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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 17, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. more than 150 people have now died in severe floods across western europe with hundreds of people remaining unaccounted for. the german president has been visiting one of the stricken areas. and i'm here where the president was visiting one of the worst affected towns that hit western germany. the uk's health secretary sajid
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javid says he has tested positive for coronavirus and is experiencing "mild" symptoms. i was feeling a bit groggy last night so i took a lateral flow test this morning and it's come out positive, so i'm now self isolating at home with my family until i get the results of a pcr test. olympics organisers announce the first case of coronavirus in the athletes�* village, six days before the tokyo games begin. and why the world's new space race is all about getting technology rather than people up into orbit around the earth. hello and welcome to bbc news. rescue crews have been racing to find survivors after the floods that wreaked havoc in germany and its western neighbours
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switzerland, luxembourg and the netherlands. 153 people are so far known to have died across europe, 133 of them in germany alone. hundreds remain unaccounted for, and thousands are now homeless. thousands of residents of wassenberg, an area west of the german city of cologne, have left their homes after a dam was breached by floodwater overnight. german officials say the country s flood warning system functioned as it was supposed to, but the amount of rain — and how rapidly it fell — was unforeseen. my my colleaguejoins us my colleague joins us now. this is my colleague “oins us now. this is one of my colleague “oins us now. this is of those — my colleague joins us now. this is one of those places _ my colleague joins us now. this is one of those places that - my colleague joins us now. this is one of those places that has - my colleague joins us now. this is one of those places that has beeni one of those places that has been targeted which has had such a crisis through this whole tragedy. not only land collapse, buildings collapses, but also this dual carriageway was
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completely flooded when we got here very early in the morning and slowly, as the waters have been receding, the salvage operation is taking place. with over 130 people killed in this flooding, the country is morning and it is in deep shock. the papers are calling this the flood of death. the rescue operation is intense. over 20,000 rescuers have been mobilised across the country. the armyjoining with the police force and a whole cast of volunteers who were trying to help those people who have lost everything. when it comes to erftstadt, so many people have experienced that. the country's president was here earlier on to pay his condolences to show his support. translation: this is a time - of distress and our country stands together during this time. i'm very pleased to see just how much sympathy and solidarity is being shown, not only here in the region but also throughout germany.
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soa so a lot of solidarity but also a lot of shock given just how much the damage was. in the space of less than two days, two months�* worth of rain fell here. you can see behind me the level of destruction. in this particular area it has been incredibly intense. the strength of the water has toppled cards as if they were simply toys, so a lot of concern and worry but people are slowly going back to their collapsed houses to see the level of destruction and the level of damage that has taken place in this particular part. of course there are other states like the south was badly affected and a lot of volunteers trying to help. it�*s not just in western germany, neighbouring netherlands and also belgium has had a lot of damage. one
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town in particularfrom where my colleague now reports. this is the river meuse, and if you look carefully here you can see some of the debris that is being carried downstream. and the smell of oil, the stench, something that you can smell around here. this is the belgian city of liege, and rescue workers were sent from italy, france and austria to help with the recovery effort here — and the evacuations, too. most people are now returning to their homes, but the belgian prime minister has declared the 20th ofjuly a national day of mourning. at least 20 people have been killed here alone. they say they have never experienced catastrophic floods of this scale before. now, across the border, not far from here, in the netherlands, the emergency services are still trying to reconnect the power supplies. but there, so much of the country
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lies ten metres below sea level, they have so much experience and talent in managing the rising tides, and what the last few days has demonstrated, this extreme rainfall that even the most sophisticated technology will struggle under this kind of pressure. experts have said it should be a wake—up call, politicians across the continent have blamed climate change, but what so many people in this region, here in liege, in limburg, which has been classified as a disaster area, and beyond, what they want to know now — they want assurances from those politicians that something like this can never happen again. so the sense of shock that anna holligan was describing in liege is palpable across this part of western germany as well. this amount of
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rainfall that took place over two months�* worth of rain that happened in just 2a hours, months�* worth of rain that happened injust 2a hours, a lot of it during the night that caught people off—guard. the local weather authorities are saying they did issue warnings and it was up to local authorities to provide further details as to what to do. but the debate now as this rescue operation is in its throws at the moment, the conversation is now about what was happening with the weather system, and i know my colleague chris has been monitoring this for us, sojust explain where we are with this weather system. where was it that heaviest? ., . . weather system. where was it that heaviest? ., , , ., heaviest? you can see this line that develo ed heaviest? you can see this line that developed across _ heaviest? you can see this line that developed across western - heaviest? you can see this line that| developed across western germany, across _ developed across western germany, across parts — developed across western germany, across oarts of— developed across western germany, across parts of belgium, _ developed across western germany, across parts of belgium, the - across parts of belgium, the netherlands— across parts of belgium, the netherlands and _ across parts of belgium, the netherlands and parts - across parts of belgium, the netherlands and parts of- across parts of belgium, the - netherlands and parts of switzerland as well, _ netherlands and parts of switzerland as well, and — netherlands and parts of switzerland as well, and look— netherlands and parts of switzerland as well, and look how _ netherlands and parts of switzerland as well, and look how slow—moving i netherlands and parts of switzerlandl as well, and look how slow—moving it is. as well, and look how slow—moving it is we _ as well, and look how slow—moving it is we had _ as well, and look how slow—moving it is. we had several— as well, and look how slow—moving it is. we had several pulses _ as well, and look how slow—moving it is. we had several pulses of- is. we had several pulses of torrential— is. we had several pulses of torrential rain. _ is. we had several pulses of torrential rain. it _ is. we had several pulses of torrential rain. it is- is. we had several pulses of torrential rain. it is locked l is. we had several pulses of| torrential rain. it is locked in is. we had several pulses of- torrential rain. it is locked in the same _ torrential rain. it is locked in the same kind — torrential rain. it is locked in the same kind of— torrential rain. it is locked in the same kind of area. _ torrential rain. it is locked in the same kind ofarea. how- torrential rain. it is locked in the same kind of area. how much. torrential rain. it is locked in the i same kind of area. how much rain fell? _ same kind of area. how much rain fell? well, — same kind of area. how much rain fell? well, to— same kind of area. how much rain
