground as we have seen in germany and belgium as well where peoples lives have been lost and the livelihoods and homes destroyed. so i think a lot of questions around how this would happen and lessons learned. notjust would happen and lessons learned. not just for
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would happen and lessons learned. notjust for germany but would happen and lessons learned. not just for germany but for all of us actually. i not just for germany but for all of us actually-— us actually. i suppose the difficulty _ us actually. i suppose the difficulty with _ us actually. i suppose the difficulty with asking - us actually. i suppose the difficulty with asking a - us actually. i suppose the - difficulty with asking a question of how well prepared when authorities and individuals in towns and cities and individuals in towns and cities and so on is whether the preparation would have made a significant difference of whether due to the changes we are seeing in a climate that actually these extreme weather events can almost overcome whatever preparations will be put in place? i preparations will be put in place? i think what is surprising in all of this is— think what is surprising in all of this is we — think what is surprising in all of this is we have been having extreme weather— this is we have been having extreme weather event5 this is we have been having extreme weather events for quite a long time _ weather events for quite a long time i'm — weather events for quite a long time. i'mju5t weather events for quite a long time. i'm just trying to think back to hurricane katrina and the floods in bangladesh. there have been major emergencies happening out of the emergencie5 happening out of the ordinary— emergencies happening out of the ordinary for possibly two decades now _ ordinary for possibly two decades now i_ ordinary for possibly two decades now. i know we have the uk flood awareness — now. i know we have the uk flood awarene55 5y5tem now. i know we have the uk flood awarene55 system which pinpointed what was _ awarene55 system which pinpointed what was going to happen and we are and they— what was going to happen and we are and they gave the german government four days _ and they gave the german government four days notice of it in the german
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government— four days notice of it in the german government didn't do anything sol think— government didn't do anything sol think the _ government didn't do anything sol think the complaint is not that the couldn't— think the complaint is not that the couldn't have envisaged how people would _ couldn't have envisaged how people would be _ couldn't have envisaged how people would be affected but they could warn _ would be affected but they could warn people they would be affected which _ warn people they would be affected which may have given them time to vacate _ which may have given them time to vacate their— which may have given them time to vacate their homes but what do you do with— vacate their homes but what do you do with that number of people? incomplete contra5t do with that number of people? incomplete contrast the observer ha5 incomplete contrast the observer has the weather we have across much of the weather we have across much of the uk, if not all of the uk. temperatures reaching 30 degrees celsius are even higher in parts. the summer we thought we would never get. what consolation when travelling to sunny regular holiday hotspots is becoming increasingly difficult? �* ., , ., hotspots is becoming increasingly difficult? ., , ., ., difficult? bring on summer at home and stavcations _ difficult? bring on summer at home and staycations given _ difficult? bring on summer at home and staycations given that - difficult? bring on summer at home and staycations given that we - difficult? bring on summer at home and staycations given that we can'tl and staycations given that we can't go anywhere unless you want to go to countries that are on the government green list that are not holiday destinations are hard to reach. i
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think this is very welcome news to get people jhye think this is very welcome news to get peoplejhye and i think if people are sensible and still safe it is something everybody can really enjoy. the irony being everything is opening up tomorrow and people will probably want to stay outdoors and enjoy the weather. we probably want to stay outdoors and enjoy the weather.— enjoy the weather. we can see the sun beautifully _ enjoy the weather. we can see the sun beautifully streaming - enjoy the weather. we can see the sun beautifully streaming and - sun beautifully streaming and through the window behind you. our vision of summer behind you. yesterday we drove to oxford for this wedding but there are the downsides of travelling to places, they shut — downsides of travelling to places, they shut the motorway on the way back last _ they shut the motorway on the way back last night 5aw they shut the motorway on the way back last night saw a one hour and ten minute — back last night saw a one hour and ten minute journey became a two and a half— ten minute journey became a two and a half hour— ten minute journey became a two and a half hourjourney even though there _ a half hourjourney even though there was— a half hourjourney even though there was very little traffic. and that is _ there was very little traffic. and that is going to happen more and more _ that is going to happen more and more as— that is going to happen more and more as we have these 5taycation5. it more as we have these 5taycation5. it used _ more as we have these 5taycation5. it used to— more as we have these 5taycation5. it used to mean you stayed in more as we have these staycations. it used to mean you stayed in your own home — it used to mean you stayed in your own home but now it means you stay somewhere _ own home but now it means you stay somewhere in britain. so all that means— somewhere in britain. so all that means we — somewhere in britain. so all that means we are going to end up with i
