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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 17, 2021 6:00am-10:00am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: a surprise change to the quarantine rules for travellers from france. the need to self isolate for ten days will remain in place, causing anger and confusion among holidaymakers. i have booked everything 2a hours ago and now everything is changing, so quite disappointing. the race to find survivors of the floods that have wreaked havoc across western europe. more than 120 people are dead. hundreds are still missing. more than 35 million people in england will be offered a flu jab this winter. they will include the over—50s
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and children up to the age of 16. plenty of fun in the sun for the thousands heading to this weekend's sporting events. at the open, louis oosthuizen leads by two shots at the halfway point. and at silverstone, more than 80,000 fans are expected for the new qualifying race ahead of tomorrow's british grand prix. we have just had a very balmy night and it promises to be a sunny and very warm day. guess what — same tomorrow. it is saturday i7july. our top story: fully vaccinated travellers returning to england and wales from france will still have to spend ten days in quarantine, the government has announced. the rule takes effect from monday when many other covid restrictions, including those around travel to amber list countries, are being eased. with more details, here is our political correspondent jonathan blake. for those hoping for a holiday
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in france this summer, plans may have to change. from monday the country will stay on the amber list, but unlike other destinations in that category, adults who are fully vaccinated will still have to isolate for ten days on their return to england and wales. i was planning on going to france for a short trip, as i have a family wedding there coming at the end ofjuly. that was the plan. i've — the wedding has been delayed, it was supposed to be last year. i booked everything 2a hours ago and now everything is changing, so quite disappointing. concern about cases in france of the beta variant of coronavirus, first detected in south africa, have prompted the move. ministers stopped short of adding france to the red list, which involves hotel quarantine. but the health secretary,
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sajid javid, said the government had always been clear it would not hesitate to take rapid action at the borders to stop covid—i9. travel industry bodies have accused the government of a confused approach to international travel and also criticised the change. really the government has caused chaos here. they made an announcement that people from amber list countries with two jabs did not need to quarantine. now they seem to have changed their mind on a fourth category, an amber list plus, if you like, which is creating chaos for the travelling public and the travel industry yet again. allowing fully vaccinated adults to avoid isolation on their return from amber list countries offers hope of a holiday for some, but the decision to make france an exception is a sign of uncertainty in government about how the pandemic will pan out. jonathan blake, bbc news. the news broke just before 8:30pm last night and it was met by a series of furious responses from different parts of the travel industry.
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the boss of easyjet, johan lundgren, issued a statement saying: that sentiment was echoed by willie walsh of the international air transport association, who said: a eurotunnel spokesperson said the announcement so close to the school holidays "will ruin summer for many people". and the ferry operator dfds said the news came as a surprise and that it is disappointing that services are not opening up totally to everyone as we all would have liked. bulgaria has banned people from the uk travelling there because of the rising number of covid infections. the ban will come into effect on monday, the same day the country joins the british government's green travel list. hundreds of people are still missing following floods across large parts
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of western europe. at least 128 people have died after heavy rainfall caused severe flooding in germany, belgium and the netherlands. 0ur correspondent anna holligan has the latest. as the water gradually subsides, the number of people confirmed damp continues to rise. in germany, many are still missing. tens of thousands of homes are waiting for the power to be restored. across the border in belgium, homes engulfed, whole villages submerged. swathes of liege wiped out the elements. in pipinster, armed forces came to save the stranded, who left everything behind. in a nearby town, the waters have receded, but they are stunned by everything that has been swept away. by everything that has been swept awa . ~ ,, ~ , by everything that has been swept awa. ~ away. translation: this shop has
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been 0 en away. translation: this shop has been open for _ away. translation: this shop has been open for three _ away. translation: this shop has been open for three years. - away. translation: this shop has been open for three years. we - away. translation: this shop has been open for three years. we had | away. translation: this shop has l been open for three years. we had to go through renovations, we had to live through covid, we were hoping to get back on our feet, and now this. �* . ~ , ., , this. the belgian prime minister has declared 20 july _ this. the belgian prime minister has declared 20 july a _ this. the belgian prime minister has declared 20 july a national - this. the belgian prime minister has declared 20 july a national day - this. the belgian prime minister has declared 20 july a national day of. declared 20 july a national day of morning. in the netherlands, this was roermond. sections of the city have simply disappeared. this region is now officially a disaster zone. while covid kept them isolated, this crisis has reunited a community. these are the remnants of businesses in a spa town. while the emergency services are busy trying to restore power and secure pavements, the people have come together to try to bring some form of order to these devastated streets. this solidarity and sense of purpose is what is getting them through. we
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and sense of purpose is what is getting them through. we need to stay positive- _ getting them through. we need to stay positive. we _ getting them through. we need to stay positive. we can _ getting them through. we need to stay positive. we can cry - getting them through. we need to stay positive. we can cry all - getting them through. we need to stay positive. we can cry all day i stay positive. we can cry all day but this will not help anything, so better smiling and keep working, and try to save anything. after better smiling and keep working, and try to save anything.— try to save anything. after the rain, try to save anything. after the rain. here _ try to save anything. after the rain, here and _ try to save anything. after the rain, here and right _ try to save anything. after the rain, here and right across - try to save anything. after the - rain, here and right across western europe, they are still calculating the cost of repairing what remains. more than 35 million people in england will get a free flu jab this winter, and for the first time all children aged 11 to 16. the expanded programme will be delivered alongside booster jabs for covid—i9. here is our health and science correspondent james gallagher. flew all but disappeared last winter. the restrictions, social distancing and mask wearing that slow down the spread of coronavirus also prevented the usual round of winter bugs. but now we're getting closer to normal, the fear is we could have a bigger than usualflu
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season, that could combine with covid and other infections with the nhs under intense pressure. so england is launching its biggest everflu vaccination england is launching its biggest ever flu vaccination programme. england is launching its biggest everflu vaccination programme. more than 35 million people will be offered the vaccine for free. so who can get it? doctors, nurses, care home staff and other front—line and care workers, anyone over the age of 15. pregnant women. people at high risk of flu, including those with asthma, and there will be a significant expansion of the number of children offered the vaccine. children get a nasal spray instead of an injection. two and three —year—olds as well as all primary school children will be offered the vaccine as usual. last year, only secondary school pupils up to the age of 12 were included, but this will increase to all those 16 and under. it will increase to all those 16 and under. , ,, ., , ., under. it is desperately important that we all get — under. it is desperately important that we all get vaccinated - under. it is desperately important that we all get vaccinated if - under. it is desperately important that we all get vaccinated if we i under. it is desperately important | that we all get vaccinated if we are invited this year, because last year cases were very low. they were
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partly low because people won't going out and about and they weren't mixing, but they were also partly low because so many people were vaccinated. over 80% of over 65 �*s took up the invitation to get vaccinated. this year we have got more people than ever being invited, and that is going to be one of the best ways of venting the hospitals from being unable to cope. meanwhile, there could also be more covid jabs this winter. the nhs is drawing up plans to give a third dose to more than 30 million people if they are needed. pop—up vaccine centres are opening across england in shops and parks this weekend as part of an nhs grab—a—jab initiative. the vaccination hubs will be set up in primark stores, the tate modern and even the open championship. the aim is to boost the vaccine uptake among young people ahead of monday, when the majority of coronavirus restrictions are set to be lifted. i would urge you to come in, get
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yourself vaccinated. there will be a wonderful atmosphere and there will be lots of help and support and advice and guidance for you, for anybody who is over 18 and eligible to have a vaccine. please do come forward if you have not had the jab and we are here and ready and waiting for you. from today there will no longer be a limit on the number of people meeting outside in wales as some coronavirus restrictions are eased. the relaxation also allows six adults from different households to meet indoors, and organised indoor events can start taking place with up to 1,000 people seated and 200 standing. the united states wants to build a giant new radar system in the uk to track objects in deep space. the us space force is developing the global system to identify potential targets in areas where a lot of military satellites are positioned. the ministry of defence said the new radar capability has the potential to make space
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safer and more secure. hippos, walruses and whales could be given greater legal protection under plans to crack down on ivory poaching. the government wants to extend a planned law banning the trade of items containing elephant ivory to cover other at—risk animals. conservationists say the move sends a clear signal to the rest of the world. and how about this for an impressive feat of physical strength and lung power. this is the world freediving championships in the bahamas, where alessia zecchini has set a new record. she propelled herself to a depth of 7a metres without any oxygen tanks orflippers to help push her along. she held her breath for a remarkable three minutes and two seconds.
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just to get this clear, she propelled herself down 7a metres and held her breath for three minutes and two seconds. that held her breath for three minutes and two seconds.— held her breath for three minutes and two seconds. that is quite some achievement _ and two seconds. that is quite some achievement. did _ and two seconds. that is quite some achievement. did i— and two seconds. that is quite some achievement. did i get _ and two seconds. that is quite some achievement. did i get that - and two seconds. that is quite some achievement. did i get that by - and two seconds. that is quite some achievement. did i get that by way l achievement. did i get that by way of celebration they all splashed her in the face? did thatjust happened? i think they did, didn't they? they checked the watch and everyone just said... you know that thing when you are a kid and you splash each other in the face? it are a kid and you splash each other in the face?— in the face? it is not 'ust when ou're a in the face? it is not 'ust when we a kid. h in the face? it is not 'ust when you're a kid. the _ in the face? it is notjust when you're a kid. the pressure - in the face? it is notjust when you're a kid. the pressure of l in the face? it is notjust when l you're a kid. the pressure of the water as you _ you're a kid. the pressure of the water as you go _ you're a kid. the pressure of the water as you go down _ you're a kid. the pressure of the water as you go down to - you're a kid. the pressure of the water as you go down to that. you're a kid. the pressure of the i water as you go down to that depth is just unbelievable. henge water as you go down to that depth isjust unbelievable.— isjust unbelievable. have you ever done that recently? _ isjust unbelievable. have you ever done that recently? you _ isjust unbelievable. have you ever done that recently? you know - isjust unbelievable. have you ever done that recently? you know you| isjust unbelievable. have you ever. done that recently? you know you do that when you are younger, you hold your breath. do you think you can hold your breath for a long time? no. ., , hold your breath for a long time? no. ., g the hold your breath for a long time? n0-- they say _ hold your breath for a long time? no-- they say you - hold your breath for a long time? no.- they say you can - hold your breath for a long time? | no.- they say you can train no. really? they say you can train ourself no. really? they say you can train yourself very _ no. really? they say you can train yourself very quickly _ no. really? they say you can train yourself very quickly to _ no. really? they say you can train yourself very quickly to be - no. really? they say you can train yourself very quickly to be able - no. really? they say you can train yourself very quickly to be able to | yourself very quickly to be able to do that. not that, obviously that is a whole different thing, but for more than you think you might. d0 more than you think you might. do ou more than you think you might. do you think you could hold your breath for a minute? you think you could hold your breath fora minute? i you think you could hold your breath for a minute?— for a minute? i am not going to do it now.
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let's take a look at today's front pages. chaos — that is how most of the papers describe changes to quarantine rules for people returning from france. the mail reports an estimated 500,000 british travellers will be affected this weekend. the daily telegraph comments that the latest change could make it difficult to convince other countries to drop quarantine requirements for fully vaccinated travellers arriving from the uk. the paper also features a photograph of a boy enjoying a day out at the beach ahead of what could be the hottest day of the year. and of course, we will get all of that with tomasz a little later. that is also the story on the front page of the daily express. the paper reports that the rising temperatures mean a health alert has been issued for people in britain. and german newspaper faz has this dramatic image of the aftermath of the flooding there. the headline simply reads "what remains is mud, rubble and destruction"
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there are some mind—boggling pictures in the papers today. yes. there are some mind-boggling pictures in the papers today. yes, i was 'ust pictures in the papers today. yes, i was just looking... _ pictures in the papers today. yes, i was just looking... give _ pictures in the papers today. yes, i wasjust looking... give me - pictures in the papers today. yes, i wasjust looking... give me a - pictures in the papers today. yes, i i wasjust looking... give me a second and i will see if i can find this. at the moment we know that at least 120 people have died and hundreds are still missing. we will be showing you this and discussing this later this morning as well. apologies, that is slightly bad television for that moment, but i did see this picture earlier on. you know sometimes with these stories in such an epic scale, this is still in the daily telegraph... your eye is just drawn to the various parts. the calm here and this is obviously one of the mudslides. it isjust like there is this, which is a relatively normal flood scene, and then the absolute horror of that image. it does kind of bring it home. we were talkin: this does kind of bring it home. we were talking this morning, _ does kind of bring it home. we were talking this morning, we _ does kind of bring it home. we were talking this morning, we have - does kind of bring it home. we were talking this morning, we have had . talking this morning, we have had floods here and we know how emotional and how devastating it can
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be forfamilies. we have emotional and how devastating it can be for families. we have seen the flooding here in the uk, but the idea that 120 dead, 128 dead, and thatis idea that 120 dead, 128 dead, and that is why. villagers have literally been swept away with these mudslides. and we know yesterday we were being told that the weather would continue. we have had that kind of rainfall and it has moved over to the mainland in europe. i haven't actually looked at the latest forecast for europe, where the storms are right now, but yesterday's forecast was saying they are moving further east and south helps the alpine region, the balkans, italy. the good news is, perhaps the flood stricken regions at the moment aren't experiencing any real rainfall, but i will check for you what the very, very latest is from the last few hours or so.
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such a contrast. taste is from the last few hours or so. such a contrast.— is from the last few hours or so. such a contrast. we don't want any more rain in _ such a contrast. we don't want any more rain in that _ such a contrast. we don't want any more rain in that part _ such a contrast. we don't want any more rain in that part of _ such a contrast. we don't want any more rain in that part of the - such a contrast. we don't want any more rain in that part of the world, do you? more rain in that part of the world, do ou? ., ., , ,. ., do you? no, of course. in such a contrast with _ do you? no, of course. in such a contrast with what _ do you? no, of course. in such a contrast with what we _ do you? no, of course. in such a contrast with what we getting . do you? no, of course. in such a l contrast with what we getting now this weekend.— contrast with what we getting now this weekend. obviously, here. but we had the — this weekend. obviously, here. but we had the heavy _ this weekend. obviously, here. but we had the heavy rain _ this weekend. obviously, here. but we had the heavy rain earlier- this weekend. obviously, here. but we had the heavy rain earlier in - this weekend. obviously, here. but we had the heavy rain earlier in the| we had the heavy rain earlier in the week that caused flash flooding across some parts of witton. london, other areas of the south. now that is out of the way and my goodness, look at that, it is hot and sunny. we haven't had a sustained period of fine weather for a little while. it is upon us now and it is thanks to high pressure which has drifted from the azores and just a reminder, high pressure means that the area is sinking so it stops the cloud from forming and it clears the sky so a lot of sunshine on the way for many parts of the uk today. there are little subtleties in the weather. parts of western scotland a bit fresher. looking at the arrows, it is a breeze coming in off the
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atlantic ocean. for the western isles of scott lind cut it will be fresher. —— western isles of scotland it will be fresher. 30, 29 for birmingham, 3a gloucester. really, a pretty hot day and lots of hot sunshine for the british grand prix as well, both today and tomorrow. i don't mackay 20s. —— hi 20s. the other thing is the high uv levels so you may want to consider that, how you prepare for it is up to you, but lots of sunshine into the evening hours. a balmy night. right now the two bridges on the south coast of england around 18 degrees so no doubt this time tomorrow it will be pretty warm, too. city temperatures will be around 15 or 16 degrees. i wouldn't be surprised if it is even higher than that in some spots. a subtle difference in the forecast tomorrow
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because the winds blow around the high pressure like so, it is actually going to push in slightly cooler air off the atlantic in and over scotland and northern ireland and into the north of england so that means that the heat tomorrow, the hottest of the air will contract towards the southern half of the uk. here we could see around 31 also so it is the south that could have the hottest day tomorrow. then i pressure lasts into monday and then we will see the temperatures easing to comfortable levels into the week ahead. back to you both.— ahead. back to you both. thomasz, thanks very — ahead. back to you both. thomasz, thanks very much _ ahead. back to you both. thomasz, thanks very much was _ ahead. back to you both. thomasz, thanks very much was that - ahead. back to you both. thomasz, thanks very much was that we - ahead. back to you both. thomasz, thanks very much was that we will i thanks very much was that we will speak later. now it's time for this week's click.
