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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 18, 2021 1:00am-1:31am BST

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not only here in the region but also throughout germany. the uk's health secretary tests positive for coronavirus — just as the government prepares to lift its legal restrictions. a new round of peace talks gets under way in qatar between afghan leaders and the taliban.
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and nervous laughter in cannes, as the director spike lee, accidentally lets slip the name of the winner of the palme d'or. hello and welcome to bbc news. well, rescue workers searching for victims of the devastating floods across western europe have warned that more bodies may be found in submerged cars, cellars and collapsed buildings. at least 170 people are known have died, most of them in western germany. chancellor angela merkel is due to visit affected areas on sunday. with more, here's our berlin correspondent, jenny hill.
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in ahrweiler, everything, everyone, is covered in a thick, sticky mud. there's no power, nowhere to buy food, not much mobile reception. but they're doing what they can. willie told us they've never seen anything like it here, not even in his parents�*, grandparents�*, time. "the water rose two metres in 15 or 20 minutes," he told us. "people tried to save their things, went on to their basements, and unfortunately got trapped. i was lucky," he said, "i could get out the back of my basement." around 100 people have died in this district alone. many more are still missing. there was so little time to run, people tell us. look at the force of this flood.
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and the damage it left behind. the water's receding, but the number of dead is expected to continue to rise. search and rescue, it's feared, will soon be a recovery operation. today, the german president described the loss as heartbreaking. translation: it's a time of misery, and in times i of misery, our country sticks together. i'm glad that people, notjust here in the region, but from all over germany, send messages of sympathy and solidarity. so many people just want to help, donations piling up, overwhelming the volunteers at this makeshift warehouse. translation: ican't. imagine what it must be like to be affected. that's why i'm here, to help people. in ahrweiler, across the region, lives turned upside down. this is amelie. "the water," she told us, "came from the playground to our house, but luckily just the ground floor. my gran and grandad were affected, though. they are staying with us now." as the waters slowly subside,
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they reveal the extent of the damage done. the task of rebuilding this region seems overwhelming, so much of its vital infrastructure — bridges, roads, railways — has completely gone. hard to imagine the time, the money it'll take to get this region back on its feet. jenny hill, bbc news, ahrweiler. well, 27 people are known to have died in neighbouring belgium, where rescue operations are continuing. from there, anna holligan sent this report. this is the revenues and if you look carefully you can see some of the degree has been carried downstream and the smell of oil, the stands is something that you can smell all around here. this is the belgian city of liege and rescue workers were sent from italy, france
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and austria to help with the recovery effort here and the evacuations, to. most people are now returning to their homes but the belgian prime minister has declared july 20 a national day of mourning. at least 20 people have been killed here alone, they say they have never experienced catastrophic floods of this scale before. now, across the border, not far from scale before. now, across the border, not farfrom here in the netherlands, the emergency services are still trying to reconnect the power supplies. but there, so much of the country lies ten metres below sea level. they have so much experience and talent in managing the rising tides, and what the last few days has demonstrated, this extreme rainfall, that even the most investigated technology will struggle under this kind of pressure. experts have said it should be a wake—up call, across the continent, have
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blamed climate change. but what so many people in this region here in the air is, in limburg, which has been classified as a disaster area, and beyond, what they want to know now — they want assurances from those politicians that something like this can never happen again. anna holligan there. more of those images on our website. bbc.com/news. here in the uk, the health secretary, sajid javid, is self—isolating after testing positive for coronavirus. mrjavid, who's fully vaccinated, said he'd felt a "bit groggy" on friday night. it's understood he met the prime minister on friday, but it's not yet clear whether borisjohnson will have to self—isolate, too. it comes just ahead of the government lifting covid restrictions in england on monday. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley reports. downing street yesterday. the health secretary outside number 10, face mask in hand,
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but this morning he tested positive for coronavirus. i was feeling a bit groggy last night, so i took a lateralflow test this morning and it has come out positive, so i'm now self—isolating at home with my family until i get the results of a pcr test. i'm grateful that i have had two jabs of the vaccine, and so far my symptoms are very mild. this was sajid javid at a care home on tuesday, four days before his symptoms develop. it's not clear yet if anyone else in government will have to self—isolate as a close contact. it comes ahead of a crucial week. from monday, social distancing will officially end in england. there will be no limits at events. face masks won't be a legal requirement. but there were more than 5a,000 cases in the last 24—hour period. some are warning we shouldn't be too relaxed, pointing to countries like israel, where some restrictions have been brought back. if we behave like they have done and change our behaviour
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too dramatically when the restrictions are changed, then we're going to end up having to do what they're having to do now, which is reconsider reimposing restrictions. next week will be a significant moment in the sometimes slow road out of lockdown in england, but it won't be back to normality overnight. face coverings will still be recommended in some places and there will still be an emphasis on caution. and the number of positive cases we're seeing, like the health secretary's, is a reminder that even if many restrictions are going, the virus hasn't disappeared. for tourists returning from paris and the rest of france, some changes have already been delayed. double—jabbed people were supposed to be spared quarantine, but last night, the government announced that wouldn't be happening. that's left some in the travel industry frustrated. whilst public health will always be a priority, it does not feel like it's the right thing to do to hold the uk back when other countries are travelling in their abundance.
