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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 18, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with ben thompson and rachel burden. our headlines today: the health secretary, sajid javid, confirms he has covid—19, it raises questions over who in government might have to self—isolate, just hours before most restrictions in england are lifted. with hundreds still missing after germany's devastating floods, the scale of the disaster continues to emerge. these residents of this home for disabled people tragically died. and they were not able to leave their rooms and apparently the water level came up so fast... silverstone hosts the biggest
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sporting crowd since the start of the pandemic this afternoon. 140,000 fans head to the track for the british grand prix, as lewis hamilton looks to keep his title hopes alive! the man hoping to circumnavigate mainland britain on a paddle board reaches the halfway point. we'll catch up with him as he rounds the top of scotland. and the uk makes the most of the sunny weather, as the hottest temperatures of the year are recorded. and there is more hot weather on the way for today. sunshine is expected to last a few more days yet. good morning to you. it's sunday the 18th ofjuly. our top story: senior government ministers are waiting to hear if they will have to quarantine after the health secretary, sajid javid, confirmed he has tested positive for coronavirus. mrjavid held a meeting with the prime minister on friday, shortly before experiencing symptoms. it comes ahead of most legal covid
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restrictions being lifted in england tomorrow. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley has this report. downing street on friday. the health secretary leaving number 10 where he held talks with the prime minister. last night, though, sajid javid confirmed he had coronavirus after the second test. 1 confirmed he had coronavirus after the second test.— the second test. i was feeling a bit funn last the second test. i was feeling a bit funny last night — the second test. i was feeling a bit funny last night so _ the second test. i was feeling a bit funny last night so i _ the second test. i was feeling a bit funny last night so i took - the second test. i was feeling a bit funny last night so i took a - the second test. i was feeling a bit funny last night so i took a laterall funny last night so i took a lateral flow test came out positive. i am now self—isolating with my family until i get the results of my pcr test. i am grateful i have had to jabs of the vaccine and my symptoms are mild. he jabs of the vaccine and my symptoms are mild. ., ., are mild. he will have to self-isolate _ are mild. he will have to self-isolate and - are mild. he will have to self-isolate and there i are mild. he will have to| self-isolate and there are are mild. he will have to _ self-isolate and there are questions self—isolate and there are questions of whether others will have to stay at home, too, including boris johnson. it comes ahead of a crucial week in which almost all legal restrictions in england will be lifted. from tomorrow, social distancing will be scrapped. there will be no limits at events and legally you won't have to wear a face covering. in some places you
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will still need one. the number of cases is increasing. there are more than 54,000 cases is increasing. there are more than 511,000 in the last 2a hours. inns farm —— some have warned about being too relaxed in the coming days and weeks. next week will be a significant moment in the sometimes slow road out of lockdown in england, but it won't be back to normality of an eight. face coverings will still be recommended in some places and there will still be an emphasis on caution in. and the number of positive cases we are seeing, likely health secretary's, is a reminder that the virus hasn't disappeared. this was wales yesterday, people taking advantage of the weather after restrictions and gatherings where lifted. there are more freedoms coming from people across the uk, but that doesn't come with no risk. nick eardley, bbc news. and the search continues for hundreds of missing people in western europe
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after record rainfall caused devastating flooding. yeah, more than 170 people have been killed across germany and belgium. chancellor merkel is due to visit affected areas today. 0ur europe correspondent, jenny hill, has more. in ahrweiler, everything, everyone, is covered in a thick, sticky mud. there's no power, nowhere to buy food, not much mobile reception. but they're doing what they can. willie told us they've never seen anything like it here, not even in his parents' grandparents' time. "the water rose two metres in 15 or 20 minutes," he told us. "people tried to save their things, went into their basements and, unfortunately, got trapped. i was lucky," he said, "i could get out the back of my basement." around 100 people have died in this district alone. many more are still missing.
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there was so little time to run, people tell us. look at the force of this flood. and the damage it left behind. the water's receding, but the number of dead is expected to continue to rise. search and rescue, it's feared, will soon be a recovery operation. today, the german president described the loss as heartbreaking. translation: ican't. imagine what it must be like to be affected. that's why i'm here — to help people. in ahrweiler, across the region, lives turned upside down. this is amelie. "the water," she told us, "came from the playground to our house, but luckily just the ground floor. my gran and granddad were affected, though. they are staying with us now." as the waters slowly subside, they reveal the extent of the damage done. the task of rebuilding this
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region seems overwhelming. so much of its vital infrastructure — bridges, roads, railways — it's completely gone. hard to imagine the time, the money it'll take to get this region back on its feet. jenny hill, bbc news, ahrweiler. we can speak now to our correspondent, damien mcguinness. the pictures are devastating. what is the focus of the rescue mission, now? yeah, that is right, rachel. you saw so many people in this region left with absolutely nothing. livelihoods wiped out in a few seconds. so, right now the wrecks you —— rescue operation is under way, i spoke to emergency responders saying they're still looking for people, many of these people may not have survived. that is a real problem right now.
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the death toll may still unfortunately go up further. angela merkel is visiting one of the small villages that was most badly hit, and just a few kilometres from where i am standing here, right now i am inaformer i am standing here, right now i am in a former stadium that has been turned into a donation centre, we are just turned into a donation centre, we arejust right beside turned into a donation centre, we are just right beside a co—ordination point where emergency vehicles go in and out, we are seeing hundreds of ambulances and army vehicles going in and out of the centre of the time. the pressure is still on. hundreds of people at this stage will be working through the notes to gather donations from local people because that has been flooding in. food, water and supplies to keep people going and then the next step is to pass that on two people in need. it is a difficult operation and a dangerous one because so many of those roads are still unsafe. 0fficials one because so many of those roads are still unsafe. officials are warning we have got to be careful. damien, thank you very much. scotland is bringing in the same quarantine rules as england
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and wales for travellers returning from france. from tomorrow, fully vaccinated people returning from amber list countries will no longer have to self—isolate for 10 days, but the easing of restrictions will not apply to france. meanwhile ibiza, majorca and menorca are being moved onto the government's amber travel list. this will be overnight tonight. this means from tomorrow, fully—vaccinated people travelling to england, scotland and wales will be exempt from quarantine on return. northern ireland is expected to follow suit. now, two athletes have tested positive for covid—19 in the olympic village in tokyo. 0rganisers say they're from the same team and sport as the official who tested positive yesterday. other members of the team are being isolated in their rooms. no further details have been released. police investigating violence and disorder at last sunday's euro final between england and italy have
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released images of ten men they want to speak to. officers have condemned what they call the disgraceful scenes witnessed at wembley stadium. london's hosting of the match saw ugly scenes, which included some ticketless fans storming the grounds in an attempt to watch the game. northern ireland's leading supermarkets have called for urgent action to prevent disruption to trade under the terms of the brexit protocol. six retailers are asking for changes before october — when an extended grace period ends, which currently allows for lighter touch controls on some goods. 0ur reporter, sara girvin, has more. the six retailers named in this letter make up three quarters of northern ireland's grocery market. they say unless something is done, 0ctober one when the grace period is due to end, there will be hit by more checks on goods and more cost. that is because of the northern ireland protocol, it is part of the brexit deal, and is aimed at avoiding a hard border on the island of ireland, effectively keeping northern ireland in the eu's single
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markets for goods. supermarkets get a similarwarning markets for goods. supermarkets get a similar warning back injanuary when there were issues in getting some items to shelves the northern ireland. bc since then not enough has changed. == ireland. bc since then not enough has changed-— has changed. -- they say. that is what the concern _ has changed. -- they say. that is what the concern of _ has changed. -- they say. that is what the concern of the - has changed. -- they say. that is - what the concern of the supermarkets is. we haven't seen that movement to get a new way of trading between britain and northern ireland under the protocol that removes friction. as well as northern ireland consumers being impacted in terms of choice and cost, the retailers warn that red tape and falling profit margins could force them to move supply chains from britain to the eu. the government is expected to set out its preferred way forward in the protocol on wednesday. sara girvin, bbc news. now, with the mercury hitting highs of 30—plus—degrees yesterday, tens of thousands of you took to beaches, parks and lakes across the uk to make use of the weekend sunshine. this was the scene at seaburn beach near sunderland in tyne and wear.
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it was fierce. these pictures from northern ireland. northern ireland, meanwhile, recorded its highest—ever temperature — 31.2 degrees celsius at ballywatticock in county down. and please do send us your pictures of how you spent the hottest day of the year so far. these are just some of the pictures i took. nothing more satisfying than getting the white sheets on the line. and there is henry. yeah, that was before the paddling. it was quite a long day. we did have a lounge in the paddling pool and cooled off. your day was quite different to my. i mean, it looks lovely. that your day was quite different to my. i mean, it looks lovely.— i mean, it looks lovely. that was sunset from _ i mean, it looks lovely. that was sunset from a _ i mean, it looks lovely. that was sunset from a train _ i mean, it looks lovely. that was sunset from a train window? - i mean, it looks lovely. that was | sunset from a train window? yes. i mean, it looks lovely. that was i sunset from a train window? yes. a lot of the staff _ sunset from a train window? yes. a lot of the staff were _ sunset from a train window? yes. a lot of the staff were not _ sunset from a train window? yes. a lot of the staff were not able - sunset from a train window? yes. a lot of the staff were not able to - lot of the staff were not able to turn up for work. that was something we were discussing. that turn up for work. that was something we were discussing.— we were discussing. that is a big issue and was _
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we were discussing. that is a big issue and was on _ we were discussing. that is a big issue and was on the _ we were discussing. that is a big issue and was on the front - we were discussing. that is a bigj issue and was on the front pages we were discussing. that is a big i issue and was on the front pages of the papers this morning. several of them look ahead to coronavirus restrictions easing in england tomorrow, with the government facing growing criticism over its approach. the observer leads with accusations from public health leaders who claim borisjohnson is "letting covid rip" by relaxing measures. meanwhile, the health secretary's positive covid test has sparked a "no.10—pingdemic", according to the mail on sunday. the paper quotes a source who warns that "half the cabinet" could be in isolation by the end of the week, because of contact with sajid javid over the past few days. so many people self—isolating at the moment. the telegraph suggests the government could decide against mass vaccinations for all children and teenagers, with only those vulnerable getting the jab. ministers say a decision has not yet been made. and sunny scenes like this make many of the front pages after the uk recorded its hottest day of the year so far. as we were talking about. this picture, in the sunday times,
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shows thousands of people enjoying the warm weather on a beach at bournemouth. very aware, we are talking about extreme weather this morning, the heatwave here and extreme weather on continental europe. it heatwave here and extreme weather on continental europe.— continental europe. it has been ferocious _ continental europe. it has been ferocious. on _ continental europe. it has been ferocious. on the _ continental europe. it has been ferocious. on the front - continental europe. it has been ferocious. on the front of- continental europe. it has been ferocious. on the front of most| ferocious. 0n the front of most newspapers and inside as well, it is said to be even warmer today. to be careful if you are out there. as rachel was saying, there are concerns that things like the transport network here and suggesting huge delays and cancellations that make as we saw in germany and the netherlands, —— and cancellations. as we saw in germany and the netherlands, that flooding, differences around the world. but is not to say that _ differences around the world. but is not to say that people _ differences around the world. but is not to say that people have - differences around the world. but is not to say that people have not i differences around the world. but is not to say that people have not been enjoying the warm weather here. to sendin enjoying the warm weather here. to send in your photos. we will try and
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share some of those with you later. get in touch with us this morning. so many people have been doing home diy projects over the year, and resorting to using google to work out how to do them.— resorting to using google to work out how to do them. maybe not to take them on? _ out how to do them. maybe not to take them on? you _ out how to do them. maybe not to take them on? you can _ out how to do them. maybe not to take them on? you can look i out how to do them. maybe not to take them on? you can look up i out how to do them. maybe not to i take them on? you can look up almost an hint take them on? you can look up almost anything and — take them on? you can look up almost anything and find _ take them on? you can look up almost anything and find out _ take them on? you can look up almost anything and find out how— take them on? you can look up almost anything and find out how to _ take them on? you can look up almost anything and find out how to do - take them on? you can look up almost anything and find out how to do it. i anything and find out how to do it. this is the advice, saying people are taking a potentially dangerous jobs themselves such as installing domestic electrical equipment including sockets and switches. please leave this to trained tradespeople, it says here. 44% of respondents of this poll have taken on more challenging diy respondents of this poll have taken on more challenging dionbs in the last month, i have tried to install sockets or switches in 34% of people have done bathroom plumbing work, upgrading or refitting a kitchen was
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attempted by 8%. that is mega. well done if you have done it, even more if you have finished it. that is the thing, it is how far through you get before you have to call in a tradesman. and also how annoying must be as a tradesman if you have to go in and fix of badly done projects. you have to go in and fix of badly done injects-— you have to go in and fix of badly done projects. done pro'ects. good luck trying to net a done projects. good luck trying to net a hold done projects. good luck trying to get a hold of— done projects. good luck trying to get a hold of a — done projects. good luck trying to get a hold of a tradesperson i done projects. good luck trying to get a hold of a tradesperson at i done projects. good luck trying to | get a hold of a tradesperson at the moment. i get a hold of a tradesperson at the moment. , ., , ., , ., ., moment. i need your help, a bit of a double spread- _ moment. i need your help, a bit of a double spread. "i _ moment. i need your help, a bit of a double spread. "i built _ moment. i need your help, a bit of a double spread. "i built a _ moment. i need your help, a bit of a double spread. "i built a spitfire i double spread. "i built a spitfire in my garden". it was from bits of stuff that you find around the house. a bottle was used to shoot compressed air, a ben ten was used for part of the engine bean tin. diy shops, his garage and his kitchen. quite a thing to have in the back garden. quite a thing to have in the back carden. ., , ., quite a thing to have in the back carden. . , ., m quite a thing to have in the back carden. . , ., n ., quite a thing to have in the back carden. . , ., ., ., ~ ., garden. that is a heck of a lockdown ro'ect, garden. that is a heck of a lockdown preject. isn't — garden. that is a heck of a lockdown preject. isn't it? _ garden. that is a heck of a lockdown
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project, isn't it? what— garden. that is a heck of a lockdown project, isn't it? what would - garden. that is a heck of a lockdown project, isn't it? what would you i garden. that is a heck of a lockdown project, isn't it? what would you do | project, isn't it? what would you do with it after that? just project, isn't it? what would you do with it after that?— with it after that? just admire your aood with it after that? just admire your good work? _ with it after that? just admire your good work? i'm — with it after that? just admire your good work? i'm trying _ with it after that? just admire your good work? i'm trying to _ with it after that? just admire your good work? i'm trying to work i with it after that? just admire your good work? i'm trying to work out | good work? i'm trying to work out where it actually goes... haste good work? i'm trying to work out where it actually goes. . ._ where it actually goes... have a little read _ where it actually goes... have a little read of _ where it actually goes... have a little read of that. _ where it actually goes... have a little read of that. let's - where it actually goes... have a little read of that. let's look i where it actually goes... have a little read of that. let's look at | little read of that. let's look at the weather this morning. it is going to get hotter, isn't it? yes and no, actually. _ going to get hotter, isn't it? 13:3 and no, actually. yesterday the highest temperatures, as we have just been highlighting, was in northern ireland, 31 degrees. will probably hit 31 again today in the south—east of the country so it is london that will get the hot and sunny weather. that is about as high as the temperatures are going to get so actually, overall, for us here in the british isles, 31 degrees is pretty normal this time of the year. necessarily four northern ireland but overall for the british isles so not necessarily hotter that it is going to stay as hot through today and of course the uv levels are going to be very high as well— the
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high—pressure is bringing us clear skies across the uk so lots of sunshine but notice in the north of the country today, there is a weather front and that means a little bit more cloud and look at the arrows here— they are coming off the arrows here— they are coming off the sea so that means slightly fresher and cloudier conditions getting into parts of scotland and northern ireland stop think about this part of the country here where yesterday it was very, very warm stop it will be quite a bit cooler. belfast down to 22. it is england and wales where we will see the highest two bridges today that is because the heat is being pushed by the breeze and the wind arrows here a little bit further south into the country. a pretty balmy night on the way for england and wales. that is the temperature at 5am so that means earlier on in the night is going to be hotter. high—pressure still
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across the uk and in fact, the uk is in the middle of the high—pressure. it means that the winds are blowing around it and away from us so actually it falls calm so it means that averages are going to get back up that averages are going to get back up a little bit. it could mean a difference of five degrees or so. they could be a couple of showers in this heat over the next few days are certainly monday and tuesday, the possibility of one or two showers breaking out almost anywhere across the country and you can see on tuesday, look at that on tuesday, 23 in belfast, 25 in glasgow and that is because we are in the middle of the high—pressure where the winds are light, so light winds, with guys, lots of sunshine, the temperatures go up this time of the year. —— clear skies. and look at the week ahead. sure, the temperatures won't be quite as high
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and we will be pleased about that, we don't like it too hot, but they could be some showers heading away at the end of the weekend, but at the moment, as it stands, the week ahead is looking sunny and very warm. ~ . ~' ahead is looking sunny and very warm. ~ ., ~ ., ahead is looking sunny and very warm. ~ .~ ., ., warm. we will take that, tomasz. sunny and — warm. we will take that, tomasz. sunny and warm. _ a huge clean up effort is under way in the worst—affected regions of germany and belgium hit by devastating flooding. 0ur correspondent, anna holligan, spent the day with the residents of one street in the dutch village of geulle. this street lies deep inside the dutch disaster zone. brigitte and her husband peter came home to this. others are still cautiously navigating their way back. this is cecile. cecile runs a fishing lake, which is just behind these trees, but you can see
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here the water is everywhere. everywhere, yes. where are the fish? all over the place. yeah, it's terrible. do you think you'll still have a business after this? scoffs. after corona was all terrible, we look... difficult. it is difficult — more, more. more difficult. more difficult as corona, yeah. but you're here in your sandals — do you have people coming to help you? yes, but water must go down. yeah. chuckles. it's hard to know how to help. but while covid kept people apart, alone, this catastrophe has united communities. peter's neighbours were too afraid to set foot in the floodwater, so he waded in to film some footage so they could see the scale
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of the damage inside. the water came very quick, higher, so in the house until my middle, and we have saved our goats, our chickens and ourdog. this record rainfall has been an awakening for a low—lying nation that thought it had sufficient flood defences. at last, friends have arrived to help rescue cecile's livelihood. like so many, she was hoping, as the covid rules eased, this summer season would be a chance to catch a break. but once again, they are surrounded by uncertainty. anna holligan, bbc news, geleen.