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the list and is the home of british motorsports and i'm here at the vika championship. this is a race with a difference. as one team is made up entirely of drivers who have some form of disability but thanks to a bit of technology, they have serious hopes of taking home. more on that in a few minutes but where is spencer? i said silversto on! are you lost? spencer? i said silversto on! are ou lost? ., ., ., ., ., you lost? no, i had an invitation i could not refuse _ you lost? no, i had an invitation i could not refuse from _ you lost? no, i had an invitation i could not refuse from another - you lost? no, i had an invitation i| could not refuse from another race outfit here. we have the whole circuit to ourselves today so i am going to be on this track later, putting some brand—new assistive tech to the test. de putting some brand-new assistive tech to the test.— putting some brand-new assistive tech to the test. add racing speeds! just don't go — tech to the test. add racing speeds! just don't go breaking _ tech to the test. add racing speeds! just don't go breaking anything. - just don't go breaking anything. i'll try not to...— i'll try not to... here at silverstone, _ i'll try not to... here at silverstone, things - i'll try not to... here at silverstone, things are | i'll try not to... here at - silverstone, things are busier i'll try not to... here at _ silverstone, things are busier and noisier and that's because everyone
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here is racing for real. and we've been invited into team brit's garage. so paul is over there having a nose about and hopefully can tell us more. nosing about is what i do best. and here at the home of british motor racing in silverstone, there is certainly lots to see. but specifically, i'm here to meet team brit. a competitive motorsport team with a difference. they're made up of six disabled drivers using bespoke specially adapted cars. to compete in races against nondisabled drivers on a level playing field. my visit came during testing ahead of the latest round of the brit car championship. aaron morgan is one of team brit's to drivers in, driving an aston martin ga. aaron became
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disabled after a motocross accident. the drivers on the team use control systems developed by engineers in—house. it systems developed by engineers in-house. , ., , , in-house. it is a completely bespoke. — in-house. it is a completely bespoke, developed - in-house. it is a completely bespoke, developed i - in-house. it is a completely bespoke, developed i teamj in-house. it is a completely - bespoke, developed i team brit. their man other engineers within the team said right, we've what this problem, this is what we need to achieve and this is the solution they come up with and it is by far they come up with and it is by far the best in the world. it is they come up with and it is by far the best in the world.— the best in the world. it is linked to a seam _ the best in the world. it is linked to a seam -- _ the best in the world. it is linked to a seam -- system _ the best in the world. it is linked to a seam -- system of- the best in the world. it is linked| to a seam -- system of actuators the best in the world. it is linked - to a seam -- system of actuators and to a seam —— system of actuators and sophisticated electronic systems to drive the vehicles. can you tell us about the controls and how you use them to drive the car? yes. about the controls and how you use them to drive the car?— about the controls and how you use them to drive the car? yes, with the accelerator. — them to drive the car? yes, with the accelerator, you _ them to drive the car? yes, with the accelerator, you just _ them to drive the car? yes, with the accelerator, you just pull _ them to drive the car? yes, with the accelerator, you just pull this - them to drive the car? yes, with the accelerator, you just pull this here i accelerator, you just pull this here and there are various throttles. on the other side is the brake pedal which works in exactly the same way so you can modulated and then these grey buttons inside the steering will operate the gears. the way the car is set up, you have the shift on the left side. while you are on full throttle with your right hand, you then have your left hand to change
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then have your left hand to change the gears and then it is vice—versa for breaking as well. when you break with your left hand you can go down with your left hand you can go down with your left hand you can go down with your right hand. the with your left hand you can go down with your right hand.— with your right hand. the key thing about these _ with your right hand. the key thing about these controls _ with your right hand. the key thing about these controls is _ with your right hand. the key thing about these controls is they - with your right hand. the key thing about these controls is they are . about these controls is they are designed to be used by drivers with a range of impairments. these could be driven by someone with only the use of one arm, for example. aaron's teammate in this example is autistic and the adaptations coexist alongside the regular controls. hand controls per se aren't new. i use them to drive my car, but these are quite different to what you might find on a road car as they are tuned for a racing environment. but a racing team is more thanjust for a racing environment. but a racing team is more than just the drivers and building systems like this into already finely tuned machines isn't a straightforward process. so you usually work with different iterations of these controls. how does that process work and how did you get to where you are now? , ., and how did you get to where you are now? , . , ., and how did you get to where you are now? , . , . ., ., 4' now? festival we start with looking to the drivers _ now? festival we start with looking to the drivers and _ now? festival we start with looking to the drivers and what _ now? festival we start with looking to the drivers and what their- now? festival we start with looking to the drivers and what their needs | to the drivers and what their needs and disabilities are and what
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physical limitations they have to do mat kavanagh. —— first of all. we have panels on the steering wheel. we start with very different steering wheels to what we had now so we are constantly improving it based on driver feedback. so we are constantly improving it based on driverfeedback. there so we are constantly improving it based on driver feedback. there are lots of challenges because the cars aren't particularly good at tolerating other things being added into that network. but this part of what we do and why we do it. team brit's ultimate _ what we do and why we do it. team brit's ultimate aim _ what we do and why we do it. team brit's ultimate aim is _ what we do and why we do it. team brit's ultimate aim is to _ what we do and why we do it. team brit's ultimate aim is to make - brit's ultimate aim is to make racing history and take a team to the world—famous lamont 24—hour endurance race. becoming the first ever british all disabled team to do so. this is a lot of part amazement and part terror. other passenger in a modified chevrolet corvette c8 stingray, but it is who is driving and how he is driving that is blowing my mind. we have met sam
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schmidt before. he is a racing driver who was paralysed in an accident in 2000, and five years ago, he took us for a ride through las vegas in a car that allowed him to drive using just his head and his mouth. to drive using 'ust his head and his mouth. , _ , , to drive using 'ust his head and his mouth. , , ., mouth. so, the steering system is an ir camera system — mouth. so, the steering system is an ir camera system on _ mouth. so, the steering system is an ir camera system on whichever- mouth. so, the steering system is an ir camera system on whichever way i ir camera system on whichever way you turn your head steers the car. you turn your head into a steering angle. a tube is connected to a pressure sensor, positive pressure blowing your excelerator, and negative pressure, sipping, that is your brake pedal. the negative pressure, sipping, that is your brake pedal.— your brake pedal. the car is illegal to drive in the _ your brake pedal. the car is illegal to drive in the us _ your brake pedal. the car is illegal to drive in the us and _ your brake pedal. the car is illegal to drive in the us and sam - your brake pedal. the car is illegal to drive in the us and sam has - your brake pedal. the car is illegal to drive in the us and sam has a i to drive in the us and sam has a drivers license and since 2016, the system has been fine tuned so that it is now not only safe and responsive enough to drive at road speeds, but at race speeds. hundred and 23, 128, speeds, but at race speeds. hundred and 23,128,128, speeds, but at race speeds. hundred and 23, 128, 128, well... in fact, sam has taken this car up to
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201 mph. not today, though. anyway, the reality is, operating equipment without using arms or legs has many more implications than just on a racetrack. more implications than 'ust on a racetrack. ~ ., ,., more implications than 'ust on a racetrack. ~ ., , more implications than 'ust on a racetrack.— racetrack. where i also see this technology _ racetrack. where i also see this technology being _ racetrack. where i also see this technology being very - racetrack. where i also see this| technology being very beneficial racetrack. where i also see this i technology being very beneficial is in the workplace. industrial applications, forklifts, harvesters, trains stop it is kind of scary but i could operate a train sitting in my living room with this technology so i would really like to see disabled veterans and people of all disabilities have an opportunity to go back to work and, you know, many of them just want to be a productive member of society and haven't been given that opportunity for the technology to do it. —— or the technology. technology to do it. -- or the technology-— technology to do it. -- or the technology. technology to do it. -- or the technolo . . , ., technology. can i 'ust say, that was
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incredible. you _ technology. can i just say, that was incredible. you are _ technology. can i just say, that was incredible. you are just _ technology. can i just say, that was incredible. you are just incredible. | incredible. you are just incredible. you should try the car from over here with my controls.— you should try the car from over here with my controls. ok... i'm ha- here with my controls. ok... i'm ha - to here with my controls. ok... i'm happy to do _ here with my controls. ok... i'm happy to do that _ here with my controls. ok... i'm happy to do that but _ here with my controls. ok... i'm happy to do that but not - here with my controls. ok... i'm happy to do that but not at - here with my controls. ok... i'm happy to do that but not at thatl happy to do that but not at that speed. well, this is a first. what an honour, what a thrill. what a potential humiliation! t0 an honour, what a thrill. what a potential humiliation!— an honour, what a thrill. what a potential humiliation! to drive the car, ou potential humiliation! to drive the car. you are going _ potential humiliation! to drive the car, you are going to _ potential humiliation! to drive the car, you are going to point - potential humiliation! to drive the car, you are going to point your. car, you are going to point your nose where you want to go. don't lean, leaning is not going to work, you actually have to rotate your head. �* ., , ., ., , ., head. i'm ready to give it a shot. i'm 'ust head. i'm ready to give it a shot. l'm just going — head. i'm ready to give it a shot. l'm just going to _ head. i'm ready to give it a shot. i'm just going to let _ head. i'm ready to give it a shot. i'm just going to let it _ head. i'm ready to give it a shot. i'm just going to let it go - head. i'm ready to give it a shot. i'm just going to let it go and - head. i'm ready to give it a shot. | i'm just going to let it go and then start... �* , start... and, here is the thing, from pretty _ start... and, here is the thing, from pretty much _ start... and, here is the thing, from pretty much the - start... and, here is the thing, from pretty much the start - start... and, here is the thing, from pretty much the start of l start... and, here is the thing, i from pretty much the start of the first lap, i get it. it does take a lot of concentration but as long as i stay focused, sam,'s car...
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well, how was it? are you going to take myjob away? that well, how was it? are you going to take my job away?— take my job away? that was pretty emotional for _ take my job away? that was pretty emotional for me _ take my job away? that was pretty emotional for me because - take my job away? that was pretty emotional for me because actually| take my job away? that was pretty i emotional for me because actually it wasn't as hard as i thought it was going to be. and so it kind of shows how this kind control system could be used by ordinary people who aren't mad racing drivers. i need a few more laps. that was incredible but really hard, i'm actually a much better driver than that with normal controls, i promise. itruth? better driver than that with normal controls, i promise.— controls, i promise. why don't you do a la- controls, i promise. why don't you do a lap with _ controls, i promise. why don't you do a lap with the _ controls, i promise. why don't you do a lap with the normal _ controls, i promise. why don't you do a lap with the normal controls, | do a lap with the normal controls, i'll use my controls, and we will see who is faster.— i'll use my controls, and we will see who is faster. umm. .. all right, wish me luck- _ see who is faster. umm. .. all right, wish me luck. see, _ see who is faster. umm. .. all right, wish me luck. see, in _ see who is faster. umm. .. all right, wish me luck. see, in my— see who is faster. umm. .. all right, wish me luck. see, in my mind - see who is faster. umm. .. all right, wish me luck. see, in my mind this| wish me luck. see, in my mind this isn't a foregone conclusion. in some ways i have an advantage. i know the circuit and ways i have an advantage. i know the circuitand i'm
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ways i have an advantage. i know the circuit and i'm using the same controls that i have for my entire aduu controls that i have for my entire adult life. bill controls that i have for my entire adult life. �* controls that i have for my entire adult life.- how - controls that i have for my entire adult life.- how did - controls that i have for my entire adult life.- how did i - controls that i have for my entire | adult life.- how did i do? adult life. all right. how did i do? 150. adult life. all right. how did i do? 150-1-50---_ adult life. all right. how did i do? 150. 1.50... was— adult life. all right. how did i do? 150. 1.50... was that— adult life. all right. how did i do? 150. 1.50... was that good? - 150. 1.50. .. was that good? respectable. _ 150. 1.50. .. was that good? respectable. well, - 150. 1.50. .. was that good? respectable. well, let's- 150. 1.50... was that good? | respectable. well, let's see. 150. 1.50... was that good? - respectable. well, let's see. how are we? confident? _ respectable. well, let's see. how are we? confident? he _ respectable. well, let's see. how are we? confident? he is - respectable. well, let's see. how are we? confident? he is honest! | so... you know that bit about it not being a foregone conclusion? yeah, i don't stand a chance. j being a foregone conclusion? yeah, i don't stand a chance.— don't stand a chance. ) the first meetin: don't stand a chance. ) the first meeting we _ don't stand a chance. ) the first meeting we knew _ don't stand a chance. ) the first meeting we knew it _ don't stand a chance. ) the first meeting we knew it was - don't stand a chance. ) the first meeting we knew it was going i don't stand a chance. ) the firstl meeting we knew it was going to don't stand a chance. ) the first - meeting we knew it was going to take months, we knew it was going to take a lot of commitment from the engineers, resources. they thought it was funny after an hour i said, i'm very interested but not unless
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we can do... i'm very interested but not unless we can do- - -_ i'm very interested but not unless we can do... congratulations. 1.45. there was — we can do... congratulations. 1.45. there was no _ we can do... congratulations. 1.45. there was no contest, _ we can do... congratulations. 1.45. there was no contest, really. - we can do... congratulations. 1.45. there was no contest, really. howl we can do... congratulations. 1.45. i there was no contest, really. how do you feel? i there was no contest, really. how do ou feel? , , , , ., you feel? i guess the best word i can use is _ you feel? i guess the best word i can use is freedom. _ you feel? i guess the best word i can use is freedom. you - you feel? i guess the best word i can use is freedom. you know, i you feel? i guess the best word i i can use is freedom. you know, i'm you feel? i guess the best word i - can use is freedom. you know, i'm in total control and there are very few things in my life that i have control over and to be able to steer and gas and brakejust like control over and to be able to steer and gas and brake just like the old days... and gas and brake 'ust like the old da s... ., ., , days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring- — days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring- l've — days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring. i've gotta _ days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring. i've gotta make - days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring. i've gotta make a - days... sam, thanks for being so inspiring. i've gotta make a call. inspiring. i've gotta make a call now and let someone know how i did. hey, lara. emma, sam beat me. no surprise really when you think about it. ., ., ., , ., surprise really when you think about it. ., ., ., _, | it. no, did well. how do you feel? i feel inspired. _ it. no, did well. how do you feel? i feel inspired, very _ it. no, did well. how do you feel? i feel inspired, very humble, - it. no, did well. how do you feel? i feel inspired, very humble, a - it. no, did well. how do you feel? i feel inspired, very humble, a bit. feel inspired, very humble, a bit sick and glad its over. anyway, i'll see you later. that is it for this week. thank you so much for watching
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the this is the short version of the show so the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. as waiting for you right now on ipla er. �* , waiting for you right now on ipla er. a waiting for you right now on iplaer. ,, , , iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team _ iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on _ iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social— iplayer. as ever, you can keep up with the team on social media. i iplayer. as ever, you can keep up i with the team on social media. find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter @bbcclick.— and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watchin: and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and _ and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and will— and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and will see _ and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and will see you - and twitter @bbcclick. thanks for watching and will see you soon. i hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. records have been broken in the gulf already and we haven't even got to the final day. it is already and we haven't even got to the final day-— the final day. it is a fantastic day at the 0pen _
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the final day. it is a fantastic day at the open so — the final day. it is a fantastic day at the open so far. _ the final day. it is a fantastic day at the open so far. day - the final day. it is a fantastic day at the open so far. day three - the final day. it is a fantastic day - at the open so far. day three should be interesting as the world's best players are really turning on the style at the moment. south africa's louis oosthuizen heads the leaderboard after the second day's play at the open championship in kent. his 36—hole total of 129 is the lowest in the history of the open. our sports correspondent andy swiss has more. it is the closest most of us will get to the trophy, the open's favourite photo op doing a roaring trade. others are chasing the real thing. louis oosthuizen has already won it once, 11 years ago. oh. thing. louis oosthuizen has already won it once, 11 years ago.— won it once, 11 years ago. oh, my word. won it once, 11 years ago. oh, my word- after— won it once, 11 years ago. oh, my word. after another— won it once, 11 years ago. oh, my word. after another stunning - word. after another stunning disla , word. after another stunning display. he — word. after another stunning display. he might _ word. after another stunning display, he mightjust- word. after another stunning display, he mightjust do - word. after another stunning display, he mightjust do it i word. after another stunning - display, he mightjust do it again on a remarkable 11—under par. but in the sandwich sunshine, he was not the sandwich sunshine, he was not the only one making hay. this is morikawa's debut at the open. this first impressions go, not bad. itruihat first impressions go, not bad. what a da he first impressions go, not bad. what a day he is — first impressions go, not bad. what a day he is having. _ first impressions go, not bad. what a day he is having. he _ first impressions go, not bad. what a day he is having. he is _ first impressions go, not bad. what a day he is having. he is two - first impressions go, not bad. what a day he is having. he is two shots| a day he is having. he is two shots back while — a day he is having. he is two shots back while hopes _ a day he is having. he is two shots
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back while hopes of _ a day he is having. he is two shots back while hopes of a _ a day he is having. he is two shots back while hopes of a home - a day he is having. he is two shots| back while hopes of a home winner are led by andy sullivan, another impressive day keeping him in contention.— impressive day keeping him in contention._ the | impressive day keeping him in - contention._ the rory contention. rory mcllroy! the rory mcllroy fan — contention. rory mcllroy! the rory mcllroy fan club _ contention. rory mcllroy! the rory mcllroy fan club was _ contention. rory mcllroy! the rory mcllroy fan club was out _ contention. rory mcllroy! the rory mcllroy fan club was out in - contention. rory mcllroy! the rory mcllroy fan club was out in force i mcilroy fan club was out in force and the got a few decent moment, but 11 shots back, his hopes look remote. what they would all have done for a little bit of this. england'sjonathan thompson england's jonathan thompson thrilling england'sjonathan thompson thrilling the crowd with a hole in one. itjust doesn't get any better. it has been a day of glorious weather and some equally glorious golf. but none brighter than louis oosthuizen. on this form, he will take some stopping. roared on by his home crowd, lewis hamilton claimed pole position for formula one's first sprint race ahead of the british grand prix. as a government test event, 86,000 fans were at silverstone, with 140,000 expected on sunday. hamilton's first lap in the final session was quick enough to secure the top spot for the new qualifying race, ahead of title rival max verstappen.