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fell? well, to the _ same kind of area. how much rain fell? well, to the south—west- same kind of area. how much rain fell? well, to the south—west of. fell? well, to the south—west of bonn _ fell? well, to the south—west of bonn in — fell? well, to the south—west of bonn in germany— fell? well, to the south—west of bonn in germany the _ fell? well, to the south—west of bonn in germany the majority . fell? well, to the south—west of| bonn in germany the majority of fell? well, to the south—west of- bonn in germany the majority of the rain here _ bonn in germany the majority of the rain here fell— bonn in germany the majority of the rain here fell in— bonn in germany the majority of the rain here fell in 12 _ bonn in germany the majority of the rain here fell in 12 hours. _ bonn in germany the majority of the rain here fell in 12 hours. in - bonn in germany the majority of the rain here fell in 12 hours. in other. rain here fell in 12 hours. in other parts _ rain here fell in 12 hours. in other parts of— rain here fell in 12 hours. in other parts of germany _ rain here fell in 12 hours. in other parts of germany 270 _ rain here fell in 12 hours. in other| parts of germany 270 millimetres rain here fell in 12 hours. in other. parts of germany 270 millimetres of rain in _ parts of germany 270 millimetres of rain in 48 _ parts of germany 270 millimetres of rain in 48 hours. _ parts of germany 270 millimetres of rain in 48 hours. why— parts of germany 270 millimetres of rain in 48 hours. why did _ parts of germany 270 millimetres of rain in 48 hours. why did that - parts of germany 270 millimetres of rain in 48 hours. why did that rain . rain in 48 hours. why did that rain becomes— rain in 48 hours. why did that rain becomes slow—moving, _ rain in 48 hours. why did that rain becomes slow—moving, torrentiall rain in 48 hours. why did that rain - becomes slow—moving, torrential and becomes slow— moving, torrential and locked _ becomes slow—moving, torrential and locked in— becomes slow—moving, torrential and locked in the — becomes slow—moving, torrential and locked in the same _ becomes slow—moving, torrential and locked in the same kind _ becomes slow—moving, torrential and locked in the same kind of— becomes slow—moving, torrential and locked in the same kind of place? - becomes slow—moving, torrential and locked in the same kind of place? it l locked in the same kind of place? it was down _ locked in the same kind of place? it was down to— locked in the same kind of place? it was down to the _ locked in the same kind of place? it was down to the jet _ locked in the same kind of place? it was down to the jet stream, - locked in the same kind of place? it was down to the jet stream, and - locked in the same kind of place? it was down to the jet stream, and we had this— was down to the jet stream, and we had this area — was down to the jet stream, and we had this area of _ was down to the jet stream, and we had this area of low _ was down to the jet stream, and we had this area of low pressure - was down to the jet stream, and we had this area of low pressure across western— had this area of low pressure across western europe, _ had this area of low pressure across western europe, and _ had this area of low pressure across western europe, and because - had this area of low pressure across western europe, and because of- had this area of low pressure acrossj western europe, and because of the broad _ western europe, and because of the broad pattern, — western europe, and because of the broad pattern, the _ western europe, and because of the broad pattern, the big _ western europe, and because of the broad pattern, the big waves- western europe, and because of the broad pattern, the big waves in- western europe, and because of the broad pattern, the big waves in thei broad pattern, the big waves in the 'et broad pattern, the big waves in the jet stream. — broad pattern, the big waves in the jet stream. that— broad pattern, the big waves in the jet stream, that low— broad pattern, the big waves in the jet stream, that low could - broad pattern, the big waves in the jet stream, that low could not - broad pattern, the big waves in thei jet stream, that low could not move from where — jet stream, that low could not move from where it — jet stream, that low could not move from where it was _ jet stream, that low could not move from where it was and _ jet stream, that low could not move from where it was and as _ jet stream, that low could not move from where it was and as well - jet stream, that low could not move from where it was and as well as - from where it was and as well as that we — from where it was and as well as that we had _ from where it was and as well as that we had big _ from where it was and as well as that we had big temperature - that we had big temperature contrasts _ that we had big temperature contrasts in _ that we had big temperature contrasts in europe. - that we had big temperature contrasts in europe. cool, . that we had big temperature i contrasts in europe. cool, fresh that we had big temperature - contrasts in europe. cool, fresh air across— contrasts in europe. cool, fresh air across the — contrasts in europe. cool, fresh air across the north _ contrasts in europe. cool, fresh air across the north west _ contrasts in europe. cool, fresh air across the north west but - across the north west but temperatures _ across the north west but temperatures into - across the north west but temperatures into the - across the north west but. temperatures into the high across the north west but - temperatures into the high 30s across— temperatures into the high 30s across eastern— temperatures into the high 30s across eastern areas. - temperatures into the high 30s across eastern areas. then - temperatures into the high 30s . across eastern areas. then humid temperatures into the high 30s - across eastern areas. then humid air -ot across eastern areas. then humid air got outied _ across eastern areas. then humid air got potted in — across eastern areas. then humid air got potted in across— across eastern areas. then humid air got pulled in across northern - got pulled in across northern germany— got pulled in across northern germany and _ got pulled in across northern germany and fed _ got pulled in across northern germany and fed into - got pulled in across northern germany and fed into this i got pulled in across northern l germany and fed into this area got pulled in across northern - germany and fed into this area where the winds— germany and fed into this area where the winds converged _ germany and fed into this area where the winds converged together. - germany and fed into this area where the winds converged together. so - germany and fed into this area where the winds converged together. so in. the winds converged together. so in marry— the winds converged together. so in many ways— the winds converged together. so in many ways it — the winds converged together. so in many ways it was _ the winds converged together. so in many ways it was a _ the winds converged together. so in many ways it was a perfect - the winds converged together. so in many ways it was a perfect storm. l many ways it was a perfect storm. these _ many ways it was a perfect storm. these torrential _ many ways it was a perfect storm. these torrential downpours - many ways it was a perfect storm. these torrential downpours were i these torrential downpours were locked _ these torrential downpours were
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locked in — these torrential downpours were locked in the _ these torrential downpours were locked in the same _ these torrential downpours were locked in the same place - these torrential downpours were locked in the same place for- these torrential downpours were | locked in the same place for hour after— locked in the same place for hour after hour— locked in the same place for hour after hour and _ locked in the same place for hour after hour and that _ locked in the same place for hour after hour and that led _ locked in the same place for hour after hour and that led to - locked in the same place for hour. after hour and that led to enormous falls after hour and that led to enormous tails of— after hour and that led to enormous tails of rain. — after hour and that led to enormous falls of rain, record—breaking - after hour and that led to enormous falls of rain, record—breaking falls l falls of rain, record—breaking falls of rain _ falls of rain, record—breaking falls of rain and — falls of rain, record—breaking falls of rain and those _ falls of rain, record—breaking falls of rain and those catastrophic- of rain and those catastrophic floods — floods. and . floods. . and when floods. - and when it floods. — and when it comes to the state governor for north west... for this particular region, he is talking about climate change being no longer an abstract book that people are really living with it, that these are the repercussions of it. talk about how that impacts and feeds into the conversation with what we are seeing on the ground with this huge rescue operation taking place right now. huge rescue operation taking place riaht now. , ,, ., ., right now. some things we know about climate change. _ right now. some things we know about climate change, 0k, _ right now. some things we know about climate change, ok, it's _ right now. some things we know about climate change, ok, it's not _ climate change, ok, it's not something _ climate change, ok, it's not something that _ climate change, ok, it's not something that necessarily. climate change, ok, it's not i something that necessarily you climate change, ok, it's not - something that necessarily you think about— something that necessarily you think about happening. _ something that necessarily you think about happening, it _ something that necessarily you think about happening, it is _ something that necessarily you think about happening, it is already- something that necessarily you think about happening, it is already with l about happening, it is already with us. temperatures— about happening, it is already with us. temperatures around - about happening, it is already with us. temperatures around the - about happening, it is already with| us. temperatures around the globe have risen— us. temperatures around the globe have risen about _ us. temperatures around the globe have risen about 1.2 _ us. temperatures around the globe have risen about 1.2 celsius - us. temperatures around the globe have risen about 1.2 celsius above. have risen about 1.2 celsius above where _ have risen about 1.2 celsius above where they— have risen about 1.2 celsius above where they were _ have risen about 1.2 celsius above where they were during _ have risen about 1.2 celsius above where they were during the - where they were during the industrial— where they were during the industrial revolution- where they were during the industrial revolution kind l where they were during thei industrial revolution kind of where they were during the - industrial revolution kind of time so we _ industrial revolution kind of time so we already— industrial revolution kind of time so we already have _ industrial revolution kind of time so we already have a _ industrial revolution kind of time so we already have a hotter- industrial revolution kind of time l so we already have a hotter planet. warm _ so we already have a hotter planet. warm air _ so we already have a hotter planet. warm air holds _ so we already have a hotter planet. warm air holds more _ so we already have a hotter planet. warm air holds more moisture - so we already have a hotter planet. warm air holds more moisture so. so we already have a hotter planet. - warm air holds more moisture so when these _