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we will be live examining how that rescue efforts are continuing. same rescue efforts are continuing. some ofthe rescue efforts are continuing. some of the pictures _ rescue efforts are continuing. some of the pictures we _ rescue efforts are continuing. some of the pictures we have _ rescue efforts are continuing. some of the pictures we have seen - rescue efforts are continuing. some of the pictures we have seen have l of the pictures we have seen have been devastating. i said where do we start in terms of sport? with the british grand prix! the start in terms of sport? with the british grand prix!— british grand prix! the british grand prix — british grand prix! the british grand prix and _ british grand prix! the british grand prix and 140,000 - british grand prix! the british grand prix and 140,000 fans| british grand prix! the british i grand prix and 140,000 fans are at silverstone this afternoon. the new style of qualifying, a shorter sprint rach... sprint race, goes up another notch to 40,000. people will be cheering this man on, lewis hamilton. yes, good morning everyone. lewis hamilton will be desperate to keep his world title hopes alive this afternoon he's 33 points behind reb bull's max verstappen in the world championship standings. verstappen's won four out of the last five races, but today hamilton will have
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the roar of a home crowd behind once again — a hundred and 40,000 of them, as lydia campbell reports. away from the fans and soon there will be a lot more of them. as silverstone welcomes the biggest crowd at a sporting event in the uk since the start of the pandemic. just happy to be out and about and at a sport event, i've missed it. s yeah, it is great and it is the first time i've been here so i don't know what it was like but nice at the minute, yeah. the know what it was like but nice at the minute, yeah.— know what it was like but nice at the minute, yeah. the uk has been buildin: the minute, yeah. the uk has been building up — the minute, yeah. the uk has been building up to _ the minute, yeah. the uk has been building up to this _ the minute, yeah. the uk has been building up to this was _ the minute, yeah. the uk has been building up to this was not - the minute, yeah. the uk has been building up to this was not they i building up to this was not they were 15,000 people on centre court to watch the wimbledon finals, 60,000 at wembley to witness the final of the european championship, and now, 140,000 at silverstone. aha, and now, 140,000 at silverstone. critical part of the events research programme is that everybody here is either had a negative lateral flow test in the 48 hours before they arrive, or they are second vaccine jab plus two weeks. we have stopped at nothing to make sure this is a
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safe as it possibly can be. and at nothing to make sure this is a safe as it possibly can be. and for laces safe as it possibly can be. and for places like _ safe as it possibly can be. and for places like silverstone, _ safe as it possibly can be. and for places like silverstone, allowing i safe as it possibly can be. and for| places like silverstone, allowing a capacity crowd has allowed them to think about the future. this capacity crowd has allowed them to think about the future.— think about the future. this was reall a think about the future. this was really a crunch _ think about the future. this was really a crunch moment - think about the future. this was really a crunch moment for i really a crunch moment for silverstone. if they couldn't get bands in, it could have been they didn't have any more money, they would be broke, and that would be a desperate time for the track. fight! desperate time for the track. and what about _ desperate time for the track. and what about the _ desperate time for the track. and what about the racing? that is what the crowds are here for after all. max verstappen was literally honest fire at the start of the new sprint qualifying on saturday. that must have helped him as he overtook lewis hamilton before the first turn, and thatis hamilton before the first turn, and that is how they finished. verstappen peeping hamilton at the polls ahead of the main race today. -- dipping- polls ahead of the main race today. —— pipping. but while hamilton could not deliverfor his —— pipping. but while hamilton could not deliver for his fans on saturday, they were still happy to see them. with today's crowd hoping to see the spectators over the three days to 300,000, many more people across the country will be hoping that scenes like these will soon be
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our normality again. lydia campbell, bbc news. so an exciting day ahead at silverstone but the action doesn't stop there. in just a few hours' time the final round of golf�*s open championship gets under way at royal st george's in kent. south african louis oosthuizen leads the way, but there are a few big names lurking just behind, as andy swiss reports. asun a sun —soa ked a sun —soaked sandwich and a day when being a wealth fan was about as fun as it gets, but while they asked in the heat, others were trying to keep their cool. after shutting —— starting with it to shortly, louis oosthuizen started in his unflappable style. butjordan spieth piled on the pressure. and so did collin morikawa as three of them became locked in a thrilling battle. hopes of a home winner are fading. paul casey and the pinpoint precise andy sullivan the best of the bunch. they are seven shots back. while rory mcilroy is 11 back after around
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which began promisingly before falling away. but at the top of the leaderboard, late drama. jordan spieth missed one and collin morikawa. could this once again be his year? morikawa. could this once again be his ear? �* ., , his year? and so louis oosthuizen takes a slender— his year? and so louis oosthuizen takes a slender 1-shot _ his year? and so louis oosthuizen takes a slender 1-shot lead i his year? and so louis oosthuizen takes a slender 1-shot lead into i his year? and so louis oosthuizen. takes a slender 1-shot lead into the takes a slender 1—shot lead into the final day. takes a slender 1-shot lead into the final da . , ., , final day. this enthralling open remains tantalisingly _ final day. this enthralling open remains tantalisingly poised. . tadej pogacar is set to defend his tour de france title this afternoon, as the race heads to paris for its final stage. the slovenian finished 8th in yesterday's 20th stage to retain a substantial lead and with the tradition that no—one attacks the yellowjersey on the final day, he'll be confirmed as champion in paris this evening. the other parisian tradition is a sprint finish on the champs—elysees — where mark cavendish could set a new record for 35 stage wins,
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and win the sprinter�*s green jersey. there could be a few sore heads in st helen's this morning because for the first time in 13 years, saint's have won rugby league's challenge cup. they came from behind to beat castleford tigers, in front of a roaring wembley crowd, asjoe lynskey reports. 45,000 brought the noise from the north, after so long in the silence for rugby, it means so much. this is the broad search showpiece match. castleford and st helens are the two oldest clubs. saints got the first to score with help from the post but castleford responded with something extraordinary. castleford responded with something extraordinary-— extraordinary. castleford fans are lea - in: extraordinary. castleford fans are leaning into _ extraordinary. castleford fans are leaping into the _ extraordinary. castleford fans are leaping into the air! _ extraordinary. castleford fans are leaping into the air! in _ extraordinary. castleford fans are | leaping into the air! in castleford, this sort leaping into the air! in castleford, this sport is _ leaping into the air! in castleford, this sport is at _ leaping into the air! in castleford, this sport is at the _ leaping into the air! in castleford, this sport is at the heart - leaping into the air! in castleford, this sport is at the heart of - leaping into the air! in castleford, this sport is at the heart of the i this sport is at the heart of the town, but a fierce half in the heat would drain them in the second. st helens were here as favourites, now they surged through the gaps and
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into the lead, after 13 years without it, one of this sport's giants had its oldest prize. it without it, one of this sport's giants had its oldest prize. it has been a long _ giants had its oldest prize. it has been a long time _ giants had its oldest prize. it has been a long time coming - giants had its oldest prize. it has been a long time coming and i been a long time coming and obviously, a number of years before we got back here and win it again. really tough game today, obviously the heat a part. specialfor me really tough game today, obviously the heat a part. special for me to come. this has been rugby's toughest year. but come. this has been rugby's toughest ear. �* ., ., year. but a thrilling final in the noise is a _ year. but a thrilling final in the noise is a win _ year. but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in _ year. but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in itself. - year. but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in itself. it i year. but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in itself. it is i year. but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in itself. it is st | noise is a win in itself. it is st helens who go home singing. joe lynskey, bbc news. the preparation's now over for the british and irish lions. they thrashed the stormers 49—3 yesterday in the final warm—up match before their first test against south africa. they did fall behind early but quickly turned things around exeter�*s sam simmonds was just one of seven try scorers. but the headlines were saved for tour captain alun wynjones
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he came off the bench, to complete an incredible return from dislocating his shoulder just three weeks after dislocating his shoulder. but, wales were well beaten by a strong argentina side in their second test match in cardiff. the visitors dominated throughout to finish 31 points to 11 winners. wales coach wayne pivac said he was without 27 players for the game because of injuries and lions commitments in south africa. and the lions in south africa are, just three weeks after dislocating his shoulder, he is back. you'll make insane! amazing that story. cannot wait, next test, first test. looking forward to it.— cannot wait, next test, first test. looking forward to it. should be a cracker. stay with us, we'll have more on the devastating floods in germany in the next half hour.
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hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. good morning to you. it is 6:30. there are growing concerns that the rescue effort in western germany, following the worst flooding in 200 years, is turning into a recovery mission. at least 170 people have died and hundreds more are missing. in a moment we'll speak tojournalist, kate martyr, but first, let's take a look at her firsthand account of the devastation she's witnessed in the town of sinzig.
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this is the home here where these residents of this home for disabled people tragically died. they were unable to leave their rooms and apparently, as you can see down in the dig, the water level came up so fast and the residents at home were not warned. it's quite sad to look at these windows where everyone, well, the residents under the water line here would have died and people in the entire street here... i spoke to the neighbour at this house here, she said she knew the residents and other people i spoke to said they could hear them maybe, screaming as well, as the water level came up... it was just — how sad this, like, tragedy is. well, let's speak now to kate martyr, the freelance journalist who recorded that footage. good morning
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to you. we saw some of the devastation there in that footage you sent through to us. can you explain how bad it is where you are right now? so, in this corner of south—western germany it is usually a really beautiful area, germany it is usually a really beautifularea, it germany it is usually a really beautiful area, it is wine country, very intellect. but the destruction that came to these small villages in the valley has just been unprecedented, really. i have been to two villages over the past few days, one was kind of further up the river and one was where you saw that report, both of these villages were completely decimated by the flood and many of the residents there told me it was something they couldn't even comprehend even happening in this small, usually very sleepy place. you couldn't even access coming into the street or the main
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square is. they werejust coming into the street or the main square is. they were just covered coming into the street or the main square is. they werejust covered in debris. some of that has been removed with heavy machinery. cars were piled up, there was debris entries and residents helping the clean—up effort. —— andries. residents in the clean—up were warned they may find bodies and to alert emergency services. it's absolutely unprecedented and people have lost really, absolutely everything. it have lost really, absolutely everything-— have lost really, absolutely eve hina. , , , ., everything. it is the speed of the floodin: everything. it is the speed of the flooding that _ everything. it is the speed of the flooding that took _ everything. it is the speed of the flooding that took many - everything. it is the speed of the flooding that took many by i everything. it is the speed of the i flooding that took many by surprise, kate. just explain how quickly this happen? kate. just explain how quickly this ha en? , , , happen? residents said they were warned about _ happen? residents said they were warned about this _ happen? residents said they were warned about this but _ happen? residents said they were warned about this but could i happen? residents said they were warned about this but could not i warned about this but could not believe how fast the water rose. people spoke that the water level rose a metre within minutes. so they were just absolutely unable to flee,
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really, and many fled to the upper floors of their home if they were able to. yeah, just the speed of the flooding is something everyone is saying is very shocking and scary for them. ., ., . ., ., for them. you touched on that there were warnings _ for them. you touched on that there were warnings that _ for them. you touched on that there were warnings that this _ for them. you touched on that there were warnings that this floodwater l were warnings that this floodwater was coming, but what sense do you get about what action people were able to take, if any, to get out of harm's way?— able to take, if any, to get out of harm's wa ? ~ ., , harm's way? well, that is the thing. many people — harm's way? well, that is the thing. many people just — harm's way? well, that is the thing. many people just didn't _ harm's way? well, that is the thing. many people just didn't take - harm's way? well, that is the thing. many people just didn't take action. | many people just didn't take action. they said, you know, we live by the river and have experienced flooding before. perhaps at worst our basements or sellers would get flooded. many people had these warnings and thought they would be able to save their homes. i spoke to one couple in this town and they said they managed to close the door and they could hear the water bobbing around outside and objects knocking on their home and then all of a sudden the door burst open and they had tojust
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of a sudden the door burst open and they had to just run upstairs to escape these floodwaters. and they just watched from their neighbour's upstairs apartment as their car got washed away in the floodwaters. residents have really very little time to respond to this as well. i time to respond to this as well. i am interested in the response of the emergency services, to. i know you spent time in the town where 12 people died yesterday. it was a disabled care facility, wasn't it. what help has been made available, and what were the emergency services able to do, if indeed they were able to access some of these areas? 50. to access some of these areas? so, there has been _ to access some of these areas? so, there has been a _ to access some of these areas? in, there has been a presence to access some of these areas? sc, there has been a presence from emergency services there. there has been a lot of police and a lotto help with voluntary organisations, —— a lot of help, and help technicians, a technical health organisation. they had a large presence on the ground and the red cross and military as well. there
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has been a huge kind of mobilisation of these services. but at the same time, the destruction has had such a large place over such a short time that those services were really spread quite thinly. so there was a huge community health effort as well. there were volunteers they spoke to yesterday in sinzig who travelled, they decided to get together about 200 kilometres away, 50 young men to just drive to sinzig to help out, and the residents were extremely helpful for that —— grateful for that. extremely helpful for that -- grateful for that.— extremely helpful for that -- grateful for that. kate, i know you have been covering _ grateful for that. kate, i know you have been covering this _ grateful for that. kate, i know you have been covering this every i grateful for that. kate, i know you| have been covering this every day. the death tolljust aims to keep raising. do we know the latest? i raising. do we know the latest? 1 think it is still over the thousands, i am think it is still over the thousands, iam not think it is still over the thousands, i am not too sure on that. i urge some caution, because some of these people, the internet
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connection has been down and telephone networks are also quite inaccessible at the moment because a lot of the infrastructure has been damaged due to floodwater. so even though some of the missing numbers are quite scary and high, i would urge some caution there because it is kind of — people at the moment are quite unable to reach each other. as he said, at the moment the death toll is raising. kate other. as he said, at the moment the death toll is raising.— death toll is raising. kate martyr, thank ou death toll is raising. kate martyr, thank you for— death toll is raising. kate martyr, thank you for your _ death toll is raising. kate martyr, thank you for your time. - death toll is raising. kate martyr, thank you for your time. i - death toll is raising. kate martyr, thank you for your time. i know l death toll is raising. kate martyr, thank you for your time. i know it is difficult reporting in such difficult circumstances. thank you. thank you. difficult circumstances. thank you. thank ou. �* difficult circumstances. thank you. thank you-— thank you. and we will bring you u dates thank you. and we will bring you updates on _ thank you. and we will bring you updates on that _ thank you. and we will bring you updates on that story _ thank you. and we will bring you updates on that story as - thank you. and we will bring you updates on that story as we i thank you. and we will bring you updates on that story as we go i updates on that story as we go through— updates on that story as we go through on breakfast this morning. time now for the travel show. christa larwood is in northern ireland for the final part in the road to recovery series. you've got to love it! proper british coastline! we're on an adventure across the uk as it opens up for travel again. yes, we're open! from rugged coastlines to breathtaking landscapes and natural habitats.
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did you see that? 0urjourney will take us to the four nations that make up the united kingdom. and with an eye on our carbon footprint... we're in an all—electric revamp of an iconic british motor. on this week's show, christa goes behind the wheel in northern ireland. where my search for a seabird pays off. are they all birds? there must be hundreds of thousands of birds here. i take on a local delicacy. you got me, i ate one, well done! and try an unusual test drive. laughter this is genius! laughter.
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away we go! laughter i'm in south—east northern ireland, and i'm trying to get a good lay of the land. plus, after the last year and a half, this seems like a good way to get away from it all. ken found during the first lockdown that lots more people were getting in touch to take to the skies.
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and ken's microlight business is one of thousands here to have had to cope with the ups and downs of the pandemic. myjourney will take me over 100 miles up the coast to finish at one of this country's iconic natural wonders: giant's causeway. and it all starts by leaving petrol power behind and switching to the travel show electric van for an early—morning visit to killough bay in county down. check that out, smooth!
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yawns it was too early for the hotel breakfast this morning. and the idea is i have breakfast at this place i'm going, which, isuspect to most people, would be a great delight, a real delicacy. but as for some other people, myself included, it's a bit more of a daunting prospect. chuckles we'll see how we go. this is one of a number of bays along the coast here that, over the years, have become renowned for a local delicacy. brother and sister luc and perrine have been farming them by the thousands. hello, there. heya. i have found the right place.
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are those oyster beds out there? yeah. 0yster beds down there. fantastic. do we go out on the truck? yes. let's do it. do wejustjump on? yes, jump on! along the coast of northern ireland, inlets off the sea like killough bay have developed as an ideal place to farm oysters. they say each bay with its distinct conditions give sea oysters slightly different flavours. luc and perrine's family oyster business has 700 bags of oysters out in this bay. each grows for around three years before it is considered for market and lots of care goes into making them taste their best. well, these are the big ones to go to markets and restaurants and such.
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essentially, every three or four weeks we turn them because there is growth in them. i will show you all this white and purple, that is all new growth. yep. so that breaks off. we turn the bags to break that off, which makes the oysters harder and makes the shells nice and round. so, you pick the bag up. yep. and turn it on its side. then you let it go and back up again and hit it. other way, hit it and back over. if they are on the sea — the seabed, they would just roll, the shells would keep rolling down and make them round and harder. that is the shape we want to go to. the more you do that, the better the meat quality and the quality of the meat. it can be endless. it is good and bad, isn't it? how has business been in recent times? the last time you came in march, everything stopped, basically. there was no local market. the exports tapered off and finished. so we found other channels but still it is only getting back to the way it was now.
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as far as we were concerned, we were down here and we got more work done, so we worked the oysters more than we have done before and it is much better quality now. we found with the little break we were able to fix things and work the oysters more, bag them much better and work them better and more often to get a nice, betterfinished product. the unexpected benefit of covid is nicer oysters? yeah! turns out it was, for us. who knew? yeah, that's that's exactly it. are you ready? you're gonna really enjoy it. before the pandemic, perrine sold oysters direct to customers at market stalls, to people who sometimes, like me, need a little bit of convincing. what do you say at the market when somebody says "0h..."? what is your sales pitch? a lot of people don't like the idea of it
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in their minds but there is always the same reaction. they don't know but then they put it in their mouth, make a funny face, chew it and swallow it and they decide that's a good aftertaste. so, you have to chew it. i heard you have to swallow it down. you can do but it is better to chew it. are you ready? as ready as i will ever be. i mean, it does not taste of fish, does it? it is not fishy, it is like the sea. it is more like seaweed more than anything else. i could see how you could convince people. you got me, i ate one! well done! you can try another one again. well, that went better than i expected. with breakfast sorted, i'm off for some culture in the next part of myjourney, which takes me up the coast
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for a quick stop—off at northern ireland's capital city belfast. here and in some other parts of northern ireland, it's notjust covid that tourism has had to overcome in recent years. the 30—year conflict known as the troubles halted a lot of travel to this city up until the good friday agreement was signed in 1998. a sort of dark tourism emerged afterwards as visitors explored places and murals associated with the conflict, but in recent years murals with other topics at their heart out become a bigger part of the urban landscape. seedhead arts have been offering walking tours of these modern murals and during covid offered a digital walking tour for people to do individually. i've been really lucky doing street art tours in cities around the world but there is something special about a street art tour in belfast. it's notjust the beauty, it's the culture and history of this place. the best thing is that even
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during a lockdown in the middle of a pandemic, you can grab the app, head out into the fresh air and safely see these works of art. it's pretty incredible! but i'm really here for more traditional arts. the grand opera house is the only remaining victorian theatre in northern ireland. currently celebrating 125 years, it was saved from demolition in the �*70s, bombed in the �*90s, and now it has been through a year—long restoration attempt right in the middle of a pandemic. it's not yet reopened to the public during my visit, but i'm getting an early preview as it gets its finishing touches. inside it's been faithfully restored, bringing things like the ornate ceiling paintings back to their former glory. so what condition where they in when you came in? were theyjust very dirty?
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yeah — you weren't able to pick out the figurative details and the varnish deteriorated significantly, so they were brown and yellow in colour. how on earth did you get up and do it? because i'm imagining michelangelo lying on the back. we have an amazing birdcage scaffolding, all on one level. we're working above our heads and moving around accordingly. you do exercises to try to watch your necks and heads, certain ballerina exercises, stretching your head. people always say to us, oh well, like michelangelo, do you work on your back for the ceiling? michelangelo didn't do that either. it's a myth! i know. one of the main difficulties for ruth was in assembling the team. having planned to bring in expertise from across europe, the pandemic meant that ruth needed to uncover local young talent for thejob. yes, challenging, but very worthwhile. some of the team members
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enjoyed it so much that they want to go and study further, go to university to study conservation. now i'm leaving the modern buzz of belfast and heading north back along the coast for something more historic. there are quite a few castles in northern ireland, and that of course will come as no surprise to fans of game of thrones, knowing parts of that series were filmed here in various castles. it all seems like such a nice idea, owning a castle, but they cost an absolute fortune to run. and for glenarm castle, first built in the 17th—century, the impact of the troubles on tourism meant relying on deserters for lots of income would have been a risky strategy, until recently. so during the pandemic, when tourism was at an all—time low, they decided to take
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a leap and invest in tourism for the future. it was all about surviving long—term. so we took a look how we could reinvent ourselves to come out again when this would be over. we knew the public perception would have changed and that outdoor space was going to be more valuable moving forward, and so we concentrated our efforts on creating outdoor space and activities. in addition to the gardens on the grounds that were already drawing visitors, adrian added new glamping pods as well as electric bikes to explore the wider area, including forest on the outskirts of the grounds. this area, which has barely changed in 400 years, has been recognised in recent years for its vast biodiversity. this is brilliant because it feels like i am really fit. i'll never cycle without this again!