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the advance party, the pacesetters. for these fans, silverstone means the whole weekend. friday is the start, sunday will be full capacity. 140,000 back to watch formula one here. , , ., ., 140,000 back to watch formula one here, , ., ., 140,000 back to watch formula one here.�* , . . ,, 140,000 back to watch formula one here, , . . ,, here. just amazing. i missed it so much last — here. just amazing. i missed it so much last year. _ here. just amazing. i missed it so much last year. i _ here. just amazing. i missed it so much last year. i was _ here. just amazing. i missed it so much last year. i was in _ here. just amazing. i missed it so much last year. i was in agony - much last year. i was in agony watching it on tv, so to be here again... you just can't beat it. do again... you 'ust can't beat it. do ou again... you 'ust can't beat it. do you have — again... you just can't beat it. do you have any anxiety about being with so many people again? i personally don't, no. i think. with so many people again? i - personally don't, no. i think they have organised _ personally don't, no. i think they have organised it _ personally don't, no. i think they have organised it well. _ personally don't, no. i think they have organised it well. it - personally don't, no. i think they have organised it well. it should | personally don't, no. i think they i have organised it well. it should be safe. _ have organised it well. it should be safe. it _ have organised it well. it should be safe, it should be fun. it is have organised it well. it should be safe, it should be fun.— safe, it should be fun. it is 'ust about being i safe, it should be fun. it is 'ust about being sensible �* safe, it should be fun. it is 'ust about being sensible and h safe, it should be fun. it isjust about being sensible and risk. about being sensible and risk assessing. _ about being sensible and risk assessing, and _ about being sensible and risk assessing, and we're - about being sensible and risk assessing, and we're to- about being sensible and risk assessing, and we're to be i about being sensible and risk- assessing, and we're to be outdoors, so i assessing, and we're to be outdoors, so i think_ assessing, and we're to be outdoors, so i think we — assessing, and we're to be outdoors, so i thinkwe can_ assessing, and we're to be outdoors, so i think we can control— assessing, and we're to be outdoors, so i think we can control to _ assessing, and we're to be outdoors, so i think we can control to a - so i think we can control to a certain— so i think we can control to a certain extent _ so i think we can control to a certain extent what - so i think we can control to a certain extent what we - so i think we can control to a certain extent what we do i so i think we can control to a i certain extent what we do and so i think we can control to a - certain extent what we do and then we will— certain extent what we do and then we will make — certain extent what we do and then we will make sure _ certain extent what we do and then we will make sure we _ certain extent what we do and then we will make sure we test - certain extent what we do and then i we will make sure we test ourselves. show _ we will make sure we test ourselves. show your— we will make sure we test ourselves. show your proof _ we will make sure we test ourselves. show your proof of— we will make sure we test ourselves. show your proof of complete - show your proof of complete vaccination or a negative test result. it is the routine british sport has become accustomed to, but not on this scale.— not on this scale. scientists who know about _ not on this scale. scientists who know about this _ not on this scale. scientists who know about this are _ not on this scale. scientists who know about this are comfortable not on this scale. scientists who - know about this are comfortable that a site of this side, and let us not
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forget this is a 550 acre site, we have as many seats here is a premiership foot football club, but ours is spread over 3.5 miles. this is an enormous site and that makes a huge difference. is an enormous site and that makes a huge difference-— huge difference. economically, for ou, huge difference. economically, for you. these — huge difference. economically, for you, these three _ huge difference. economically, for you, these three days _ huge difference. economically, for you, these three days mean - huge difference. economically, for you, these three days mean you i huge difference. economically, for. you, these three days mean you can carry on your business. is that right? without this you are gone, basically. is it as stark as that? it is as dark as that. the silverstone _ it is as dark as that. the silverstone experience i it is as dark as that. the silverstone experience includes the on—site museum charting the past and future of motorsport, changes to technology always running in conjunction with the sport's primary goal to be entertaining. while qualifying on friday brought a roar of celebration from the crowds when they knew that lewis hamilton was quickest, head of max verstappen. that means hamilton is on pole for today's sprint race. results and that determine grid positions for sunday's grand prix. it is all exciting. well, that is the intention. the organisers here seem surprised and impressed by the size of the crowd just for friday's event. certainly the sunshine helps,
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but the desire to rejoin a huge sporting occasion here seems clear. it promises to be a buzzing weekend ahead at silverstone. england lost their first t20 match against pakistan after a thriller at trent bridge. some big hitting from pakistan captain babar azam helped his side to a total of 232 from their 20 overs. it would have been england's biggest run chase ever, and thanks to a century from just 43 balls by liam livingstone they got very close, but in the end it proved too much and pakistan won by 31 runs. the second of the three—match series will be at headingley on sunday. tadej pogacar looks set to win the tour de france for the second year running. the slovenian maintained his overall lead of more than five minutes after yesterday's 19th stage. if he is still in the yellowjersey after today's time trial he will ride unopposed into paris on the final day. that is where britain's mark cavendish will be hoping to claim the outright record for stage wins after he could only finish in the main group yesterday, well behind winner matej mohoric of slovenia.
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a person has tested positive for covid—19 at the tokyo olympics athletes' village, organisers said on saturday 17july, in the first such case that adds to concerns about infections at the games which begin next week. tokyo 2020 ceo toshiro muto confirmed that a visitor from abroad who is involved in organising the games had tested positive. the opening ceremony is on friday and the games are due to be held mostly without spectators. a half—capacity wembley will watch st helens take on castleford in rugby league's challenge cup final. this is another of the government's pilot events, with up to 45,000 expected for a match between two sides who have waited a while to win this competition. joe lynskey reports. # touching me, touching you... this is the summer when blessings again. now rugby league gets its turn in the noise. it
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now rugby league gets its turn in the noise. ., , , �*, the noise. it has been the sport's tou~hest the noise. it has been the sport's toughest year. — the noise. it has been the sport's toughest year, but _ the noise. it has been the sport's toughest year, but now _ the noise. it has been the sport's toughest year, but now 45,000 i the noise. it has been the sport's - toughest year, but now 45,000 watch st helens play castleford. this challenge cup final will look more like old times.— like old times. castleford, the little mining — like old times. castleford, the little mining town _ like old times. castleford, the little mining town team, - like old times. castleford, the little mining town team, wins| like old times. castleford, the i little mining town team, wins the rugby league cup. it is a very fine achievement by the boys. castleford have won it four _ achievement by the boys. castleford have won it four times _ achievement by the boys. castleford have won it four times before, - achievement by the boys. castleford have won it four times before, but i have won it four times before, but in west yorkshire it feels distant. they last had the cup in 1986, and in the last ten years have been runners—up both here and in the super league. runners-up both here and in the super league-— runners-up both here and in the super league. runners-up both here and in the suerleauue. ., ., �* ., super league. castleford haven't won the cu for super league. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 — super league. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 years, _ super league. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 years, and _ super league. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 years, and i _ super league. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 years, and i think - the cup for 30 years, and i think for us to be able to win it, we would probably write our names in history. it is a long time coming for a team that has been around for the last seven or eight years. we want to be remembered. that is surely the point of everyone's career. you want to get to the top, you want to be remembered. st helens have more recent _ you want to be remembered. st helens have more recent memories. _ you want to be remembered. st helens have more recent memories. they - you want to be remembered. st helens have more recent memories. they last| have more recent memories. they last won it in 2008, but for one of this sport's giants, that is too long ago. in the team that day was
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22—year—old james roby, one club man who now at 35 leaves out the team. i have been lucky enough to be involved in the challenge cup winning team but never as captain, and that would really cap it off. it is a fantastic achievement and obviously great for the town and the team. i thinkjust off the back of what everyone has been through with covid and everything like that, it will give everyone a real lift. ih will give everyone a real lift. in the third round, castleford one with a golden point kick. it wasn't the same in the silence. through the year, this sport has battled on, through squad outbreaks and called off games. more than ever it depends on community. just off games. more than ever it depends on community-— on community. just to be able to re -a m on community. just to be able to repay my granddad, _ on community. just to be able to repay my granddad, who - on community. just to be able to repay my granddad, who got - on community. just to be able to repay my granddad, who got me| repay my granddad, who got me involved in the game to start off with, took me two training sessions here, there and everywhere. it would be the ultimate reward for me if i can lift that trophy up and bring it over to him at the end, with him stood in the crowd, and have a photo with my grandad. that stood in the crowd, and have a photo with my grandad-— with my grandad. at times this year the cup has —
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with my grandad. at times this year the cup has felt _ with my grandad. at times this year the cup has felt empty, _ with my grandad. at times this year the cup has felt empty, but - with my grandad. at times this year the cup has felt empty, but the - the cup has felt empty, but the oldest competition will finish with a true showpiece. wembley is ready for the noise from the north. one of castleford or st helens will go home singing. tottenham's new manager, nuno espirito santo, insists harry kane is in his words "our player". the england captain's future has been the subject of much speculation over the last few months. the bbc understands kane has an agreement that would allow him to leave spurs this summer, but his new manager wouldn't be drawn on kane's future. harry is our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. now is the moment for harry to recover his energy, to rest. and when harry comes again, we will have time to speak. i am looking forward for him tojoin the group speak. i am looking forward for him to join the group and start working together. when he arrives, he will
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feel that everyone of us has to commit ourselves to become better. and we are very ambitious. we are ambitious people. we want to do it well, and we count on harry in that. it will be back to business as usual for a lot of the players involved in the euros, and then pre—season on the euros, and then pre—season on the way, pretty much. it is hard to forget the moment denmark's christian eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest at the euros earlier this month, and that incident has put the role of defibrillators back into focus. two years ago, former tottenham hotspurs player justin edinburgh died after suffering a cardiac arrest while working out at the gym. his son now wants to make it law for sports facilities to have public access to the life saving equipment. luxmy gopal reports. schoolchildren learning the most valuable lesson of all: how to save a life. ., .,
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a life. one, two, three, four... charlie and _ a life. one, two, three, four... charlie and brett _ a life. one, two, three, four... charlie and brett has _ a life. one, two, three, four... charlie and brett has dedicated a life. one, two, three, four... - charlie and brett has dedicated his life to this cause.— life to this cause. edinburgh gets throu~h. life to this cause. edinburgh gets through- it _ life to this cause. edinburgh gets through- it is _ life to this cause. edinburgh gets through. it is after _ life to this cause. edinburgh gets through. it is after his _ life to this cause. edinburgh gets through. it is after his father, - through. it is after his father, justin edinburgh, _ through. it is after his father, justin edinburgh, former- through. it is after his father, - justin edinburgh, former tottenham hotspur player and later manager, died of a cardiac arrest age 49 at the gym. he died of a cardiac arrest age 49 at the . m. ., , died of a cardiac arrest age 49 at the . m. ., the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone _ the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone wanted _ the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone wanted my _ the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone wanted my dad - the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone wanted my dad to i the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone wanted my dad to be the gym. he was the cool dad. i everyone wanted my dad to be their dad and i am not ashamed to say that. i might say i am big headed saying that, but he obviously was. he was just a man who gave so much to people. i have lost my best friend, i have lost the person i look up to, and you live with it every day,. the grief doesn't go away. every day,. the grief doesn't go awa . , g , every day,. the grief doesn't go awa . y . , , , away. the gym where justin suffered away. the gym where justin suffered a cardiac arrest _ away. the gym where justin suffered a cardiac arrest did _ away. the gym where justin suffered a cardiac arrest did not _ away. the gym where justin suffered a cardiac arrest did not have - away. the gym where justin suffered a cardiac arrest did not have a i a cardiac arrest did not have a defibrillator. ii a cardiac arrest did not have a defibrillator.— a cardiac arrest did not have a defibrillator. , . ., defibrillator. if my dad when he had his cardiac arrest _ defibrillator. if my dad when he had his cardiac arrest was _ defibrillator. if my dad when he had his cardiac arrest was in _ defibrillator. if my dad when he had his cardiac arrest was in a _ defibrillator. if my dad when he had his cardiac arrest was in a facility i his cardiac arrest was in a facility where it was by law required, he might still be around, and that is played on my mind forever. charlie set u- a played on my mind forever. charlie set up a foundation _ played on my mind forever. charlie set up a foundation to _ played on my mind forever. charlie set up a foundation to change i played on my mind forever. charlie set up a foundation to change the i set up a foundation to change the law to make it compulsory for health and sports facilities to have a defibrillator on site. the aim is
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also to improve access and first aid training. also to improve access and first aid trainina. ., ., also to improve access and first aid trainina. ., ._ ., ., also to improve access and first aid trainina. ., ., . ., ., ., training. today i have learnt how to do cpr accurately _ training. today i have learnt how to do cpr accurately and _ training. today i have learnt how to do cpr accurately and how- training. today i have learnt how to do cpr accurately and how to i training. today i have learnt how to do cpr accurately and how to do i training. today i have learnt how to i do cpr accurately and how to do that chest— do cpr accurately and how to do that chest presses and how to use defibrillators. we chest presses and how to use defibrillators.— chest presses and how to use defibrillators. we are sending defibrillators _ defibrillators. we are sending defibrillators to _ defibrillators. we are sending defibrillators to gyms - defibrillators. we are sending defibrillators to gyms and i defibrillators. we are sending i defibrillators to gyms and sports companies — defibrillators to gyms and sports companies and _ defibrillators to gyms and sports companies and schools, - defibrillators to gyms and sports companies and schools, and i defibrillators to gyms and sports companies and schools, and if. defibrillators to gyms and sportsl companies and schools, and if we defibrillators to gyms and sports i companies and schools, and if we see anyone _ companies and schools, and if we see anyone in_ companies and schools, and if we see anyone in danger. _ companies and schools, and if we see anyone in danger. we— companies and schools, and if we see anyone in danger, we can _ companies and schools, and if we see anyone in danger, we can do - companies and schools, and if we see anyone in danger, we can do cpr- companies and schools, and if we see anyone in danger, we can do cpr to i anyone in danger, we can do cpr to them. _ anyone in danger, we can do cpr to them. , ., , ., anyone in danger, we can do cpr to them. ,~. , ., ~ ., ., them. everyone should know about it so that they — them. everyone should know about it so that they can _ them. everyone should know about it so that they can help _ them. everyone should know about it so that they can help people - them. everyone should know about it so that they can help people in i them. everyone should know about it so that they can help people in need| so that they can help people in need as well, just likejustin edinburgh. needed help but he didn't get it in time. . . needed help but he didn't get it in time. , ., , needed help but he didn't get it in time. , . , ., needed help but he didn't get it in time. , ., ,., , time. this man is a spurs defender, like justin was. _ time. this man is a spurs defender, like justin was. he _ time. this man is a spurs defender, like justin was. he is _ time. this man is a spurs defender, like justin was. he is lending - time. this man is a spurs defender, like justin was. he is lending his i likejustin was. he is lending his support to the campaign, including playing in a friendly against oriente to fund for the foundation. it is asking me to deliver a shock to analyse the hart. the it is asking me to deliver a shock to analyse the hart.— to analyse the hart. the role of defibrillators _ to analyse the hart. the role of defibrillators was _ to analyse the hart. the role of defibrillators was thrown i to analyse the hart. the role of defibrillators was thrown into i to analyse the hart. the role of i defibrillators was thrown into sharp focus after his team—mate, christian eriksen, suffered a cardiac arrest when he collapsed on the pitch earlier this month. iainth when he collapsed on the pitch earlier this month.— when he collapsed on the pitch earlier this month. with what went on at the euros, _