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warm air holds more moisture so when these extreme — warm air holds more moisture so when these extreme ingredients _ warm air holds more moisture so when these extreme ingredients come - these extreme ingredients come together, — these extreme ingredients come together, the _ these extreme ingredients come together, the rain— these extreme ingredients come together, the rain you _ these extreme ingredients come together, the rain you get - these extreme ingredients come together, the rain you get out i these extreme ingredients come together, the rain you get out of them _ together, the rain you get out of them is — together, the rain you get out of them is going _ together, the rain you get out of them is going to _ together, the rain you get out of them is going to be _ together, the rain you get out of them is going to be much - together, the rain you get out of| them is going to be much heavier than _ them is going to be much heavier than it— them is going to be much heavier than it would _ them is going to be much heavier than it would otherwise _ them is going to be much heavier than it would otherwise have - them is going to be much heavierl than it would otherwise have been them is going to be much heavier- than it would otherwise have been so ciimate _ than it would otherwise have been so climate change — than it would otherwise have been so climate change plays— than it would otherwise have been so climate change plays a _ than it would otherwise have been so climate change plays a part - than it would otherwise have been so climate change plays a part in - than it would otherwise have been so climate change plays a part in this. . climate change plays a part in this. in climate change plays a part in this. in belgium — climate change plays a part in this. in belgium a — climate change plays a part in this. in belgium a 270 _ climate change plays a part in this. in belgium a 270 odd _ climate change plays a part in this. in belgium a 270 odd millimetres. climate change plays a part in this. | in belgium a 270 odd millimetres of rain, in belgium a 270 odd millimetres of rain. the _ in belgium a 270 odd millimetres of rain, the authorities— in belgium a 270 odd millimetres of rain, the authorities there _ in belgium a 270 odd millimetres of rain, the authorities there think- rain, the authorities there think that is— rain, the authorities there think that is something _ rain, the authorities there think that is something you _ rain, the authorities there think that is something you might - rain, the authorities there think- that is something you might expect less that is something you might expect tess than— that is something you might expect less than once _ that is something you might expect less than once every _ that is something you might expect less than once every century - that is something you might expect less than once every century so - that is something you might expect less than once every century so it l less than once every century so it is a rare — less than once every century so it is a rare event _ less than once every century so it is a rare event. but _ less than once every century so it is a rare event. but the _ less than once every century so it is a rare event. but the thing - less than once every century so it is a rare event. but the thing is l is a rare event. but the thing is that— is a rare event. but the thing is that some _ is a rare event. but the thing is that some of— is a rare event. but the thing is that some of those _ is a rare event. but the thing is that some of those stats - is a rare event. but the thing is that some of those stats are i is a rare event. but the thing is - that some of those stats are based on what _ that some of those stats are based on what has — that some of those stats are based on what has happened _ that some of those stats are based on what has happened in— that some of those stats are based on what has happened in the - that some of those stats are based on what has happened in the past, | on what has happened in the past, our weather— on what has happened in the past, our weather records _ on what has happened in the past, our weather records from - on what has happened in the past, our weather records from the - on what has happened in the past, | our weather records from the past. those _ our weather records from the past. those are — our weather records from the past. those are not— our weather records from the past. those are not necessarily - our weather records from the past. i those are not necessarily important any more _ those are not necessarily important any more because _ those are not necessarily important any more because our— those are not necessarily important any more because our climate - those are not necessarily important any more because our climate has. any more because our climate has already— any more because our climate has already changed. _ any more because our climate has already changed, it _ any more because our climate has already changed, it is _ any more because our climate has already changed, it is already - already changed, it is already hotter, — already changed, it is already hotter, there _ already changed, it is already hotter, there is _ already changed, it is already hotter, there is already- already changed, it is already hotter, there is already more| hotter, there is already more moisture _ hotter, there is already more moisture in— hotter, there is already more moisture in the _ hotter, there is already more moisture in the atmosphere. hotter, there is already more i moisture in the atmosphere so hotter, there is already more - moisture in the atmosphere so what we might— moisture in the atmosphere so what we might expect _ moisture in the atmosphere so what we might expect is _ moisture in the atmosphere so what we might expect is these _ moisture in the atmosphere so what we might expect is these severe - we might expect is these severe events— we might expect is these severe events might _ we might expect is these severe events might a _ we might expect is these severe events might a little _ we might expect is these severe events might a little bit - we might expect is these severe events might a little bit more i events might a little bit more common _ events might a little bit more common they— events might a little bit more common. they will— events might a little bit more common. they will always . events might a little bit more common. they will always bej events might a little bit more - common. they will always be pretty uncommon, — common. they will always be pretty uncommon, trut— common. they will always be pretty uncommon, butjust _ common. they will always be pretty uncommon, but just the _ common. they will always be pretty uncommon, but just the frequency. uncommon, but just the frequency instead _ uncommon, but just the frequency instead of— uncommon, but just the frequency instead of once _ uncommon, but just the frequency instead of once every _ uncommon, but just the frequency instead of once every century - uncommon, but just the frequency. instead of once every century maybe once every— instead of once every century maybe once every 30, — instead of once every century maybe once every 30, 40, _ instead of once every century maybe once every 30, 40, 50 _ instead of once every century maybe once every 30, 40, 50 years, - instead of once every century maybe once every 30, 40, 50 years, but. once every 30, 40, 50 years, but that is— once every 30, 40, 50 years, but that is something _ once every 30, 40, 50 years, but that is something that _ once every 30, 40, 50 years, but that is something that scientistsl that is something that scientists and climatologists _ that is something that scientists and climatologists will— that is something that scientists and climatologists will have - that is something that scientists and climatologists will have to l and climatologists will have to model— and climatologists will have to model and _ and climatologists will have to model and look— and climatologists will have to model and look out _ and climatologists will have to model and look out over - and climatologists will have to model and look out over the l and climatologists will have to i model and look out over the next and climatologists will have to - model and look out over the next few years _ model and look out over the next few years with _ model and look out over the next few years with this — model and look out over the next few years with this system. _
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model and look out over the next few years with this system.— years with this system. chris, thanks so _ years with this system. chris, thanks so much. _ years with this system. chris, thanks so much. chris - years with this system. chris, thanks so much. chris fox - years with this system. chris, - thanks so much. chris fox talking about one of the debate taking place here, climate change very much at the top of people�*s conversation. but at the forefront of people�*s minds across this part of western germany is of course the deaths of over 150 people, and people are now slowly starting to return back to their properties. the devastation, their properties. the devastation, the destruction speaks for itself, the destruction speaks for itself, the images we are seeing behind us, martin. the the images we are seeing behind us, martin. . _ , the images we are seeing behind us, martin. . , , ., ~' martin. the warning system worked but it was the _ martin. the warning system worked but it was the speed _ martin. the warning system worked but it was the speed with _ martin. the warning system worked but it was the speed with which - martin. the warning system worked but it was the speed with which this happened which took everyone by surprise, so how are the community is responding? —— the communities? they are in a state of shock. what happened happened so quickly and overnight that people were being woken up in the middle of the night and told to evacuate so there an awful lot of just shock. and told to evacuate so there an awful lot ofjust shock. when people are coming to terms, and the recovery operation has been immense.