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foradrian, it's a very special place. so you've been around for a while? i grew up here. my father was a chauffeur for the family here, started work in 1960. and when i was a wee boy of four, i was intrigued by where he was going. i would hide underneath a coat in his wee van and halfway to work i would pop up and say, "surprise, dad, i'm coming to work with you today!" so, i completely fell in love with glenarm. this is where i wanted to spend the rest of my life. one of my aspirations was to open it up more to share it with everybody. now that is what we are doing. back at the castle, adrian had one more thing to show me. i don't know what this is going to be. adrian was kind of laughing when he was talking about it, so we'll see. laughter. adrian, your car's shrunk!
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yeah, this is my toy, every good estate should have one. and it turns out the mini land rover is actually part of a fleet of them that adrian's brought in for kids to use on a new off—road course. oh, that is brilliant. look at you! you look like you're four years old again, back on the estate. if i had someone like that when i was four, i couldn't have contained myself! so you want a wee go? yes, obviously! laughs. there you go. all you gotta do is press the button, hold on tight. you good to go? i've got mine pressed... laughs. 0k. ah, she's off! genius! thanks adrian, see you later! bye! remember to come back now! that's it, i'm off to see the giant's causeway, bye! you think that's far enough? i think i should stop her now. don't trust her in the wee land rover. laughs.
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the next part of myjourney takes me further north—east, and off the mainland to rathlin island. a ferry has long been a lifeline for the 150 people who live on this island. and it became particularly vital for getting supplies to the residents over the last year. the islanders took the decision early in the pandemic to stop non—essential access to the island, and only recently opened up again to tourists. so far it has helped keep the island covid—free, and we've done two lateral flow tests before coming over to try and help keep it that way. one of the main draws for tourists is the chance to get close to puffins and other rarely seen birds. so i'm waiting for my guide liam,
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warden of the island. he's lived here all his life and has promised me a glimpse of the birds. the man himself. hello! hello, you must be christa! did my big blue bus give it away? i'm afraid so. you coming to see the puffins? that would be lovely, can i follow you? yes, follow me up to the seabird centre. see you there. a puffin bus usually takes most visitors up to the site, but we have special permission for the travel show electric van. the seabird centre opened up here for the first time in 1.5 years just a couple of weeks before our visit. and a viewing platform at the back shows the birds putting on quite a display. are they all birds? yeah, they're all over the place like little pebbles. i can't quite get my head around how many of them
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there are here. it's pretty amazing, it is indeed. there must be hundreds of thousands of birds here. there 5 indeed, there are hundreds of thousands, there's about 140,000 guillemots alone. you see how the flat top there is just completely covered in guillemots. there's about 7,000—8,000 guillemots in that one area. for protection they would like to be in close proximity to the others, so safety in numbers. so if you are nesting in the middle of that density over there, the chance of your egg and your chicks surviving is much greater than if you're out on a lower ledge on your own. because they don't have to worry too much about land—based predators here, but there's always other birds, there's great black—backed gulls and ravens and things that will come along and take eggs, so if you're in one of those places you're better protected. but now it is time to find the star of the show, the puffins. if you look out for the orange feet, they are the first thing that jumps out at you.
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either on the bare soil or the green grassy bits, down the bottom there. oh, there they are! they're quite obvious once you're looking for the feet. they nest on the ground so at the minute there will be one bird in there incubating the egg, and the other one, its partner could be out feeding at sea. and how has it been over the past year because you've had quite a unique experience here on rathlin island. it's strange, because you expect to hear a bus coming up the road with people and it is not happening, its quiet. saturday afternoon and there's not a voice to be heard anywhere along the way. but you get used to it, it was quite nice, i think in some ways i really felt more relaxed for a year, orfor a season. laughs. you know, because the summer can be quite busy for people doing all sorts of differentjobs and facilitating all the people who come here. and not having all that pressure meant that people were pretty laid—back.
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it was a chill—out year, i suppose. and now people are free like myself to come over on the ferry, is it nice to welcome people back to rathlin? it's brilliant they're coming here and having the opportunity to get back to see what's on offer on rathlin. to end my time here, i'm heading back to the mainland, and just a little further up the coast. coming to the end of ourjourney soon. not far away. you've done a good job, old girl! four countries, lots of adventures. now, there's one place in northern ireland that i've always really wanted to go to. in fact i remember really clearly as a kid seeing a picture, and saying, "what's that place? i want to go there!"
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and now i'm on my way. giant's causeway is a unesco world heritage site, and it's been here for millennia. but even this place has been affected by covid in its own way. this is it, look at this. incredible. it's mad to think that nature created this. legend has it that it came about because of a fight between two giants. it's thought to be the most visited tourist site in northern ireland. around a million people came in 2019 — but with changes to visitor numbers during the pandemic, the national trust have said that this is a once—in—a—generation chance to change how they manage their tourism approach, to avoid what they call the pitfalls of over—tourism. they've begun spreading visitors out more throughout the day, to help make a more positive impact on the local area.
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its natural hexagonal columns stretching out to the sea are actually formed because of the way lava slowly cooled when it was created. but that's not the story that captures most people's imagination. so there was a irish giant called fionn mac cumhaill, who lived here with his wife oona and their son 0isin, and there's a scottish giant called benandonner who lives on the scottish island of staffa, one of the outer hebrides. and the two of them get into an argument, hurling insults across the sea at each other, and eventually fionn decides he's had enough, he needs to go to staffa to put an end to it and challenge benandonner. but it's a well—known fact that giants do not like getting their feet wet, so so he decided to get up early the next morning and build a causeway across to staffa. whichever story is true, giant's causeway seems sure to keep the visitors coming for a long time yet. and for me, it's where my journey in northern ireland comes to an end. i've been really struck by the resilience of the people i've met here, and their optimism. they're determined to notjust get through this crisis, but to do better on
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the other side of it. and i think for uk travellers, the past year has been a good chance for us to take stock and appreciate what we have right here on our doorstep. it is not fishy, it is like the sea.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. the headlines that evan: 00. sergeant javid confirms he sergeantjavid confirms he has given 19. others in government may have to self—isolate hours before most restrictions in england are lifted. with hundreds still missing in germany following floods, the skill of the disaster continues to emerge. residents of this home for disabled people _ residents of this home for disabled people tragically died and they were unable _ people tragically died and they were unable to— people tragically died and they were unable to leave their rooms, and apparently— unable to leave their rooms, and apparently the water leveljust came up apparently the water leveljust came up so _ apparently the water leveljust came up so fast _ apparently the water leveljust came up so fast it is good morning! till the stone up so fast it is good morning! t ii the stone host the biggest sporting crowd since the start of the pandemic —— silverstone.140,000 fans head to the track is lewis hamilton aims to keeps his title hopes alive. the man
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circumnavigating britain on a paddleboard reaches the halfway point. we catch up with him at the top of scotland. and point. we catch up with him at the top of scotland.— point. we catch up with him at the top of scotland. and europe makes the most of — top of scotland. and europe makes the most of sunny _ top of scotland. and europe makes the most of sunny weather - top of scotland. and europe makes the most of sunny weather with i top of scotland. and europe makes| the most of sunny weather with the hottest temperatures of the year recorded. ~ ., ., ., ., recorded. more hot weather on the wa for recorded. more hot weather on the way for today- _ recorded. more hot weather on the way for today. sunshine _ recorded. more hot weather on the way for today. sunshine is - recorded. more hot weather on the | way for today. sunshine is expected to last for a few more days yet. good morning to you. it is just after 7am on sunday, july 18. senior government ministers are waiting on news of whether they will have two currency in. health secretary sajid javid has tested positive for coronavirus. he met with the prime minister on friday. nick eardley has this report. downing street on friday. the health secretary outside number 10, where he held talks with the prime minister. last night, though, sajid javid confirmed he had coronavirus,
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after a second test. i was feeling a bit groggy last night, so i took a lateralflow test, and it's come out positive. so, i'm now self—isolating at home with my family until i get the results of a pcr test. i'm grateful i have had two jabs of the vaccine, and so far my symptoms are very mild. he'll now have to self—isolate and there are questions of whether others might be told to stay at home, too, including boris johnson. it comes ahead of a crucial week in which almost all legal restrictions in england will be lifted. from tomorrow, social distancing will be officially scrapped. there will be no limits at events and legally you won't have to wear a face covering. although in some places it still will be recommended. but the number of cases is increasing. there were more than 54,000 in the last 24—hour period. and some have warned about being too relaxed in the coming days and weeks. next week will be a significant moment in the sometimes slow road out of lockdown in england, but it won't be back to normality overnight.
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face coverings will still be recommended in some places, and there will still be an emphasis on caution. and the number of positive cases we are seeing, like the health secretary's, is a reminder that even if many restrictions are going, the virus hasn't disappeared. this is wales, yesterday, people taking advantage of the weather after restrictions on gatherings outside were lifted. there are more freedoms coming for people across the uk, but that doesn't come without risk. nick eardley, bbc news. yes, not without risk. good morning. talk to us about the impact. we are waiting to hear if government members may have to self—isolate? i government members may have to self-isolate?— self-isolate? i think the impact to some extent _ self-isolate? i think the impact to some extent will _ self-isolate? i think the impact to some extent will depend - self-isolate? i think the impact to some extent will depend on i self-isolate? i think the impact to some extent will depend on how. self-isolate? i think the impact to i some extent will depend on how many are asked to self—isolate, whether thatis are asked to self—isolate, whether that is officials or ministers. we know sajid javid was in the commons
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a couple of time last week, including on wednesday. we know as well of course we had this meeting with the prime minister on friday. it was friday evening he began to feel unwell. in terms of close contacts and self—isolation, michael gove, a senior minister, back in june did not have to self—isolate after coming in contact with a positive case. he was part of a pilot in looking at daily testing instead. we wait for news this morning in terms of who sajid javid's close contacts iron who may be asked to self—isolate, but look, overall, what we have now is the prospect on so—called freedom day as it is sometimes called tomorrow, the health secretary being in confinement, being in self—isolation, one of many people of course who has been pinged or asked to stay at home or has tested positive for covid, as we continue to see a rise in cases. that is the
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backdrop into tomorrow. yesterday, the liberal democrats called for a rethink on lifting restrictions tomorrow in england, being the plan was reckless. jeremy hunt, the former health secretary and a conservative mp raised the prospect that if things are on the wrong trajectory by autumn, we could see really there —— c restrictions reimpose. they said they never want to do that but heading into tomorrow, there is not some great sense from government of liberation day, rather, wait a lotto of caution with all of this going on in the background. with all of this going on in the background-— with all of this going on in the backuround. ,, ., ~' ,, ., with all of this going on in the backuround. ,, ., ~' ., ., the search continues for hundreds of missing people in western europe after record rainfall caused devastating flooding. more than 180 people have been killed across germany and belgium. we can now speak now to our correspondent, damian mcguinness. what is going on where you are this morning?
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what is going on where you are this mornin: ? ., ., what is going on where you are this mornin. ? ., ., , ., morning? yeah, where i am standing riaht now, morning? yeah, where i am standing right now, rachel, _ morning? yeah, where i am standing right now, rachel, is— morning? yeah, where i am standing right now, rachel, is a _ morning? yeah, where i am standing right now, rachel, is a sports - right now, rachel, is a sports stadium but today it is being used as a donation centre. behind me, you can see piles of supplies: food, water, clothing, bedding, household equipment, everything you need to survive. that is because so many people have lost their homes or have been wiped out financially or have lost all of their possessions. what have seen in this region is in lots and lots of small towns and villages, in this wooded, hilly region, devastation. the waters came in seconds. some people managed to get out. some people did not. hence the high number of fatalities in this region. this date was the worst hit in germany. even if people managed to survive, in so many cases they lost their possessions. 0vernight hundreds of people have been gathering donations from local people, they are being passed on to those in need. today chancellor
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angela merkel will be visiting shorts, a small village a few kilometres here. —— schult. houses were swept away. some mediaeval. that pretty village is a scene of debris. she will be speaking to survivors and victims of the floods. thank you, damien. elsewhere in this is in this is two athletes have tested positive for coronavirus in the olympic village in tokyo. police investigating violence and disorder at last sunday's euro final between england and italy have released images of ten men they want to speak to. officers have condemned what they call the disgraceful scenes witnessed at wembley stadium. london's hosting of the match saw
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ugly scenes, which included some ticketless fans storming the grounds in an attempt to watch the game. ibiza, majorca and menorca will move from the government's green travel watchlist to amber overnight. from tomorrow, people aged over 18 who are not fully vaccinated will have to quarantine on returning from the islands. 0ur correspondent nick beake joins us now from ibiza. nick, what do the latest changes mean for travellers? good morning, ben, rachel. ibiza itself is waking _ good morning, ben, rachel. ibiza itself is waking up _ good morning, ben, rachel. hafiz: itself is waking up slowly. some people having a morning dip. but some people are racing back to beat the new quarantine rules. in practical terms, what it means is they have to take their pcr test earlier than expected, and we have been talking to people talking to their travel company to get an earlierflight, others booking their own so they can be back before 4am
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tomorrow morning. most of the people i have spoken to have had one jab but because they have not had two, they face the prospect of otherwise isolating for ten days. also, people coming back from france, even though thatis coming back from france, even though that is on the amber list, british and other people arriving in the uk who have been double jabbed still have two isolate, and that is because of concerns regarding spread of the beta variant first seen in south africa. as the ibiza, it's hard for businesses, they do not know what is going to happen in coming weeks. the brits are the best customers here, but in a sense in the coming hours we will get a sense. more than 20 planes from the uk are due to touch down here. may be some people with young kids or people who can afford the luxury of isolation, ten days after they get back, it seems they are still coming on their holidays, determined to get away this summer. as we have been saying for months, uncertain times.
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nick, thank you very much. hick nick, thank you very much. nick beake in ibiza. _ nick, thank you very much. ti ta; beake in ibiza. beautiful. with the the mercury hitting highs of 30—plus—degrees yesterday, tens of thousands of you took to beaches, parks and lakes across the uk to make the most of the weekend sunshine. this was the scene at seaburn beach near sunderland in tyne and wear. northern ireland, meanwhile, recorded its highest—ever temperature — 31.2 degrees celsius at ballywatticock in county down. i would love to hear from anyone in ballywatticock, what they did to keep cool. and you've been sending in your pictures of fun in the sun. this is laura having a belated 40th birthday with herfamily and paddleboards. good balance. good work. it's notjust us humans, who needed to cool off. this is luther in the paddling pool. this is a lovely family picture from tony, who was celebrating a very delayed christmas day — complete with secret santa, a tree and full
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christmas dinner. iam not i am not sure if it was a day for christmas dinner, yesterday, was it? and while most of were probably working up a sweatjust sitting around, neil was taking part in the ingleborough mountain race! what a tremendous effort, outs off to you. you would have needed a hat, let's be sensible about this. what is the one picture that sums up your day yesterday? send it in. fin is the one picture that sums up your day yesterday? send it in.— day yesterday? send it in. on the website or— day yesterday? send it in. on the website or on _ day yesterday? send it in. on the website or on twitter. _ scotland has announced that it's bringing in the same rules as england and wales for travellers returning from france. from monday, people will still be required to quarantine for ten days — while those coming back from other amber—list countries will not have to isolate, if they have been fully vaccinated. anne chamberlaine is from england but lives in paris and hasn't seen her parents for 18 months — she booked herflight hours
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before the rules changed. we can talk to her now. and, i am so sorry your plans have been so messed up. what is it like being separated from your family up. what is it like being separated from yourfamily for 18 up. what is it like being separated from your family for 18 months? up. what is it like being separated from yourfamily for 18 months? it from your family for 18 months? ut has been hard. we have accepted it, i think, up until this point in the pandemic we have gone through lockdowns, we have accepted travel restrictions and until now we were very stoic about it. you know, the new normal, not seeing family or parents or siblings. my baby daughter was born in paris in october last year, right before france went into its second lockdown. we accepted my grandparents would not be able to come in for the birth and they would not be able to come for christmas. we were quite weak about it, we got used to sending each other messages on scope and sending photos and maybe using zoom. then, finally when
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the government announced the quarantine would be listed for amber countries, and because myself and my husband were both vaccinated, we thought, great, we can travel to london and see our family and be reunited again. i had booked train tickets and accommodation and this announcement came through a few hours later. it has just made us — it feels even further. we had got our hopes up and now it is all up in the airagain. it our hopes up and now it is all up in the air again-— the air again. it is difficult, isn't it, because _ the air again. it is difficult, isn't it, because you i the air again. it is difficult, isn't it, because you feel i the air again. it is difficult, l isn't it, because you feel you the air again. it is difficult, i isn't it, because you feel you are doing everything right and respecting all the rules and then finally when you get that moment of opportunity to finally get together with your family... opportunity to finally get together with yourfamily... i understand your frustration. with yourfamily... i understand yourfrustration. to read some with yourfamily... i understand your frustration. to read some of the responses from the travel companies, they feel your frustration, to. they say things like this will ruin the summer for many, that is eurotunnel. airlines uk, the random rule changes make it impossible for travellers that make easyjet's executive says the government is making it up as a ——
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impossible for travellers that make easyjet's chief executive says the government is making it up as they government is making it up as they go along let you accept in the circumstances these choices have to be made. t circumstances these choices have to be made. , ., ., , be made. i understand that but the difference between _ be made. i understand that but the difference between domestic- be made. i understand that but the difference between domestic rules| difference between domestic rules and international rules are opposite to each other. i do not understand how we can impose fully vaccinated people from france to have two quarantine for ten days. people in england who are not vaccinated, whether the beta variant is present or not, it being encouraged to not wear masks, stopped social distancing, it doesn't seem consistent. if there was a policy continuing, it would be easier to understand. but i think these contradictions are making it harder to accept. contradictions are making it harder to acce t. ., contradictions are making it harder to accet. ., ., ., ., ., to accept. you are meant to travel on august — to accept. you are meant to travel on august 20. — to accept. you are meant to travel on august 20. you — to accept. you are meant to travel on august 20, you have _ to accept. you are meant to travel on august 20, you have time i to accept. you are meant to travel on august 20, you have time to i to accept. you are meant to travel i on august 20, you have time to think about this and you have booked your
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tickets with some flexibility built in. what are you going to do, just wait and see? yes, we're going to wait and see if there is a u—turn or something changes in the next three weeks and fingers crossed we will still be able to come but if the quarantine rules remain as they are, there is no point in us coming to the uk are not being able to introduce my baby to her grandparents. i think we will just have to cancel our trip and postpone it to, i don't know, maybe christmas. it postpone it to, i don't know, maybe christmas. , . , postpone it to, i don't know, maybe christmas. , ., , ., ~ christmas. it is really tough. all the best to _ christmas. it is really tough. all the best to you _ christmas. it is really tough. all the best to you and _ christmas. it is really tough. all the best to you and your - christmas. it is really tough. all the best to you and your family| christmas. it is really tough. all. the best to you and your family and i hope you get to be reunited together at some stage soon. thank ou. now let's speak to chris parker who is a director at the international ferry operator, dfds ferries. what does this mean for you as a company? it what does this mean for you as a com an ? , . what does this mean for you as a coman ? ,., ., , company? it is a real disappointment of course, mostly _ company? it is a real disappointment of course, mostly for _ company? it is a real disappointment of course, mostly for our _ company? it is a real disappointment of course, mostly for our passengers| of course, mostly for our passengers who had been expecting to come back from next week without having to quarantine. it is a difficult situation for them and of course we
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are working as hard as we can to bring people back this weekend. today in fact before the rules, as the rules change was up to be honest, it is another example of how quickly things can change. as ever, it pays to keep an eye on the rules and to go to gov.uk to make sure you have everything you need is a traveller, but it is very difficult and we feel for all of our passengers. and we feel for all of our passengers-— and we feel for all of our assenuers. ~ ., ., ., passengers. we will get onto that but first of all, _ passengers. we will get onto that but first of all, can _ passengers. we will get onto that but first of all, can you _ passengers. we will get onto that but first of all, can you clarify, i but first of all, can you clarify, it is relatively clear, if you are coming from france to the uk and you have not had the double vaccination, you will have to quarantine for ten days at home. what about if you are driving through france, for example, another country, and you get to take another country, and you get to take another ferry. another country, and you get to take anotherferry. what another country, and you get to take another ferry. what does another country, and you get to take anotherferry. what does it another country, and you get to take another ferry. what does it mean for passengers that are just passing through france? i’m passengers that are 'ust passing through france?_ passengers that are 'ust passing throu~h france? �* ., ., , through france? i'm afraid the rules a- -l even through france? i'm afraid the rules apply even if — through france? i'm afraid the rules apply even if you — through france? i'm afraid the rules apply even if you are _ through france? i'm afraid the rules apply even if you are just _ apply even if you are just transiting through france. if you are travelling through a series of
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countries, it is the strictest rules that apply. even those who are travelling from other countries would also have to quarantine, i'm afraid to stop 0k, useful for everyone. afraid to stop ok, useful for everyone-— afraid to stop ok, useful for eve one. 2 ., ~ ., ., everyone. let's talk about that uncertainty _ everyone. let's talk about that uncertainty because _ everyone. let's talk about that uncertainty because i - everyone. let's talk about that uncertainty because i have i everyone. let's talk about that l uncertainty because i have been speaking to travel firms in the last six months about the on—off restrictions and how difficult it is for you to know. how damaging is it, the on— off nature of these restrictions? the on- off nature of these restrictions?— the on- off nature of these restrictions? ~ ., ., ~ ., restrictions? we were looking at havin: a restrictions? we were looking at having a relatively _ restrictions? we were looking at having a relatively good - restrictions? we were looking at having a relatively good july. i restrictions? we were looking atj having a relatively good july. we actually had more bookings on four july then we had january— february— march combined. we were starting to see some confidence returned but of course when rules change like this it has an immediate and very damaging effect on people's confidence to travel and i think thatis confidence to travel and i think that is going to be with us for the foreseeable future. as ever, i think with, as with many other travel firms, we have to be flexible without travel guaranteed, which we do. we have to work with customers