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earlier this month. with what went on at the euros, it _ earlier this month. with what went on at the euros, it has _ earlier this month. with what went on at the euros, it has shocked i earlier this month. with what went j on at the euros, it has shocked the world. i have seen christian smile and trained with him a few times, and trained with him a few times, and is human that position was quite upsetting. i think it is a good cause. i think every ticket we sell, the money will be donated to the justin edinburgh foundation. access to a defibrillator _ justin edinburgh foundation. access to a defibrillator will _ justin edinburgh foundation. access to a defibrillator will save _ justin edinburgh foundation. access to a defibrillator will save many, i to a defibrillator will save many, many _ to a defibrillator will save many, many lives, because every minute that is_ many lives, because every minute that is lost — many lives, because every minute that is lost before a defibrillator arrives — that is lost before a defibrillator arrives gives 10% reduction in survivat _ arrives gives 10% reduction in survival. survival in this country is poor~ — survival. survival in this country is pm we _ survival. survival in this country is poor. we could do much better. from _ is poor. we could do much better. from the — is poor. we could do much better. from the tragic circumstances of his father's death, charlie hopes, will come a positive impact to help save the lives of others. it is one of those stories where we took quite a bit here and we have had demonstrations in the studio, and it is hugely important. here's tomasz with a look at this morning's weather. lots of people if they are heading
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out, maybe going on a train journey and looking out at a blue sky. definitely. it is looking absolutely stunning today. just in time for the weekend, hot and sunny. obviously not everybody likes it hot but let us face it, we could do with some settled, pleasant weather. all thanks to high pressure which has drifted in all the way from the azores. it has —— is actually called and azores high, because it wobbles its way towards us from the azores. the conceive a lot of cloud in the sky across the bulk of england and wales today, also in southern scotland. northern ireland looking sunny. the one place where it is probably going to be a little bit more cloudy, certainly cooler, a little bit fresher with splits and spots of rain is around these western coasts of scotland, but eastern scotland is much warmer. the lower limbs on the south of scotland
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warm as well. 26 expected in northern ireland, and look at that. we have 30 there across parts of yorkshire and lincolnshire, pushing 30 through the midlands, down into gloucestershire. high 20s for the south coast of england as well. st ives, places like that, will be around 2a degrees. british grand prix high 20s both today and tomorrow. and the uv levels are obviously going to be very high. many of us will be flocking to the parks, so don't forget that. this is what it looks like for this evening. so clear skies again. a really beautiful, balmy evening out there. it will be one of those evenings where the light winds almost feel like you are abroad on holiday somewhere, that kind of thing. a bit more cloud overnight across the north—west of the uk and a little bit of rain there for the north highlands. actually, tomorrow because winds blow around the winds are light in the high pressure but they are still there. the slightly fresher air is coming off the
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atlantic tomorrow and invading, coming in and over scotland, northern ireland and the north of england. you can see some yellows here indicating fresher conditions. 20 in glasgow, 21 in belfast, perhaps a five degrees drop tomorrow. that means the heat will be contracting towards the southern half of the uk. we will continue to see this pattern, actually, into monday as well. high—pressure brings very warm and settled weather but it all depends how the winds blow around the high—pressure. they can drag on that cooler air of the atlantic. you can see that it is not going to get cool across the south but certainly not quite so hot. rather than, say, 31 which we might have in london, we are going to be down to the mid 20s, which for most of us is almost a perfect summer temperature. back to you two. mark kermode has this week's
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edition of the film review. hello and welcome to the film review with me, mark kermode, rounding up the best new movies available for viewing in cinemas and in the home. far and away the most important and uplifting new release this week is summer of soul, questlove�*s sundance award—winning documentary that uncovers a treasure trove of footstomping, heart—stopping live music footage that, incredibly, has remained hidden for half a century. are you ready, black people? crowd: ready! are you really ready? ready! are you ready to listen to all the beautiful black voices, the beautiful black feeling, the beautiful black waves moving in beautiful air? are you ready, black people? are you ready?
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documenting the 1969 harlem cultural festival that has until now been effectively erased from pop—culture history, summer of soul boasts a jaw—dropping roster of acts who performed in mount morris park over six consecutive weekends — including stevie wonder, nina simone, sly and the family stone, gladys knight and the pips, bb king, the fifth dimension and many, many more. nobody ever heard of - the harlem culture festival. nobody would believe that happened. the acts are amazing, the atmosphere electrifying and the footage, frankly, astonishing, not least because it's lain unseen for so long. while mike wadleigh's woodstock and the maysles brothers' gimme shelter have long been considered the definitive documents of the highs and lows of pop culture in �*69, summer of soul makes both look like a footnote to the main event — musically, politically, culturally. # it took me by surprise, i must say... from mavis staples and mahalia jackson performing doctor martin luther king's
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favourite song, take my hand, precious lord to nina simone unveiling a new composition inspired by the off—broadway stage show to be young, gifted and black, this is some of the most thrilling concert footage you'll ever see. # can't you hear me callin' to ya? astutely chosen newsreels put the performances in context, coming at the end of a decade of unrest and assassinations, with the war raging in vietnam and civil rights under attack at home. when neil armstrong takes one small step for a man, a concertgoer reacts by stating, "never mind the moon, let's get some of that cash in harlem" — a sentiment echoed by the reverend jesse jackson. the fact that no one was interested in this historic footage of the harlem cultural festival for so long stands as evidence of the whitewashing of american history, a subject that seems particularly pertinent at the moment. plaudits, then, to director ahmir thompson, aka musician questlove, who begins and ends his
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film with a festival—goer viewing the newly uncovered footage for the first time, and then tearfully thanking the film—maker for proving to him that he isn't crazy — this really happened. we wanted progress. we are black people and we should be proud of this. we were coming together to say this is our world, and how beautiful it was. thanks to this terrific film, that's something we can all share in. # i can take you higher... we believed in what we felt in here. just go do it! summer of soul is in cinemas now and on disney+ from july the 30th. this is our last stand.
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back in 2013, writer—director james demonaco's dystopian horror—action cheapie the purge became a money—spinning hit, taking close to $90 million at the box office after costing only three. partly inspired by an episode of star trek, the film largely played out in a single home in a near—future america where 12 hours of murderous lawlessness are officially sanctioned every year. subsequent instalments broadened the scope, moving the series closer to the escape from new york template that demonaco had originally envisaged, but had been unable to explore due to lack of resources. now, following two sequels and a prequel, we have a fifth instalment, the forever purge, which opened to sniffy reviews and disappointing box office a couple of weeks ago in the us, which is a shame because i thought it was one of the best instalments in the series. one night only. rest of the year is peaceful.
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help me! she screams. written by demonaco and directed by everardo valerio gout, making his hollywood feature debut, the forever purge begins withjuan and adela crossing the border into the us, starting new lives in texas away from murderous drug cartels. on the eve of the fascistic new founding fathers' annual purge, the couple take refuge in a migrant shelter, knowing that they'll be targets for attack. but even after the i2—hour curfew, the killing continues, led by white supremacists worshiping guns, sedition and segregation. you don't have to be a political scientist to appreciate that there's a thin line between the satirical horrors of the forever purge and real—life news reports of the recent violent assault on the american capitol by a group that included neo—nazis. as with all effective dystopian fiction, the future is now. the message may not be subtle,
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but the film is an effectively blunt tool — a mainstream exploitation vehicle designed to entertain while ensuring that no one leaves the theatre without realising what it was all about. plaudits are due to ana de la reguera, who played a key role in zack snyder's zombie romp, army of the dead, and who here delivers a hefty punch, fronting a cast that includes will patton, tenoch huerta and josh lucas. as for the director, he handles the forever purge�*s numerous action sequences with efficient gusto, mixing politics and popcorn thrills to crowd pleasing effect. it's in cinemas now. "come down, come down," his father cried. "you'll be much safer by my side." page. at the opposite end of the dramatic spectrum, nowhere special is a northern ireland—set drama from writer—director uberto pasolini, whose impressive cv includes producing the international hit the full monty and directing
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the melancholy drama still life. inspired by a newspaper story, nowhere special centres onjames norton'sjohn, a window cleaner single—handedly raising his young son, michael. john is dying and is desperate to find the perfect family to care for his child after he's gone, but that's proving to be an impossible task, not least becausejohn wants to protect michael from the reality of his situation for as long as possible. i don't want him to understand death. not yet. while the set—up may sound mawkishly sentimental, pasolini keeps things nicely underplayed, relying on the on—screen chemistry between norton and young daniel lamont to tell the story with little dramatic padding. as the pair plod from house to house interviewing possible adoptive parents, their reactions are as eloquent as they are sometimes silent, a look frequently saying much more than words could.
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ace cinematographer marius panduru keeps things deceptively simple, his eye for detail finding the magical in the everyday and showing that this very personal tale has universal appeal. bye, son. nowhere special is in cinemas now. from northern ireland to france for the bizarre horror—comedy hybrid deerskin, a very strange but delightfully unhinged offering from film—maker, musician and dj quentin dupieux, aka mr oizo. jean dujardin, who won an oscarfor the artist, plays georges, who blows all his cash on a killer style deerskin jacket before heading
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off into the mountains, armed only with a digital camera. checking into a remote hotel, georges tries to pass himself off as a film—maker, impressing local bartender denise, played by portrait of a lady on fire star adele haenel. denise has dreams of editing films, and she soon finds herself cutting together georges's incoherent home movies. she sees something in them, but she wants more. and so, driven by the voice of his jacket, which tells him it longs to be the only jacket in the world, georges sets out to feed this growing obsession. there are echoes of the gruesome belgian black comedy man bites dog in georges's increasingly insane film—making adventures, along with shades of the killer dress riffs from tobe hooper�*s i'm dangerous tonight, or more recently, peter strickland's in fabric. but the tone of dupieux's film is altogether more goofy, even as killer style turns to killer instinct and mockumentary slips into snuff movie territory.
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indeed, what's remarkable isjust how upbeat things remain, leaving us laughing at, or perhaps even with georges, as he enters the mouth of madness. it's a credit to haenel that she manages to play her role with such a straight bat, providing the perfect foil for dujardin�*s madness. as long as she's invested in his twisted endeavours, then we have a reason to keep watching — a point of entry into this increasingly absurdist but weirdly entertaining oddity. deerskin is in cinemas now. my name's eep. .. ..and we're the world's first family, the croods. he groans. another glorious morning. i'll leave you with news of a new age, the belated sequel to 2013's prehistoric animation the croods. venturing out into the world in search of their tomorrow, the caveman crood family find themselves face—to—face with the future in the form of the bettermans.
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as cultures class, so changes occur, with ryan reynolds's guy sporting a man bun while nicholas cage�*s grug learns about man caves and bro bonding. come on, thunk, we're going outside. i don't want to, i'm watching birds! in my day, we didn't stare at birds, we fought them! j let me live my life! meanwhile, emma stone's eep teaches the bettermans' daughter, dawn, voiced by kelly marie tran, to walk on the wild side, as the whole plot careens unevenly toward a banana field showdown with weaponised punch monkeys. really. it's hard the classic fair with all the bestjokes aimed at the adults, leaving the kids to gulp at the often spectacular visuals while mum and dad laugh at the social satire and pop references. even if you're struggling to remember much about the film, which is in cinemas now, five minutes after it's finished. that's it for this week. thanks for watching the film review. stay safe, and i'll see you next week. my little sister... my little sister, she bites a lot, and my dad doesn't even know
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about this one. whoa, peanut toe!
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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a surprise change to the quarantine rules for travellers to france. fully vaccinated holidaymakers will still have to self—isolate on return, sparking anger and confusion in the travel industry. i booked everything 2a hours ago and now everything is changing, so quite disappointing. the race to find survivors of the floods that have wreaked havoc across western europe. more than 120 people are dead. hundreds are still missing. more than 35 million people in england will be offered a flu jab this winter. they'll include the over—50s and children up to the age of 16.
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plenty of fun in the sun for the thousands heading to this weekend's sporting events. at the open, breaking records, louis oosthuizen leads by two shots at the halfway point. and at silverstone, more than 80,000 fans are expected for the new qualifying race ahead of tomorrow's british grand prix. we've just had a very balmy night and it promises to be a sunny and very warm day. and guess what — same tomorrow. it is saturday i7july. fully vaccinated travellers returning to england and wales from france will still have to spend ten days in quarantine, the government has announced. the rule takes effect from monday when many other covid restrictions, including those around travel to amber list countries, are being eased.
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with more details here is our political correspondent jonathan blake. for those hoping for a holiday in france this summer, plans may have to change. from monday the country will stay on the amber list, but unlike other destinations in that category, adults who are fully vaccinated will still have to isolate for ten days on their return to england and wales. i was planning on going to france for a short trip, as i have a family wedding there coming at the end ofjuly. that was the plan. i've — the wedding has been delayed, it was supposed to be last year. and i booked everything 2a hours ago and now everything is changing, so quite disappointing. concern about cases in france of the beta variant of coronavirus, first discovered in south africa, have prompted the move. ministers stopped short of adding france to the red list, which requires enforced hotel quarantine. but the health secretary, sajid javid, said the government had always been clear it would not hesitate to take rapid action
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at the borders to stop the spread of covid—i9. travel industry bodies accuse the government of a confused approach to international travel, though, and labour also criticised the change. really the government has caused chaos here. they made an announcement that double—jabbed people coming from amber list countries did not need to quarantine. now they seem to have changed their mind on a fourth category, an amber list plus, if you like, which is creating chaos for the travelling public and the travel industry yet again. allowing adults who are fully vaccinated to avoid isolation on their return from amber list countries offers hope of a holiday for some, but the decision to make france an exception is a sign of uncertainty in government about how the pandemic will pan out. jonathan blake, bbc news. our political correspondent jessica parkerjoins us now from west london.