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frustration shared by tourists leaving london this morning. i'm trying my hardest to follow the rules, but i don't understand the rules, so i don't know. at this point, i'm going on my holiday and whatever happens happens. it's just constantly changing. it actually feels more, like, political than anything else. it's very confusing. i think everything is really badly handled. in wales today, restrictions on meeting outside were lifted. across the uk, there are more freedoms on their way, but that isn't without risk. nick eardley, bbc news. well, meanwile, the uk has recorded over 50,000 new covid cases for a second consecutive day. scientists and medical experts have expressed concern at the relaxation of covid rules while cases are clearly rising. here's anna collinson. it's the birthplace of the ashes. but this weekend, the oval cricket ground has become one of many pop—up vaccine hubs.
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and one of those in line was surrey cricketerjordan clark. with significant freedoms for england and scotland less than two days away, there's another push for people to get theirjab. we started the clinic at eight o'clock in the morning. as normal, we had a bit of a rush at eight o'clock but now there's a steady flow of people. we are doing roughly 400 people every hour. as expected, as restrictions have eased over recent months and as more people have come together, infections have risen. the big difference this time, though, is the vaccine, which has helped to reduce the threat of covid, although not eliminate it. it's those hospital admissions that are causing real concern at the moment and the projections on how high they could go are quite alarming, so it's not the situation we wanted to be in. we didn't want to be opening up, really, in quite a dramatic way at a time when we have so many infections. but other scientists feel more confident about this wave, pointing to the data — which shows fewer people have become seriously ill and those that are are in hospital for less time. amid fears the double threat
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of covid and the flu could put intense pressure on the health service this winter, free flu vaccines will be offered to more than 35 million people in england, including expanding the programme to include pupils up to year 11. it finally feels as if we are giving priority to educational continuity for those young people, so they can start september with a sense that the adults in the room are doing everything they can to look after them. 0n the hottest day on record in northern ireland, people in newry in county down waited patiently for a vaccine. hoping to get the vaccine, to try and cure covid, like, you know? i think everyone at this stage wants it to go on, like, so i may as well play my part. as people queued for jabs around the uk, england's deputy chief medical officer, jonathan van—tam, predicted a bumpy winter ahead. how bumpy it becomes, he says, will depend on our behaviour. anna collinson, bbc news.