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to give them the that if they book that they won't lose out and we don't want them to lose out, we want them to travel with us. that is what we can do, give them the information on what we have been asking government to do is also be active and communicate to customers what is required and of course, in ordinary circumstances, the more notice the better, but we do understand that sometimes these rules are brought in at very short notice. itruihat sometimes these rules are brought in at very short notice.— at very short notice. what is your oli on at very short notice. what is your policy on people _ at very short notice. what is your policy on people wanting - at very short notice. what is your policy on people wanting to i at very short notice. what is your i policy on people wanting to change their booking? if the ferry, for example, is not cancelled but you decide not to travel anyway, do you get your money back? we decide not to travel anyway, do you get your money back?— get your money back? we offer our travel guaranteed _ get your money back? we offer our travel guaranteed meaning - get your money back? we offer our| travel guaranteed meaning anything you have with us you can take forward and use on bookings up to september 2020 december 2022. so we will review that and make sure people don't lose out. fine
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will review that and make sure people don't lose out.- will review that and make sure people don't lose out. one of your bi est people don't lose out. one of your biggest expenses _ people don't lose out. one of your biggest expenses is _ people don't lose out. one of your biggest expenses is running - people don't lose out. one of your biggest expenses is running the i biggest expenses is running the ferries themselves, if you to get a number of that cancellations, what does that mean for costs for a company like yours?— does that mean for costs for a company like yours? well, we are not lookin: to company like yours? well, we are not looking to reduce _ company like yours? well, we are not looking to reduce services. _ company like yours? well, we are not looking to reduce services. we - company like yours? well, we are not looking to reduce services. we were l looking to reduce services. we were looking to reduce services. we were looking at bookings around about 20-25 % the looking at bookings around about 20—25 % the levels and they were even before this announcement. we are still seeing many people travelling out of the uk than travelling out of the uk than travelling back. but we have been travelling back. but we have been travelling for the last 18 months. we have had reduced —— we have not reduced services because we carry freight. we are one of the busiest routes in europe. between calais and dunkirk. from that perspective, our services will continue to run whether or not we can carry passengers but it does leave a bit of a hole in ourfinances. you of a hole in our finances. you mentioned — of a hole in our finances. you mentioned freight. _ of a hole in our finances. you mentioned freight. the - of a hole in our finances. you mentioned freight. the other story we're watching today is the number people who have been pinged meaning
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that they are unable to work because they are at home self—isolating. what are you saying in terms of the impact on your staff but also the number of hauliers who are able to use your services? we number of hauliers who are able to use your services?— use your services? we have instituted — use your services? we have instituted working - use your services? we have | instituted working practices, bubbles, both on board a shift and also in our courts to make sure there isn't too much interaction across the workforce if we do get people pinged, we are not losing a lot of people at the same time. we're not seeing significant impact on that so far, thankfully. and certainly on—board, we have very limited instances of cases and long may that continue. in terms of hauliers, we are not seeing a significantly affect rate traffic at the moment but i know that for individual hauliers it is extremely difficult to find staff. and it is a worry for them.— difficult to find staff. and it is a worry for them. thanks for talking to us, worry for them. thanks for talking to us. chris _ worry for them. thanks for talking
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to us, chris parker, _ worry for them. thanks for talking to us, chris parker, director- worry for them. thanks for talking to us, chris parker, director of- worry for them. thanks for talking i to us, chris parker, director of the ferry company dfds ferries. it does, talking about the pingdemic and talking about how marks & spencer �*s might be reducing its opening hours, restaurants aren't going to be able to open fully in england even though the restrictions are lifting completely tomorrow. the prime minister have to self isolate for the next few days. find prime minister have to self isolate for the next few days.— for the next few days. and people mi . ht for the next few days. and people might have _ for the next few days. and people might have to _ for the next few days. and people might have to do _ for the next few days. and people might have to do change - for the next few days. and people might have to do change from - for the next few days. and people might have to do change from a i might have to do change from a dinner to a lunch service because they can't get supplies was not the haulage issue is huge. plus staffing issues, haulage issue is huge. plus staffing issues. not — haulage issue is huge. plus staffing issues, notjust _ haulage issue is huge. plus staffing issues, notjust in _ haulage issue is huge. plus staffing issues, notjust in businesses- haulage issue is huge. plus staffing issues, notjust in businesses like l issues, notjust in businesses like that but also public transport in the health service as well i was reading this morning that the uk has a third highest cases in the world, only indonesia and brazil have higher cases was not as we get ready
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to open up a lot of people must be feeling that that is not the right decision. �* , ., , feeling that that is not the right decision. . , ., �* feeling that that is not the right decision. . , , . decision. and people don't expect eve one decision. and people don't expect everyone to _ decision. and people don't expect everyone to rush _ decision. and people don't expect everyone to rush back _ decision. and people don't expect everyone to rush back because . decision. and people don't expect everyone to rush back because a i decision. and people don't expect l everyone to rush back because a lot of people will feel nervous. people may feel that as they are shaking off restrictions, they may lose people because phil... because people because phil... because people feel uncomfortable. and here is tomasz with the weather. hot weather always comes with caution, doesn't it? , ~ ., doesn't it? feels like we are living in a parallel _ doesn't it? feels like we are living in a parallel unit _ doesn't it? feels like we are living in a parallel unit force. _ doesn't it? feels like we are living in a parallel unit force. -- - in a parallel unit force. —— universe. strong sunshine. a lot of us love the strong sunshine. whether you like it or not, the you feel levels are high so just take it steady in that sunshine. it is about as high as it gets across many parts of england and wales you could earn quite easily. the high—pressure is
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bringing us the settled weather. the highs have established themselves across the uk. to the north, we have across the uk. to the north, we have a weather front. across the uk. to the north, we have a weatherfront. sometimes across the uk. to the north, we have a weather front. sometimes weak weather fronts move around and weather fronts move around and weather fronts move around and weather fronts are not always linked to lows, they are linked to weaker areas of high pressure as well, so you can see cloud and a breeze of the atlantic in the north of the uk so here, the yellow colours are showing the fresh atlanticare but yesterday we had temperatures up to 31 in the —— atlantic air. and in places like heathrow, gravesend, probably approaching 30 in the midlands, too. a balmy evening, a balmy night. overnight averages in towns and cities no lower than 17. and all through the night, it would be warmer than that. there is the
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high—pressure on monday, still a weather front high—pressure on monday, still a weatherfront nibbling high—pressure on monday, still a weather front nibbling in there. nibbling away at, i should say laughs, at parts of northern scotland. a bit more cloud here again, a little fresher, but i think the winds in the centre of the high—pressure means the wins are lighter and that means we could see high 20s in the lowlands of scotland. 27—28, still high enough to perhaps spark off a shower or summertime local thunderstorm and thatis summertime local thunderstorm and that is both on monday and tuesday. it broadly speaking, you can see it is a very warm, very sunny, and the high—pressure that is sitting on top of us is in no hurry to budge we think they will hang around for some till the end of the week with warm and sunny weather on the way. back
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to you both. pare and sunny weather on the way. back to you both-— to you both. are you all right, tomasz. _ to you both. are you all right, tomasz, what _ to you both. are you all right, tomasz, what are _ to you both. are you all right, tomasz, what are you - to you both. are you all right, tomasz, what are you doing? | to you both. are you all right, - tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, to you both. are you all right, _ tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, if ou must tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, if you must see! — tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, if you must see! this _ tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, if you must see! this is _ tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, if you must see! this is on _ tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, if you must see! this is on the _ tomasz, what are you doing? ummm, if you must see! this is on the floor- you must see! this is on the floor and there is a lot of high—tech here and there is a lot of high—tech here and sometimes as we walk around you get a bit tangled up. there are always bits of tech around here that you don't see. always bits of tech around here that you don't see-— you don't see. sorry, you -- i think i threw you — you don't see. sorry, you -- i think i threw you under _ you don't see. sorry, you -- i think i threw you under the _ you don't see. sorry, you -- i think i threw you under the bus - you don't see. sorry, you -- i think i threw you under the bus there. i i threw you under the bus there. yeah, you did. we i threw you under the bus there. yeah. you did-— i threw you under the bus there. yeah, you did. we don't want to see an hinr yeah, you did. we don't want to see anything else _ yeah, you did. we don't want to see anything else under— yeah, you did. we don't want to see anything else under that _ yeah, you did. we don't want to see anything else under that line - anything else under that line either. , , , either. they might be some shorts under there- _ it's a world record attempt which has been tried many times, but to date no—one has successfully completed it. but, fingers crossed, someone may. brendon prince, has set out to become the first person to paddleboard around mainland britain — we caught up with him just before he set off. let's take a look.
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well, brendon is now about half way through his journey
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and is in thurso in the highlands in scotland. halfway there, rendon. you probably couldn't see those pictures but it looked incredibly peaceful and zen —like. and i bet it hasn't been like that all the way round so far, has it? -- that all the way round so far, has it? —— brendon. far that all the way round so far, has it? -- brendon.— that all the way round so far, has it? -- brendon. far from it. that is wh i it? -- brendon. far from it. that is why i sat— it? -- brendon. far from it. that is why i sat in — it? -- brendon. far from it. that is why i sat in my _ it? -- brendon. far from it. that is why i sat in my van _ it? -- brendon. far from it. that is why i sat in my van because - it? -- brendon. far from it. that is why i sat in my van because listen | why i sat in my van because listen to the weather report which said wonderful except for up here which is 30-40 wonderful except for up here which is 30—a0 mile—per—hour winds, i can't see more than 50 yards. i imagine the wind and forgive me for asking you a stupid or really obvious question, but wind is the biggest problem out on the water, is it? ~ , ,., , biggest problem out on the water, is it? ~ , , ~ , biggest problem out on the water, is it? ,, biggest problem out on the water, is it? ~ ,, biggest problem out on the water, is it? ~ y it? absolutely. as a paddle border, ou have it? absolutely. as a paddle border, you have nothing _ it? absolutely. as a paddle border, you have nothing more _ it? absolutely. as a paddle border, you have nothing more than - it? absolutely. as a paddle border, you have nothing more than that. l it? absolutely. as a paddle border, i you have nothing more than that. the tidal stream, wind, everything affects you. all of your planning has to be around that to make sure you go in the direction you need to go to get around this country as quick as possible. so
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go to get around this country as quick as possible.— go to get around this country as quick as possible. so today would mark the halfway _ quick as possible. so today would mark the halfway point. - quick as possible. so today would mark the halfway point. how- mark the halfway point. how significant is that milestone for you? it significant is that milestone for ou? , ., , ., ., you? it is huge, really, in that of course, you? it is huge, really, in that of course. good. — you? it is huge, really, in that of course, good, great _ you? it is huge, really, in that of course, good, great people - you? it is huge, really, in that of course, good, great people like. course, good, great people like yourself want to talk about it and thatis yourself want to talk about it and that is promoting what i want to do which is the whole water safety thing. but for me, personally, no—one really knows about a month ago when i am getting up at 4am in the pouring rain and putting wet kintana and when you hit a milestone like this, you feel like you are getting somewhere —— putting wet kit on. because the coast is a long way. it is the weekend, week out. i am halfway, i actually have the easier part, as such, on paper, coming up the east coast rather than the west coast which i have done for the last almost 12 weeks.— almost 12 weeks. brendon, talk us throurh almost 12 weeks. brendon, talk us through an — almost 12 weeks. brendon, talk us through an typical— almost 12 weeks. brendon, talk us through an typical day. _ almost 12 weeks. brendon, talk us through an typical day. i _ almost 12 weeks. brendon, talk us through an typical day. i know- almost 12 weeks. brendon, talk us| through an typical day. i know they would be no such thing but how many hours are you on the board every day, what does a day look like for
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you? day, what does a day look like for ou? . , day, what does a day look like for ou? ., , ., ., , ., you? that is a great question because every _ you? that is a great question because every day _ you? that is a great question because every day is - you? that is a great question| because every day is different you? that is a great question - because every day is different and has to be fluid to the conditions and knowing about the conditions. a typical day, get up four or 5am, paddle for 12 hours and hopefully the conditions allow you to have gone a long way in those 12 hours. you might have gone... my best days are 75—80 kilometres. my worst days down in cornwall are when it has been bad swell and it has been one or two kilometres in a day because it has been so hard against the wind. �* it has been so hard against the wind. . , ., it has been so hard against the wind. �* , ., ., it has been so hard against the wind. . i. ., .,, i. ., wind. are you eating as you go, ltrendon? _ wind. are you eating as you go, brendon? that _ wind. are you eating as you go, brendon? that is _ wind. are you eating as you go, brendon? that is a _ wind. are you eating as you go, brendon? that is a thing - wind. are you eating as you go, brendon? that is a thing i - wind. are you eating as you go, | brendon? that is a thing i would wind. are you eating as you go, - brendon? that is a thing i would he worried about. i brendon? that is a thing i would he worried about.— worried about. i eat about three times what _ worried about. i eat about three times what i _ worried about. i eat about three times what i would _ worried about. i eat about three times what i would normally - worried about. i eat about three times what i would normally eat worried about. i eat about three i times what i would normally eat in worried about. i eat about three - times what i would normally eat in a day and i take food with me, lots of water. and in fact, i'm almost 12 weeks into this and it has gone incredibly well, the body is holding out. but the only thing that has
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been one issue has been my mouth because i have been eating more than a normal —— normally would and it has been a bit sore! that is the only thing. has been a bit sore! that is the only thing-— has been a bit sore! that is the onl thin. . , ,, ., , only thing. laughs. soft food only from now on- _ only thing. laughs. soft food only from now on. you _ only thing. laughs. soft food only from now on. you speak— only thing. laughs. soft food only from now on. you speak about - only thing. laughs. soft food only from now on. you speak about this water message and this is what this whole project is all about, and i know this is something you have been involved in in a long time but there was a particular moment, a catalyst for you, which meant you quit your full—timejob and are for you, which meant you quit your full—time job and are devoting your life to this. can you tell us about that? yeah, i have been a water safety advocate, promoting that 25 years in education and pe in schools. i'm always promoting water safety because although we live in this maritime history, great britain environment, we know very little. the common man knows very little about water safety. as a lifeguard of duty, i had an incident where i
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lost three souls of the coast near cornwall, and you only need to see drowning, the catastrophic aspects of drowning and the family — the effects on the family to think, i need to do more on this and familiar, promoting water safety is all about education and teaching our children about water safety. so that is why this project has come together, because everybody is now listening to what i am saying about water safety. i set up a charity as well to do just that, going water safety. i set up a charity as well to dojust that, going into schools. the website is all about that, teaching water safety to children and our main goal is to create a water safety app, gema fired for children to be able to play, so they can pay that at their local beach or waterway before they get there. the carrier can hand them a phone and they can play that. then once they get there they know what
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the dangers make beer or the flow of that river they are visiting. what the dangers make beer or the flow of that river they are visiting.— that river they are visiting. what a brilliant way _ that river they are visiting. what a brilliant way to _ that river they are visiting. what a brilliant way to raise _ that river they are visiting. what a brilliant way to raise awareness. l that river they are visiting. what a | brilliant way to raise awareness. in brendon, before you go, we saw incredible pictures of you there on the paddleboard of —— off offshore wind farms. the paddleboard of -- off offshore wind farms-— the paddleboard of -- off offshore wind farms. , , ., wind farms. every day is a new day. some of the — wind farms. every day is a new day. some of the morning _ wind farms. every day is a new day. some of the morning sun _ wind farms. every day is a new day. some of the morning sun rises, - wind farms. every day is a new day. some of the morning sun rises, thej some of the morning sun rises, the animals we have seen on the west coast of scotland, comparing the different areas of our wonderful coastline, it isjust different areas of our wonderful coastline, it is just phenomenal. different areas of our wonderful coastline, it isjust phenomenal. of course, there are some highlights. i have seen different animals, a shark came and saw me, it was like a mini jaws. that was a start. there are so many stories to tell, whether it be from seeing things, animals, people, the engagement, the people i have met have been so friendly and
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helpful in what we're trying to do here. it helpful in what we're trying to do here. , ., ., , , helpful in what we're trying to do here. , ., ., ,, ., ' ., here. it is a massive team effort. brendon. — here. it is a massive team effort. brendon. of _ here. it is a massive team effort. brendon, of luck. _ here. it is a massive team effort. brendon, of luck. it _ here. it is a massive team effort. brendon, of luck. it has - here. it is a massive team effort. brendon, of luck. it has been - here. it is a massive team effort. brendon, of luck. it has been so | brendon, of luck. it has been so nice to talk to you. best of luck, and hitting the halfway mark today, hopefully. we and hitting the halfway mark today, hoefull . ~ , i. and hitting the halfway mark today, hoefull . ~ , and hitting the halfway mark today, | hopefully-_ god hopefully. we will see you soon. god bless! i appreciate _ hopefully. we will see you soon. god bless! i appreciate it. _ hopefully. we will see you soon. god bless! i appreciate it. what _ hopefully. we will see you soon. god bless! i appreciate it. what a - bless! i appreciate it. what a legend. and amazing, amazing effort. we have all the details on a busy weekend of sport in a moment. stay with us. hello, this is breakfast,
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with ben thompson and rachel burden. it is 7:3li. it is 7:34. it is! carreon. —— carry on. as we've been hearing this morning the health secretary has tested positive for covid—19. mrjavid, who has received both vaccine doses, says he's suffering with "very mild symptoms". let's discuss this and more with our gp this morning, dr fari ahmad. how are you this morning? good morning. i am well. how are you? good. this is no surprise, the viruses circulating. it has hit the health secretary, even though he has been double jabbed. so, it does not offer a complete action, does it? that is right. one of the things we have learnt is getting the vaccination doesn't mean that you never get covid. it means that you can get covid but not going to get serious covid. get the covid which will mean you were going to hospital they need oxygen, you need all of
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they need oxygen, you need all of the extra interventions that people get when they become quite ill with it. most people who have had two jabs, if they do get covid, their symptoms should be milder and they should be able to manage it at home, which i will be, is what will happen in the years to come. it which i will be, is what will happen in the years to come.— in the years to come. it looks likely anyone _ in the years to come. it looks likely anyone who _ in the years to come. it looks likely anyone who has - in the years to come. it looks likely anyone who has been i in the years to come. it looks| likely anyone who has been in in the years to come. it looks - likely anyone who has been in close contact with him will have to self—isolate. that may well include the prime minister. we haven't had that confirmed yet but would you expect senior government ministers to be impacted by this? yes. expect senior government ministers to be impacted by this?— to be impacted by this? yes. i think that is the thing. _ to be impacted by this? yes. i think that is the thing. and _ to be impacted by this? yes. i think that is the thing. and it _ to be impacted by this? yes. i think that is the thing. and it depends i that is the thing. and it depends how much in close contact they were or how long they were in close contact. were they wearing masks? the of these other factors that come into play. i think we will find out, whoever gets pinged and told you are in close contact they need to self—isolate. it will be interesting to see the people who have had to self—isolate, whether they were wearing masks and things, will they
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get covid will be ok? what is happening, you know, to everybody else is also playing out in our government. it else is also playing out in our government-— else is also playing out in our government. else is also playing out in our rovernment. , ., , , ., government. it is happening in all areas and all _ government. it is happening in all areas and all sectors. _ government. it is happening in all areas and all sectors. i _ government. it is happening in all areas and all sectors. i know - government. it is happening in all areas and all sectors. i know the l areas and all sectors. i know the health sector, the nhs, is being affected by staff having to self—isolate. we talk about the pandemic and looking at the impact on hospitalisations. we were focusing on patients going into hospital but not even so much on the pressures from hospitals, surgeries all around the country that do not have enough staff, if the virus is letting rip, as some people have said it is. is that becoming a problem for you?— said it is. is that becoming a problem for you? said it is. is that becoming a roblem for ou? , ., , ., problem for you? yes. not 'ust ask what other — problem for you? yes. not 'ust ask what other surgeries h problem for you? yes. not 'ust ask what other surgeries are _ problem for you? yes. notjust ask what other surgeries are having, i problem for you? yes. notjust ask. what other surgeries are having, you know, they don't want to many staff to be pinged. clinicians and the like. receptionists, they help us manage, so, you know, we are finding that some days are getting more and more difficult to bond going, and this is on top of the fact that the
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moment the demand for nhs services, for gps or any hospital is increasing phenomenally, just for all of the other things that have happened. those things that needed attention over the pandemic. lots of people are burned out. staff are burnt out from working hard. it's not a great combination. it's actually quite worrying. find not a great combination. it's actually quite worrying. and there was a hirh actually quite worrying. and there was a high number _ actually quite worrying. and there was a high number of _ actually quite worrying. and there was a high number of outbreaks l actually quite worrying. and there l was a high number of outbreaks for nora virus this year. while you are with us, let me ask you about the hot weather. which of course is a blessing for many people, for others it is going to be a bit uncomfortable. it is probably worth reminding everyone, to give lillian those little sunspots where temperatures may be higher than 31, officially recorded, what is the basic health message there? yes. basic health message there? yes, while it is great _ basic health message there? yes, while it is great to _ basic health message there? yes, while it is great to enjoy _ basic health message there? ya: while it is great to enjoy the sun, make sure you take simple precautions. when the sun is at its strongest, you know, around midday, don't go out. stay in the shade.