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like i say, this road earlier was full of cars that had been abandoned and the grim search operation for potential remains taking place earlier on today. the army is out in force but people are still in shock as to what has happened and how quickly it happened. we all talk about the devastating impact of water, we are seeing it here in front of our eyes. as the president is saying, people are rallying together. there was a huge effort, over 20,000 rescue workers have been mobilised to help out in this effort but it will take a long time to clear and a long time before it will be anywhere near safe. for clear and a long time before it will be anywhere near safe.— be anywhere near safe. for the moment. _ be anywhere near safe. for the moment, thank _ be anywhere near safe. for the moment, thank you _ be anywhere near safe. for the moment, thank you very - be anywhere near safe. for the| moment, thank you very much. be anywhere near safe. for the - moment, thank you very much. kasia in erftstadt in germany. the uk health secretary sajid javid has tested positive for coronavirus. mrjavid said he was fully vaccinated, with two doses, and was experiencing only mild covid symptoms. he broke the news in
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a video posted on twitter. hi, everyone. ijust wanted to update you all that i have tested positive for covid. i was feeling a bit groggy last night so i took a lateral flow test this morning and it came out positive. so i am now self—isolating at home with my family until i get the result of a pcr test. i am grateful that i have had two jabs of the vaccine and so far my symptoms are very mild. i also want to take this opportunity to thank everyone involved in our national vaccine roll—out programme, truly the best of its kind anywhere in the world. if you haven�*t had yourjabs yet, please get out there and get them as soon as you can. and if, like me, you might feel a bit groggy or you feel you might have come into contact with someone who is positive, please also take a lateral flow test. if everyone plays their part, you�*re not only protecting yourself and your loved ones, but you�*re also safeguarding the nhs and helping to preserve our way life. thank you. earlier on i spoke to our political
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correspondentjessica parker who explained the current situation. now the prospect of the health secretary possibly having to be in self—isolation on the day that legal restrictions are lifted in england and now he�*s waiting for his pcr, the more reliable type of test to come back. so we�*ll wait for news in terms of what that brings. at the moment, we know he�*s positive on a lateral flow test, one of those rapid tests. but pending that result, of course, there will be questions as well, notjust for where sajid javid might be doing on monday, but where he�*s been in the last few days, where he�*s been in the last week. we know, for example, on tuesday he was on a visit to a care home, questions as well as to whether he�*s recently met the prime minister. i haven�*t been able to draw downing street on that. but if the pcr test was to come back a positive result,
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you might imagine there will be some sort of test process for the health secretary, including his contacts, which are, of course, likely to include some pretty senior members of government. some breaking news to bring you from the world of cycling. in the past few minutes, team emirates rider of slovenia has effectively wrapped up the 2021 tour de france title. he won the time trial in 35 minutes and 53 seconds, a full 21 seconds ahead of his closest rival. he now leads by five minutes and 20 seconds ahead of sunday�*s parading to paris, putting him on course to win the title for the second year running. let�*s turn to afghanistan now. high—level talks between afghan political leaders and the taliban
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have begun. afghan government sources have told the bbc that peace negotiations are off to good start — but have warned that the window for negotiations is closing fast, as taliban militants continue their unexpectedly rapid advance across the country. the talks are under way in doha. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in doha. she�*s been speaking to the key players on both sides about the significance of these negotiations. afghanistan, even in the best of times — but no—one can remember the best of times — is one of the poorest countries in the world, notwithstanding the fact that there�*s been 20 years of major international engagement, and now it is reeling from a humanitarian crisis — growing hunger, growing displacement from the violence, and growing fear amongst so many afghans about what the future holds. we saw so many of this new, young, educated generation, which came of age after the fall of the taliban in 2001, wondering now whether there is space for them in the kind of afghanistan which emerges. what has happened on the battlefield has emboldened the taliban and they�*ve been clarifying their ideas about afghanistan�*s political future, and it is one in which they dominate and it�*s
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a very different kind of political order than the one now in the islamic republic of afghanistan. so there�*s a sense of urgency here, and if these talks make progress this weekend, hope they can have another round in the coming weeks before that window to actually negotiate an end to the war, rather than fight to the end is not lost. lyse doucet indo half. —— in doha. more than 150 people have now died in severe floods across western europe with hundreds of people remaining unaccounted for. the german president has been visiting one of the stricken areas. the uk health secretary sajid javid says he has tested positive for coronavirus and is experiencing "mild" symptoms. the organisers of the tokyo olympics are seeking to reassure athletes and the people of japan that the games will be covid—secure
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after the first case of the virus in the olympic village was confirmed earlier today. the officials have refused to reveal the nationality of the infected person, but said it was a games organiser from abroad. meanwhile, athletes continue to arrive in tokyo, which is under a state of emergency for the duration of the event. let�*s have a listen to what one of the games�* organisers had to say on that positive coronavirus case. there was one person in the village. this was the very first case in the village that was reported during the screening test. yesterday he or she underwent this pcr test, and right now this person is confined in a hotel. when we have positive cases, to what extent we disclosed information was another question. are we going to disclose the name of the country or not?
