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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 17, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines... the search for hundreds of people still missing, following devastating floods in germany and other european countries. the health secretary, sajid javid, says he's tested positive for coronavirus and is experiencing "mild" symptoms. a new round of afghan peace talks has got under way in qatar between afghan leaders and the taliban. both sides have sounded a note of cautious optimism. olympics organisers have announced the first case of coronavirus in the athletes�* village six days before the start of the tokyo games.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the writer and broadcaster, lucy beresford, and the property and personal finance commentator, anne ashworth. great to see you both, thank you very much, we will chat and a moment. first, a quick perusalfor some of the front pages. as health secretary sajid javid tests positive for covid, the observer leads on the plea from top scientists to the prime minister, not to "let the virus rip" as england prepares to lift all remaining lockdown restrictions on monday. the health secretary's positive covid test is also the lead for the express, with the paper carrying warnings from business leaders that they expect staffing chaos to continue as workers continue to be "pinged" by the nhs test and trace app. the telegraph leads on claims that
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ministers have decided only to offer covid vaccines to the most vulnerable uk children over 12—years—old, rather than a wider rollout. that story also on the digital front page of the independent — conversely, the paper saying that the government is under pressure to providejabs for all uk teenagers. the times picks up on the number of staff off work due to being buzzed by the test and trace app — the paper uses the example of parts of the london underground, which were forced to close over the weekend due to a lack of staff. soa so a little flavour there of some of the front pages. let's begin our talk. lucy, if you could pick us off, we start with the front page of the observer and the lead story there. , ,., ., the observer and the lead story there. , ,., . ., ., “ there. yes, so we are looking forward to — there. yes, so we are looking forward to freedom _ there. yes, so we are looking forward to freedom day -
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there. yes, so we are looking forward to freedom day on i there. yes, so we are looking - forward to freedom day on monday, that's when everyone had been gearing too initially, but unfortunately there are now some really important things that have been changing, leading some health officials to actually warn boris johnson that this is probably going to be the biggest gamble ever. and the background to this is obviously that boris johnson the background to this is obviously that borisjohnson would like the nation to open up more fully so that that can actually improve the economy and maybe even improve health waiting lists, we know 7 million people have not come forward for their treatment over the last 15 months. the problem is that the covid cases are ramping up, there is an extraordinary ping pandemic, where half a million people have been pinged and forced to self—isolate — and just today we have discovered that sajid javid, the health minister, has also been feeling very groggy, he's done a test and appears to have covid,
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which begs the question how many people in government are also going to have to self—isolate? the irony is that freedom day on monday could occur and half the cabinet could be self isolating. so it is almost a perfect storm of things going wrong atjust perfect storm of things going wrong at just the perfect storm of things going wrong atjust the moment perfect storm of things going wrong at just the moment when perfect storm of things going wrong atjust the moment when the government wants things to open up. it makes you wonder how things will change this freedom day — what will normal look like come monday? weill. normal look like come monday? well, this is not the — normal look like come monday? well, this is not the day _ normal look like come monday? well, this is not the day of— normal look like come monday? well, this is not the day of revelry _ normal look like come monday? well, this is not the day of revelry that we had _ this is not the day of revelry that we had imagined, especially with the news that— we had imagined, especially with the news that the health secretary has had one _ news that the health secretary has had one positive test and is waiting for another— had one positive test and is waiting for another — which suggests that half the _ for another — which suggests that half the cabinet could be in isolation. but i think things look very different than the way they did when _ very different than the way they did when these dates were decided — and the crucial_ when these dates were decided — and the crucial thing to concentrate on now is_ the crucial thing to concentrate on now is what— the crucial thing to concentrate on now is what will the government actually — now is what will the government actually do about the numbers of people _ actually do about the numbers of people who are not vaccinated? these