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keep your room school. enzyme blinds can help, hydrate, keep drinking plenty. we a heart, wear sunscreen if are going out. —— hat. little ones may struggle without or older, failure people. i know it is going to be hard to wear a mask today while you are out in the sun but please carry doing so.— while you are out in the sun but please carry doing so. thank you so much, please carry doing so. thank you so much. fari — please carry doing so. thank you so much, fari ahmad, _ please carry doing so. thank you so much, fari ahmad, but— please carry doing so. thank you so much, fari ahmad, but at - please carry doing so. thank you so much, fari ahmad, but at least - please carry doing so. thank you so much, fari ahmad, but at least we | much, fari ahmad, but at least we can be outdoors while we are seeing people. thank you so much, doctor fari ahmad, one of our regular contributors on breakfast. and will be talking about the reopening and changes to restrictions. that's checking on the sport. austin has the details. it all about silverstone. it is sport. austin has the details. it all about silverstone.— sport. austin has the details. it all about silverstone. it is a busy da of all about silverstone. it is a busy day of sport _ all about silverstone. it is a busy day of sport today. _ all about silverstone. it is a busy day of sport today. one - all about silverstone. it is a busy day of sport today. one where i all about silverstone. it is a busy day of sport today. one where it| all about silverstone. it is a busy i day of sport today. one where it is a bit of a battle for people out
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there between spending time outside in the sun and racing back inside to watch this brilliant sport going on. we will start with the british grand prix.140,000 we will start with the british grand prix. 140,000 fans that the stone today, plenty chairing this man on, lewis hamilton. looking for another grand prix win. desperate to keep his world title hopes alive this afternoon. yes, good morning, everyone. he's 33 points behind red bull's max verstappen in the world championship standings. verstappen's won four out of the last five races, but today hamilton will have the roar of a home crowd behind once again —140,000 of them, as lydia campbell reports. away from the fans, and soon there will be a lot more of them, as silverstone welcomes the biggest crowd at a sporting event in the uk since the start of the pandemic. just happy to be out and about and at a sport event, i've missed it. yeah, feels great. it's the first time i've been here as well, so i don't know what it was like, but it's nice at the moment, yeah. the uk has been building up to this.
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there were 15,000 people on centre court to watch the wimbledon finals, 60,000 at wembley to witness the final of the european championship, and now, 140,000 at silverstone. a critical part of the events research programme is that everybody here is either had a negative lateral flow test in the 48 hours before they arrive, or they are second vaccine jab plus two weeks. we've stopped at nothing to make sure this is a safe as it possibly can be. and for places like silverstone, allowing a capacity crowd has allowed them to think about the future. this was really a crunch moment for silverstone. if they couldn't get fans in, it could have been they didn't have any more money, they'd he broke, and that would be a desperate time for the track. and what about the racing? that's what the crowds are here for after all. max verstappen was literally on fire at the start of the new sprint qualifying on saturday. that must have helped him as he overtook lewis hamilton before the first turn, and that's
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how they finished. verstappen pipping hamilton at the pole ahead of the main race today. but while hamilton couldn't quite deliver for his fans on saturday, they were still happy to see him. with today's crowd set to take the number of spectators over the three days to more than 300,000, many more people across the country will be hoping that scenes like these will soon be a normality again. lydia campbell, bbc news. so, an exciting day ahead at silverstone but the action doesn't stop there! in about 20 minutes' time, the final round of golf�*s open championship gets underway at royal st george's, in kent. south african louis oosthuizen leads the way but there are a few big names lurking just behind, as andy swiss reports. a sun—soaked sandwich and a day when being a golf fan was about as fun as it gets. but while they basked in the heat, others were trying to keep their cool.
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after starting with a two—shot lead, louis oosthuizen began in his usual unflappable style. but soon he had company — another former champion, jordan spieth, piling on the pressure. and so did collin morikawa as three of them became locked in a thrilling battle. hopes of a home winner are fading. paul casey and the pinpoint precise andy sullivan the best of the bunch. but they are seven shots back. while rory mcilroy is 11 back after a round which began promisingly before falling away. but at the top of the leaderboard, late drama. spieth missed a tiddler at the last and oosthuizen edged clear of morikawa. he's lead after every round so far. could this once again be his year? and so louis oosthuizen takes a slender 1—shot lead into the final day. this enthralling open remains tantalisingly poised. andy swiss, bbc news, sandwich.
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elsewhere, tadej pogacar is set to defend his tour de france title this afternoon, as the race concludes in paris. the slovenian finished eighth in yesterday's 20th stage to retain a substantial lead, and with the tradition that no—one attacks the yellowjersey on the final day, he's set to be confirmed as champion in paris. but, the other parisian tradition is a sprint finish on the champs—elysees, where mark cavendish could set a new record for 35 stage wins on the tour and take the sprinter�*s green jersey. saint helens have won rugby league's challenge cup for the first time in over a decade, after beating castleford 26—12. in front of 45,000 fans at wembley, saints came from behind to win a thrilling final in searing heat at wembley. joe lynskey reports. 45,000 brought the noise from the north. after so long in the silence for rugby league, it means so much.
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this is their sport's showpiece match. castleford and st helens are two of the oldest clubs. they know games can change with the bounce of the ball. saints got the first score with help from the post, but castleford responded with something extraordinary. castleford fans are leaping to the air! in castleford, this sport's at the heart of the town, but a fierce half in the heat would drain them in the second. st helens were here as favourites, now they'd surged through the gaps and into the lead. after 13 years without it, one of this sport's giants had its oldest prize. yeah, it's been a long time coming and obviously a number of years before we've been able to get back here and win it again. so, it was one really tough game today, obviously the heat i think played a part. you could see that in the second half, for both teams, but it's very special for me to call myself the captain of this team and obviously to lift this trophy. this has been rugby league's toughest year, but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in itself.
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it is st helens who go home singing. joe lynskey, bbc news. congratulations to them. and finally, the preparation's now overfor the british and irish lions — they thrashed the stormers 49—3 in theirfinal warm—up match before the first test against south africa next weekend. the lions did fall behind early, but quickly turned things around. exeter�*s sam simmonds was just one of seven try scorers. but the headlines were saved for tour captain alun wynjones. he came off the bench, to complete an incredible return to action just three weeks after dislocating his shoulder. an incredible story, that. three weeks, at the age of 35 he is back on the field. but weeks, at the age of 35 he is back on the field-— on the field. but while we're talkin: on the field. but while we're talking comebacks, - on the field. but while we're talking comebacks, i- on the field. but while we're talking comebacks, i know l on the field. but while we're i talking comebacks, i know you on the field. but while we're - talking comebacks, i know you have talked about it, mark cavendish today was not in fact in all the papers, a brilliant piece in the observer this morning talking about
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it. do you want to pick up on that? and even the tour de france director has basically said he is the greatest sprinter in the history of the tour and in the history of cycling. he is absolutely astonishing, what he has achieved. just read a little about it, he has battled through physical and mental illnesses and now to be possibly getting this record today... absolutely. he even nearly left the sport a couple of years ago. but eddy merckx's records, any thought he was completely untouchable. he is level with them now with the amount of stage wins and if he really wins it today, it will be historic. it is a bi if, it today, it will be historic. it is a big if, though. _ it today, it will be historic. it 3 a big if, though. anything can happen in the final stage. actually, there is a link _ happen in the final stage. actually, there is a link here. _ happen in the final stage. actually, there is a link here. remember - happen in the final stage. actually, j
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there is a link here. remember the tour of yorkshire? the yorkshire dales is famous for its stunning scenery, including rolling hills and far—reaching moorlands, but decades of intensive land use has taken its toll on parts of the landscape. that's why ingleborough, the county's second highest mountain, has become the focus of a huge restoration project. our reporter paul hudson can explain. we had a photo as well! wherever you look in the parts of the yorkshire dales, the scenery is absolutely stunning. on the beauty of the valley to the mountains which make up the three peaks of panic and is, work side and ingleborough, there are a few areas they can match this part of the world. but extensive [and use has had an impact on the area, meaning large swathes of bare limestone and heavily grazed pasture are now commonplace. this man from the yorkshire wildlife
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trust remembers what the area used to look like. well, it is quite something to see these two areas are something to see these two areas are so close side—by—side was notjust explained to us a bit more as to what is going on. the explained to us a bit more as to what is going on.— explained to us a bit more as to what is going on. the area over here we removed — what is going on. the area over here we removed all— what is going on. the area over here we removed all the _ what is going on. the area over here we removed all the grazing - what is going on. the area over here we removed all the grazing animals, over 30 years ago. as you can see, the plant life has really rebounded so it is covered in wildflowers, all sorts of different colours, you can see lots of small shrubs and trees have decided to grow back and it gives us a bit of an indication of what it might have looked like before. it what it might have looked like before. , . ., ., what it might have looked like before. ., ., before. it is amazing to see what can happen _ before. it is amazing to see what can happeniust_ before. it is amazing to see what can happen just over _ before. it is amazing to see what can happen just over a _ before. it is amazing to see what can happen just over a few- before. it is amazing to see what i can happen just over a few decades but why is it so important to try and return the landscape to how it was? ~ , ., ., was? wildlife is under threat and we have lost so — was? wildlife is under threat and we have lost so much _ was? wildlife is under threat and we have lost so much habitat _ was? wildlife is under threat and we have lost so much habitat in - have lost so much habitat in yorkshire dales so if we're going to bring about nature's recovery in yorkshire, we need to look on a scale and try to reconnect these patches of natural habitat back together. patches of natural habitat back to . ether. . together. hence the wild ingleborough _ together. hence the wild ingleborough project. i together. hence the wild i ingleborough project. how together. hence the wild - ingleborough project. how do you plan to execute it? we ingleborough project. how do you plan to execute it?— plan to execute it? we will be
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workin: plan to execute it? we will be working with _ plan to execute it? we will be working with local _ plan to execute it? we will be working with local people - plan to execute it? we will be working with local people and | working with local people and landowners to help us do this project stop we want them to help us build the vision for the project to connect this natural habitat together, to help us restore natural processes to the landscape and then hopefully, those threatened species will start to flourish again and some of the lost species may come back. it some of the lost species may come back. , , . ., ., back. it is very clear looking at this barren _ back. it is very clear looking at this barren limestone - back. it is very clear looking at. this barren limestone pavement back. it is very clear looking at - this barren limestone pavement what extensive farming has had. 30 years ago this would have been covered in trees and native shrubs, but the wild ingleborough project aims to transform this to its former glory. the area earmarked stretches from the revel —— river to ingleborough with 300 hectares has a ready been restored. with hundreds of metres of walls to be rebuilt and plans for much more we hope to allow natural re— habilitation of the through low grazing with cattle, and linking up
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existing woodlands and re—establishing a natural tree line up re—establishing a natural tree line up the mountain, so we will do that by tree planting, with native species and also letting natural regeneration of trees on the limestone pavement like here. so they might be young trees and stuff scattered around?— they might be young trees and stuff scattered around? indeed and a wide varie of scattered around? indeed and a wide variety of really _ scattered around? indeed and a wide variety of really important _ scattered around? indeed and a wide variety of really important flowers i variety of really important flowers as well. that supports insect and a whole host of wildlife. the as well. that supports insect and a whole host of wildlife.— whole host of wildlife. the pro'ect will run whole host of wildlife. the pro'ect wiu for — whole host of wildlife. the pro'ect will run for the fi whole host of wildlife. the pro'ect will run for the next i whole host of wildlife. the pro'ect will run for the next 12 i whole host of wildlife. the project will run for the next 12 months - will run for the next 12 months creating 40 hectares of native woodland with 30,000 new trees hoping restore this area to its former glory. and in doing so contribute to the fight against climate change. stunning scenery! especially on a da like stunning scenery! especially on a day like today- — stunning scenery! especially on a day like today. if— stunning scenery! especially on a day like today. if you _ stunning scenery! especially on a day like today. if you are - stunning scenery! especially on a day like today. if you are out, - day like today. if you are out, enjoy it. in the last week, we've seen floods devastate western europe and record
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temperatures in the us. ros atkins is taking a look at recent heatwaves around the world and why they're worrying scientists. this is a story of two heatwaves that have set record temperatures, started wildfires and killed people and that connect to what we're doing to our planet and how we're tackling climate change. because the science is absolutely clear, this is all part of the same story. we are seeing the effects of climate change in california and other parts of the country and the world as well but it's already happening. we can't keep waiting to act. let's take this stage by stage by looking at how these heatwaves fit into a far bigger picture, and we'll start up close — on the western side of north america. the first heatwave began in latejune. this is portland in the us. this is british columbia in canada.
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and temperature records were being smashed. lytton, and canada's previous record, was 44.4 degrees celsius. now it's 49.6. that's now canada's highest ever temperature. move over the border to seattle in the us. it went from this — to this. and, further south in portland, the old record was beaten by another big margin. and none of this is normal. this is how one canadian climatologist puts it. and here's weather historian christopher burt. nature is telling us this isn't normal too. on the pacific coast its estimated over1 billion marine creatures have been killed.
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this man runs an oyster business in canada. basically cooked the oysters, clams, mussels, most of the mussels around here now are all gone. my clams, you can see they're all dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. this image from bbc weather shows the 10th ofjuly in the us. the red means hotter than average. and this is death valley in california. it's reached 54.4 c. if confirmed, that would equal the highest temperature ever reliably recorded anywhere. and if that's the heat, one of its consequences is wildfires, a lot of them. back to lytton in canada, it was nearly wiped out by a fire. and this is california. across western canada and the us, there's been well over 1000 wildfires since april, many in the last two months. and the link to the heat is explicit. it's actually all very
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related to extreme heat. so with extreme heat, that kind of triggers a drought which we're also really experiencing in california, extreme drought, and with that extreme drought the wildfires are also more severe. and if that's the fires caused by the heat, next we have to step back again and look at why these two heatwaves have happened. the immediate cause is what's caused a heat dome. my colleague david shukman explains. there's a vast dome of high pressure above western canada. it's like a lid in the atmosphere, trapping warm air and pushing it down where it gets even hotter. and the heat is held in place by the path of the jetstream, so, temperatures have kept climbing. and that's the double danger. high—pressure that can't move on. basically no weather systems can move in so we don't get any relief with thunderstorms or showers and all we get is just pure blue skies and sunshine and this is very dangerous. so the fires happened because the temperatures happened
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because the heat homes happened. let's take another step back. how do heat domes connect with climate range? ——how do heat domes connect with climate change? on that, this is the director of the earth system science centre. if we weren't warming up the planet through carbon pollution, we wouldn't expect to see this more often than once in 100,000 years. what climate change has done is made this a much more probable event. now, as you may have noticed, scientists used to be more reticent about making an explicit link between a single weather event and climate change. now, though, increased computing power means increased confidence in the accuracy of climate modelling. listen to how definitive professor peter stott is on the current heat waves. we've analysed the climate that you would expect without emissions of greenhouse gases and you just don't see these sorts of extraordinary temperatures that we're seeing at the moment. so this climate modelling is providing clarity. look at this from dr friederike otto from the university of oxford. she's looked at these heatwaves and concluded...
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so we have to link from the fires to the temperatures to the heat dome to climate change. the final part of the equation is us — humanity — and how we're the cause of this. humanity is waging war on nature. this is suicidal. nature always strikes back and it is already doing so, with growing force and fury. on that, mr guterres is right. nature is providing any number of warnings. just look at the last few weeks. europe has recorded its second hottestjune. moscow equalled its highestjune temperature, or if we shift to mexico, it's recorded its highest ever temperature injune. that was in mexicali. or you could look at new zealand.
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it's winter there. it too has recorded its hottestjune. the list goes on. and while i'm going through all of this, perhaps you're thinking, well, we know this. we know climate change is an issue, we know we need to act. we are acting. but there are two important things to note here. the first is that these heat waves in north america have scientists worried. bear in mind most climate modelling anticipates gradual warming. but as we've seen, there's nothing gradual about this. as the climatologist professor sir brian hoskins puts it... in other words, what is starting to happen with climate change may be worse than has been projected. and if that's the first point, the second is this — that deciding to act isn't the same as taking the right action. let me show you what i mean. this year has been full of bold commitments.