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we have been discussing with the ioc and the ioc says if we disclose the name of the country, with high probability, you should be able to identify who this person is. travel firms have criticised the uk government�*s decision to keep quarantine rules in place for travellers returning to england and wales from france — even if they are fully vaccinated. for all other amber list countries, the rules relax on monday, with adults who have been double jabbed in the uk no longer needing to isolate for ten days on arrival. our business correspondent vishala sri—pathma has more. the eiffel tower, an iconic symbol of paris, known for its architectural ingenuity, reopened to tourists this week, but despite it being only hours away, for many brits
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it might prove to be a destination too far given these latest changes to quarantine rules for arrivals from france. it has their own plans for these travellers into disarray. very confusing, i am trying my hardest to follow the rules but i don�*t understand so i don�*t know, at this point i�*m going on my holiday and whatever happens happens. it actually feels more like political than anything else, it is very confusing, i think everything is really badly handled. their disappointment was echoed by the travel industry, who had hoped that allowing quarantine—free travel to fully vaccinated arrivals from amber list countries like france would give people more confidence when booking trips. that confidence now for many has been shattered. everything we do is about mitigated risk when we are taking travellers to different destinations. however, the road map has been in place, the restrictions are easing as of monday, we are seeing the rest of the globe, us and europe are travelling freely, we have a very successful deployment of the vaccine and we still cannot unlock international travel
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to countries with a lower case of virus than we have. the government is insistent that the decision was made in the interests of public health with there being a widespread of the beta variant in france. france is a popular destination for brits. its proximity, better weather and golden beaches are all part of its allure, making it the second most visited country pre—pandemic from people in the uk. in fact 500,000 brits were due to travel through the country this weekend, but for many these changes will mean a trip across the channel remains uncertain. vishala sri—pathma, bbc news. cuba�*s president has dismissed the demonstrations against the communist government is a lie. thousands took to the streets of havana and other cities last weekend demanding freedom and more covid vaccinations. but he denounced the spreading of what he called false images on social media. he had earlier accused
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the us of provoking the protests. thousands of people have been protesting in france against new rules, which will oblige health workers to be vaccinated against coronavirus. the restrictions also mean that people will need to show either a vaccine health pass or a negative covid test to enter public places including restaurants. since they were announced on monday, a record number of people have booked appointments to be vaccinated. the annual haj pilgrimmage is getting under way in mecca with a reduced number of participants. for a second consecutive year, only 60,000 people will be taking part because of covid restrictions. in normal years, around two and a half million muslims from across the world would visit the holiest sites of islam in mecca and medina — a pilgrimmage which all muslims are expected to make at least once in their lifetimes. the us military wants to build a large new radar site in britain
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to track targets in deep space. it comes amid growing concerns about an arms race in space. the us and britain have accused china and russia of developing weapons to shoot down satellites. the us space force is developing a global radar system to identify potential threats up to 36,000 kilometres in space. as well as the uk, other sites will include texas and australia. our defence correspondent jonathan beale reports. the race in space is already under way. not just for commercial ventures like virgin galactic, with its recent maiden voyage, but for nations also. three, two, we have ignition. last year, the us military launched another ten satellites into space. america also now has its own space force, not least to protect the systems we now all use — such as gps location. there are threats in space. i�*d say the two countries that are most threatening are china and russia. there have been anti—satellite
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missiles that have been developed. america already has early warning systems to detect ballistic missiles — including the fylindales radar in north yorkshire. now the us wants to build a new radar system for deep space. and one of the new sites could be in the uk. what could end up in the uk is an array of parabolic antennas, and it could be anywhere from ten to 15 for tracking, and potentially four to six for transmitting. so it would cover a large area, would it? it would cover a large area for it to receive — probably an area of one kilometre in diameter. the deep space advanced radar capability, which will be able to detect and object the size of a football up to 36,000 kilometres away, is being developed here in california. one of the sites visited by the british defence secretary this week, who wants to strengthen cooperation on space — not least to protect critical
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national infrastructure. space is a growing domain for both commerce, but also to protect all the key national infrastructure that we need to in today's world. it is under threat. in some areas, our adversaries are weaponising space, so we have to make sure at the very least we're providing resilience. the locations of the deep space radar capability, or darc for short, have still to be agreed, but one of the sites being considered by the us space force is in the south of england or scotland — as well as in texas and australia. it may prove controversial, but the government�*s made clear it wants britain to be in the vanguard of efforts to keep space safe. jonathan beale, bbc news, los angeles. italian diver alessia zecchini has set a new world record at the world free diving championships in the bahamas. she propelled herself to a depth of 74 metres without any oxygen tanks or flippers to help
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push her along. to reach that level under water meant she had to hold her breath for three minutes and two seconds. you are watching bbc news. hello again, for most of us this is the hottest spell of weather we have seen so far this year. we had the new hi mark set for the time of year in both wales and scotland. yesterday. —— yesterday in northern ireland the record was set but it is more than that today, the hottest day of the year so far in northern ireland. those temperatures, though, could be updated later on as more data becomes available today. and today we have got blue skies, the sunshine out in full force across the majority of the uk. it is just in the north—west of scotland where we have seen some thicker cloud. cloud like this, so it has
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still been bright enough with a bit of sunshine around, but has been noticeably a little bit cooler and fresher into north—west scotland. overnight tonight, for most of us, it is a dry night with long, clear spells, but the most notable point about tonight�*s weather is just how warm it is going to be. these are not the minimum temperatures, but the temperatures you might encounter going to bed at 11pm tonight. 23s there for london and cardiff. a little bit fresher further north and also in the countryside, a more comfortable night�*s sleep here. now, tomorrow, there�*s some respite from the hot weather across the north west as these north—westerly winds drag in some slightly cloudy weather, some slightly cooler on the way as well. so temperatures generally in the low 20s, still warm in anyjuly sunshine that comes through, but the heat really that bit further southwards, where high 20s, low 30s on the cards, 31 celsius there in london. it is going to be the hottest day of the year for the uk as a whole tomorrow. and what follows is a very warm night, of course. 24 degrees this time sunday night at 11pm in london. now, looking at the weather picture deeper into next week, high pressure is still on the scene but we do have a low that is trying to move in off the atlantic
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in the not going to be moving in anytime soon, though. so for monday, it is another largely dry day with sunshine for most of the uk, again the north—west staying a little bit cooler, fresher and cloudier. temperatures in the sunshine widely low to mid 20s across northern areas of the uk. in the south, it is still very hot, with temperatures high 20s, perhaps even low 30s in the very hottest areas and, really, through the rest of the week ahead, the weather set fair. it will generally stay warm or very warm with just one or two storms around from time to time. that�*s your weather.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... more than 150 people have now died in severe floods across western europe, with hundreds of people remaining
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unaccounted for. the german president has been visiting one of the stricken areas. translation: our country stands to . ether at translation: our country stands together at this _ translation: our country stands together at this time. _ translation: our country stands together at this time. i _ translation: our country stands together at this time. i am - translation: our country stands| together at this time. i am pleased together at this time. i am pleased to see just how much sympathy and solidarity is being shown not only here in the region, but throughout germany. the health secretary sajid javid says he has tested positive for coronavirus and is experiencing "mild" symptoms. i was feeling groggy last night so i put limited collateral flow test last night and it came back positive so i am now isolating at home. travel firms criticise the government�*s decision to keep quarantine rules in place for travellers returning to england and wales from france — even if they are fully vaccinated. olympics organisers announce the first case of coronavirus in the athletes�* village, six days before the tokyo games begin. as england prepares to lift remaining coronavirus restrictions, there are calls for mental health support to continue for people suffering from anxiety. the mental health charity mind says
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the mental health consequences of coronavirus require an immediate and long—term commitment from government. colleen harris reports. there is just this sense of, like, overwhelming anxiety of being around large groups of people. not everyone is looking forward to restrictions easing. lauren developed anxiety and depression in her teens. just the thought of socialising can be a challenge. i would struggle a lot previously with not, i couldn�*t leave the door, and the build—up to it was just awful, and i�*d sit here and kind of pick holes in myself, and it just all spirals. this is a song that i've been working on. it's called merry go round. like lauren, angelica jane also has anxiety and depression, but found lockdown helpful
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and life less overwhelming. stepping out of that is causing her worries. it would be nice to be able to actually go out with friends and do nice things, but on the other hand, there is kind of this fear, like i don't really know how it's going to be going back, if i'm starting school again, because i haven't been experiencing that in a while. the government has pledged £500 million towards a mental health recovery plan in england, but charities warn it�*s not enough to meet a long—term need for support. the mental health consequences of coronavirus are here in the here and now. many people really struggling. but we also know there is a longer term issue affecting people with existing mental health problems, which we will see for many, many months and years to come. solutions like this alongside clinical treatments can help. for angelica jane, it�*s music, and for lauren, it�*s art.