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seem _ people who are not vaccinated? these seem to _ people who are not vaccinated? these seem to he _ people who are not vaccinated? these seem to be the people who are failing — seem to be the people who are failing iii~ — seem to be the people who are falling ill. will they take a leaf out of — falling ill. will they take a leaf out of president macron's book, for example. _ out of president macron's book, for example, who earlier this week said that people would be denied entrance to bars, _ that people would be denied entrance to bars, restaurants, or not be able to bars, restaurants, or not be able to get— to bars, restaurants, or not be able to get on— to bars, restaurants, or not be able to get on flights? immediately that prompted huge numbers of people to -et prompted huge numbers of people to get vaccinations, amongst the population which had been initially hesitant _ population which had been initially hesitant. so in order to salvage this experiment, the government needs_ this experiment, the government needs to — this experiment, the government needs to do something quite brave which _ needs to do something quite brave which may— needs to do something quite brave which may be to enforce people and say to _ which may be to enforce people and say to them that getting vaccinated is their_ say to them that getting vaccinated is their civic duty. so some very interesting _ is their civic duty. so some very interesting days lie ahead, but not quite _ interesting days lie ahead, but not quite the _ interesting days lie ahead, but not quite the fun days we had been expecting, i think. quite the fun days we had been expecting, ithink. you quite the fun days we had been expecting, ithink.— quite the fun days we had been expecting, ithink. expecting, i think. you know, we've 'ust not expecting, i think. you know, we've just got confirmation, _ expecting, i think. you know, we've just got confirmation, because - just got confirmation, because obviously sajid javid knows the bbc papers were coming up — we've had confirmation from nick lee who is
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pointed us to his twitter feed, sajid javid's twitter feed confirming that he has his pcr test which has come back positive, he had the lateral flow earlier, and that has now been confirmed by the pcr test and he says, "so i will continue to isolate and work from home," and he gives a handy reminder of which test you may need and when. it looks like many more of us may be using those tests over the coming weeks. let's turn to the sunday express, again, "summerfreedom express, again, "summer freedom fast," express, again, "summerfreedom fast," the headline there. yes. express, again, �*summer freedom fast," the headline there.- fast," the headline there. yes, so arain, fast," the headline there. yes, so again. it's — fast," the headline there. yes, so again, it's really _ fast," the headline there. yes, so again, it's really drawing - fast," the headline there. yes, so| again, it's really drawing attention to the fact that what should have been the culmination of several weeks of planning, building up the nation to this incredible day where we could have freedom at last is now just ascending into chaos, not least because of that latest news from sajid javid. but the interesting
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thing about what will happen to him to the people who've been around him — for example, he visited a care home last tuesday, he went to visit the prime minister yesterday — will all these people that he's been in contact with get contacted to self—isolate? or will the people who he works for in particular going to be part of this scheme of around 40,000 people who, instead of being forced to self—isolate, have been told that they can take a test every day and if it tests negative, they can be released? now that has actually caused some, i suppose, disquiet amongst people who recognise that as a two—tier system. you've got 40,000 people who are having special privileges, so to speak, and the rest of us having to isolate whenever we get ping to. so it would be very interesting to see with regards to the cabinet whether they are all suddenly miraculously part of this 40,000 cohort taking
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part of this 40,000 cohort taking part in this trial. but i think overall, unfortunately it speaks to more confusion, and on a day went on to be about clarity and revelry, i wonder what is planned for monday with revelry. for most of us, it'll be yet again more confusion around mask wearing, can we wear them, should we wear them on the underground, in the supermarkets? so less clarity than we were anticipating, which is why the express sums it up.— anticipating, which is why the express sums it up. same story, different front _ express sums it up. same story, different front page, _ express sums it up. same story, different front page, the - express sums it up. same story, different front page, the sunday| different front page, the sunday times, i don't know about you but the messages coming out of this is evenif the messages coming out of this is even if you've had both jabs feel that you can still test positive and contract the coronavirus, but it'll be a test of the degree of illness, don't you think, that if you do