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scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, this is the decade we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of a climate crisis. if that's the us then there's china. it's promised to be carbon neutral by 2060. and this is borisjohnson. we're halfway to net zero. we have carbon emissions lower than at any point since the 19th century. we're ending support for fossil fuels overseas and doubling our international climate finance. the language is urgent, more urgent than ever. the policies do go further than before. but there are concerns all of this might not be enough. listen to this senior climate official on the uk's plan to remove as much carbon as it puts in to the atmosphere. something called net zero. when you look at the policies to deliver it, i'm afraid we are very off—track, very, very substantially off—track. really only about 20% of the policy
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commitments that the government has made would take us towards that goal of net zero emissions. there's also this from baroness worthington who's the lead author on the uk's climate change act. she says... and all of these commitments and questions feed into the preparations for the un's latest climate summit, cop26. it's happening in glasgow in november. it's another opportunity to set ambitious targets, and to look at the funding, the technology and the police needed to deliver them. ——policies needed to deliver them. but while we build up to that, there's a profound tension in plain sight. a tension between the long—term global response and what's happening now.
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look at this graph. this shows global carbon emissions. they go up and up. the year with the highest emissions in history was...2019. and emissions are having consequences now which brings us right back to the heatwaves in north america and why they matter so much, because the individual experiences of the millions of people caught up in this make real the dangers of changing our climate. they make real why cop26 is receiving so much attention. and they offer another reason why just a few months ago david attenborough made this demand of the world's leaders. never before it's been so important that there should be a playing field, there should be a ground, a debating ground where we can all talk and come to an agreement. because unless we all agree, we are lost.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. good morning, at eight o'clock. our headlines today... the health secretary, sajid javid, confirms he has covid—19 — raising questions over who in government might have to self—isolate — just hours before most restricitons in england are lifted. with hundreds still missing after germany's devastating floods — the scale of the disaster continues to emerge. good morning, silverstone hosts the biggest sporting crowd since the start of the pandemic this afternoon. 140,000 fans head to the track for the british grand prix as lewis hamilton looks to keep his title hopes alive! with less than a week to the start of the olympics — we go behind the scenes with two of the stars of team gb — adam peaty and helen glover — as they prepare for tokyo 21. the sun may be out already where you
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are. the uk makes the most of the sunny weather as the hottest temperatures of the year are recorded. there's more hot weather on the way for today. the sunshine is expected to last for a few more days yet. it's sunday the 18th ofjuly. our top story... senior government ministers are waiting to hear if they'll have to quarantine after the health secretary, sajid javid, confirmed he has tested positive for coronavirus. mrjavid held a meeting with the prime minister on friday, shortly before experiencing symptoms. it comes ahead of most legal covid restrictions being lifted in england tomorrow. our political correspondent, nick eardly has this report. downing street on friday. the health secretary outside number 10, where he held talks with the prime minister. last night, though, sajid javid confirmed he had coronavirus, after a second test. i was feeling a bit groggy last night, so i took a lateralflow test this morning and it's come out positive.
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so i'm now self—isolating at home with my family until i get the results of a pcr test. i'm grateful that i've had two jabs of the vaccine, and so far my symptoms are very mild. he'll now have to self—isolate and there are questions whether others might be told to stay at home, too, including borisjohnson. it comes ahead of a crucial week in which almost all legal restrictions in england will be lifted. from tomorrow, social distancing will be officially scrapped. there will be no limits at events and legally you won't have to wear a face covering. although in some places, they will still be recommended. but the number of cases is increasing. there were more than 54,000 in the last 24—hour period. and some have warned about being too relaxed in the coming days and weeks. next week will be a significant moment in the sometimes slow road out of lockdown in england, but it won't be back to normality overnight. face coverings will still be
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recommended in some places, and there will still be an emphasis on caution. and the number of positive cases we're seeing, like the health secretary's, is a reminder that even if many restrictions are going, the virus hasn't disappeared. this is wales yesterday — people taking advantage of the weather after restrictions and gatherings outside were lifted. there are more freedoms coming for people across the uk, but that doesn't come without risk. nick eardley, bbc news. we're joined now by our political correspondent, jessica parker. jess, what impact could this have on the government? just at the point they want to tell us to go out and take advantage of the new freedoms in england. breaking news, we'vejust had the new freedoms in england. breaking news, we've just had from number ten, breaking news, we've just had from numberten, because breaking news, we've just had from number ten, because one of the big question has been who did sajid javid come into contact with in government and who might be asked to self—isolate. we've just had a notification that the prime minister
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and the chancellor have been contacted by nhs test and trace as contacts of someone who has tested positive for covid. we imagine that thatis positive for covid. we imagine that that is sajid javid. we've been told that is sajid javid. we've been told that they will be participating in the daily contact testing pilot to allow them to continue to work from downing street. they will be conducting only essential government business during this period. so it does appear, although they are not specific about it, that the high minister and chancellor came into contact with sajid javid. we know that he had a meeting with the health secretary on friday. they are going to use this contact tracing a pilot, which michael gove incidentally used back injune. becoming a little bit clearer in terms of those implications. but of course, the backdrop to this is that we are heading into what some are calling freedom day tomorrow in england when legal restrictions and social contact are lifted, and when we head into that... find
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social contact are lifted, and when we head into that. . ._ we head into that... and it looks like we've _ we head into that... and it looks like we've got — we head into that... and it looks like we've got a _ we head into that... and it looks like we've got a problem - we head into that... and it looks like we've got a problem with i we head into that... and it looks| like we've got a problem with our line. the key thing to take out of thatis line. the key thing to take out of that is that the prime minister will still be working, albeit in a limited capacity, as will the chancellor, and they will be participating in this test and release scheme. i don't know who gets to say if you can participate, but presumably being the prime minister helps in that situation. but we will bring you more on that, and don't forget the andrew marr show from nine o'clock this morning. we will have a voice from the government later. we might find out more about that later. stan; government later. we might find out more about that later.— more about that later. stay tuned for that. a clean—up operation is underway in the regions of germany and belgium worst affected by unprecedented flooding. at least180 people have died and hundreds are believed to be missing. rescuers have said the situation
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is moving to a recovery phase. we will be live in germany shortly. police investigating violence and disorder at last sunday's euro final between england and italy have released images of ten men they want to speak to. officers have condemned what they call the disgraceful scenes witnessed at wembley stadium. london's hosting of the match saw ugly scenes, which included some ticketless fans storming the grounds in an attempt to watch the game. two athletes have tested positive for coronavirus in the olympic village in tokyo. the coach for the south african men s football team has confirmed two cases of covid. officials for the games say all those involved are isolating and close contacts have been identified. ibiza, majorca and menorca will move from the government's green travel watchlist to amber overnight. what does that mean? from tomorrow, people aged over 18, who are not fully vaccinated, will have to quarantine on returning from the islands.
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our correspondent nick beake joins us now from ibiza. nick, what do the latest changes mean for travellers? we've touched on some of them there. what will people need to do? the beaches on _ what will people need to do? the beaches on the island are filling up, but unfortunately a lot of young brits are packing up because this is the last day of their holidays. they've had to cut them short because they are trying to beat this new quarantine rule that comes in at 4am tomorrow morning. lots of the young brits we've been talking to, they've had one jab, but because they've had one jab, but because they are not double jab they face ten days of isolation if they don't get back before this deadline. what is that meant in practical terms? they have been on a phone is trying to get an early flight, some people have been booking themselves. they've had to bring forward the taking of their pcr tests here on the island so they are able to get back to the uk. it has been a bit of a nightmare, really. they are pleased that they've been able to have a holiday, but it is but a but
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dampener on things. are business things on the island, it's another headache for them because two weeks ago they were celebrating when i've either went on the green watchlist which meant travel becomes a lot easier, but now they are not quite sure about what is going to happen. people coming back from france tomorrow, another headache for people who are double vaccinated because they are worried about the in france linked to the beta variant which was first seen in south africa. so even though you have been double jabbed, you will have to self—isolate for ten days. in terms of this place, the island, lots of planes from the uk still arriving. 20. we were looking at the arrivals board. but i think lots of businesses on the island have been hard—hit already, they are going to work out that they have to wait and see reallyjust how many brits will still come, determined to have a holiday, even if it means that when they get back the uk it will be a lot more difficult. thanks so much.
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it looks very sunny there. with the the mercury hitting highs of 30—plus degrees yesterday, tens of thousands of you took to beaches, parks and lakes across the uk to make the most of the weekend sunshine. this was the scene at seaburn beach near sunderland. northern ireland, meanwhile, recorded its highest ever temperature — 31.2 degrees celcius at ballywatticock in county down. and you've been sending in your pictures of your sunny weekend. this is margaret's view from her balcony in tenby this morning. now, it doesn't get better than this. anna sent this one of herself on the uninhabited island of nornour on the isles of scilly. here's archie cooling
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off in the sun. helping anyone standing in perimeter, too.— helping anyone standing in perimeter, too. our favourite is this one- _ perimeter, too. our favourite is this one- i _ perimeter, too. our favourite is this one. ijust _ perimeter, too. our favourite is this one. i just love _ perimeter, too. our favourite is this one. i just love this - perimeter, too. our favourite is this one. ijust love this photo i perimeter, too. our favourite is i this one. ijust love this photo so much. we don't have a name for the baby but that is definitely one way to cool off. itjust goes to show, you don't need to go out and find a paddling pool, just find an old bucket. as my mum would do, the wash basin from the sink. love it. i hope it worked, anyway. aha, basin from the sink. love it. i hope it worked, anyway.— it worked, anyway. a lot more of that going _ it worked, anyway. a lot more of that going on _ it worked, anyway. a lot more of that going on today. _ at least 180 at least180 people are now known to have died.
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families are desperatly searching for missing relatives after floods devastated parts of germany and belgium. more than 180 people died and thousands have damian, has there been any update overnight? overnight, we've had more rain in the south of germany, in bavaria. the rain has gone, the skies are blue, everything looks pretty normal if you don't look at the devastation. but the water is still on the ground so it is still a dangerous situation. the ground is so sudden it has undermined roads and houses, but those rains have moved on. on the border of austria and germany, one village was particularly badly hit, one person died in those flooding is. but of course, people in the south have more warning because the problem here in western germany, it happened so quickly, over the space of two
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days. this region got the same amount of rain it would usually get within the space of two months, just to give you an idea of the enormity of rainfall. that is why we had so many problems here.— of rainfall. that is why we had so many problems here. thank you very much, many problems here. thank you very much. damien- _ families are desperatly searching for missing relatives after floods devastated parts of germany and belgium. more than 180 people died and thousands have been left homeless — let's speak now tojulain reichelt, editor in chief at bild — one of germany's leading newspapers — and care worker, silke mohnfeld. good morning to both of you. i know it has been a really busy and dramatic story to be reporting on. can you tell us about where you work and how it's been affected by the floods of the recent days? goad floods of the recent days? good morninr. floods of the recent days? good morning- i _ floods of the recent days? good morning. i work _ floods of the recent days? good morning. i work as _ floods of the recent days? good morning. i work as a _ floods of the recent days? good morning. i work as a care -
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floods of the recent days? good morning. i work as a care worker in a retirement— morning. i work as a care worker in a retirement home. the home i work in was _ a retirement home. the home i work in was not _ a retirement home. the home i work in was not affected but another one that we _ in was not affected but another one that we also take care of was hit by the flood. — that we also take care of was hit by the flood, wednesday to thursday, so within _ the flood, wednesday to thursday, so within minutes they were without electricity, without water. no light, — electricity, without water. no light, none of the medical devices worked _ light, none of the medical devices worked without electricity. they hit the alarm _ worked without electricity. they hit the alarm and nobody came because obviously— the alarm and nobody came because obviously no one was able to come. and that _ obviously no one was able to come. and that was a very hard to situation _ and that was a very hard to situation for people, the inhabitants and the care workers that were — inhabitants and the care workers that were there at that point. so what _ that were there at that point. so what we — that were there at that point. so what we were trying to do and what we did, _ what we were trying to do and what we did, we — what we were trying to do and what we did, we evacuated all of the inhabitants yesterday and friday, so now they _
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inhabitants yesterday and friday, so now they are all safe in other homes — now they are all safe in other homes. of course, the care workers there _ homes. of course, the care workers there are _ homes. of course, the care workers there are now have to take care of more _ there are now have to take care of more people so we are trying to help out there. _ more people so we are trying to help out there, we are trying to bring goods— out there, we are trying to bring goods to — out there, we are trying to bring goods to people who lost their homes — goods to people who lost their homes. it's really an un—describable situation _ homes. it's really an un—describable situation in— homes. it's really an un-describable situation. . ,~ . . , situation. in any circumstances, this would _ situation. in any circumstances, this would be _ situation. in any circumstances, this would be upsetting - situation. in any circumstances, this would be upsetting and - this would be upsetting and destabilising, but you said that in particularfor destabilising, but you said that in particular for this generation of residents a traumatic experience to go through. residents a traumatic experience to no throurh. m, residents a traumatic experience to no throurh. n,, ., residents a traumatic experience to go through-— residents a traumatic experience to raothrouh. ., , ., ., go through. most of them started to scream or to — go through. most of them started to scream or to cry. — go through. most of them started to scream or to cry, or _ go through. most of them started to scream or to cry, or both, _ go through. most of them started to scream or to cry, or both, when - go through. most of them started to | scream or to cry, or both, when they heard _ scream or to cry, or both, when they heard the _ scream or to cry, or both, when they heard the word evacuation. for those who survived — heard the word evacuation. for those who survived the war, it is really traumatising. sorry. i completely understand. _ traumatising. sorry. i completely understand, so _ traumatising. sorry. i completely understand, so do _ traumatising. sorry. i completely understand, so do take _ traumatising. sorry. i completely understand, so do take your- traumatising. sorry. i completelyj understand, so do take your time this morning. it's important to know
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and to acknowledge what people have been through there, and as you say, reflecting on the past and then dealing with this now. what kind of support apart from actually going into these other premises, what kind of psychological support is there for them? igrate of psychological support is there for them? ~ . of psychological support is there forthem? . .,., ,, ., for them? we have psychologists that are there in the _ for them? we have psychologists that are there in the home _ for them? we have psychologists that are there in the home where - for them? we have psychologists that are there in the home where they - for them? we have psychologists that are there in the home where they are | are there in the home where they are now _ are there in the home where they are now they— are there in the home where they are now. they are trying to talk to them committed — now. they are trying to talk to them committed to calm them. actually, that was— committed to calm them. actually, that was a — committed to calm them. actually, that was a nice idea. we what had one care _ that was a nice idea. we what had one care worker brought her dog and that really— one care worker brought her dog and that really helped because there was 'ust that really helped because there was just a _ that really helped because there was just a little fun in all this. sometimes it's the simple things, and i know you've done amazing work with your husband over the past few days supporting this effort, so i'm sure that is hugely appreciated. julian, you are editor and chief at
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the newspaper there, and one thing you have been able to do is set up a missing person page. tell us about how that came about? in missing person page. tell us about how that came about?— how that came about? in the first hours of this _ how that came about? in the first hours of this disaster, _ how that came about? in the first hours of this disaster, a - how that came about? in the first hours of this disaster, a disasterl hours of this disaster, a disaster like we — hours of this disaster, a disaster like we haven't _ hours of this disaster, a disaster like we haven't seen _ hours of this disaster, a disaster like we haven't seen in- hours of this disaster, a disaster like we haven't seen in germanyj hours of this disaster, a disaster. like we haven't seen in germany in decades, _ like we haven't seen in germany in decades, it — like we haven't seen in germany in decades, it became _ like we haven't seen in germany in decades, it became very— like we haven't seen in germany in decades, it became very clear- like we haven't seen in germany in decades, it became very clear thatj decades, it became very clear that the floods— decades, it became very clear that the floods had _ decades, it became very clear that the floods had killed _ decades, it became very clear that the floods had killed an _ decades, it became very clear that the floods had killed an off - decades, it became very clear that the floods had killed an off a - decades, it became very clear that the floods had killed an off a lot i the floods had killed an off a lot of people. — the floods had killed an off a lot of people. but— the floods had killed an off a lot of people, but also there - the floods had killed an off a lot of people, but also there were i the floods had killed an off a lot - of people, but also there were even more _ of people, but also there were even more people — of people, but also there were even more people missing _ of people, but also there were even more people missing in— of people, but also there were even more people missing in this - of people, but also there were even l more people missing in this complete nightmare _ more people missing in this complete nightmare and — more people missing in this complete nightmare and chaos. _ more people missing in this complete nightmare and chaos. and _ more people missing in this complete nightmare and chaos. and our- more people missing in this complete nightmare and chaos. and our brand i nightmare and chaos. and our brand is still— nightmare and chaos. and our brand is still the _ nightmare and chaos. and our brand is still the biggest _ nightmare and chaos. and our brand is still the biggest reach _ nightmare and chaos. and our brand is still the biggest reach in - is still the biggest reach in germany, _ is still the biggest reach in germany, so _ is still the biggest reach in germany, so we _ is still the biggest reach in germany, so we decided l is still the biggest reach in. germany, so we decided we is still the biggest reach in - germany, so we decided we wanted is still the biggest reach in _ germany, so we decided we wanted to help the _ germany, so we decided we wanted to help the authorities _ germany, so we decided we wanted to help the authorities in _ germany, so we decided we wanted to help the authorities in their— germany, so we decided we wanted to help the authorities in their search - help the authorities in their search effort _ help the authorities in their search effort and — help the authorities in their search effort and get _ help the authorities in their search effort and get a _ help the authorities in their search effort and get a platform - help the authorities in their search effort and get a platform for- help the authorities in their search effort and get a platform for all. effort and get a platform for all those _ effort and get a platform for all those people _ effort and get a platform for all those people looking _ effort and get a platform for all those people looking for- effort and get a platform for all those people looking for a - effort and get a platform for alll those people looking for a loved ones _ those people looking for a loved ones so— those people looking for a loved ones so we _ those people looking for a loved ones. so we offer— those people looking for a loved ones. so we offer people - those people looking for a loved ones. so we offer people to - those people looking for a loved i ones. so we offer people to share their— ones. so we offer people to share their pictures _ ones. so we offer people to share their pictures and _ ones. so we offer people to share their pictures and their— ones. so we offer people to share i their pictures and their whereabouts and where _ their pictures and their whereabouts and where they— their pictures and their whereabouts and where they had _ their pictures and their whereabouts and where they had last _ their pictures and their whereabouts and where they had last seen - their pictures and their whereabouts and where they had last seen their. and where they had last seen their loved _ and where they had last seen their loved ones — and where they had last seen their loved ones on _ and where they had last seen their loved ones on our— and where they had last seen their loved ones on our website - and where they had last seen their loved ones on our website and - and where they had last seen their loved ones on our website and in i and where they had last seen their. loved ones on our website and in our paper. _ loved ones on our website and in our paper, and _ loved ones on our website and in our paper. and although _ loved ones on our website and in our paper, and although i _ loved ones on our website and in our paper, and although i have _ loved ones on our website and in our paper, and although i have to - loved ones on our website and in our paper, and although i have to admitl paper, and although i have to admit that hope _ paper, and although i have to admit that hope is— paper, and although i have to admit that hope is very— paper, and although i have to admit that hope is very dim _ paper, and although i have to admit that hope is very dim for— paper, and although i have to admit that hope is very dim for those - that hope is very dim for those people — that hope is very dim for those people who _ that hope is very dim for those people who are _ that hope is very dim for those people who are still— that hope is very dim for those people who are still missing, i that hope is very dim for those i people who are still missing, we that hope is very dim for those - people who are still missing, we are all trying _
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people who are still missing, we are all trying to — people who are still missing, we are all trying to do — people who are still missing, we are all trying to do our— people who are still missing, we are all trying to do our best _ people who are still missing, we are all trying to do our best and - all trying to do our best and support— all trying to do our best and support people _ all trying to do our best and support people like - all trying to do our best and support people like those i all trying to do our best and i support people like those we all trying to do our best and - support people like those we just saw on _ support people like those we just saw on the — support people like those we just saw on the programme, - support people like those we just saw on the programme, to - support people like those we just saw on the programme, to help i support people like those we just i saw on the programme, to help the people _ saw on the programme, to help the people there — saw on the programme, to help the people there inie— saw on the programme, to help the people there-— people there. we were 'ust looking at one of those h people there. we were 'ust looking at one of those pages, _ people there. we were just looking at one of those pages, and - people there. we were just looking at one of those pages, and it - people there. we were just looking at one of those pages, and it really does remind you of course that they are individualfamilies, notjust are individual families, not just numbers are individualfamilies, notjust numbers or stories. a lot of people getting in touch with you as a result of that page. have you been able to reunite anyone and find missing relatives? igrate able to reunite anyone and find missing relatives?— able to reunite anyone and find missing relatives? we don't want to take credit for _ missing relatives? we don't want to take credit for reuniting _ missing relatives? we don't want to take credit for reuniting people. - take credit for reuniting people. there _ take credit for reuniting people. there were _ take credit for reuniting people. there were people _ take credit for reuniting people. there were people made - take credit for reuniting people. there were people made aware| take credit for reuniting people. - there were people made aware from our coverage — there were people made aware from our coverage a_ there were people made aware from our coverage. a heartbreaking - there were people made aware from our coverage. a heartbreaking storyl our coverage. a heartbreaking story of two _ our coverage. a heartbreaking story of two sisters — our coverage. a heartbreaking story of two sisters talking, _ our coverage. a heartbreaking story of two sisters talking, and - our coverage. a heartbreaking story of two sisters talking, and then - of two sisters talking, and then finally— of two sisters talking, and then finally meeting _ of two sisters talking, and then finally meeting their— of two sisters talking, and then i finally meeting their grandparents again _ finally meeting their grandparents again this— finally meeting their grandparents again this is— finally meeting their grandparents again. this is creating _ finally meeting their grandparents again. this is creating a _ finally meeting their grandparents again. this is creating a lot - finally meeting their grandparents again. this is creating a lot of- again. this is creating a lot of attention— again. this is creating a lot of attention and _ again. this is creating a lot of attention and tells _ again. this is creating a lot of attention and tells people - again. this is creating a lot ofi attention and tells people who again. this is creating a lot of- attention and tells people who has been messed _ attention and tells people who has been messed and _ attention and tells people who has been messed and he _ attention and tells people who has been messed and he was- attention and tells people who has been messed and he was being. attention and tells people who has - been messed and he was being looked for.