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this is a decision made at 8:30pm last night. track forward to what sort of reaction there has been stop as we have been hearing, some angry reaction particularly from travel companies. {lit reaction particularly from travel companies— reaction particularly from travel comanies. , , , , companies. of course, it is slightly reminiscent— companies. of course, it is slightly reminiscent of— companies. of course, it is slightly reminiscent of last _ companies. of course, it is slightly reminiscent of last summer, - companies. of course, it is slightly reminiscent of last summer, when| companies. of course, it is slightly i reminiscent of last summer, when we would see these last—minute changes to travel plans. ministers are saying, of course, that they have always been clear that they could take what they described as rapid action. but what is quite unusual in this case is that france has been sort of put into this subcategory of the amber list. ministers clearly have not felt the situation is bad enough to put france on the red list but they have felt the situation is bad enough to not want to go ahead with that relaxation for travellers returning from france on monday. and the government will know that this will cause vocal frustration amongst travellers, amongst, as i said
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before, travel companies. they will know as well that they will be accused of causing chaos and confusion two days out from the lifting of restrictions that we are expecting in england. but they decided to press ahead with it anyway, and i think it therefore shows that the government is clearly feeling nervous about the coronavirus situation, and as well that we are not on some unstoppable journey to freedom and lifting measures — certainly, at least, not when it comes to international travel. ., ., ., ,, , ., more than 35 million people in england will get a free flu jab this winter. over—50s and all children up to 16 will be included. the expanded programme will be delivered alongside booster jabs for covid—i9. here is our health and science correspondent james gallagher. flu all but disappeared last winter. the restrictions, social distancing and mask wearing that slowed down the spread of coronavirus also prevented the usual round of winter bugs.
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but now we're getting closer to normal, the fear is we could have a bigger than usual flu season. that could combine with covid and other infections to put the nhs under intense pressure, so england is launching its biggest ever flu vaccination programme. more than 35 million people will be offered the vaccine for free. so who can get it? doctors, nurses, care home staff and otherfront—line and care workers, anyone over the age of 50, pregnant women, people at high risk from flu, including those with asthma, and there will be a significant expansion of the number of children offered the vaccine. children get a nasal spray instead of an injection. two— and three—year—olds as well as all primary school children will be offered the vaccine as usual. last year only secondary school pupils up to the age of 12 were included, but this will increase to all those i6 and under. it's desperately important
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that we all get vaccinated if we're invited this year, because last year cases were very low, but they were partly low because people weren't going out and about and they weren't mixing, but they were also partly low because so many people were vaccinated. over 80% of over 65s took up the invitation to get vaccinated. this year we've got more people than ever being invited, and that is going to be one of the best ways of preventing the hospitals from being unable to cope. meanwhile, there could also be more covid jabs this winter. the nhs is drawing up plans to give a third dose to more than 30 million people if they are needed. pop—up vaccine centres are opening across england in shops and parks this weekend as part of an nhs grab—a—jab initiative. the vaccination hubs will be set up in primark stores, the tate modern and even the open championship. the aim is to boost the vaccine
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uptake among young people ahead of monday, when the majority of coronavirus restrictions are set to be lifted. from today there will no longer be a limit on the number of people meeting outside in wales as some coronavirus restrictions are eased. the relaxation also allows six adults from different households to meet indoors and organised indoor events can start taking place with up to 1,000 people seated and 200 standing. the united states wants to build a giant new radar system in the uk to track objects in deep space. the us space force is developing the global system to identify potential targets in areas where a lot of military satellites are positioned. the ministry of defence said the new radar capability has the potential to make space safer and more secure. the search is on to find the hundreds still missing
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in the worst floods for decades in parts of western europe. after sustained heavy rainfall in germany, belgium and the netherlands, three major rivers burst their banks destroying homes. authorities have called the flooding a humanitarian disaster. our correspondent anna holligan is in the dutch town of guelle for us this morning. we have been speaking to the last couple of days it yesterday when we were talking to you we saw the devastation and the impact it is having on people's lives, those who of course are struggling with their homes and also very mindful hundreds are still missing and 120 and rising debt. . , are still missing and 120 and rising debt. ., , ., ., ., debt. that is one of the reason so many peeple _ debt. that is one of the reason so many peeple here _ debt. that is one of the reason so many people here say _ debt. that is one of the reason so many people here say they - debt. that is one of the reason so many people here say they feel i debt. that is one of the reason so | many people here say they feel as though they are the lucky ones. this
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is peter and bridget�*s home. peter hasjust is peter and bridget�*s home. peter has just put this pump into is peter and bridget�*s home. peter hasjust put this pump into position at his doorway. he has tried to block the water from flooding in. i can see it is already up the stairs and ijust asked him, where are you going to pump it to? that is the problem here, becausejust like all around, they are entirely flooded. where i am standing now is supposed to be a road and there are worms floating in the water. we spoke to one woman who lives just up the other side of this street and she said there are now fish swimming in her garden. where we are is guelle. we are about 20 kilometres from both the german and belgian border stop scenes like these are reflected right across this region, which is now officially considered to be a disaster zone. so many of the people here are trying to clean up, but they are going to need more help. irate they are going to need more help. we will be talking about this a little bit more. thank you so much, anna
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holly can in guelle. we can speak now to gregor jericho who was forced to evacuate his home after it flooded, south of cologne in the north rhine—westphalia region, one of the worst hit areas in germany. very good to see you this morning. i know you are going through quite a bit. we have seen some of the damage to property and some of the wider pictures. you explained to me that in amongst your neighbours and your family there has been loss of life. yes, it is very sad because the city where i live was completely cut off from the outside. there was no electricity, no internet and the cellular network has also collapsed. people are extremely worried about their loved ones because they cannot reach anyone in the city. for example, in my street a young woman
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was lying under a car and my brother pulled her out and tried to revive her but she was already dead. she drowned under the car. i am her but she was already dead. she drowned under the car.— drowned under the car. i am so sor . drowned under the car. i am so sorry- this _ drowned under the car. i am so sorry- this is — drowned under the car. i am so sorry. this is something - drowned under the car. i am so sorry. this is something i - drowned under the car. i am so sorry. this is something i knowj drowned under the car. i am so - sorry. this is something i know has been... many households are dealing with this and the numbers of those still missing is really alarming as well. , ., , , , well. yes, and yesterday we visited the ci of well. yes, and yesterday we visited the city of rheinbach _ well. yes, and yesterday we visited the city of rheinbach again - well. yes, and yesterday we visited the city of rheinbach again and - the city of rheinbach again and everywhere people sat crying in front of broken houses and the city looks like a battlefield. the streets are torn open everywhere and the bridges have collapsed and cars are in places where they normally never get. it was really... you can't believe it.— never get. it was really... you can't believe it. tell me a little bit about what _ can't believe it. tell me a little bit about what help _ can't believe it. tell me a little bit about what help is - can't believe it. tell me a little bit about what help is coming i can't believe it. tell me a little l bit about what help is coming to people like yourself and the scenes
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you have described. what kind of help is available? what is being done? . help is available? what is being done? , ., , ., ., ., done? rheinbach is a small town and eve one done? rheinbach is a small town and everyone knows _ done? rheinbach is a small town and everyone knows each _ done? rheinbach is a small town and everyone knows each other, - done? rheinbach is a small town and everyone knows each other, so - done? rheinbach is a small town and everyone knows each other, so therej everyone knows each other, so there is a lot of solidarity. neighbours are helping each other, so it is like the hull city has come together and people are helping each other. it is really heartwarming seeing it. given what you described at the beginning about the loss of life of one of your neighbours, i suppose damage to property doesn't seem so important, but i think your own home there has been affected quite badly. yes, my street is completely torn open and the cars from my neighbours were washed away. the sellers are completely full of water —— the
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cellars are completely full of water and completely damaged, yes, there is no electricity. i and completely damaged, yes, there is no electricity.— is no electricity. i think we 'ust showed, actually, i is no electricity. i think we 'ust showed, actually, an i is no electricity. i think we just showed, actually, an image i is no electricity. i think we just| showed, actually, an image for is no electricity. i think we just - showed, actually, an image for our viewers here which i think was your street and it was basically water just rushing past the cars. yes. how is it riaht just rushing past the cars. yes. how is it right now? _ just rushing past the cars. yes how is it right now? the image just rushing past the cars. i9; how is it right now? the image we are seeing, and i am assuming this is from yesterday, is all the streets completely covered in water. you can't see the road, you can't see gardens at all. has that changed? yes, for now it is dry but it is full of debris and rubbish. there are some cars lying there, so there is no more water but it is hard to get through the city.—
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is no more water but it is hard to get through the city. thank you so much for taking _ get through the city. thank you so much for taking time _ get through the city. thank you so much for taking time to _ get through the city. thank you so much for taking time to speak- get through the city. thank you so much for taking time to speak to i get through the city. thank you so l much for taking time to speak to us this morning and sharing your story. we wish you well in the next few days. thank you.— we'rejoined now by german minister stephan mayer, whojoins us from munich. good morning. well, it is a horrible morning. what is happening with the efforts to find those who are missing? can you update us on the numbers and the rising death toll? it is really an absolute catastrophe, it is a disaster stop in germany especially in the two states that are worst hit. and neighbouring countries like belgium, the netherlands and luxembourg. in germany, it is only mid term number so more than 130 dead people but
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unfortunately we have to expect that this number will increase even more because more than thousands of persons are still missing, and now, fortunately the levels of the rivers are declining and the flooding is become weaker but on the other hand, certainly this means that a lot of dead persons will be detected in the next hours i guess. certainly we provide any help we have in germany to the two state, about 1000 members of our army to the two state, about 1000 members of ourarmy are to the two state, about 1000 members of our army are in deployment in the two state. the red cross has 3500 volunteers there. our technical relief agency more than 1000 so it
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is, we have enough capacities in order to help the persons but it is really a humanitarian catastrophe for those who died or are injured. we have hundreds of persons who are injured. so it is really unbelievable.- injured. so it is really unbelievable. :, : :, ~ :, unbelievable. the chancellor angela merkel has warned _ unbelievable. the chancellor angela merkel has warned that _ unbelievable. the chancellor angela merkel has warned that it _ unbelievable. the chancellor angela merkel has warned that it will - merkel has warned that it will worsen in the coming days. there are people who have had to flee their homes and homes have been devastated. what reassurance is being offered to them that they will have homes to go to sooner rather than later? it have homes to go to sooner rather than later?— than later? it is a difficult situation _ than later? it is a difficult situation on _ than later? it is a difficult situation on the - than later? it is a difficult situation on the one - than later? it is a difficult| situation on the one hand. than later? it is a difficult - situation on the one hand. on the other hand we perceive a lot of help by neighbours in the different villages and different cities. there are a lot of donations given to the homeless now. hotels are offered to
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them or private houses, private households offered to accommodate those who had to leave their homes and you had to be evacuated —— who had to be evacuated for stops certainly the governments of the two states and also the federal government of germany offered a lot of financial aid but certainly that is necessary no doubt, but on the other hand, all the ones who are affected by this horrible flooding, they say it wouldn't be necessary. certainly money now is not the decisive hurdle but the first task now is to help those who are still in there. afterwards we have to discuss about the financial aid. and
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discuss about the financial aid. and of course, questions will be asked stop there have been warnings. globally. human induced climate change is going to bring pulses of extreme weather and this is what has been experienced. do you agree? absolutely. certainly it cannot be denied that this horrible events, this horrible disaster is linked to global warming and climate change and no reasonable politician doesn't denies this. and certainly we have to do more and we have to speed up and accelerate our measures in order to fight against the global warming. thank you very much for your time. let'sjust pick up thank you very much for your time. let's just pick up with thomasz. i
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know you have been casting your eye on what has been going on there and what caused the problems in the first place but also about the situation moving now because there are some real problems. in situation moving now because there are some real problems.— situation moving now because there are some real problems. in terms of the river for — are some real problems. in terms of the river for the _ are some real problems. in terms of the river for the flood _ are some real problems. in terms of the river for the flood stricken - the river for the flood stricken region for now and the short term, there is good news that there is no further rainfall expected in fact, the high pressure will be dominating the high pressure will be dominating the weather there as well. there are no storms in the forecast in the last few hours or so stop it has been quite stormy in other parts of germany, central germany, southern germany, central germany, southern germany around the alps and the thinking is that through the weekend, there could be some storms moving through croatia, the czech republic and poland as well and into other areas of eastern europe so we could be seeing some nasty storms in the next couple of days, they don't seem to have the same pattern as
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what we had over germany. that is some good news there are at least for now. thank you for going through that. that is where the news focus is. what about whether at home? for us it is looking good and for most of us, clear blue skies. hot as well. temperatures will probably hit 30 or 31 degrees today and tomorrow probably we will get a little over 30. here is the high—pressure that is dominating the weather. the flood stricken region was around here and you can see some storms around eastern parts of germany. whether if we look at this again, this part of europe is actually looking dry today and just off the edge of the screen you can see a few showers. but for most of us, the weather here in the uk is quiet so we have a little bit
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of drizzle and a clouds this afternoon around western and northern parts of scotland. fresher here, 17 degrees. but looking at aberdeen, 25. we might hit in some spots around northern ireland the mid— 20s. you can see inland is hitting 30 degrees in gloucester and hull as well. a lot of sunshine for the british grand prix as well both today and tomorrow. we might even hit 30 degrees on sunday. we have a balmy evening on the way and ahead of that, once again it a reminder of the high uv levels and today given the high uv levels and today given the clear blue skies. a balmy evening. a bit more cloud across scotland and actually hear we're a slightly fresher cooler air coming off the atlantic and that will be a trend for the second part of the weekend. yes it is still going to be
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warm in the morning with 15 or 16 degrees at the trend for tomorrow will be for the slightly cooler air to spill in across scotland, northern ireland and the north of england so these areas here tomorrow could be around four or five degrees cooler so overall, for most of us is is the hottest day, it will be the hottest day today but tomorrow in the north it will be a bit fresher, however, the peak in the temperatures will be tomorrow as the heat contracts towards the south of the country. there is the high—pressure for monday. you can see high—pressure actually dominates the weather across most of western europe where we have had the floods are so good news on the weather front there, extending into next week and actually settled weather for most of us next week as well. irate for most of us next week as well. we will continue to report on these storms. we have seen germany and in
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the past few days we have had record temperatures in the united states. ros atkins is taking a look at recent heatwaves around the world — and why they're worrying scientists. this is a story of two heatwaves that have set record temperatures, started wildfires and killed people. they connect to what we are doing to our planet and how we are tackling climate change was not because society is absolutely clear, this is all part of same story. irate society is absolutely clear, this is all part of same story.— all part of same story. we are seeinu all part of same story. we are seeing the — all part of same story. we are seeing the effects _ all part of same story. we are seeing the effects of- all part of same story. we are seeing the effects of climate i all part of same story. we are - seeing the effects of climate change in california and other parts of the country and the world as well but it is already happening. irate country and the world as well but it is already happening.— country and the world as well but it is already happening. we can't keep waitin: to is already happening. we can't keep waiting to act- _ is already happening. we can't keep waiting to act. let's _ is already happening. we can't keep waiting to act. let's take _ is already happening. we can't keep waiting to act. let's take stage - is already happening. we can't keep waiting to act. let's take stage by l waiting to act. let's take stage by stage. by looking at how these heatwaves fit into a far bigger picture, and we will start up close. on the western side of north america. the first heatwave began in late june. america. the first heatwave began in latejune. this is portland in the