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in thailand, the deaths and cases have reached an all—time high. and a country will be given first and vaccine doses from different manufacturers. that speak to professor tony cunningham, directorat the cunningham, director at the centre cunningham, directorat the centre for virus research at the westmead institute in sydney. thank you so much for your time. thailand is going to be mixing saner back in the astrazeneca jabs. is that because of efficacy issues with either of the vaccines?- either of the vaccines? yes, indeed. they _ either of the vaccines? yes, indeed. they are _ either of the vaccines? yes, indeed. they are concerned| indeed. they are concerned about the efficacy of sai novak, which in two different trials, one in brazil and also one in the emirates, is performed at a lower level than
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astrazeneca and also the pfizer the donor and johnson & johnson. the donor and johnson & johnson-— the donor and johnson & johnson. ., ~' , , , johnson. how likely is this strategy — johnson. how likely is this strategy going _ johnson. how likely is this strategy going to - johnson. how likely is this strategy going to work - johnson. how likely is this| strategy going to work and johnson. how likely is this - strategy going to work and help thailand get those cases under control? , ., , thailand get those cases under control? , ., , control? so, people are using these so-called, _ control? so, people are using these so-called, what - control? so, people are using these so-called, what they i control? so, people are using. these so-called, what they call these so—called, what they call it heterologous, schedules of vaccines where you prime with one and boost with the second. the second dose with another to the first. for several reasons. one is supply, if one has troubles with supply of individual vaccines, you can mix and match, the other is efficacy and as we have seen with thailand. the other is side effect, where people are concerned about very rare side effect from the vaccines. the last one is shortening the interval between doses, so, the
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trials that have been run recently, which have not been looking at efficacy, simply immune responses, have tried to shorten the interval between vaccine doses by using, say, a single dose of astrazeneca and then one with pfizer. we have a long way to go, though. these two trials that have been published have only look at immune responses and side effects. 0ne showed a increased incidence of side effects, the other showed no change. 0ne other showed no change. one from the uk, one from spain. there are four trials at present going on looking at efficacy and side effects in more detail.— efficacy and side effects in more detail. so, is it fair to say that _ more detail. so, is it fair to say that we _ more detail. so, is it fair to say that we cannot - more detail. so, is it fair to say that we cannot really i more detail. so, is it fair to l say that we cannot really say whether mixing these vaccines gets a better immune response or perhaps negates some of the side effects?— side effects? well, the trial that will run _
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side effects? well, the trial that will run in _ side effects? well, the trial that will run in the - side effects? well, the trial that will run in the uk - side effects? well, the trial that will run in the uk is - that will run in the uk is probably the best at addressing this, and it showed that if you have a first dose of pfizer, and the second dose of pfizer, that gave you a very short period of time the best antibody levels, the second best was the first dose astrazeneca, then pfizer, the second dose. third—best, pfizer, followed by astrazeneca, and fourth was astrazeneca, and fourth was astrazeneca, astrazeneca. it was only four weeks apart, not the recommended 12 weeks. the trial only looked at antibodies, it didn't look at weight cell responses, which protect against disease in the long. so, we have a way to go, as i say. long. so, we have a way to go, as i say-— as i say. other countries have been doing — as i say. other countries have been doing this. _ as i say. other countries have been doing this. we - as i say. other countries have been doing this. we have - as i say. other countries have | been doing this. we have seen other countries mixing vaccines that may given there is this huge push to get as many people possible globally vaccinated.
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could mixing vaccines be the way forward?— could mixing vaccines be the way forward? yes and is not a new concept- _ way forward? yes and is not a new concept. we _ way forward? yes and is not a new concept. we did - way forward? yes and is not a new concept. we did this - way forward? yes and is not a new concept. we did this with j new concept. we did this with hiv vaccine trials. first dose with wine, second dose with another type of vaccine and the common element of this is the spike protein of the virus itself, whether you code for it with rna, or the astrazeneca vaccine, oryou with rna, or the astrazeneca vaccine, or you injected directly as in the novavax vaccine, that is the thing that is common between the two types of vaccines themselves, and there are some scientists that suggest if you prevent that protein, orthe suggest if you prevent that protein, or the code for that protein, or the code for that protein in different ways, you might actually enhance the immune system's response. that is the theory, and it needs to be tested out very clearly and formally, particularly looking at advocacy, and that's what we're doing. figs
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at advocacy, and that's what we're doing-— at advocacy, and that's what we're doing. as you say, still a lona we're doing. as you say, still a long way — we're doing. as you say, still a long way to _ we're doing. as you say, still a long way to go. _ we're doing. as you say, still a long way to go. professor. a long way to go. professor tony cunningham with the westmead institute in sydney, thank you so much for your time. this is bbc news. 0ur headlines: a race against time — the search continues for hundreds of people still missing following devastating floods in germany and other european countries. the uk's health secretary tests positive for coronavirus just as the government prepares to lift its legal restrictions. high—level talks have begun between afghan political leaders and the taliban, in the gulf state of qatar. the negotiations are an effort to jumpstart a long—stalled process in the midst of rapid taliban military advances across afghanistan and growing concern about the country's future in the wake of the us—led nato pullout. afghan government sources say the talks have got off to a good start. 0ur chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is in doha, where she's been speaking to the key players on both sides:
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these high—level talks are taking place in the midst of growing uncertainty, if not anxiety, about afg hanistan's future. afghan government negotiators say they are acutely aware that the window for peace talks is fast narrowing, perhaps a question ofjust two to three months. because the backdrop, of course, is that the taliban have been overrunning districts across afghanistan and seizing strategic order crossings. so i asked the minister of state for peace, sayed sadat mansoor naderi, did he believe after talking to the taliban again here that they were interested in a political solution? well, we hope so, because the only solution to the conflict in afghanistan is a political solution, is through a meaningful negotiation, and conflict and taking afghanistan by force is not the solution. it will not be acceptable to the people of afghanistan.