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contract the coronavirus, it's how bad those symptoms will be and how the jabs are actually helping with that? 50 the jabs are actually helping with that? ., ., , the jabs are actually helping with that? ., ., ., that? so far, indications are that ou are that? so far, indications are that you are double _ that? so far, indications are that you are double jabbed _ that? so far, indications are that you are double jabbed and - you are double jabbed and unfortunate enough to contract coronavirus, the symptoms are not quite _ coronavirus, the symptoms are not quite so _ coronavirus, the symptoms are not quite so bad. but lucy referred to the revelry — quite so bad. but lucy referred to the revelry i was planning for next week_ the revelry i was planning for next week - _ the revelry i was planning for next week - i_ the revelry i was planning for next week — i went to an art gallery and bought— week — i went to an art gallery and houqhta— week — i went to an art gallery and bought a lot — week — i went to an art gallery and bought a lot more masks because i suspected — bought a lot more masks because i suspected that we would be wearing them - _ suspected that we would be wearing them - hut— suspected that we would be wearing them — but the crucial thing about them — but the crucial thing about the sunday— them — but the crucial thing about the sunday times story is the ping pandemic, — the sunday times story is the ping pandemic, the number of people being told to— pandemic, the number of people being told to self—isolate and its implications for the economy. will we be _ implications for the economy. will we be seeing empty food shelves because — we be seeing empty food shelves because people in the transport industry— because people in the transport industry can't work? we already saw the chaos— industry can't work? we already saw the chaos today on the london tube system _ the chaos today on the london tube system because certain lines weren't workinq _ system because certain lines weren't working. you keep speaking to people and saying _ working. you keep speaking to people and saying they are self isolating, they aren't — and saying they are self isolating, they aren't there — the consequences
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of this— they aren't there — the consequences of this tracking system is another decision— of this tracking system is another decision that confronts the cabinet next week, however they meet, whether— next week, however they meet, whether it's by zouma or whether they have — whether it's by zouma or whether they have been fortunate enough to si-n they have been fortunate enough to sign up _ they have been fortunate enough to sign up to— they have been fortunate enough to sign up to this pilot scheme where you just _ sign up to this pilot scheme where you just have to take tests to not self—isolate. you just have to take tests to not self-isolate— you just have to take tests to not self-isolate. the front page of the sunday telegraph, _ self-isolate. the front page of the sunday telegraph, "children - self-isolate. the front page of the sunday telegraph, "children will. sunday telegraph, "children will only be jabbed if vulnerable." this is the story they're going with, however, lucy, what did you make when you saw this? the however, lucy, what did you make when you saw this?— however, lucy, what did you make when you saw this? the tricky thing is i've when you saw this? the tricky thing is we read — when you saw this? the tricky thing is i've read lots _ when you saw this? the tricky thing is i've read lots of _ when you saw this? the tricky thing is i've read lots of front _ when you saw this? the tricky thing is i've read lots of front pages, - is i've read lots of front pages, and they are not saying the same thing. so as you say in the sunday telegraph, you've got the sense that ministers have actually decided against mass vaccination for teenagers and they've decided to do that on the advice of scientists. now these vaccines were approved for the 12-15 now these vaccines were approved for the 12—15 age group last month, but
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there has been so much debate about whether children should be vaccinated at all, and there have been some studies particularly when schools in norway and australia, and they showed that there wasn't any significant child to adult transmission of the virus, and therefore that's one of the reasons why people have been very resistant to get this particular cohort of people vaccinated. the problem is that we are recognising that even if you have been vaccinated, that doesn't actually stop you passing the virus on — and that again, some people would argue, why would we vaccinate children? but it seems if you read the sunday telegraph, there are moves afoot to actually step back from that idea of actually max vaccinating that particular cohort of children —— mass vaccinating. the problem is there's another front page saying complete the ——
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completely the opposite. page saying complete the -- completely the opposite. before i come to you. _ completely the opposite. before i come to you, because _ completely the opposite. before i come to you, because it'll- completely the opposite. before i come to you, because it'll take i completely the opposite. before i j come to you, because it'll take us some time next paper because we're still talking about children being vaccinated, but we've had a response from the department of health regarding this front—page story on the sunday telegraph, saying the government will continue to be guided by the advice of thejc vi and no decisions have been made by ministers on whether people aged 12-17 ministers on whether people aged 12—17 years old should be routinely offered covid—19 vaccines." turning to the front page of the independent, we're still talking about children being vaccinated but about children being vaccinated but a slightly different take on their front page? it a slightly different take on their front page?— a slightly different take on their front nae? , , front page? it is quite interesting, i wonder front page? it is quite interesting, i wonder who _ front page? it is quite interesting, i wonder who is _ front page? it is quite interesting, i wonder who is guiding _ front page? it is quite interesting, i wonder who is guiding the - front page? it is quite interesting, l i wonder who is guiding the sunday telegraph— i wonder who is guiding the sunday telegraph to indicate that a decision— telegraph to indicate that a decision had been made on this issue of the _ decision had been made on this issue of the vaccination of children. now it is quite — of the vaccination of children. now it is quite clear that the pfizer vaccine — it is quite clear that the pfizer vaccine was passed as 0k