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us. this is british columbia in canada. and temperature records were being smashed. lytton, canada's highest ever territory. move over the border to seattle in the us was a bit went from this — to this. and further south in portland, the old record was beaten by another big margin. and none of this is normal. this is how one canadian climatologist puts it. and here is whether historian christopher burt. nature is telling us this isn't normal, too. on the
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pacific coast it is estimated over1 billion marine creatures have been killed. this man runs an oyster business in canada.— killed. this man runs an oyster business in canada. basically cooked the oysters. — business in canada. basically cooked the oysters, clams, _ business in canada. basically cooked the oysters, clams, mussels, - business in canada. basically cooked the oysters, clams, mussels, mosti business in canada. basically cooked| the oysters, clams, mussels, most of the oysters, clams, mussels, most of the muscles around here now are all gone. i clams, the muscles around here now are all gone. iclams, mussels the muscles around here now are all gone. i clams, mussels was not you can see all of the clams are all dead. : :, :, :, :, :, , , dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. _ dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. this _ dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. this shows - dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. this shows the i followed by another. this shows the 10th ofjuly in the us. red means hotter than average. this is death valley in california. it has reached 54.4 c valley in california. it has reached 54.1; c stop if confirmed, that would equal the highest temperature ever reliably recorded anywhere. and if thatis reliably recorded anywhere. and if that is the heat, what of its —— one of its consequences is wildfires, a lot of them. back to lytton in canada,it lot of them. back to lytton in canada, it was nearly wiped out by a fire. across california there has been well over 1000 wildfires since april, many in the last two months. and the link to the heat is expose
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it. allen is actually all very related to extreme heat. so with extreme heat, that triggers a drought. extreme heat, that triggers a drou . ht. . extreme heat, that triggers a drouuht. , :, , : :, drought. -- it is actually. we are all experiencing _ drought. -- it is actually. we are all experiencing extreme - drought. -- it is actually. we are| all experiencing extreme drought drought. -- it is actually. we are i all experiencing extreme drought in california and with that extreme drought, the wildfires are also more severe. : :. drought, the wildfires are also more severe. : :, , drought, the wildfires are also more severe. : . , , severe. and if that is the fires caused by _ severe. and if that is the fires caused by the _ severe. and if that is the fires caused by the heat, _ severe. and if that is the fires caused by the heat, next i severe. and if that is the fires caused by the heat, next we i severe. and if that is the fires i caused by the heat, next we have to step back again and look at why these two heatwaves have happened. the immediate cause is what's caused a heat dome. my colleague david shukman explains.— a heat dome. my colleague david shukman explains. there is a vast dome of high _ shukman explains. there is a vast dome of high pressure _ shukman explains. there is a vast dome of high pressure above i shukman explains. there is a vast i dome of high pressure above western canada. it is like a lead in the atmosphere trapping warm air and pushing it down where it gets even hotter. and the heat is held in place either part of the jetstream so temperatures have kept climbing. and that's the double danger. high—pressure that can't move on. basically no weather systems can move in so we don't get any relief with thunderstorms or showers and all we get is a pure blue skies and sunshine and this is very dangerous. so the fires happened because the
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temperatures happened because the heat homes happened. now let's take another step back. how do heat dome is connect with climate range? on that, this is the director of the earth system science centre. ii that, this is the director of the earth system science centre. if we won't warming _ earth system science centre. if we won't warming up _ earth system science centre. if we won't warming up the _ earth system science centre. if we won't warming up the planet i earth system science centre. if w9 won't warming up the planet through carbon pollution, we wouldn't expect to see this more often than once in 100,000 years. what climate change has done is made there is a much more probable event.— has done is made there is a much more probable event. now, as you may have noticed. — more probable event. now, as you may have noticed, scientists _ more probable event. now, as you may have noticed, scientists use _ more probable event. now, as you may have noticed, scientists use to - more probable event. now, as you may have noticed, scientists use to make i have noticed, scientists use to make more reticent about making an explicit leak between apps specific weather event and climate change was not now, though, increased computing power means increased confidence in the accuracy of climate modelling. listen to professor peter stott on climate change was top we have analysed it. climate change was top we have analysed it— analysed it. the emissions of greenhouse _ analysed it. the emissions of greenhouse gases, _ analysed it. the emissions of greenhouse gases, you i analysed it. the emissions of greenhouse gases, you just i analysed it. the emissions of- greenhouse gases, you just don't seem to see these sorts of extraordinary temperatures we see at the moment. 50 extraordinary temperatures we see at the moment-— the moment. so this climate modelling — the moment. so this climate modelling is _ the moment. so this climate modelling is providing i the moment. so this climate| modelling is providing clarity. the moment. so this climate i modelling is providing clarity. look at this from dock the auto from the
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university of oxford. she concluded... —— dr otto. so we have to link from the fires to the temperatures to the heat dome to climate change was not the final part of the equation is us, humanity, and how we are the cause of s. :. , humanity, and how we are the cause of s. :, , , :, :, :, of s. humanity is waging war on nature. this _ of s. humanity is waging war on nature. this is _ of s. humanity is waging war on nature. this is suicidal. - of s. humanity is waging war on nature. this is suicidal. nature i nature. this is suicidal. nature always strikes back and it is already doing so with growing force and fury. fin already doing so with growing force and fu . :. ~ already doing so with growing force and fu . :, ~ :, :, :,: and fury. on that, mr good terrace is providing — and fury. on that, mr good terrace is providing warnings _ and fury. on that, mr good terrace is providing warnings -- _ and fury. on that, mr good terrace is providing warnings -- mr- and fury. on that, mr good terrace | is providing warnings -- mr antonio is providing warnings —— mr antonio guterres. moscow equalled its highestjune temperature or if we shift to mexico, it has recorded its highest ever temperature injune. highest ever temperature in june. that highest ever temperature injune. that was in mexicali. or you can
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look at new zealand. it is winter there. it too has recorded its hottestjune. the list goes on. and while i'm going through all of this, perhaps you're thinking, well, we know this. we know climate change is an issue, we know we need to act. we are acting. but there are two important things to note here. the first is that these heat waves in north america have scientists worried. they're in mind, it anticipates gradual warning but as we have seen, there is nothing gradual about this. as the climatologist professor sir brian hoskins puts it... in other words, what is starting to happen with climate change may be worse than has been projected. and if that's the first point, the second is this, that deciding to act isn't the same as taking the right action. let me show you what i mean.
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this year has been full of bold commitments.— this year has been full of bold commitments. , , , :, commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive _ commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, - commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, this i commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, this is i this is the decisive decade, this is the decade we much... we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of a climate crisis. ii consequences of a climate crisis. if thatis consequences of a climate crisis. if that is the us and china has promised to become carbon neutral by 2060. and this is borisjohnson. irate 2060. and this is boris johnson. we are 2060. and this is borisjohnson. 9 are halfway to net zero. we have carbon emissions lower than at any point since the 19th century. we're ending support for fossil fuels overseas and doubling our international climate finance. the lan . ua . e international climate finance. the language is _ international climate finance. the language is urgent. more urgent than ever. the policies do go further than before. but there are concerns all of this might not be enough. listen to this senior climate official on the uk's plan to remove as much carbon as it puts into the atmosphere of something called net zero. ~ , :, atmosphere of something called net zero. . y:, atmosphere of something called net zero. ~ y:, :, : , zero. when you look at the policies to deliver it. _ zero. when you look at the policies to deliver it, i'm _ zero. when you look at the policies to deliver it, i'm afraid _ zero. when you look at the policies to deliver it, i'm afraid we -
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zero. when you look at the policies to deliver it, i'm afraid we are i to deliver it, i'm afraid we are very off—track, very, very substantially off—track. really only about 20% of the policy commitments that the government has made would take us towards that goal of net zero emissions.— take us towards that goal of net zero emissions. there is also this from baroness — zero emissions. there is also this from baroness worthington i zero emissions. there is also this from baroness worthington who i zero emissions. there is also this| from baroness worthington who is zero emissions. there is also this i from baroness worthington who is the lead author on the uk's climate change act. she says concerned... she then talks about carbon budgets, the idea that a country can produce an amount of carbon. she says what if... and all of these commitments and questions feed into the preparations for the un's latest climate summit. cop26 happening in glasgow. the technology and the policies needed to deliver them. but while we build up to that, there is a profound tension in plain sight. a tension between the long—term global response and what is happening now.
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look at this graph. it shows global carbon emissions. it goes up and up. the year with the highest emissions in history was... 2019. and emissions are having consequences now which brings us right back to the heatwaves in north america. and why they matter so much. because the individual experiences of the millions of people caught up in this make real the dangers of changing our climate. they make real why cop26 is receiving so much attention. and they offer another reason why just a few attention. and they offer another reason whyjust a few months ago david attenborough made this demand of the world's leaders. irlezrer david attenborough made this demand of the world's leaders.— of the world's leaders. never before has it been — of the world's leaders. never before has it been so _ of the world's leaders. never before has it been so important _ of the world's leaders. never before has it been so important that - of the world's leaders. never before has it been so important that there i has it been so important that there shouldn't be a playing field, debating ground, where we can all talk and come to an agreement because unless we all agree, we are lost.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. from monday, people returning from amber list countries will no longer have to self—quarantine if they have been fully vaccinated. but if you're heading to france from england and wales you'll still have to isolate for ten days when you get back. the government says it is due to concerns over the variant first discovered in south africa. they made the announcement last nightjust before 8:30pm and it was greeted with dismay on social media. you can feel the frustration in claire's tweet. nathan has given up on his holiday.
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we're joined now by the independent�*s travel editor simon calder. good morning to you, simon. you are our guru in this respect. just before 8:30pm last night the announcement came in. did you have any warning about it and what do you make of the change?— any warning about it and what do you make of the change? well, the travel indust , make of the change? well, the travel industry, travellers _ make of the change? well, the travel industry, travellers and _ make of the change? well, the travel industry, travellers and those - make of the change? well, the travel industry, travellers and those sad i industry, travellers and those sad cases we were just hearing from you are to terms with yet another volte face. it isjust are to terms with yet another volte face. it is just 2a hours before the new rule comes into effect which
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means anybody coming from a medium risk amber country, if they are lucky enough to have two jabs, they will not need to self isolate and will not need to self isolate and will only need to take one test after they arrived back, rather than two. it was really opening up the summer, coinciding with the start of school holidays for many families in england and wales, and suddenly one of the two most popular countries, along with spain, for british holidaymakers, france, has gone into a new category. this is amber plus and in 25 minutes from now the first train from here at london's st pancras on eurostar will depart. a lot of those people in the past nine days, on the basis that they thought they wouldn't need to quarantine, will have booked tickets whether for a weekend in paris or to go further into france, and now they are having to work out what the options are. the reaction, as you can imagine, in the travel industry is absolutely aghast. the international air transport association accused the government of destroying the travel industry and says that people have
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been told that on the back of a successful vaccination programme, they would be able to travel to france and many other countries, and they have had the rug pulled from on under them. they have had the rug pulled from on underthem. eurotunnel, which they have had the rug pulled from on under them. eurotunnel, which does the shuttle operation to calais, simply says this has ruined the summerfor many simply says this has ruined the summer for many families. simon, i am slightly — summer for many families. simon, i am slightly confused. _ summer for many families. simon, i am slightly confused. i _ summer for many families. simon, i am slightly confused. i was - summer for many families. simon, i am slightly confused. i was in i am slightly confused. i was in france... i don't know if you have had any contact with the government, but why wasn't france simply put on the red list?— the red list? well, there are all sorts of reasons _ the red list? well, there are all sorts of reasons for _ the red list? well, there are all sorts of reasons for that. i the red list? well, there are all sorts of reasons for that. the i the red list? well, there are all i sorts of reasons for that. the first one is that probably the so—called managed quarantine scheme couldn't cope. at the moment there are about 1000 people coming in from red list countries, which include india, the uae, turkey and all of south america. they can cope with 1000 people coming in. france, being such an important country, of course hundreds of thousands of british expatriates living there, many people with family connections and millions of us normally travelling there on holiday, it would increase
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may be fivefold the number of people going into hotel quarantine. also, the government very much wishes it had come up with this amber plus category originally, rather than just putting it in at the 11th hour. because now they can add other countries to it. there is some talk about pieces like luxembourg, belgium and germany going onto the amber plus list. it also may be somewhere like turkey could be moved from red to this category. but going from red to this category. but going from a very simple traffic light system announced a couple of months ago, we are now up to five categories. and who knows what other new categories await. honestly, travel this summer looks increasingly just for the travel this summer looks increasinglyjust for the bold and the desperate. increasingly just for the bold and the desperate.— increasingly just for the bold and the deserate. 9 , :, :, increasinglyjust for the bold and the deserate. 9 , :, :, , the desperate. when grant schapps is asked about the _ the desperate. when grant schapps is asked about the changes _ the desperate. when grant schapps is asked about the changes that - the desperate. when grant schapps is asked about the changes that have i asked about the changes that have been made, sometimes at short notice, he says by now people get
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that things can change and they may well change. he says to be surprised by any of these things, well, what are you looking at if you are surprised by them?- are you looking at if you are surrised b them? ,, :, , , surprised by them? sure, absolutely, and the government _ surprised by them? sure, absolutely, and the government has _ surprised by them? sure, absolutely, and the government has been - and the government has been consistent in saying this isn't going to be a normal summer. however, havingjust going to be a normal summer. however, having just nine days ago given the impression that actually yes, we could start a race to the sun, to find out that actually the rules have changed fundamentally for many, many people who are now either cancelling trips or maybe trying to work out if they can possibly self isolate, it isjust work out if they can possibly self isolate, it is just triggering a huge amount of upset. as we heard from the viewers who have been in touch, and there is a sense among everyone else that they cannot possibly have any confidence in any travel arrangements. possibly have any confidence in any travelarrangements. i possibly have any confidence in any travel arrangements. i was due to go to france this afternoon. because i have been watching what has been going on, i was more worried that france, when the uk hit 50,000 cases
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a day, might stop us going. i had not actually booked my ticket yet, but of course most people will want to book an awful lot longer ahead and that if they are taking their families, and the travel industry is just saying consumer confidence is utterly destroyed by this latest move. :. ~' utterly destroyed by this latest move. . ~ ,:, utterly destroyed by this latest move. :, ~ ,:, y utterly destroyed by this latest move. . ~ y:, , : utterly destroyed by this latest move. . ~ , : :, move. thank you very much, and thanks for— move. thank you very much, and thanks for taking _ move. thank you very much, and thanks for taking us _ move. thank you very much, and thanks for taking us through i move. thank you very much, and thanks for taking us through how| move. thank you very much, and i thanks for taking us through how it will work in practice. good to see you. thank you. there is sunshine, you saw it there, in london. there is sunshine at st george's in kent as well, and the sun was shining on this man, who has broken records.— broken records. absolutely, louis oosthuizen _ broken records. absolutely, louis oosthuizen has _ broken records. absolutely, louis oosthuizen has just _ broken records. absolutely, louis oosthuizen hasjust smashed i broken records. absolutely, louis oosthuizen hasjust smashed it i broken records. absolutely, louis oosthuizen hasjust smashed it inj oosthuizen has just smashed it in sandwich in kent. south africa's louis oosthuizen heads the leaderboard after the second day's play at the open championship in kent. his 36—hole total of 129 is the lowest in the history of the open.