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suspect— means we are going to end up with i suspect there's a lot of hot tempers but if— suspect there's a lot of hot tempers but if you _ suspect there's a lot of hot tempers but if you feel you are free to go to places — but if you feel you are free to go to places it— but if you feel you are free to go to places it feels better, better to have a _ to places it feels better, better to have a temper tantrum in a car than be stuck— have a temper tantrum in a car than be stuck indoors feeling miserable. you were _ be stuck indoors feeling miserable. you were not the only one at a wedding, i was as well. they set all the tables out doors and we were so grateful for the balmy evening and it felt like a little taste of normality again. i don't know how yours felt. it normality again. i don't know how ours felt. . , normality again. i don't know how ours felt. ., , ., , normality again. i don't know how ours felt. . , . , . normality again. i don't know how ours felt. ., , ., , ., ., yours felt. it was great. they had a hue yours felt. it was great. they had a huge number _ yours felt. it was great. they had a huge number of — yours felt. it was great. they had a huge number of people _ yours felt. it was great. they had a huge number of people in - yours felt. it was great. they had a huge number of people in this - yours felt. it was great. they had a| huge number of people in this giant hole with _ huge number of people in this giant hole with tables of sex with big screens — hole with tables of sex with big screens between us and it was done very seriously but once we spilled out, of— very seriously but once we spilled out, of course you didn't have to wear _ out, of course you didn't have to wear masks _ out, of course you didn't have to wear masks out in the open air and that was— wear masks out in the open air and that was magical but i have to say every _ that was magical but i have to say every time — that was magical but i have to say every time somebody under 25 came near me _ every time somebody under 25 came near me i_ every time somebody under 25 came near me i was sort of skirting round the edges— near me i was sort of skirting round the edges of the grass so maybe i've still got _ the edges of the grass so maybe i've still got a _ the edges of the grass so maybe i've still got a bit of a way to go on that— still got a bit of a way to go on that one _ still got a bit of a way to go on that one i— still got a bit of a way to go on
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that one. ., still got a bit of a way to go on that one-— still got a bit of a way to go on that one. ,, ., ., ., ~ that one. i think we all have. thank ou ve that one. i think we all have. thank you very much- _ that one. i think we all have. thank you very much. thank— that one. i think we all have. thank you very much. thank you - that one. i think we all have. thank you very much. thank you to - that one. i think we all have. thank you very much. thank you to you i that one. i think we all have. thank i you very much. thank you to you both for going through the papers with us this morning. enjoy the rest of the sunny sunday. that's it for the papers this hour. hello. another hot and sunny one out there today, and we're pretty much entering, at least statistically, the hottest period of the year so no surprise the temperatures are pretty high. but also this time of the year, the sun is very strong and in fact the uv levels are about as high as they get, for england and wales, in many parts, they are indeed very high today. the high pressure's with us, keeping things sunny and very warm. to the north, however, there is a weather front. you can see the wind is coming off the atlantic so that means cooler conditions across parts of scotland and also a little bit cooler for northern ireland. yesterday in county down we got up to 31.2 celsius. i don't think we're going to make that today. for example, in belfast it will be only around 22 celsius. glasgow hitting 20 degrees,
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probably not much higher than that. the 30 or 31 degrees will be reserved for more central and southern areas of the uk. now, early this evening temperatures will still be well into the 20s across many areas of the country, so a very warm and comfortable evening. by the end of the night falling no lower than 17 in cardiff and london. a lot fresher in scotland. 11 there in glasgow, 12 expected in aberdeen. here is tomorrow's weather map. the high pressure's with us. we are right in the middle of the high pressure. in the middle of the high pressure the winds tend to fall light, it's very dry, there is very little cloud so actually for some of us monday is going to feel every bit as hot and in fact the heat might actually spark off one or two showers because that is a possibility tomorrow. but generally speaking, i think there will be more sunshine around across scotland and northern ireland tomorrow so temperatures up to 24 in glasgow, pushing the high 20s in the south and i think we will see exactly the same pattern on tuesday. lots of sunshine across the uk, very light winds, feeling every bit as hot and the possibility of these higher temperatures sparking off one or two showers. wednesday is going to be another very, very warm day. temperatures in some spots again hitting the high 20s, in fact not far off 30
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there in cardiff but towards the end of the week the temperatures will ease a little bit and there is just the chance we will get some showers come the weekend. bye— bye. wednesday is going to be another very, very warm day. temperatures in some spots again hitting the high 20s, in fact not far off 30 there in cardiff but towards the end of the week the temperatures will ease a little bit and there is just the chance we will get some showers come the weekend.
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this is bbc news. our top stories... uk health secretary sajid javid confirms he has coronavirus — and the prime minister and chancellor have been alerted by the covid contacts app — as england prepares to ease restrictions further. a clean—up operation is underway in the areas of germany and belgium worst affected by unprecedented flooding. 180 people have died. scotland is bringing in the same quarantine rules as england and wales for travellers returning from france. fully—vaccinated people will have to self—isolate for ten days — unlike with other amber—list countries.
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and 140,000 fans are expected at silverstone

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