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it is quite clear that the pfizer vaccine was passed as ok for 12—15 -year-oids— vaccine was passed as ok for 12—15 —year—olds back injune, so it could be ok_ —year—olds back injune, so it could be ok for— —year—olds back injune, so it could be ok for this — —year—olds back injune, so it could be ok for this group. but maybe there _ be ok for this group. but maybe there is— be ok for this group. but maybe there is some feeling that we will io there is some feeling that we will go out _ there is some feeling that we will go out into the summer and hope that the summer— go out into the summer and hope that the summer weather, people out and about— the summer weather, people out and about mostly in the fresh air, the virus _ about mostly in the fresh air, the virus wiii— about mostly in the fresh air, the virus will burn itself out. but i start — virus will burn itself out. but i start worrying about the return to school _ start worrying about the return to school in — start worrying about the return to school in september, if our children are not— school in september, if our children are not vaccinated, will we see more classes _ are not vaccinated, will we see more classes sent — are not vaccinated, will we see more classes sent home because they need to self—isolate? we need to be given try to self—isolate? we need to be given by our— to self—isolate? we need to be given by our government a framework for what this— by our government a framework for what this liberty looks like, because _ what this liberty looks like, because for most people it seems like a _ because for most people it seems like a very— because for most people it seems like a very incoherent stage at the nronrent — like a very incoherent stage at the moment. , , ., ., ,., , moment. just on that point very ruickl , moment. just on that point very quickly, because _ moment. just on that point very quickly, because we _ moment. just on that point very quickly, because we are - moment. just on that point very quickly, because we are running moment. just on that point very - quickly, because we are running out of time, do you understand what the rules are? are you up to speed? i think i know what the rules are, but it seems— think i know what the rules are, but it seems as — think i know what the rules are, but it seems as if there's going to be so much — it seems as if there's going to be
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so much flexibility over there, and i'm so much flexibility over there, and i'm very— so much flexibility over there, and i'm very pleased that i'm not working _ i'm very pleased that i'm not working in a shop which would prefer people _ working in a shop which would prefer people to _ working in a shop which would prefer people to wear masks or have to request— people to wear masks or have to request people to put them on. but it's clear— request people to put them on. but it's clear on — request people to put them on. but it's clear on transport, as i understand it, most people will be required _ understand it, most people will be required to wear masks. i think most people _ required to wear masks. i think most people want— required to wear masks. i think most people want to do their duty as citizens— people want to do their duty as citizens in— people want to do their duty as citizens in this very, very testing time, _ citizens in this very, very testing time, they— citizens in this very, very testing time, they need more clarity or perhaps— time, they need more clarity or perhaps the situation is so fluid that the — perhaps the situation is so fluid that the government cannot even provide _ that the government cannot even provide this. these are challenging times, _ provide this. these are challenging times, more than we expected we would _ times, more than we expected we would he — times, more than we expected we would be as 19july times, more than we expected we would be as 19 july approached. times, more than we expected we would be as 19july approached. tiers; would be as 19 july approached. very ruickl , would be as 19 july approached. very quickly. the — would be as 19july approached. - quickly, the gamble on achieving immunity is one of the lines from the independent on the story? i think a lot of people would argue that it could be a bit of a gamble to have set this particular date in stone, and then needing to go live with it irrespective of what was
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happening in the days leading up to it, and that's where we are at the moment. i think that's why we've all probably just moment. i think that's why we've all probablyjust got to moment. i think that's why we've all probably just got to focus on moment. i think that's why we've all probablyjust got to focus on the things that we can control, a bit like the serenity player that's used a lot in recovery —— prayer, that it's about focusing on what you can control, working out whether there are things you cannot control and being at peace with the things that are not within your control. {lilia are not within your control. ok, leavin: are not within your control. ok, leaving it _ are not within your control. ok, leaving it there _ are not within your control. ok, leaving it there for _ are not within your control. 0k, leaving it there for now, thank you both for your time this evening here on bbc news, thank you. thank you forjoining us here on the papers. goodbye with for now, i'm back at the top of the hour with the latest news.