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our sports correspondent andy swiss has more. it is the closest most of us will get to the trophy — the open's favourite photo op doing a roaring trade. but others here are chasing the real thing. louis oosthuizen has already won it once, 11 years ago. oh, my word. and after another stunning display, he mightjust do it again, on a remarkable 11 under par. but, in the sandwich sunshine, he was not the only one making hay. this is collin morikawa's debut at the open. as first impressions go, not bad. what a day he is having. he is two shots back while hopes of a home winner are led by andy sullivan, another impressive day keeping him in contention. rory mcllroy! the rory mcllroy fan club was out in force, and they got a few decent moments. but 11 shots back, his hopes look remote. what they would all have done
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for a little bit of this — england'sjonathan thompson thrilling the crowd with a hole in one. oh, it's in! itjust doesn't get any better. well, it has been a day of glorious weather and some equally glorious golf, but none brighter than louis oosthuizen. on this form, he will take some stopping. roared on by his home crowd, lewis hamilton claimed pole position for formula one's first sprint race ahead of the british grand prix. as a government test event, 86,000 fans were at silverstone, with 140,000 expected on sunday. hamilton's first lap in the final session was quick enough to secure the top spot for the new qualifying race ahead of title rival max verstappen. lam iamso i am so grateful to see everyone here. we have missed you for a whole year, so to come to the silverstone grand prix and have a full crowd like this, you see the energy. when i was coming into this i was hopeful
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that with the great work we have done together in the team plus the energy of the fans it would get us there. so this is down to the fans, i think. tadej pogacar looks set to win the tour de france for the second year running. the slovenian maintained his overall lead of more than five minutes after yesterday's 19th stage. if he is still in the yellowjersey after today's time trial he will ride unopposed into paris on the final day. that is where britain's mark cavendish will be hoping to claim the outright record for stage wins after he could only finish in the main group yesterday, well behind winner matej mohoric of slovenia. an official involved in organising the tokyo olympics has tested positive for covid—19 at the athletes' village. it is the first case detected ahead of the games. the indidual and their nationality have not been named. they will now be kept under a 14—day quarantine and moved to a hotel outside the village premises. the opening ceremony is on friday and the games are due to be held mostly without spectators and under tight quarantine rules. on this bumper sporting weekend,
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a5,000 fans will be at wembley for rugby league's challenge cup final later. castleford take on st helens. castleford won with a golden—point kick on their way to the final. they haven't won this competition since 1986 but have come so close to both league and cup success under coach daryl powell in recent years. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 years, and i think for us to be able to win it would probably write our names in history. it's a long time coming for a team that has been around for the last seven or eight years, with daryl. we want to be remembered. that is surely the point for anyone's career, you want to be remembered. st helens are the favourites although they last won the challenge cup back in 2008. one man in that team is still with the saints today. james roby was 22 that day. now he is the club captain. i've been lucky enough to be involved in the challenge cup winning team, but never as a captain, and that would really
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cap it off. it was a fantastic achievement, and obviously great for the town and the team. i thinkjust off the back of what everyone's been through, with covid and everything like that, it would give everyone a real lift. england lost their first t20 match against pakistan after a thriller at trent bridge. some big hitting from pakistan captain babar azam helped his side to a total of 232 from their 20 overs. it would have been england's biggest run chase ever, and thanks to a century from just 43 balls by liam livingstone, they got very close. but in the end it proved too much, and pakistan won by 31 runs. the second of the three—match series will be at headingley tomorrow. very happy. it would be nice if we won the game, but like you said, considering the first time around that i played for england, the changes i have had to make and the maturity i have had to show the last couple of years, it is very pleasing to be able to go out there and do that. when i am enjoying my cricket, that. when i am enjoying my cricket, thatis that. when i am enjoying my cricket, that is when i play my best cricket. i am not looking too far ahead. we
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have an important series. we still have an important series. we still have two games to win here to hopefully turn around the series. looking forward to a few games at home. i looking forward to a few games at home. :. looking forward to a few games at home. :, :, :, :,, , :, home. i am loving the atmosphere at the cricket- — home. i am loving the atmosphere at the cricket- l— home. i am loving the atmosphere at the cricket. ijust _ home. i am loving the atmosphere at the cricket. i just think _ home. i am loving the atmosphere at the cricket. i just think it _ home. i am loving the atmosphere at the cricket. ijust think it has - the cricket. ijust think it has done so much lately, with all the different formats, just trying to get more people watching. i still find it a bit confusing, i must say. it can be. i find it a bit confusing, i must say. it can be. :. , find it a bit confusing, i must say. it can be. :, , :, :, find it a bit confusing, i must say. itcanbe. .y :, .: :, it can be. i actually had a chart once with _ it can be. i actually had a chart once with all _ it can be. i actually had a chart once with all of _ it can be. i actually had a chart once with all of the _ it can be. i actually had a chart once with all of the fielding i once with all of the fielding positions. do you know all of them? no. :. . .. positions. do you know all of them? no. :, , ~' , , :, ' positions. do you know all of them? no. :, , ,, , , :, no. the names like silly mid-off and sill oint. no. the names like silly mid-off and silly point- i — no. the names like silly mid-off and silly point. ithink— no. the names like silly mid-off and silly point. i think it _ no. the names like silly mid-off and silly point. i think it is _ silly point. i think it is definitely trying, isn't it? it is indeed, definitely trying, isn't it? it is indeed. and _ definitely trying, isn't it? it is indeed, and we _ definitely trying, isn't it? it is indeed, and we have - definitely trying, isn't it? it 3 indeed, and we have this new hundred tournament starting next week which is designed to get newer, younger audiences into cricket. one interesting thing about the hundred is that they are talking about banning the song sweet caroline, which was so popular over the summer in euro 2020 and loads of sports use it together crowd up. they are saying they want to include a more diverse, family friendly crowd to get involved with the sport and they
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think that sweet caroline is maybe a little bit busy and a little bit blokey. that is what the thought is behind tournament sources, that is what they say in the papers today. there is a point at which, of course, they can't stop it, can they? a crowd decides to do that. there you go, people power. thea;r they? a crowd decides to do that. there you go, people power. they are -auttin a there you go, people power. they are putting a list — there you go, people power. they are putting a list together. _ there you go, people power. they are putting a list together. they _ there you go, people power. they are putting a list together. they are i putting a list together. they are talkin: putting a list together. they are talking about — putting a list together. they are talking about bringing _ putting a list together. they are talking about bringing in - putting a list together. they are talking about bringing in local i putting a list together. they are i talking about bringing in local djs and rappers, as well, to bring the spirit to the hundred. i have a feeling it may crop up, sweet caroline. won't make you tell someone not to do it, as well. now it's time for this week's newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch. should the thoughts you posted online years ago by you from working from the bbc. —— working for the bbc. and when bbcjournalists express their opinions on social media, does that damage public
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perceptions of bbc impartiality? social media activity which will be discussing later in regard to journalist will be —— was at the heart of the dominant story after the disappointment for england supporters of the team's defeat at the euro final attention swiftly moved to the online racist abuse directed at some black members of the team. : :. the team. after the dream, the abuse. there _ the team. after the dream, the abuse. there is _ the team. after the dream, the abuse. there is widespread i abuse. there is widespread condemnation of a torrent of racial abuse against england's black players on social media. emma wilkins had _ players on social media. emma wilkins had this _ players on social media. emma wilkins had this reaction. i and ron gwilliams says... on tuesday
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evening, bbc one bulletins reported on the debate over cuts to its overseas aged —— aid budget. on the debate over cuts to its overseas aged -- aid budget. britain has lona overseas aged -- aid budget. britain has long given _ overseas aged -- aid budget. britain has long given humanitarian - overseas aged -- aid budget. britain has long given humanitarian aid i overseas aged -- aid budget. britain has long given humanitarian aid to i has long given humanitarian aid to the world's tourist people but the government is cutting that aid and what was promised to be temporary has now become much longer term. and all the prime minister says? to has now become much longer term. and all the prime minister says?— all the prime minister says? to save mone . all the prime minister says? to save money- lerendan _ all the prime minister says? to save money. brendan gardner _ all the prime minister says? to save money. brendan gardner was i all the prime minister says? to save i money. brendan gardner was watching that and had this to say.
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now, last friday, the financial times reported thatjess brammer who had worked at the news website huff post uk and previously at the bbc was in line with the sievert —— seniorjob of the corporation overseeing its news channels but that a robbie gibb, formerly theresa may's communications chief but now a bbc non—executive director, had tried to block the move. edward said that so robbie had texted fran unsworth, do director of news, to say she cannot make disappointment at the government's fragile trust in the bbc will be shattered. the belief some politicians is that half post uk and ms brammer itself had left—wing or anti—government cvs and the leader of the house of commons jase jacob rees—mogg said... others felt the bbc public independence and impartiality were being damaged from the opposite
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direction. albert ross wanted... so robbie gibb hasn't commented directly on the financial times story. but the source close to him denied he used the words attributed to him. meanwhile at the westminster media forum this week, fran unsworth said editors make decisions... and the bbc added in a statement... if concerns about impartiality were
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prompted by the previousjobs held byjess brammer and so robbie gibb, there was another row over impartiality with social media at its heart. it emerged recently as reported on news watch that a journalist had posted offensive tweets about israel and hitler three years previous to her employment there. on wednesday, she put out a statement saying that she had been dismissed from herjob and objecting to the decision and offering a heartfelt apology for posting without thinking.
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last year, the bbc commissioned an independent review into this whole area headed by richard, formerly a director of global news of the bbc and now only a couple of weeks ago newsnight was enter emily maitlis was reprimanded by the bbc�*s executive complaints unit after she was retweeted a post from piers morgan asking... the last year the bbc commissioned an independent review into this area
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headed by richard sambrook. formally herself director of news at the bbc and now professor ofjournalism at cardiff university and he me now. thank you for coming on newswatch. should bbcjournalists not just be on social media or is there a clear line that they can stay the correct side of? is unrealistic to suggest that they should be on social media at all because social media has such a big place in our public consciousness in public debate. but they did to be extremely careful when they're on social media and they cannot behave in the way that many of the people in many on social media behave because they have a responsibility towards the bbc its values and to be impartial. that is where the difficulty arises because the informality of platforms like twitter in particular and the activist that we see on twitter contempt bbcjournalists to cross that line. i think that although it is inevitable for the bbc journalist to be on twitter to communicate and further journalism there, it is a disproportionate place in many of the biggest staff, journalists minds because of most of the population is not
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on twitter and frankly, most of them are never going to see it and it does occupy a lot of time and attention from bbc news journalists they think maybe there needs to be reset a little bit. what about the issue of what you retreated years in the past before you work for the bbc —— retweet. there are a couple of issues there. if you tweeted something in the past before you worked for the bbc you didn't have the responsibilities towards the bbc values as you did when you are a member of staff. but equally, social media is a public platform and if you want to work for the bbc or other news organisations that have similar standards, you have a responsibility to train behave responsibly in the run—up to that in order to clean up the media account
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retrospectively and we know employers in all areas ofjust the media absolutely go and look through potential candidates' past social media to get a sense of who they are. so so frankly, any sensible candidate will get one that represents who they are today rather than this journalist saying it is who they were several years ago. a lot of people are now trying to use social media as a tool to hit the bbc and indeed other organisations as well. we have seen similar organisations in america and other parts of the world. in my view that is a game to try to politicise if you like the bbc was not the bbc should be judged on its performance and on its output and i think it is wrong to try and judge it on its input. to try to second—guess what political views might be or whether they will be biased in a particular direction or tempted to try to is a bit of a monk 's game and not really in my view what the bbc should be doing on what
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it broadcasts and that is completely different issue. perhaps the whole of the news division needs to be changed as well, that is just ridiculous. it is aboutjudging the bbc on its performance and output are not trying to second—guess the inputs which it seems to be is an unfair and illegitimate game. what unfair and illegitimate game. what if ou have unfair and illegitimate game. what if you have work _ unfair and illegitimate game. what if you have work from _ unfair and illegitimate game. what if you have work from a _ unfair and illegitimate game. what if you have work from a left wing, known left—wing publication or a known left—wing publication or a known right—wing publication, should that stop you from joining the bbc? know, as long as you behave the way you are expected to behave in terms of impartiality otherwise we will have lots of people in bbc news who have lots of people in bbc news who have been ambers of the conservative party, members of the labour party, many other parties, worked for left—wing and right—wing organisations in the past, but what matters is what their performance is
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and their —— striving to the bbc�*s values when they are in the post. isn't right for non— executive director like so robbie gibb who was incidentally in the past himself the head of bbc political programmes, to express a view on an editorial appointment?— express a view on an editorial a- ointment? ~ �* �* :, :,, express a view on an editorial anointment? ~ �* �* :, :, appointment? well, the bbc now has a unitary board — appointment? well, the bbc now has a unitary board which _ appointment? well, the bbc now has a unitary board which means _ appointment? well, the bbc now has a unitary board which means members i appointment? well, the bbc now has a j unitary board which means members of the executive and non—executive directors all sit around the table together and therefore i don't think it is surprising or in any way improperfor those it is surprising or in any way improper for those people to share views about all sorts of issues around the bbc including potential employments. what would be improper is for the non— executive director to seek to veto and non—executive process. the bbc like most bbc agents or organisations has an hr and appointments framework to ensure election, in diversity and so on. it would be quite improperfor a non—executive director to try to interfere in that. but there is no indication that that happened. a non—executive director speaking to
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the head of news or another executive member of the same board about potential appointments or indeed any other issues seems to me entirely routine. thank you for all of your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on what you see or hear on bbc news, radio online, social media, e—mail us orfind us on radio online, social media, e—mail us or find us on twitter. you can call us... and have a look at our website. previous interviews. that is all from us. we are off the air for a few weeks now and we will be back at the start of september. until then, back at the start of september. untilthen, goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today... a surprise change to the quarantine rules for travellers to france — fully vaccinated holidaymakers will still have to self—isolate on return, sparking anger and confusion in the travel industry. i've booked everything 2a hours ago and now everything's changing, so, quite disappointing. the race to find survivors of the floods that have wreaked havoc across western europe — more than 120 people are dead, hundreds are still missing. more than 35 million people in england will be offered a flu jab this winter — they'll include the over 50s and children up to the age of 16.
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plenty of fun in the sun for the thousands heading to this weekend's sporting events. at the open — breaking records — louis oosthuizen leads by two shots at the half way point. and at silverstone, more than 80,000 fans are expected for the new qualifying race ahead of tomorrow's british grand prix. we've just had a very balmy night and it promises to be a sunny and very warm day. and guess what? same tomorrow. it's saturday the 17th ofjuly. our top story... fully vaccinated travellers returning to england and wales from france will still have to spend ten days in quarantine. the change in the rules, announced last night, takes effect from monday — when many other covid restrictions, including those around travel to amber list countries, are being eased. with more details, here's our political correspondent jonathan blake.
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for those hoping for a holiday in france this summer, plans may have to change. from monday, the country will stay on the amber list, but unlike other destinations in that category, adults who are fully vaccinated will still have to isolate for ten days on their return to england and wales. i was planning on going to france for a short trip, as i have a family wedding there, coming at the end ofjuly. that was the plan. i've. .. the wedding has been delayed, it was supposed to be last year. and i've booked everything 2a hours ago and now everything is changing, so quite disappointing. concern about cases in france of the beta variant of coronavirus, first discovered in south africa, have prompted the move. ministers stopped short of adding france to the red list, which requires enforced hotel quarantine. but the health secretary, sajid javid, said the government had always been clear it would not hesitate to take rapid action
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at the borders to stop the spread of covid—19. travel industry bodies accuse the government of a confused approach to international travel, though, and labour also criticised the change. really the government has created chaos here. they made an announcement that double—jabbed people coming from amber list countries didn't need to quarantine. now they seem to have changed their mind in relation to france. that's creating a fourth category, an amber list plus, if you like, which is creating chaos for the travelling public and the travel industry yet again. allowing adults who are fully vaccinated to avoid isolation on their return from amber list countries offers hope of a holiday for some, but the decision to make france an exception is a sign of uncertainty in government about how the pandemic will pan out. jonathan blake, bbc news. our political correspondent jessica parkerjoins us now. monday has been billed as the day for lifting restrictions —
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so this is a change that's surprised some, isn't it? yes, surprised some, isn't it? what i think it's quite interesting yes, what i think it's quite interesting is it is reminiscent of what we saw last summer in terms of these last—minute changes to international travel, that is despite now having their vaccination programme, and asjonathan was saying, ministers insist they were always clear they might have to take rapid action, but what is unusual is that france has been put into this subcategory of the amber list, the government didn't think the situation was so serious they needed to put france on the red list, they thought it was serious enough that things couldn't go ahead as planned on monday. the government will have known that by making this decision they will have sparked fury in the travel industry, they will know they will be accused of sowing chaos, confusion a couple of days out from this plan to lift restrictions, but
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they went ahead and did it anyway, a few things to note therefore. clearly ministers are feeling nervous, it may raise further questions as to whether the traffic light system is working, i think it does demonstrate that we are not on some sort of unstoppable journey to freedom, when it comes to international travel.- freedom, when it comes to international travel. at least 150 people are now known to have died as a result of this week's flooding in western europe. rescue operations are continuing across parts of germany, belgium and the netherlands as hundreds of people are still missing. earlier on breakfast we spoke to gregorjericho who was forced to evacuate his home. the city where i live, it was completely cut off from the outside, there was no internet, the cellular network has collapsed. people are extremely worried about their loved
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ones because they cannot reach anyone in the city, for example in my street a young woman was lying under a car and my brother pulled her out and try to revive her, but she was already dead. she drowned under the car. thousands of residents west of cologne have now been evacuated after a down was breached by floodwater overnight, let speak to our correspondence and holligan. we can see the scale of the problems, tell us more. —— and holligan. i want you to look at theirs, because through all of this, people are still trying to cycle to their homes, we are here, this is... an area which is echoed this to between
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the german and belgian borders, this is peter's home, look at this, he has attached a pump to try to remove some of the floodwater that is seeping into his home, but it is actually futile because there is nowhere for it to go. where i am standing, this is normally a road, up standing, this is normally a road, up here there is a small fishing lake, i spoke to cecile, she says she does know where her fish are, there are well inside my feet, a neighbour here who had to rescue his goats by hand. this area is now classed as a disaster zone which means these people can access help from the government but right now they have been left to their own devices, they are checking the woodwork, you can see through here, the water is just heading up his stairs, it is already inside my
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welly boots. so much for these people to content with right now. the rescue effort meanwhile continues, thousands evacuated in germany, west of cologne, after the dam was breached, this isn't over yet. pop—up vaccine centres are opening across england in shops and parks this weekend as part of an nhs "grab a jab" initiative. the vaccination hubs will be set up in primark stores, the tate modern and even the open championship. the aim is to boost the vaccine uptake among young people ahead of monday, when the majority of coronavirus restrictions are set to be lifted. i would urge you to come in, get yourself vaccinated. you know, there will be a wonderful atmosphere and there will be lots of help and support and advice and guidance for you. you know, to anybody who is over 18 and eligible to have a vaccine, please do come forward if you haven't had the jab, and we're here and ready and waiting for you. from today, there will no longer be
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a limit on the number of people meeting outside in wales as some coronavirus restrictions are eased. the relaxation also allows six adults from different households to meet indoors, and organised indoor events can start taking place with up to one—thousand people seated and 200 standing. the united states wants to build a giant new radar system in the uk to track objects in deep space. the us space force is developing the global system to identify potential "targets" in areas where a lot of military satellites are positioned. the ministry of defence said the new radar capability has the potential to make space "safer and more secure". hippos, walruses and whales could be given greater legal protection under plans to crack down on ivory poaching. the government wants to extend a planned law banning the trade of items containing elephant ivory to cover other at—risk animals.