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i just find it almost a source of mindfulness. my brain is constant all the time, and when i�*m doing art, it kind ofjust stops. while the end of coronavirus restrictions are in sight, it�*s just the beginning of the pandemic�*s long—term legacy on mental health. colleen harris, bbc news. in a few moments, viewers on bbc one willjoin us for a round up of the news with reeta chakrabarti. but first, as we edge closer to the end of this school year, children have coped with an academic year like none other due to the pandemic. fiona lamdin has more. finally, they�*re off on camp after postponing it twice. for these ten—year—olds, it�*s a rite of passage... yeah! ..which many other schools have been forced to cancel. on the saturday morning before they were supposed to go on the monday, we got told that there was somebody who had tested positive for covid and so the camp was cancelled.
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and they were all absolutely gutted. i'm most looking forward to spending time with my friends and then the really fun outdoor activities. just a few weeks ago, these classrooms at kings oak academy near bristol were empty up to 400 students were sent home to self—isolate. and for students in year 10, taking their mock gcses, it�*s stressful. they�*ve currently got 40 pupils out. it's been, like, quite hectic and, like, makes people i feel, like, anxious. anyone could end up being positive and, like, you don't know- whether you're going to have to go home. | when, like, all the friends in the friendship group except you are out, it�*s trying to find someone else to hang around with so that you�*re not, like, completely alone at, like, break and lunch times. we're trying to work out can we get to the summer with any more cases? catherine and her staff have been navigating a year of remote learning,
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mask wearing, and self isolation. every day, we're checking to see if another case has come in and then we have to respond very quickly to that, isolating students. we had a challenging situation last week, where year 9 needed to be closed but it then meant we needed to get our free school meal children their meals for lunch. and i was in what was actually quite an insightful and fortunate position where i could drive to all of our disadvantaged families' houses to drop off their lunches. and that gave us a real insight into some of the community needs and challenges. and over in the science lab, they are itching to turn the gas back on. with science this year, it's been a really, - really big struggle, _ particularly when you're looking at doing practical work. having to quarantine everything and kids not being able - to get their hands on actually getting a practical done, - so i think everyone's excited - when you first arrive into a science lab, particularly year seven, to get your hands on a bunsen burner. i and for kids not to have i that opportunity this year has been really hard. but in september, next term, things should look very different? i can't wait, it's going to be - absolutely brilliant just to have
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kids actually being able to really, like, partake fully in science. - whistle. well, covid has cancelled sports day, year groups can�*t mix and parents can�*t come into watch. so these year 7s are taking part in the festival of sport. it�*s been a lot of non—stop training throughout the year. we�*ve had to adapt to things that have come up. things have changed both inside and outside of school. but we�*ve had to do our best to overcome it and make the year as enjoying and fulfilling as possible for our students. and although the holidays are just days away, these school gates will stay open. they�*ve been selected to hold summer camps for students who have fallen behind. it�*s been an academic year like no other. but with contact isolation and school bubbles ending next week, everyone�*s hoping that come september things will be very different. fiona lamdin, bbc news.
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good afternoon, the health secretary sajid javid is so isolating at home after testing positive for coronavirus. he said he felt buggy on friday night and has announced it as the government prepares to go ahead with lifting coronavirus restrictions on monday. the decision last night to keep quarantine rules in place for those returning from france to england even if fully vaccinated was heavily criticised by travel firms. our travel correspondent reports. downing street yesterday, the health secretary outside number ten, facemask in hand, but this morning, he tested positive for coronavirus. i was feeling a bit groggy this morning and took a test this morning and it came at positive. i am not isolating at home with my family until i get the result of a pcr test. i�*m grateful i have had two jabs of the vaccine. myself and my
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symptoms are very mild. this jabs of the vaccine. myself and my symptoms are very mild.— symptoms are very mild. this is said symptoms are very mild. this is sajid javid _ symptoms are very mild. this is sajid javid at — symptoms are very mild. this is sajid javid at a _ symptoms are very mild. this is sajid javid at a care _ symptoms are very mild. this is sajid javid at a care home - symptoms are very mild. this is sajid javid at a care home on . sajid javid at a care home on tuesday or days before his symptoms developed. it is not yet clear if anyone else in government will have to isolate as a close contact. it comes ahead of a crucial week for ministers, from monday, legal restrictions will be lifted in england, but they were more than 54,000 positive cases reported yesterday and some are urging caution. , ., ., ., caution. there is a lot of uncertainty, _ caution. there is a lot of uncertainty, and - caution. there is a lot of uncertainty, and if - caution. there is a lot of uncertainty, and if you l caution. there is a lot of. uncertainty, and if you look caution. there is a lot of- uncertainty, and if you look at countries that are ahead of us in the curve, like the netherlands and israel, both of which incidentally have good vaccination stories, if we behave like they have done and change our behaviour too dramatically when restrictions are changed, then we will end up having to do what they are having to do now, which is reconsider imposing restrictions. now, which is reconsider imposing restrictions-— restrictions. next week will be a si . nificant restrictions. next week will be a significant moment _ restrictions. next week will be a significant moment in _ restrictions. next week will be a significant moment in the - restrictions. next week will be a - significant moment in the sometimes slow road out of lockdown in
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england, but it will not be back to normality overnight. face coverings will still be recommended in some places and there will still be an emphasis on caution. the number of positive cases we have seen, like the health secretary�*s is a reminder. the way restrictions are going, but the virus has not disappeared. some rules are changing faster than others. from monday, double jab people returning from france were supposed to be spared quarantine. last labour government announced that would not be happening, leaving the travel industry and many tourists —— last night the government announced. i don�*t know, at this point and going on my holiday and whatever happens, happens. is on my holiday and whatever happens, ha ens. , , ., on my holiday and whatever happens, hauens. , , ., happens. is feels more political than anything — happens. is feels more political than anything else. _ happens. is feels more political than anything else. it _ happens. is feels more political than anything else. it is - happens. is feels more political than anything else. it is very i than anything else. it is very confusing. i think everything is very— confusing. i think everything is very badly handled.