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silverstone is the home of british motorsports, and i'm here at the britcar championship. but this is a race with a difference, as one team is made up entirely of drivers who have some form of disability but, thanks to a bit of technology, they have serious hopes of taking home the silverware. more on that in a few minutes, but where's spencer? i said silverstone! are you lost? no, i've had an invitation that i could not refuse from another race outfit here at goodwood. now, we've got the whole circuit to ourselves today so i'm going to be on this track later, putting some brand—new assistive tech to the test...at racing speeds! just don't go breaking anything. i'll try not to.
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here at silverstone, things are busier and noisier and that's because everyone here is racing for real, and we've been invited into team brit's garage. so paul is over there having a nose about and hopefully can tell us more. paul: nosing about is what i do best. and here at the home of british motor racing in silverstone, there's certainly lots to see. but specifically, i'm here to meet team brit — a competitive motorsport team with a difference. they're made up of six disabled drivers using bespoke, specially—adapted cars to compete in races against nondisabled drivers on a level playing field. my visit came during testing ahead of the latest round of the britcar championship. aaron morgan is one of team brit's two drivers in the endurance event, driving an aston martin gt4.
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aaron became a wheelchair user in 2006 following a motocross accident. the disabled drivers on the team use control systems developed by engineers in—house. these are completely sort of bespoke, completely developed from the ground up by team brit. they and the other engineers within the team said, right, we've got this problem, this is what we need to achieve, and this is the solution they come up with and it's by far the best in the world. the control�*s linked to a system of actuators and sophisticated electronic systems to drive the vehicles. aaron, can you just explain to me a little bit about how the hand controls work and how you use them to drive the car? yeah, of course. so, with the accelerator, you just pull this paddle here, and obviously, you know, there's various levels of throttle you can apply there. on the other side is the brake paddle which works in exactly the same way so you can modulate it. and then these grey buttons inside the steering wheel operate the gears. now, the way the car's set up,
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you have the up shift on the left side, so while you're on full throttle with your right hand, you've then got your left hand to change the gears and then it's vice—versa for braking as well. so while you're braking with your left hand, you can go down the gears with your right hand. the key thing about these controls is they are designed to be used by drivers with a range of impairments. these could be driven by someone with only the use of one arm, for example. aaron's teammate in this event is autistic and the car remains drivable by him in the usual way as the adaptations coexist alongside the regular controls. hand controls per se aren't new. i use them to drive my car. but these are quite different to what you might find on a road car as they're tuned for a racing environment. but a racing team is more thanjust the drivers and building systems like this into already finely tuned machines isn't the straightforward process. and so you obviously work with different iterations of these controls. how does that process work and how did you get to where you are now?
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well, first of all we start with looking at the drivers and seeing what their needs are, you know, what their disabilities and what physical limitations they've then got. and then we start, from there, with the ergonomics of the control system that we're designing, and by that i mean the paddles that are on the steering wheel. and when we started designing this, we started with a very different steering wheel to the one we've got now so we're constantly improving it and developing it based on driver feedback. definitely challenges there and a lot of that's integrating our system with the car system. cars aren't particularly good at tolerating other things being added into the network. and so we do have that challenge but we love it, you know, it's part of what we do and it's why we do it. team brit's ultimate aim is to make racing history and take a team to the world—famous le mans 24—hour endurance race, becoming the first ever british all disabled team to do so. this is a look of part amazement and part terror. i'm a passenger in a modified chevrolet corvette c8 stingray, but it's who is driving,
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and how he's driving, that is blowing my mind. we have met sam schmidt before. he's a racing driver who was paralysed in an accident in 2000, and five years ago he took us for a ride through las vegas in a car that allowed him to drive using just his head and his mouth. so, the steering system, it's an ir camera system on whichever way you turn your head steers the car. he'll turn his head angle into a steering angle. the gas and brake, it's a sip and puff system, so we have a tube connected to a pressure sensor. positive pressure, blowing, that's your accelerator pedal. negative pressure, sipping, that's your brake pedal. the sam car is legal to drive in the us and sam has a drivers license, and since 2016, the system has been fine tuned so that it's now not only safe and responsive enough to drive at road speeds, but at race speeds. 123, 128... 128, wow.