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afghanistan's state minister for peace. but of course that is a question for the taliban too, because it's been noticed that as they make rapid military advances, it's emboldened them and they become clearer about their political vision for afghanistan. and it's one, judging by their ideas now on the table, one which doesn't include elections and has a new islamic constitution as well as leadership, which, of course, for the afghan government team means that accepting those proposals is tantamount to a call for surrender. so i asked the member of the taliban negotiating team, their spokesman suhail shaheen, whether that was the spirit of these talks. that is a perception of the other side, not our policy. our policy is to have a negotiated settlement of the issue. that is our policy.
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we want this, because in that circumstance, we can then bring a durable peace to the country. that is our objective. suhail shaheen, the taliban's spokesperson. well, both sides say the talks today here in doha have got off to a good start. what they're hoping is that these discussions can help both sides to clarify their positions and that they will lead to another round of talks involving even more high—level figures on both sides to try to push this negotiation forward. because everyone is aware, most of all afghans on the ground as well as afghanistan's neighbours, that if these talks fail, the war will get worse — much worse. now to cuba, where the president, miguel diaz—canel, has dismissed last week's historic demonstrations against the communist government as a lie.thousands took to the streets of havana and other cities last weekend, demanding freedom, democracy and more covid vaccinations. more than a 100 people have been arrested since the protests erupted. the president had earlier accused the us of provoking the demonstrations.
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speaking at a pro—government rally in havana, mr diaz—canel denounced what he said was a "false narrative" over unrest on the caribbean island. translation: we have come together to once again denounced the us blockade, aggression and terror. we couldn't put of this rally, the enemy has once again gone all out to destroy the sacred unity and peace of citizens. they are encouraging and glorifying disrespect and destruction of property, threats and harassment of citizens and families. right now what the world is seeing from cuba is a lie. a film about a serial killer has won the prize for the best picture at this year's cannes film festival. film stars and directors returned in droves to the french riviera, after the 2020 festival was cancelled because of the covid pandemic.
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but the climax of the closing ceremony went a little wrong, when director spike lee accidentally announced the winner of the coveted palme d'0r ahead of time. have a listen. can you tell me which prizes the first prize.— the first prize. yes i can. call. the first prize. yes i can. call- the _ the first prize. yes i can. call. the film _ the first prize. yes i can. call. the film that - the first prize. yes i can. call. the film that one i the first prize. yes i can. | call. the film that one wait! wait! _ call. the film that one wait! wait! ok,... - call. the film that one l wait! wait! 0k,... speaks french. we can now speak to entertainmentjournalist kj matthews, whojoins us from los angeles. lovely to see you. what happened? how did that happen?
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it was academic echoes of the oscars back in 2017. do you 0scars back in 2017. do you remember when warren davey announced the award for best picture and it was the wrong one, but many people ask spike dudley what happened, how did you get the name, or did you get the wrong title which you were supposed to announce, he was supposed to announce the best actress and he announced the winner before it was supposed to be announced, afterwards, spike lee says he has no reason, he is sorry, he knows he messed up, it's as simple as that. i guess we will never know, he feels horrible and says it is just as simple as that. and says it is 'ust as simple as that. , �* as that. didn't ruin the ceremony. _ as that. didn't ruin the ceremony, did - as that. didn't ruin the ceremony, did it? - as that. didn't ruin the ceremony, did it? it. as that. didn't ruin the l ceremony, did it? it did as that. didn't ruin the - ceremony, did it? it did not, it was history _ ceremony, did it? it did not, it was history making. - ceremony, did it? it did not, it was history making. julia l it was history making. julia one for herfilm, and she is only the second woman to win in the cannes film festival's 71! year history? 71! years and only two women have walked away with