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been messed and he was being looked for~ but— been messed and he was being looked for~ but i_ been messed and he was being looked for. but i looked _ been messed and he was being looked for. but i looked through _ been messed and he was being looked for. but i looked through the - for. but i looked through the stories— for. but i looked through the stories you _ for. but i looked through the stories you chose _ for. but i looked through the stories you chose there - for. but i looked through the stories you chose there and. for. but i looked through the - stories you chose there and there is one woman, — stories you chose there and there is one woman, julia, _ stories you chose there and there is one woman, julia, in _ stories you chose there and there is one woman, julia, in her— stories you chose there and there is one woman, julia, in her late - stories you chose there and there is one woman, julia, in her late 30s. i one woman, julia, in her late 30s. she lived — one woman, julia, in her late 30s. she lived in— one woman, julia, in her late 30s. she lived in a _ one woman, julia, in her late 30s. she lived in a basement _ one woman, julia, in her late 30s.| she lived in a basement apartment and escapes— she lived in a basement apartment and escapes to _ she lived in a basement apartment and escapes to a _ she lived in a basement apartment and escapes to a first—floor- she lived in a basement apartment and escapes to a first—floor friend, j and escapes to a first—floor friend, and escapes to a first—floor friend, and then— and escapes to a first—floor friend, and then called _ and escapes to a first—floor friend, and then called her— and escapes to a first—floor friend, and then called her relatives - and escapes to a first—floor friend, and then called her relatives from i and then called her relatives from their and — and then called her relatives from their and the _ and then called her relatives from their and the last _ and then called her relatives from their and the last thing _ and then called her relatives from their and the last thing they- and then called her relatives from | their and the last thing they heard on the _ their and the last thing they heard on the call— their and the last thing they heard on the call was _ their and the last thing they heard on the call was "the _ their and the last thing they heard on the call was "the water- their and the last thing they heard on the call was "the water is - on the call was "the water is coming, _ on the call was "the water is coming, the _ on the call was "the water is coming, the water— on the call was "the water is coming, the water is - on the call was "the water is| coming, the water is coming! on the call was "the water is i coming, the water is coming! " on the call was "the water is - coming, the water is coming! " they haven't_ coming, the water is coming! " they haven't heard — coming, the water is coming! " they haven't heard from _ coming, the water is coming! " they haven't heard from her— coming, the water is coming! " they haven't heard from her again. - coming, the water is coming! " they haven't heard from her again. in- haven't heard from her again. in that area, — haven't heard from her again. in that area, all— haven't heard from her again. in that area, all houses _ haven't heard from her again. in that area, all houses have - haven't heard from her again. in that area, all houses have beenl that area, all houses have been swept _ that area, all houses have been swept away _ that area, all houses have been swept away. we _ that area, all houses have been swept away. we have _ that area, all houses have been swept away. we have to - that area, all houses have been swept away. we have to be - that area, all houses have been. swept away. we have to be realistic here _ swept away. we have to be realistic here for— swept away. we have to be realistic here for many— swept away. we have to be realistic here for many of— swept away. we have to be realistic here. for many of the _ swept away. we have to be realistic here. for many of the people, - swept away. we have to be realistic here. for many of the people, they| here. for many of the people, they are still— here. for many of the people, they are still missing, _ here. for many of the people, they are still missing, there's _ here. for many of the people, they are still missing, there's much - are still missing, there's much hope — are still missing, there's much hope but— are still missing, there's much hope but again. _ are still missing, there's much hope. but again, i— are still missing, there's much hope. but again, i have- are still missing, there's much. hope. but again, i have covered these _ hope. but again, i have covered these kind — hope. but again, i have covered these kind of— hope. but again, i have covered these kind of events _ hope. but again, i have covered these kind of events and - hope. but again, i have covered these kind of events and there i hope. but again, i have covered i these kind of events and there are always _ these kind of events and there are always miracles. _ these kind of events and there are always miracles. we _ these kind of events and there are always miracles. we are _ these kind of events and there are always miracles. we are trying - these kind of events and there are always miracles. we are trying toi these kind of events and there are l always miracles. we are trying to do our part— always miracles. we are trying to do our part in— always miracles. we are trying to do our part in making _ always miracles. we are trying to do our part in making these _ always miracles. we are trying to do our part in making these miracles. our part in making these miracles happen — our part in making these miracles ha en. ., our part in making these miracles ha . en. ., ., our part in making these miracles ha en. ., ., ., ., our part in making these miracles ha--en. ., ., ., ., happen. holding out for a miracle, and credit to _ happen. holding out for a miracle, and credit to people _ happen. holding out for a miracle, and credit to people like _ happen. holding out for a miracle, and credit to people like our- happen. holding out for a miracle, and credit to people like our other| and credit to people like our other guest. people are trying to help out in whatever way they can. can you at least say that the weather has come
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down to allow the rescue missions and search operations to carry on? what is it looking like where you are? �* , what is it looking like where you are? �*, .,, what is it looking like where you are? ., i, , what is it looking like where you are? ., i, what is it looking like where you are? . i, ., are? it's actually sunny and warm. but that means _ are? it's actually sunny and warm. but that means on _ are? it's actually sunny and warm. but that means on the _ are? it's actually sunny and warm. but that means on the other- are? it's actually sunny and warm. but that means on the other hand | but that means on the other hand that the _ but that means on the other hand that the bugs are coming. there is mud all— that the bugs are coming. there is mud all over and now we really have to bring _ mud all over and now we really have to bring people supplies to have a shield _ to bring people supplies to have a shield against the bugs. but at least _ shield against the bugs. but at least it's— shield against the bugs. but at least it's not raining any more, and it doesn't— least it's not raining any more, and it doesn't look like any more rain in next _ it doesn't look like any more rain in next days. so that is a relief, definitely — in next days. so that is a relief, definitely. fits in next days. so that is a relief, definitely-— definitely. as you say, big challenges _ definitely. as you say, big challenges ahead. - definitely. as you say, big challenges ahead. thanki definitely. as you say, big i challenges ahead. thank you definitely. as you say, big - challenges ahead. thank you so definitely. as you say, big _ challenges ahead. thank you so much for talking to us. we do really appreciate it. bothjoining us from germany this morning to bring us up—to—date with everything that is going on there. you up-to-date with everything that is going on there-— going on there. you mention that weather.
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tomasz is looking at where that is. the beginnings of it were across... you can see in the clear it now. the stormy weather has shifted towards the alpine region. southern parts of germany, austria, croatia. these areas getting some nasty weather. last night, we had flash flooding in parts of austria. this dominus extending into the czech republic, parts of poland, and further east as well. we are not done with the weather yet. as we have been hearing, fine, sunny weather here, and the next batch of heavy rain if it does indeed materialise is not expected until later in the week, possibly the weekend. so we are going to get a week at least of some fine weather across this part of the
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world, so there is some good news at least on the weather front across this part of the world.— this part of the world. tomasz, thank you- _ this part of the world. tomasz, thank you. it's _ this part of the world. tomasz, thank you. it's fascinating - this part of the world. tomasz, thank you. it's fascinating to i this part of the world. tomasz, i thank you. it's fascinating to see how quickly it moves. tomasz, thank you very much for the latest on that storm front. you very much for the latest on that storm front-— storm front. and it's 8:23am. we will brina storm front. and it's 8:23am. we will bring you _ storm front. and it's 8:23am. we will bring you the _ storm front. and it's 8:23am. we will bring you the latest - storm front. and it's 8:23am. we will bring you the latest on - storm front. and it's 8:23am. we will bring you the latest on the i will bring you the latest on the news that the prime minister has been contacted by a track and trace after the health secretary tested positive but will not be self isolating because he is taking part in the daily testing programme. so he will continue working, but in a limited capacity. more to come later on. many sporting events were put on hold during the pandemic but some have slowly been making their return this summer including the euros and wimbledon. now it's time for the british grand prix where around 140,000 motor racing fans are due to attend silverstone today,
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which makes it the largest crowd for a sporting event in the uk since the pandemic began. let's speak to its managing director, stuart pringle. how excited are you this morning? excited. can't wait to get started. we all— excited. can't wait to get started. we all know the jeopardy involved in putting on mass events like this. talk us through what measures you have in place to try to prevent this being one of those super spreaders? we are able to take place at all because — we are able to take place at all because we have come under the government's events research programme, and the rules governing that programme are very strict. all of our— that programme are very strict. all of our fans— that programme are very strict. all of our fans arriving today have to be able _ of our fans arriving today have to be able to — of our fans arriving today have to be able to demonstrate before we check _ be able to demonstrate before we check their tickets that they have either— check their tickets that they have either had — check their tickets that they have either had bothjabbed and 14 check their tickets that they have either had both jabbed and 14 days since _ either had both jabbed and 14 days since their— either had both jabbed and 14 days since their second vaccination, or a negative _ since their second vaccination, or a negative lateral flow test within the 408i negative lateral flow test within the 408i was before they've arrived.
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that's _ the 408i was before they've arrived. that's an _ the 408i was before they've arrived. that's an extra process, but if they can't _ that's an extra process, but if they can't produce that then i'm afraid they cannot come in. how can't produce that then i'm afraid they cannot come in.— they cannot come in. how do you veri , if they cannot come in. how do you verify. if you've _ they cannot come in. how do you verify, if you've asked _ they cannot come in. how do you verify, if you've asked people - they cannot come in. how do you verify, if you've asked people to l verify, if you've asked people to turn up with proof of a negative test, how do you verify that result? it's uploaded to the government's up, it's uploaded to the government's up. the _ it's uploaded to the government's up, the nhs app, so we take that on trust _ up, the nhs app, so we take that on trust we _ up, the nhs app, so we take that on trust. we have a very responsible crowd _ trust. we have a very responsible crowd here — trust. we have a very responsible crowd here and there is no reason to doubt _ crowd here and there is no reason to doubt that— crowd here and there is no reason to doubt that it — crowd here and there is no reason to doubt that it is not correct. but ou're doubt that it is not correct. but you're right. — doubt that it is not correct. but you're right. it— doubt that it is not correct. emit you're right, it boils down to trust. let's hope that everyone going there today will want to make sure that this is a secure and safe event, and i have no doubt that most people will. but this is the issue facing so many people. actually, there is no way of checking the veracity of any test result, is there? ., , ,., veracity of any test result, is there? ., , .,, there? no, but the government has from the outset _ there? no, but the government has from the outset set _
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there? no, but the government has from the outset set this _ there? no, but the government has from the outset set this up - there? no, but the government has from the outset set this up on - there? no, but the government has from the outset set this up on a - from the outset set this up on a trust _ from the outset set this up on a trust basis _ from the outset set this up on a trust basis. all of our children have — trust basis. all of our children have been— trust basis. all of our children have been testing themselves to go to school, _ have been testing themselves to go to school, all of our key workers. that _ to school, all of our key workers. that is _ to school, all of our key workers. that is the — to school, all of our key workers. that is the way that the country has been _ that is the way that the country has been set _ that is the way that the country has been set up — that is the way that the country has been set up to run so those are the rules— been set up to run so those are the rules that _ been set up to run so those are the rules that were operating under. fire rules that were operating under. are there an rules that were operating under. site: there any concerns rules that were operating under. fife: there any concerns with rules that were operating under. fif'e: there any concerns with the rules that were operating under. fife: there any concerns with the case rates rising? the highest number of... at the third highest number of case rates anywhere in the world at the moment. did anyone from the mass events pilot to get in touch with you and say, we need to think about more restrictions or more social distancing?— more restrictions or more social distancina? :, :, ,, distancing? throughout this process, this has only — distancing? throughout this process, this has only happened _ distancing? throughout this process, this has only happened because - distancing? throughout this process, this has only happened because we i this has only happened because we have had _ this has only happened because we have had the public health director here at— have had the public health director here at northamptonshire overseeing our plans, _ here at northamptonshire overseeing our plans, signing off from the outset — our plans, signing off from the outset. we have had them on site, we've _ outset. we have had them on site, we've had — outset. we have had them on site, we've had the auditors from the events— we've had the auditors from the events research programme checking our processes as we opened up. to answer— our processes as we opened up. to answer your— our processes as we opened up. to answer your question, our processes as we opened up. to answeryour question, no, they answer your question, no, they haven't— answeryour question, no, they haven't said yesterday that cases
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have _ haven't said yesterday that cases have gone — haven't said yesterday that cases have gone up overnight and you need to change _ have gone up overnight and you need to change your processes for today. so we _ to change your processes for today. so we continue as planned. the weather looks _ so we continue as planned. tue: weather looks amazing so we continue as planned. tte: weather looks amazing so that certainly played in your favour. you won't get crowds of people gathering for shelter or anything like that. in terms of the race itself, can you just explain how the format has changed? because in terms of formula 1. changed? because in terms of formula 1, this is also a test event? absolutely, yes. for many years, for as long _ absolutely, yes. for many years, for as long as— absolutely, yes. for many years, for as long as the championship has been taking _ as long as the championship has been taking place, qualifying has taken place _ taking place, qualifying has taken place the — taking place, qualifying has taken place the day before the main race. here, _ place the day before the main race. here, we _ place the day before the main race. here, we have trialled a new format for the _ here, we have trialled a new format for the first — here, we have trialled a new format for the first time, which was that qualifying — for the first time, which was that qualifying which sets the grid for the race — qualifying which sets the grid for the race was done on a friday evening, _ the race was done on a friday evening, and yesterday we had a extra _ evening, and yesterday we had a extra race~~ _ evening, and yesterday we had a extra race... the winner of that race _ extra race... the winner of that race is— extra race... the winner of that race is now— extra race... the winner of that
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race is now on pole position for today's— race is now on pole position for today's british grand prix. and what chance does — today's british grand prix. and what chance does lewis _ today's british grand prix. and what chance does lewis hamilton - today's british grand prix. and what chance does lewis hamilton have? i chance does lewis hamilton have? because he hasn't had it going his way for the last few races. tia. way for the last few races. no, we've got _ way for the last few races. no, we've got a — way for the last few races. no, we've got a fighter _ way for the last few races. no, we've got a fighter on - way for the last few races. no, we've got a fighter on our hands. max verstappen on the red bull team. they are _ max verstappen on the red bull team. they are based in milton keynes down the road _ they are based in milton keynes down the road and are doing incredibly well this— the road and are doing incredibly well this season. lewis hamilton is energised — well this season. lewis hamilton is energised by the partisan crowd here at silverstone, who are also hugely behind _ at silverstone, who are also hugely behind the — at silverstone, who are also hugely behind the other two young brits on the grid _ behind the other two young brits on the grid. enormous cheers for them in qualifying on friday. lewis has shown _ in qualifying on friday. lewis has shown time and time again he is a master— shown time and time again he is a master at — shown time and time again he is a master at silverstone, and he absolutely feeds off the energy in the crowds. he did that on friday, put himself— the crowds. he did that on friday, put himself in pole position for the race _ put himself in pole position for the race it _ put himself in pole position for the race. it didn't quite go his way yesterday _ race. it didn't quite go his way yesterday. but he would be a brave person— yesterday. but he would be a brave person to _ yesterday. but he would be a brave person to bet against lewis at silverstone.— silverstone. and it will be a fantastic — silverstone. and it will be a fantastic day _ silverstone. and it will be a fantastic day for _ silverstone. and it will be a fantastic day for formula i silverstone. and it will be a fantastic day for formula 1 i
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silverstone. and it will be a - fantastic day for formula 1 fans at silverstone. good luck with it all. busy morning of political news. the chancellor and the prime minister at both contacted by test and trace after being in contact with the health secretary, who tested positive for covid—19, but they will not be self isolating. they will take part in the daily testing trial. much more coming up on that on bbc one at nine o'clock. good morning, andrew. b, on bbc one at nine o'clock. good morning, andrew.— on bbc one at nine o'clock. good morning, andrew. a very confusing moments in _ morning, andrew. a very confusing moments in the _ morning, andrew. a very confusing moments in the pandemic- morning, andrew. a very confusing moments in the pandemic with - morning, andrew. a very confusing - moments in the pandemic with freedom day. i had been hoping to talk to sajid javid. he is unavailable, like me double backs, like me cut covid anyway and is self isolating. and talking to jonathan anyway and is self isolating. and talking tojonathan ashworth, the shadow health secretary. sir neil
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ferguson, professor niall ferguson, a critical government advisor. finally, because we've seen these storms in germany, i've been talking to the head of the european environment agency about weather events. so a busy hour.— events. so a busy hour. thank you very much- _ events. so a busy hour. thank you very much- and — events. so a busy hour. thank you very much. and lots _ events. so a busy hour. thank you very much. and lots of news - events. so a busy hour. thank you very much. and lots of news on i events. so a busy hour. thank you| very much. and lots of news on the social media _ very much. and lots of news on the social media this _ very much. and lots of news on the social media this morning - very much. and lots of news on the social media this morning that - very much. and lots of news on the social media this morning that the l social media this morning that the prime minister will be working in a restricted capacity. he is taking part in this pilot programme, so it is probably worth giving me fewer details. this contact testing pilot is operating in several places. it includes downing street as a whole. that was already established and set up. it is being carried out in network rail, transport for london, heathrow and border force. network rail, transport for london, heathrow and borderforce. all of those are taking part in this as well. they say that these pilots take an important part in how the
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approach to testing might evolve. the prime minister eligible on the grounds that downing street was already part of the wider pilot testing programme. eligibility acce ted testing programme. eligibility accepted on — testing programme. eligibility accepted on a _ testing programme. eligibility accepted on a test _ testing programme. eligibility accepted on a test by - testing programme. eligibility accepted on a test by test - testing programme. eligibility i accepted on a test by test basis. but it also points out that anyone taking part must self—isolate when not at work, so when away from the office you will have to self—isolate. but while you are at work, you don't have to. now the sport. it will be one of those days where people are enjoying the sunshine
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rushing back in to enjoy all the sport action. good morning everyone, the final round of golf�*s oldest major — the open championship — is underway at royal st george's on the kent coast. south african louis oosthuizen leads the way, but there are a few big names lurking behind him. well let's go live to the course and speak to our reporter ben croucher. ben, oosthuizen's led since the first round — can anyone stop him today? there's every chance because it is the open championship and it is always unpredictable. what an absorbing day we had to set up this final round. there was no scoring in the first couple of rounds, —— low scoring sort some of the organisers picked the pin positions in perilous places. it was all going smoothly for oosthuizen until the back nine when he made a couple of bogeys but
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he made a fine body at the 16th and has a one—shot lead going into the final round chasing his second claretjug. the man she's come down as morikaway who says he will use his major winning experience from 2022 whole self into can tension. —— contention. spieth had a disastrous business with a bogey and a bogey and a disastrous mess at the 18th. sutherland and casey are well off the case, five under par. and play�*s already underway — what's happened so far? not a great deal because of the ones at the lower end of the leaderboard at the lower end of the leaderboard at first on sunday morning but we
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have a cracking day to look forward to. look at the setting and the scenery we have here in sandwich. the sun is shining and the wind is not that strong which will help the players to make low scores and possibly move up the board. rory michael wright is one under par at the moment. —— rory mcilroy. we should expect the winners to come down there at about half past six. silverstone will host the largest crowd at a sporting event since before the pandemic, this afternoon for british grand prix. lewis hamilton will be desperate to keep his title hopes alive, but it's red bull's max verstappen that's on pole. the current world championship leader won formula one's first ever sprint race yesterday that was being trialled as a new type of qualifying. hamilton started at the front
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of the grid for it, but verstapppen took the lead from the start and he wouldn't be caught. it's his fourth consecutive pole position — it also got him three championship bonus points. i don't know if it over—delivered power or what, but it is frustrating. but after that, i couldn't get close after that and he was too fast. but we live to fight another day and it is exciting and we did a greatjob trying something new and we go into tomorrow and hope tomorrow is a better day. tadej pogacar is set to defend his tour de france title this afternoon,
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as the race concludes in paris. the slovenian finished 8th in yesterday's 20th stage to retain his substantial lead. the tradition is that no—one attacks the yellow jersey on the final day. but the other parisian tradition, is a sprint finish on the champs—elysees. .. win that, and it's history for mark cavendish, as drew savage reports. after 2054 miles of dominating the tour de france, tadej pogacar finished stage 20 with a lead of more than five minutes. today he'll be drinking champagne on the road to paris. others will be relieved it's over. geraint thomas had hoped to challenge him but a crash and a dislocated shoulder ended that. next for him the tokyo olympics. thomas stayed in the race to help his team—mate richard carapaz of ineos grenadiers finish third overall. while chris freeman's return from injury was almost scuppered by a crash on day one. he's done well to make it this far. most riders will take it easy on the final stage. the belgian wout van aert will be going for another stage victory, this time on the champs—elysees,
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tour�*s comeback king. victory in paris for mark cavedish would ensure the sprinter�*s green jersey and set a new all—time record of 35 stage wins. there could be a few sore heads in saint helens this morning... that's because saints won rugby league's challenge cup for the first time in over a decade, after beating castleford 26-12. in front of 45,000 fans at wembley, st helens came from behind to win a thrilling final in searing heat in london. castleford had led at half—time but three second—half tries for saints sealed their first challenge cup since 2008 — when their captainjames roby was also in the side. yeah, it's been a long time coming. get back even when again, it was a tough game here today. both teams played really hard on the second half but very special for me as captain to lift the trophy.