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er... in fact, sam has taken this car up to 201mph. not today, though. anyway, the reality is that operating equipment without using arms or legs has many more applications than just on the racetrack. where i also see this technology being very beneficial is in the workplace. industrial applications, forklifts, harvesters, trains, i mean, it's kinda scary but i could operate a train, you know, sitting in my living room with this technology so i would really like to see disabled veterans and people of all disabilities have an opportunity to go back to work and, you know, many of them just want to be a productive member of society and haven't been given the opportunity or the technology to do it.
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can ijust say, that was incredible. you are just incredible. i think really you should try the car from over here with my controls. 0k. i'm happy to do that but not at that speed. well, this is a first. what an honour, what a thrill! what a potential humiliation! to drive the car, you're gonna point your nose where you wanna go. don't lean, leaning's not gonna work, you actually have to rotate your head. ready to give it a shot? i'm ready to give it a shot. i'm just gonna let it go and then start puffing. and, here's the thing, from pretty much the start of the first lap, i get it. it does take a lot of concentration but as long as i stay focused, sam's car looks after me.
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well, how was it? are you gonna take myjob away? uh, haha, that was pretty emotional for me because actually it wasn't as hard as i thought it was going to be. and so it kinda shows how this kind of control system could be used by ordinary people who aren't mad racing drivers. i need a few more laps. honestly, that was incredible but also really hard, i'm actually a much better driver than that with normal controls, i promise you. i think that's a challenge then. why don't you do a lap with the normal controls, i'll use my controls. we'll see who's faster. erm... all right, wish me luck. see, in my mind this isn't a foregone conclusion.
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in some ways i have an advantage. i know this circuit and i'm using the same controls that i have for my entire adult life. all right. hi. well, how'd i do? 1.50... is that good? respectable. laughter. so let's see if sam can beat my flying lap of 1.50. well, the very best of luck, sir. confident? don't really need it, but ok. laughter. i mean, it's honest! so, you know that bit about it not being a foregone conclusion? yeah, i don't stand a chance. right back at the first meeting we knew it was going to take months, we knew it was going to take a lot of commitment from the engineers,
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resources from arrow and my time, and they thought it was funny after an hour i said, look guys, i'm very interested but not unless we can do 100mph. spencer laughs. you know? you won. congratulations, 1.45. i mean, there was kind of no contest, really, was it. how do you feel being able to do this? you know, it's so... i guess the best word i can use is freedom. you know, just... i'm in total control and there's very few things in my life that i have control over, you know, and to be able to steer and gas and brakejust like the old days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring. i've gotta make a call now and let someone know how i did. thanks, spencer. uh—oh. hey, lara. yeah, sam beat me. not surprised, really, when you think about it. no, but you did well. how do you feel? i feel inspired, very humble, a bit sick and glad it's over. anyway, i'll see you later.
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that is it for this week. thank you so much for watching. this is the short version of the show, so the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. good evening. in allfour in all four nations of the uk and in northern ireland, temperatures broke records, 31.2 celsius in county
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down, the highest temperature in northern some sunny some sunny spells but the odd spot of rain. that's where we will see the best of the sunshine. temperatures for much of scotland and northern ireland just a little bit lower on sunday afternoon, parts of southern lincoln democrat england, south wales are looking at heights of 31 celsius. into the early hours of monday, it looks dry with some areas of cloud feeding in from the north. mild, warm, muggy nights, 11—17 c, the odd shower in the south on monday, otherwise a lot of dry weather through the week ahead as it turns more unsettled by friday.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the search continues for hundreds of people still missing, following devastating floods in germany and other european countries. the german president has been visiting one of the worst hit areas. translation: our country stands together during this time. - i'm very pleased to see just how much sympathy and solidarity is being shown, not only here in the region but also throughout germany. the uk's health secretary, sajid javid, tests positive for coronavirus. he's self—isolating at home, as the government prepares to lift its legal restrictions. a new round of peace talks gets under way in qatar between afghan leaders and the taliban. both sides are said to be positive.
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the film that won the palme d'or is titane...

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