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in wales restrictions on meeting outside were lifted. across the uk there are more freedoms on their way but that is not without risk. let�*s take a look at the latest uk government coronavirus figures — 54,674 new infections were recorded in the latest 24—hour period, taking the average per day in the past week to 42,900. the data for the number of people currently in hospital with covid hasn�*t been updated today, but figures yesterday showed 3,964 people were in hospital with the virus. 41 deaths were recorded in the past 24 hours. more than 46.2 million people have now had theirfirstjab, that�*s 87.8% of all uk adults. and over 35.7 million people, 67.8% of all adults, have had two jabs. well, as you�*ve just heard, the uk has recorded over 50,000 new covid cases for
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the second consecutive day. scientists and medical experts have expressed concern at the relaxation of covid rules while cases are clearly rising. it comes as the government announced an extension to the flu vaccination programme this winter, expected to be delivered alongside any booster jabs for covid—19. here�*s anna collinson. it is the birthplace of the ashes. but this weekend the oval cricket ground has become one of many pop—up vaccine hubs and one of those in line, cricketerjordan clarke. with significant freedoms for england and scotland less than two days early another place for people to get theirjab. irate another place for people to get their 'ab. ~ , ., another place for people to get their 'ab. ~ , . . . ., theirjab. we start the clinic at eiuht theirjab. we start the clinic at eight o'clock. _ theirjab. we start the clinic at eight o'clock. we _ theirjab. we start the clinic at eight o'clock. we had - theirjab. we start the clinic at eight o'clock. we had a - theirjab. we start the clinic at eight o'clock. we had a bit - theirjab. we start the clinic at eight o'clock. we had a bit of. theirjab. we start the clinic at | eight o'clock. we had a bit of a eight o�*clock. we had a bit of a rush at eight o�*clock and now there is a steady flow of people. sot} is a steady flow of people. 400 eo - le is a steady flow of people. 400 peeple every — is a steady flow of people. 400 people every hour. _ is a steady flow of people. 400 people every hour. as - is a steady flow of people. 400 people every hour. as restrictions have eased over recent months more people have come together, infections have risen. the big difference is the vaccine, which is help to reduce the threat of covid,
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although not eliminated.— although not eliminated. hospital admissions are _ although not eliminated. hospital admissions are causing _ although not eliminated. hospital admissions are causing concern . although not eliminated. hospital| admissions are causing concern at the moment and the projections on how they could go are quite alarming so it is not the situation we wanted to be in. we did not want to be opening up in quite dramatically at a time when we have so many infections and that is why you are heeding many people expressing concern. ,. , , ., concern. other scientists feel more confident about _ concern. other scientists feel more confident about this _ concern. other scientists feel more confident about this wave, - concern. other scientists feel more confident about this wave, pointing j confident about this wave, pointing to data showing fewer people have become seriously ill and those that are out in hospitalfor become seriously ill and those that are out in hospital for less time. amid fears the double threat of covid and the look could put intense pressure on the health service this winter free flu vaccines will be offered to more than 35 million people in england, including expanding the programme to include pupils up to year 11. in county down people wait in the hot sun for the vaccine. i people wait in the hot sun for the vaccine. ., people wait in the hot sun for the vaccine. . ., ., , , ., ,
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vaccine. i live a mile away so it is handy for — vaccine. i live a mile away so it is handy for me _ vaccine. i live a mile away so it is handy for me to _ vaccine. i live a mile away so it is handy for me to come _ vaccine. i live a mile away so it is handy for me to come here. - handy for me to come here. scientists say every person in case like this around the uk have played a role in damaging the link between coronavirus and serious illness, jab byjab. rescue crews have been racing to find survivors of floods that have wreaked havoc across western europe, killing more than 140 people. hundreds are feared missing after record rainfall triggered severe floods in germany and belgium. european leaders have blamed the extreme weather on climate change, with germany�*s president frank—walter steinmeier saying he was stunned by the devastation on a visit to the town of erftstadt. chancellor merkel is due to visit affected areas tomorrow. with all the sport now, here�*s lizzi greenwood—hughes at the bbc sport centre. thanks very much, rita.
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good evening. golf�*s open championship is into a third day on the kent coast. our correspondent andy swiss is watching at royal st george�*s and joins me now. and andy — the leader — louis oosthueizen has had a record—breaking first half to this major, how�*s he getting on today? he still leads the way. he began the day with a two shot lead and has made a really solid start to his round. he won the open in 2010 and he has been so consistent over the last few days, so he is on 12 under par. he hasjust a one—shot lead overjordan spieth on 11 under par, anotherformer overjordan spieth on 11 under par, another former open champion, with others on nine under par. earlier we saw thousands of fans following rory mcilroy on his round. it was very much a round of two halves. a string of early birdies saw him surge up the leaderboard before he fell away over the closing holes, ultimately finishing on one under par, saw his hopes would seem to be over, but the
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man they are all still chasing, louis oosthuizen, still leads the way. thank you, andy swiss there. st helen�*s have won rugby league�*s challenge cup for the first time in more than a decade. they beat castleford tigers 26 points to 12 in the final at wembley. joe lynsky reports. 45,000 brought the noise from the north after so long in the silence for rugby league it meant so much. this is the sport�*s showpiece match. because of st helens to have the oldest clubs. they know games can change with the banks of the ball. saints got the first scored with help from the post but castleford responded with something extraordinary.— responded with something extraordinary. responded with something extraordina . ., ., , extraordinary. castleford fans leap into the air- _ extraordinary. castleford fans leap into the air. in _ extraordinary. castleford fans leap into the air. in castleford - extraordinary. castleford fans leap into the air. in castleford the - into the air. in castleford the sort is into the air. in castleford the sport is at — into the air. in castleford the sport is at the _ into the air. in castleford the sport is at the heart - into the air. in castleford the sport is at the heart of- into the air. in castleford the sport is at the heart of the i into the air. in castleford the i sport is at the heart of the time but a fierce— the heat would drain them in the second. st helens were here as favourites and know they would search through the gaps and
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into the lead. after 13 years without it, one of the sport�*s giants had its oldest prize. this has been rugby league�*s toughest year but a thrilling final in the noise is a win in itself. it is st helens who go home singing. max verstappen won formula one�*s first sprint qualifying race — to take pole for tomorrow�*s british grand prix. he overtook lewis hamilton at the start and stayed in front of him for all 17 laps of this trial format at silverstone. it means verstappen is now 33 points ahead of hamilton in the drivers�* championship. and it�*s half time in the lions�* final warm—up game in south africa — and after a slow start they�*re 21—3 ahead — you can find out more on the bbc sport website. but that�*s it from me. there�*s more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we�*re back with the late news at 10:40pm. now on bbc one it�*s time for the news where you are. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news. more than 35 million people in england will get a free flu jab this winter. over 50s and all children up to 16 will be included. the expanded programme will be delivered alongside booster jabs for covid—19. here�*s our health and science correspondent james gallagher. flu all but disappeared last winter. the restrictions, social distancing