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the preparation's now over for the british and irish lions — they thrashed the stormers 49—3 in theirfinal warm—up match before the first test against south africa next weekend. they did fall behind early, but quickly turned things around... exeter�*s sam simmonds was just one of seven try scorers, but the headlines were saved for tour captain alun wynjones... he came off the bench, to complete an incredible return to action... just three weeks after dislocating his shoulder. and we've been talking about the olympics this morning — there's less than a week to go now, with the opening ceremony on friday in tokyo. and two—time gold medallist jadejones has been getting in the olympic spirit. the british fighter, who won gold at the london and rio games, has got her nails painted specially for the occasion. the olympic rings, the british flag and, fingers crossed for her,
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a gold medal — and it's not just the hands too... she's gone all the way with the feet as well. i trusted both you have painted your feet gold. the olympics start on friday when the ceremony is but some of them start on wednesday. here on breakfast we've been following the journey of team gb swimmer adam peaty as he hopes to bring back gold — once more. this is his story of his journey to tokyo. legacy is something that you can't create. here we go. it creates itself. i just want to be the best. come on, daddy!
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adam peaty takes olympic gold for greta britain. - i had mad dreams last night, i hadn't raced for so long. i had dreams of getting beat. a year in it's like a siege. edit out that bit. there's been news about the olympics being on and then off and then on and then. it doesn't really change anything for us. keep building, keep getting faster, just two lengths, innit? when you are the best in the world, you do think of people beating you. it's natural, you have a target on your back. i've had a target on my back for the last six, seven years now. and, you know, you'vejust got to be one step ahead of the opponent. adam peaty. at the age of 21, adam peaty became olympic champion.
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now he is back in the water preparing to defend his gold medal. he will swim like he's being chased and that's because he is. you went home, you've been filming for us for months and we are at the point now... ijust said to myself treasure these moments because we'll never get this back. it's been a very, very enduring and hard two years because there's been highs, obviously, there's been lows. i've had times when i think why do i even do this because it's demanding? when yourjob requires you to be extremely disciplined and extremely focused 365 days of the year, that is not normal. he chuckles. so i've just had to completely sweep the whole drive sunday night. training on monday morning.
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not used to this, injanuary, or about six weeks. we go to australia. there is normally about 35 degrees, 40 degrees on the gold coast and now it's about —3. this is the app we have to do. you check it in the morning. training. tick. how do you feel? physically normal? and do you or anyone in your household, do they have covid—19 symptoms? if you have any of them... you submit it.
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take the thermometer. in sport, i think you need to believe in yourself, you need to back yourself because no one else is. you know, when it's quiet and the blocks go, take your marks, go, complete data science, you've got to be right in your mind saying, look, i'm going to beat anyone here. for me, you've got to work on those mindset skills every single day. is that good on the last one, mel? very good. it's not what you're doing but to me, it every single day. is that good on the last one, mel? very good. it's not what you're doing but to me, it is the journey, how you are doing it. how real do the olympics feel? how are near, how close? very close was that we have spent a long time in the dark with covid and all the restrictions will stop starting to get close now, getting excited about going and i've said to the athletes, we need to go and get what we deserve this summer. you've got 25 seconds. the nhs has taken care of health and it is sport because myjob to take care of hope. we need to go and represent this country and represent that people have found a way to still achieve things and make progress, even though it has been really difficult. for the average person -
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who would probably be terrified, though it has been really difficult. for the average person - who would probably be terrified, but for adam, knowing _ that he is going to inspire so many i have arrived in manchester, in a few minutes. whilst we have been given, like, certain slots to get into the hotel. i think i am three until 3:30pm. it is quite creepy, i am in the carfilming mel. i don't know why she has so many cases, she's only a coach, she doesn't even need that much! this is the covid test. and my number. we will not be beaten by the pandemic. by the pandemic! i've got to wait here and then we are free to roam. well, not even free to roam. good evening, manchester! obviously, downstairs, we have to wait in line and get almost like a takeaway meal. this is nowhere near enough food for me. what do they think i do? that is not enough food! it looks lovely, though. there is the man himself, adam peaty. the greatest breaststroker of all
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time. even the coaches aren't allowed to shout because of covid. you are literally on the block and it is really quiet. you can hear a pin drop. that's the thing. if we create a hard environment now, hopefully by the olympics it will become normal. the mature approach now as an athlete, got to take each competition as it goes and as it comes. my muscles are tired, my body is tired but my mind is fresh. do you think you tend to push too hard? is that in you? it is in my blood. it is hard—wired, unfortunately. my dad was like it. he was a brickie. i always chose sport. in my head i would rather die than lose. if you want to be the best in the world you need that mentality but it is how you use that to your advantage and don't get consumed by it. some days, now, i'm obviously older, i now have my own son. . . it is about the balance. some days you are like i mean it is ok to
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take a loss today. and not be as hard on myself. i am still training through a pandemic and trying to race through a pandemic and try to make the most of what we have got every single day. sometimes you think what is the point? yeah, that's daddy! for me, and with george, we're the emotional support that adam needs, some separation from the pool, somewhere he can come home and not have to talk about his technique at times and stuff like that, somewhere he can escape from it. the olympics is what i live for. today is moving day. i have literally forgot my pants and socks and spare trousers and everything you need in the morning, that was a great start! we are literally 30 seconds from the new house.
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it's very exciting. it took two days to pack up. i have so many butterflies in my tummy. george, are you excited? i feel so emotional! that is the messiest bit of the kitchen. this is why the hard work is worth it. having your own home and providing and having your family. i don't think anything can prepare to that. i feel more motivated now to push on than ever. the kitchen is a mess! how much has george changed you? having a son calms a lot of people down. it's more about broadening my vision and my purpose. excited for the olympics? yeah!
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yeah, to me, it's all about being obviously, you know, the right role model that every parent wants to be. they want to be the best person they can be. so they look up to you. there'sjust such a difference in him. i think it's like an added motivation as well for him to do well in sports and outside of sports. and because he has his son watching his every move... it takes a whole team effort to get the performance we're going to need in the olympics. and you play a little part in that, too, didn't you? but i think also in terms of motivation, that i want to prove that you can be a dad and you can be the best performer in the world. people were, you know, on comments on this kind of swim site, and he's not going to be the athlete he was meant to be at the olympics because he's had a child now. right. challenge accepted. overseas ticket holders for the delayed tokyo games have been left disappointed after organisers confirmed the event will go ahead this summer without them. so the announcement was this week there will be no international visitors allowed at tokyo olympics,
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which is a little bit disappointing as an athlete. you know, this scenario is that it's not going to be... you walk out and you see tens of thousands of people, which is unfortunate. we've looked at sport and how it's adapted around, you know, look at football and how it's adapted around no crowds. i think the olympics is still going to have that aura. can you explain to us what adam is doing now, is this sprints? we're preparing to kick ass. so this is basically his race specific stuff. so he's trying to swim exactly how we would like him to swim when it matters. how has adam's year been? talk about whirlwind. he's become a father. he's had to survive a pandemic. he's had lockdowns where it'sjust been him and and his partner and obviously george all in a house. it's about basically putting down, you know, some good times. and a bit of rest. you've grown so much, my boy. you have.
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and then really, it's all about europeans and olympics. he gets the gold that was a master class. i love you so much. what can adam achieve this summer? the best thing to do is to wait and see. i know he's prepared really well. i know he's up to battle through the challenges of sport within a pandemic. i know he's given me 110%. not long now till olympics. i go in... actually, george is here. i go to olympics in four days and holding camp in yokohama. obviously, i'm going to miss my little boy, miss my family, but, you know, it'sjust going to be amazing. and i've got a good feeling about good performance in there. i'm just going to enjoy it and have a smile on my face like george, you know. i'm just going to enjoy it
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and have a smile on my face like george. hello. yeah. he said daddy's going to go really, really fast. we love you, and no matter what happens, we're so proud of you and we're looking forward to cheering you on. so i'm going to show you what goes into packing for the olympics. and potentially this bag is going to be my weighted blanket. i've still got to put my pillow in here. taking my weighted blanket because i sleep better with that. mel says you are going to carry hope with you. yeah, and i think i want to prove to people back home that, yes, we've been out the water. yes. you know, we haven't had the perfect, perfect preparation. we haven't been in training camps like the rest of these countries. we haven't done all the competitions that we normally do. but i'm still going to show fury down that last 50, and i'll show it. and if you can see that and if one person wakes up that day and goes, i'm going to do that today, myjob is done.
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he is amazing and we wish him all the very best and we know there will be two people at home cheating on from one team gb star to another. two—time olympic rowing champion helen glover won her second gold medal in rio five years ago before retiring — now she's returned to the sport in a bid to become the first person to row for great britain at the olympics after having children. a new bbc one documentary looks at what it takes to balance being a mum of three with competing in elite sport, exploring the highs and lows of the road to tokyo — let's take a look. there was 16 months from that very first outing in the early days of lockdown alone in the river to the olympics, 16 months for helen to rediscover her fitness and her three babies and reignite the love of a sport that was once alive. t babies and reignite the love of a sport that was once alive. i have do not even think— sport that was once alive. i have do not even think about _ sport that was once alive. i have do
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not even think about the _ sport that was once alive. i have do not even think about the olympics, | not even think about the olympics, have used to be, what people are like at the moment. ijust have used to be, what people are like at the moment. i just want to do some training. i was a star there. i will do some training and see where my body and is up because if i think about where i need to be in order to make the olympic team i would probably stop no because i'm1 million miles off and i know that. but having spent however long in isolation at the very least i got fed at the end of it. we're nowjoined by helen's husband, bafta—winning british explorer and presenter steve backshall. how are you this morning? i am a little bit tired, — how are you this morning? i am a little bit tired, i'm _ how are you this morning? i am a little bit tired, i'm not _ how are you this morning? i am a little bit tired, i'm not going - how are you this morning? i am a little bit tired, i'm not going to i little bit tired, i'm not going to lie. b, little bit tired, i'm not going to lie. : , ., :, ., :, lie. a year or so ago when helen turned round _ lie. a year or so ago when helen turned round and _ lie. a year or so ago when helen turned round and said _ lie. a year or so ago when helen turned round and said i - lie. a year or so ago when helen turned round and said i fancy i lie. a year or so ago when helen i turned round and said i fancy having a p0p turned round and said i fancy having a pop at this did you think she would make it?— a pop at this did you think she would make it? , ., , ,
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would make it? there is absolutely nothina would make it? there is absolutely nothing that _ would make it? there is absolutely nothing that helen _ would make it? there is absolutely nothing that helen can't _ would make it? there is absolutely nothing that helen can't achieve. i nothing that helen can't achieve. she's an extraordinarily driven and capable individual and when she said she was thinking about it i thought, all, no, here we go. but in the back of my mind a kind of knew we would be here now. of my mind a kind of knew we would be here now-— be here now. because how all of the twins? they — be here now. because how all of the twins? they are _ be here now. because how all of the twins? they are still _ be here now. because how all of the twins? they are still very _ be here now. because how all of the twins? they are still very little. i twins? they are still very little. the twins are 17 months. and another child is three next week. i am not at my —— on my own at the moment. helens mum, rachel, has been amazing helping us take care of them and i am an conall so if you hear seagulls circling overhead that is what that is. :, circling overhead that is what that is. ., :, circling overhead that is what that is. :, :, .., circling overhead that is what that is. :, :, .. ., , circling overhead that is what that is. you need to call in the army to hel on is. you need to call in the army to help on occasions _ is. you need to call in the army to help on occasions like _ is. you need to call in the army to help on occasions like this. - is. you need to call in the army to help on occasions like this. she i is. you need to call in the army to help on occasions like this. she is| help on occasions like this. she is overin help on occasions like this. she is over in tokyo preparing and of course she will be competing in the women's event there alongside polly swann. let's put the name of polly
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beside the name of helen. what of the sea before heading out? it’s a the sea before heading out? it's a really tricky _ the sea before heading out? it's a really tricky one _ the sea before heading out? it's a really tricky one because - the sea before heading out? it�*s a really tricky one because they haven't had the normal run—up to the games like this are even close to it, haven't been able to compete in any major championships apart from the europeans which they won but no chance to face off against their main opposition so it is difficult to know where they are out, whether they are looking at making the final, getting onto the podium, even winning. even they don't even know that and that's a really tricky place to be right now.- that and that's a really tricky place to be right now. helen is a competitor— place to be right now. helen is a competitor above _ place to be right now. helen is a competitor above all _ place to be right now. helen is a competitor above all else - place to be right now. helen is a competitor above all else and i place to be right now. helen is a i competitor above all else and when you look at what she is achieved, those years from 2012 to thousand 16, record after record and olympic and european gold, she will want to get on that podium in some shape or form. , . �* get on that podium in some shape or form. , :, �* :,, ., get on that podium in some shape or form. , :, �* ., , form. they haven't lost a race is the world _ form. they haven't lost a race is the world championships - form. they haven't lost a race is the world championships in i form. they haven't lost a race isj the world championships in 2011 form. they haven't lost a race is i the world championships in 2011 and they have won every single thing that the done and helen has been
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such that anything less than a fear like a disappointment for her but the fact she's got back to tokyo, this time last year she was a mum who had just given birth to twins and she was in no kind of shape to start thinking about rolling again let about getting back to elite sport. going is one of the most gruelling endurance sports. it's three sessions a day. there were times she was getting up having had one or two hours sleep, breast—feeding their babies, getting out of the water at seven o'clock and then doing that twice again while the babies had a sleep. she is passionate to attain great things, it's breathtaking. mar; passionate to attain great things, it's breathtaking.— passionate to attain great things, it's breathtaking. way to go to make the most of — it's breathtaking. way to go to make the most of us _ it's breathtaking. way to go to make the most of us look _
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it's breathtaking. way to go to make the most of us look completely i the most of us look completely inadequate. adam peaty was mentioning no crowds, no noise, it will be a very different olympics. have you spoken to her since she has been out there?— been out there? yes, i spoke to her this morning- _ been out there? yes, i spoke to her this morning. they _ been out there? yes, i spoke to her this morning. they are _ been out there? yes, i spoke to her this morning. they are in _ been out there? yes, i spoke to her this morning. they are in very i been out there? yes, i spoke to her this morning. they are in very high i this morning. they are in very high spirits and the organisation has been fantastic. but it's usually all about gold and attainment and about winning for britain but now i think we realise there a bigger picture and a lot of people are focusing on this olympics as an opportunity to gain some positivity in very testing and trying times. sport at the end of the day, for all the blood sweat and tears is about entertainment and it has an incredible ability to give us that. i cry every single time i watch the olympics, whether helen is in it or not. that chance to get back a sense of hope is something really special the olympics can
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offer each and every one of us. adam peaty showing _ offer each and every one of us. adam peaty showing us _ offer each and every one of us. adam peaty showing us what _ offer each and every one of us. adam peaty showing us what he _ offer each and every one of us. adam peaty showing us what he packs i offer each and every one of us. adam peaty showing us what he packs for the olympics. was there anything special you put in her case, steve? i put in a video from all of those who know and love for along with our celebrity friends which i shared with her this morning and i saw a video for watching it saying, all, no, no the pressure is even worse. good luck over the next few weeks. have you been locked out? it looks like you're sitting outside the front door. like you're sitting outside the front door-— like you're sitting outside the front door. :, .. , , front door. no, rachel is then they are takin: front door. no, rachel is then they are taking care _ front door. no, rachel is then they are taking care of— front door. no, rachel is then they are taking care of three _ front door. no, rachel is then they are taking care of three sleeping i are taking care of three sleeping babies and i thought it was probably the best chance we had of managing to have a conversation without screaming.
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helen glover: the mother of all comebacks is on bbc one tomorrow at 10.35pm. that's all for today dan and louise will be back tomorrow from six.
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this is bbc news. our top stories... uk health secretary sajid javid confirms he has coronavirus — and the prime minister and chancellor have been alerted by the covid contacts app — as england prepares to ease restrictions further. a clean—up operation is underway in the areas of germany and belgium worst affected by unprecedented flooding. 180 people have died. scotland is bringing in the same quarantine rules as england and wales for travellers returning from france. fully—vaccinated people will have to self—isolate for ten days — unlike with other amber—list countries.

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