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the big prize, so definitely history making, and also remember, spike dudley is the first african—american to helm and be the jurist, first african—american to helm and be thejurist, the first african—american to helm and be the jurist, the lead first african—american to helm and be thejurist, the lead of the cannes film festival this year, so first black person to be on thejury year, so first black person to be on the jury and the first person to win was a female, so wonderful to have history making at the cannes film festival right after the pandemic.— festival right after the pandemic. festival right after the andemic. a , pandemic. as you say, barriers bein: pandemic. as you say, barriers being broken. _ pandemic. as you say, barriers being broken. us— pandemic. as you say, barriers being broken. us more - pandemic. as you say, barriers being broken. us more about | being broken. us more about julia and her win, being broken. us more about julia and herwin, and how significant it is. julia and her win, and how significant it is.— significant it is. it's very significant. _ significant it is. it's very significant. julia - significant it is. it's very significant. julia is - significant it is. it's very significant. julia is only| significant it is. it's very i significant. julia is only in her 30s so she is not a director who has been around for a long time, and a lot of people outside of france may not really know her. she had some type of fame back in 2016 when she had a really well received film by the name of roar. she sticks with the horror, thriller, graphic genre, and even this year, there were people seeing the film was so graphic that some
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people actually walked out. that's her niece, that's what she does, so she is really breaking out and making an international impact which is wonderful, and i think it also sends a message to the rest of the world that people are ready to see all of these large film festivals be much more diverse, with women and with people of colour being participants and winning these awards, so i hope this is the beginning of many more women winning, and hopefully a person of colour in the future. fits hopefully a person of colour in the future-— the future. as you say, definitely _ the future. as you say, definitely some - the future. as you say, | definitely some barriers broken, and perhaps a good moment forfemale filmmakers broken, and perhaps a good moment for female filmmakers as well. just before we go, a reminder of our top story, rescue workers searching for victims at the devastating floods across europe have warned that more bodies may be found in submerged cars, sellers, and collapsed buildings. at least
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170 people are known to have died, most of them in west germany. stay with us on bbc news, much more coming up. hello there. saturday saw the warmest weather of the year so far in all four nations of the uk. and in northern ireland, whereas you can see it was beach weather in county down, temperatures actually broke the all—time record. the highest temperature since records began in northern ireland, ballywatticock 31.2 degrees. but in england, in wales and in scotland, we saw some pretty hot temperatures. however, the far north of scotland was much, much cooler, just 13 degrees for parts of shetland, whereas you can see we had a lot of cloud. you can pick that out on the satellite picture through saturday afternoon. and that cloud has been pushing a little further south—westwards, so starting off sunday morning, rather cloudy and murky for parts of northern ireland. quite a lot of cloud for scotland, too, with some patchy rain in the far north.
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the cloud should tend to break up to give some spells of sunshine, although it will stay quite murky for some northern coasts of northern ireland. i think england and wales will see the lion's share of the sunshine, and that's where we'll have the highest temperatures as well. slightly cooler day for scotland and northern ireland. for england and wales, particularly down towards the south, we're looking at highs of 30, possibly 31 degrees in the london area. and the sun very, very strong at the moment, very high uv levels in southern england, parts of wales. the lower levels further north only because we'll have more in the way of cloud. so, as we head through sunday evening and into the early hours of monday, we keep clear spells, especially across england and wales. still more cloud at times across scotland and northern ireland, some mist and murk. and it will be another very warm and muggy night. 0vernight lows between 12—17 degrees. so, we start monday with high pressure still in charge, but notice the centre of the high is slipping a little further westwards.
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that will allow a very gentle north or north—westerly flow of air across the country. and that'll bring just a subtle change in the temperatures, a slightly cooler day for many, a bit more cloud working into north sea coasts as well. some cloud for north west scotland, parts of northern ireland, and you'll see maybe just the odd shower, the odd sharp shower breaking out across southern areas. those temperatures a little down, still quite warm in the south. a little bit cooler further north. as we look further ahead, there is a lot of dry weather on offer this week. still some relatively high temperatures. it mayjust start to turn a bit more unsettled by friday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: rescue workers searching for victims of the devastating floods which earlier in the week hit germany and the benelux countries have warned that more bodies may be found in submerged cars, cellars and collapsed buildings. at least 160 people are known to have died, most of them in western germany. two days before a widescale lifting of coronavirus restrictions in england, britain's health minister has announced he's tested positive for the virus. sajid javid said he had mild symptoms, having been vaccinated. he also recently said cases of coronavirus could reach 100,000 a day later in the summer. afghan government sources have expressed optimism after the start of renewed peace negotiations with the taliban in qatar. the long—stalled talks come as the resurgent taliban continue to overrun many afghan districts.

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