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and mask wearing that slowed down the spread of coronavirus also prevented the usual round of winter bugs. but now we�*re getting closer to normal, the fear is we could have a bigger than usual flu season. that could combine with covid and other infections to put the nhs under intense pressure, so england is launching its biggest ever flu vaccination programme. more than 35 million people will be offered the vaccine for free. so who can get it? doctors, nurses, care home staff and otherfront—line and care workers, anyone over the age of 50, pregnant women, people at higher risk from flu, including those with asthma, and there will be a significant expansion of the number of children offered the vaccine. children get a nasal spray instead of an injection. two and three—year—olds as well as all primary school children will be offered the vaccine as usual. last year only secondary school pupils up to the age of 12 were included, but this will increase to all those 16 and under. it�*s desperately important that we all get vaccinated if we�*re
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invited this year, because last year cases were very low. they were partly low because people weren�*t going out and about and they weren�*t mixing, but they were also partly low because so many people were vaccinated. over 80% of over 65s took up the invitation to get vaccinated. this year we�*ve got more people than ever being invited, and that is going to be one of the best ways of preventing the hospitals from being unable to cope. meanwhile, there could also be more covid jabs this winter. the nhs is drawing up plans to give a third dose to more than 30 million people if they are needed. it�*s hard to forget the moment denmark�*s christian eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest at the euros earlier this month — and that incident has put the role of defibrillators back into focus. two years ago, former tottenham hotspurs player justin edinburgh died after suffering a cardiac arrest while working out at the gym. his son now wants to make it law
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for sports facilities to have public access to the life—saving equipment. luxmy gopal reports. schoolchildren learning the most valuable lesson of all — how to save a life. one, two, three, four... charlie edinburgh has dedicated his life to this cause. edinburgh gets through. it is after his father, justin edinburgh, former tottenham hotspur player and leyton orient manager, died of a cardiac arrest aged 49 at the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone wanted my dad to be their dad, and i�*m not ashamed to say that. i might say i am big—headed saying that, but he honestly was. he was just a man who gave so much to people. i�*ve lost my best friend, i�*ve lost the person i look up to, and you live with it every day. the grief doesn�*t go away. the gym wherejustin suffered a cardiac arrest did not have a defibrillator. if my dad, when he had his cardiac
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arrest, was in a facility where it was by law required, he might still be around, and that will play on my mind forever. charlie set up a foundation to change the law to make it compulsory for health and sports facilities to have a defibrillator on site. the aim is also to improve access to first aid training. today i've learnt how to do cpr accurately, and how to do that chest presses and how to use defibrillators. we're sending defibrillators to gyms and sports companies and schools, i and if we see anyone in danger, we can do cpr to them. - everyone should know about it so that they can help people in need as well, just likejustin edinburgh. he needed help but he didn�*t get it in time. japhet tanganga is a spurs defender, likejustin was. he is lending his support to the campaign, including playing in a friendly against orient to fundraise for the foundation. it is asking me to deliver a shock to analyse the heart.
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the role of defibrillators was thrown into sharp focus after his team—mate christian eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest when he collapsed on the pitch earlier this month. with what went on at the euros, it�*s shocked the world. i�*ve seen christian smile and trained with him a few times, and to see him in that position was quite upsetting. i think it�*s a good cause. i think every ticket we sell, the money will be donated to thejustin edinburgh foundation. access to a defibrillator will save many, many lives, because every minute that is lost before a defibrillator arrives gives a 10% reduction in survival. survival in this country is poor. we could do much better. from the tragic circumstances of his father�*s death, charlie hopes, will come a positive impact to help save the lives of others. time for a look at the weather
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with chris fawkes. hello again. for many of us, this is the hottest weather we�*ve seen so far this year. yesterday, we had the highest temperature recorded in wales and scotland. temperatures actually this afternoon are very similar in wales so that mark could be beaten. and in killowen in northern ireland, it�*s two degrees warmer than it was yesterday — 29.6, the new high for the year. those temperatures, though, could be updated later on as more data becomes available today. and today we have got blue skies, the sunshine out in full force across the majority of the uk. it is just in the north—west of scotland where we have seen some thicker cloud. cloud like this, so it has still been bright enough with a bit of sunshine around, but has been noticeably a little bit cooler and fresher into north—west scotland. overnight tonight, for most of us, it is a dry night with long, clear spells, but the most notable point about tonight�*s weather is just how warm it is going to be. these are not the minimum temperatures, but the temperatures
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you might encounter going to bed at 11pm tonight. 23s there for london and cardiff. a little bit fresher further north and also in the countryside, a more comfortable night�*s sleep here. now, tomorrow there�*s some respite from the hot weather across the north west as these north—westerly winds drag in some slightly cloudy weather, some slightly cooler on the way as well. so temperatures generally in the low 20s, still warm in anyjuly sunshine that comes through, but the heat really that bit further southwards, where high 20s, low 30s on the cards, 31 celsius there in london. it is going to be the hottest day of the year for the uk as a whole tomorrow. and what follows is a very warm night of course. 24 degrees this time sunday night at 11pm in london. now, looking at the weather picture deeper into next week, high pressure is still on the scene but we do have a low that is trying to move in off the atlantic in the not going to be moving in anytime soon, though. so for monday, it is under the largely dry day with sunshine for most of the uk, again, the north—west staying a little bit cooler, fresher and cloudier. temperatures in the sunshine widely low to mid 20 across northern areas of the uk. in the south, it is still very ho, with temperatures high 20s,
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perhaps even low 30s in the very hottest and, really, through the rest of the week ahead, the weather set fair. it will generally stay warm or very warm with just one or two storms around from time to time. that�*s your weather.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk this is bbc news with the latest and around the world. the search for hundreds of people still missing following devastating floods in germany and belgium continues. the german president has been visiting one of the stricken areas. our country stands together during this time. i�*m very pleased to see just how much sympathy and solidarity is being shown, not only here in the region but also throughout germany. and i am in erftstadt where the president was speaking, one of the worst impacted towns in this disaster in western germany. the uk�*s health secretary sajid javid says he has tested positive for coronavirus and is experiencing "mild" symptoms.
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i was feeling a bit groggy last night so i took a lateral flow test

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