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conservationists say the move sends a "clear signal i never tire of seeing a baby hippo! lovely. good morning to you. england will be rolling out its the biggest ever flu vaccination programme starting from september. more than 35 million people will be offered the vaccine for free this year. the jab will be available to all secondary school pupils up to the age of 16 for the first time. front—line health and care workers, pregnant women and anyone over the age of 50 will also be eligible. we're nowjoined by gp dr nighat arif and geoff barton from the association of school and college leaders. good morning to you both. we will come to logistics in a moment, but do you want to take us through the preparation that gps will have to be undertaken? i think you had some warning of this. irate undertaken? i think you had some warning of this.— warning of this. we did, this week on wednesday _ warning of this. we did, this week
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on wednesday at _ warning of this. we did, this week on wednesday at our _ warning of this. we did, this week on wednesday at our practice i warning of this. we did, this week on wednesday at our practice we i warning of this. we did, this week i on wednesday at our practice we sat together and looked at how we are going to roll out this incredibly ambitious new vaccination programme. we have done it before, did it last year, we have the infrastructure, the plan is that across the uk to vaccinate 35 million people who fall those categories, but now the programme has been rolled out to far more children, up to 16—year—olds, year 11 students as well. this is where the road map out of the pandemic, out of the lockdown, we do not want the pressure on the nhs in the autumn and winter months when we also get flu, we already have the covid vaccination programme, easing out of lockdown, 19th is going to be when restrictions are eased, so time will tell how we're going to handle all the cases we are seeing in the community, so it is not pressure on the nhs, that would be brilliant. we have all the infrastructure in place, mosques, synagogues, temples,
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pharmacist cue, pop—up vaccination programmes, so this is a good news story but also shows the amount of work that we have to do in primary care. . :. work that we have to do in primary care. , :, :, care. this initiative for the flu vaccine, school— care. this initiative for the flu vaccine, school programme, i care. this initiative for the flu - vaccine, school programme, expanded to supply vaccines to all secondary school pupils up to year 11 for the first time. can you talk us through some other practicalities and why you think that is a good thing, if you think that is a good thing, if you do. it you think that is a good thing, if ou do. . :. you think that is a good thing, if ou do. , :, :, you do. it is a good thing, some of the people — you do. it is a good thing, some of the people i— you do. it is a good thing, some of the people i represent, _ you do. it is a good thing, some of the people i represent, their- you do. it is a good thing, some of| the people i represent, their hearts will be _ the people i represent, their hearts will be sinking thinking, we are having — will be sinking thinking, we are having to — will be sinking thinking, we are having to set up field hospitals like we — having to set up field hospitals like we did previously. this is different. _ like we did previously. this is different, already in place with primary— different, already in place with primary children, now go to browse out his— primary children, now go to browse out his secondary, and as i understand it, the expectation if miami _ understand it, the expectation if miami head teacher of a secondary school _ miami head teacher of a secondary school is _ miami head teacher of a secondary school is that what will be needed from _ school is that what will be needed from me — school is that what will be needed from me -- — school is that what will be needed
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from me —— ifi school is that what will be needed from me —— if i am a head teacher, what _ from me —— if i am a head teacher, what is _ from me —— if i am a head teacher, what is needed is one large space, sports _ what is needed is one large space, sports hall— what is needed is one large space, sports hall for example, all done by medical— sports hall for example, all done by medical staff, a public health initiatives using schools and colleges, i think the benefit of it is twofold, safer for young people and for— is twofold, safer for young people and for the staff if we have a flu epidemic— and for the staff if we have a flu epidemic as has been predicted, secondly— epidemic as has been predicted, secondly it is good news because it finally _ secondly it is good news because it finally feels as if we're giving priority— finally feels as if we're giving priority to educational continuity for those — priority to educational continuity for those young people so they can start september with a sense that the adults in the room i doing everything they can to look after them _ everything they can to look after them right at t the age of 16. do ou them right at t the age of 16. you know them right at t the age of 16. d9 you know anything about the practicalities? —— looking after them up to the age of 16. we practicalities? -- looking after them up to the age of 16. we are bein: them up to the age of 16. we are being consulted _ them up to the age of 16. we are being consulted already, - them up to the age of 16. we are being consulted already, we i them up to the age of 16. we are i being consulted already, we haven't got the actual practicalities set in place because this is so new that it is only being within this week, but
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i am pleased thatjeff highlighted that we are trying to make sure that children's education is not disrupted in the winter months, they have had a catastrophic effect on education, we can offer to do that, as primary care providers in the community we are going to do our best to make sure that we ward off any other illnesses that could impact on that. the thing that we will have an issue with are going to be supplied, but we have good reassurance from public health england that supply will be ok, and also whether we can allow people to make those decisions, it is a choice, we still have vaccination hesitancy in the community, we have that mostly in the young, so we need to still do that educational groundwork and that is all going with us, we're still doing it has gps, with us, we're still doing it has gps, i with us, we're still doing it has gps, i am sure he will agree with me schools continue to —— engage with parents on why the vaccine is necessary. parents on why the vaccine is necessary-— necessary. what has become indication — necessary. what has become indication been _ necessary. what has become indication been with - necessary. what has become| indication been with parents? necessary. what has become i indication been with parents? there is vaccination hesitancy but also so
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many of us haven't really been able —— haven't been exposed to the two virus because of social distancing, face coverings etc. i virus because of social distancing, face coverings etc.— virus because of social distancing, face coverings etc. i think in terms of communication _ face coverings etc. i think in terms of communication with _ face coverings etc. i think in terms of communication with peers i face coverings etc. i think in terms of communication with peers on i face coverings etc. i think in terms. of communication with peers on this specific— of communication with peers on this specific issue, most people will be hearing _ specific issue, most people will be hearing about this issue for the first time, _ hearing about this issue for the first time, the flue is not actually a jab. _ first time, the flue is not actually a jab. nasal— first time, the flue is not actually ajab, nasal spray, that is first time, the flue is not actually a jab, nasal spray, that is going to be an— a jab, nasal spray, that is going to be an entitlement from september. absolutely that is the right place to do— absolutely that is the right place to do it. — absolutely that is the right place to do it. in — absolutely that is the right place to do it, in our schools and colleges. _ to do it, in our schools and colleges, that is the place where you can — colleges, that is the place where you can explain to young people fight _ you can explain to young people fight is — you can explain to young people fight is important, there is lots of trust _ fight is important, there is lots of trust with— fight is important, there is lots of trust with school leaders and teachers, therefore communication with parents has to pie this is good news _ with parents has to pie this is good news for— with parents has to pie this is good news for your family and for our school _ news for your family and for our school community. all of those things — school community. all of those things we — school community. all of those things we will be able to put in place _ things we will be able to put in place what and that will lead to its young _ place what and that will lead to its young people thinking, i can see why this is— young people thinking, i can see why this is a _ young people thinking, i can see why this is a good thing for me to do, i can see _ this is a good thing for me to do, i can see my— this is a good thing for me to do, i can see my friends are having it done _ can see my friends are having it done if— can see my friends are having it done. if that can give us a focus on the most _ done. if that can give us a focus on the most important thing is that schools— the most important thing is that schools do, teach young people
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rather _ schools do, teach young people rather than being distracted by all the absence we have had, that will be good _ the absence we have had, that will be good news for a start of the new term _ be good news for a start of the new term |_ be good news for a start of the new term. .. be good news for a start of the new term. ,, :, be good news for a start of the new term. ~' :, . be good news for a start of the new term. ,, :, :, :, :, , :,, term. i think for a lot of people, it will be a _ term. i think for a lot of people, it will be a learning _ term. i think for a lot of people, it will be a learning curve - term. i think for a lot of people, it will be a learning curve in i term. i think for a lot of people, i it will be a learning curve in terms of the flu vaccine, how it is delivered. the nasal spray, jab, who gets what? how is it administered? for anybody, we give the nasal spray from six months onwards, a nasal spray is like droplets that go up the nose, we give that up to the age of 16. we administer them throughout the school, they jabber is available to any body above that. the other thing we need to know, we get this every year, the nasal drops have some variant of blue religious groups such asjewish commences feel apprehensive about taking up the flu vaccine, we have done a lot of bad work with the medical association and various otherjewish groups to say that this is a small amount,
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insignificant, therefore on balance it is better to have the nasal spray, but as gps and doctors and pharmacists add health care professionals, we do offer parents to have the option of going into the surgery and having the jab. the jab is available, various similar to the covid jab in your is available, various similar to the covidjab in yourarm, is available, various similar to the covid jab in your arm, for anybody above the age of 50 that is available. that is the three jabs and nasal spray available on the nhs, a group of people in the middle, 16 to about 50, who might be fit and well, have no underlying health conditions, they can also volunteer and pay for a jab, it cost around £11, there are various options, lots of information will be available to allow people to have the opportunity to take it. the most important thing is please take the jab, we need to make sure we do not have a flu epidemic in the middle of
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the pandemic that we have got and try and safeguard children in our communities as much as possible. like you very much for your time. —— thank you. everyone is experiencing that schools have had a lot to content with it, and pupils have had something that generations have not had to deal with in terms of how things have worked, when teaching has worked, hang —— do they see their friends? has worked, hang —— do they see theirfriends? we has worked, hang -- do they see their friends?— has worked, hang -- do they see their friends? ~ ., , their friends? we have been looking at how children _ their friends? we have been looking at how children have _ their friends? we have been looking at how children have coped - their friends? we have been looking at how children have coped with - their friends? we have been looking at how children have coped with an. at how children have coped with an academic year like no other. finally, they're off on camp after postponing it twice. for these ten—year—olds, it's a rite of passage... yeah! ..which many other schools have been forced to cancel. on the saturday morning before they were supposed to go on the monday, we got told that there was somebody who had tested positive for covid
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and so the camp was cancelled. and they were all absolutely gutted. i'm most looking forward to spending time with my friends and then the really fun outdoor activities. just a few weeks ago, these classrooms at kings oak academy near bristol were empty up to 400 students were sent home to self—isolate. and for students in year 10, taking their mock gcses it's stressful. they've currently got a0 pupils out. it's been, like, quite hectic and, like, makes people i feel, like, anxious. anyone could end up being positive and, like, you don't know- whether you're going to have to go home. | when, like, all the friend in the friendship group except you are out, it's trying to find someone else to hang around with so that you're not, like, completely alone at, like, break and lunch times. we're trying to work out can we get to the summer with any more cases?
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catherine and her staff have been navigating a year of remote learning, mask wearing, and self isolation. every day, when checking to see if another case has come in and then we have to respond very quickly to that, isolating students. we had a challenging situation last week, where year 9 needed to be closed but it then meant we needed to get our free school meal children their meals for lunch. and i was in what was actually quite an insightful and fortunate position where i could drive to all of our disadvantaged families' houses to drop off their lunches. and that gave us a real insight into some of the community needs and challenges. and over in the science lab, they are itching to turn the gas back on. with science this year, it's been a really, - really big struggle, _ particularly when you're looking at doing practical work. having to quarantine everything and kids not being able - to get their hands on actually getting a practical done, - so i think everyone's excited - when you first arrive into a science lab, particularly year seven, to get your hands on a bunsen burner. i and for kids not to have i that opportunity this year has been really hard. but in september, next term, things should look very different? i can't wait, it's going to be - absolutely brilliant just to have kids actually being able to really,
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like, partake fully in science. - whistle. well, covid has cancelled sports day, year groups can't mix and parents can't come into watch. so these year 7s are taking part in the festival of sport. it's been a lot of non—stop training throughout the year. we've had to adapt to things that have come up. things have changed both inside and outside of school. but we've had to do our best to overcome it and make the year as enjoying and fulfilling as possible for our students. and although the holidays are just days away, these school gates will stay open. they've been selected to hold summer camps for students who fell in behind. —— who have fallen behind. it's been an academic year like no other. but with contact isolation and school bubbles ending next week, everyone's hoping that come september things will be very different. fiona lamdin, bbc news. here's thomasz with a look at this morning's weather. for a lot of people i think there is
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going to be a lot of sunshine. film. going to be a lot of sunshine. 0h, ou said going to be a lot of sunshine. oh, you said it. _ going to be a lot of sunshine. (in, you said it, absolutely, looking cracking for many of us this weekend. hot sunshine, and little too hot for some, temperatures getting up to around 31 celsius tomorrow in the south—east of the country. let's have a look at the picture across the uk right now, the high—pressure establishing itself across the uk. a lot of settled weather, high—pressure fortunately also extending into parts of western europe where we have the devastating floods, no rain in the short—term across that part of the world, good news. the forecast for today, sunshine, clearskies news. the forecast for today, sunshine, clear skies across england and wales, western and northern scotland with the wind blowing off the atlantic and more cloud, always going to be fresher from the western isles, 1a celsius in shetland, stornoway 17 celsius, a lot hotter eastern side of scotland, to the
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south also, northern ireland temperatures could get up to 26 celsius, one or two spots across england 30 celsius, anywhere from hull down into gloucestershire. hot sunshine for the grand prix as well, both on saturday and sunday, could make 30 celsius. the uv levels, very high across wales and the south of the country, high elsewhere. hardly a cloud in disguise, don't forget about that if you're out the park for any lengthy of time. fine weather for this evening, dry, sunshine, clearskies weather for this evening, dry, sunshine, clear skies at night. just in the north of scotland, a little bit of rain fleeting to the course of the night, 12 in stornoway, 15-16, of the night, 12 in stornoway, 15—16, balmy morning tomorrow. high—pressure with us, winds blow around high—pressure, it will drag in slightly cooler air into
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scotland, the north of england and northern ireland tomorrow, tomorrow the northern half of the uk broadly speaking will have more cloud in this guy, fresher, more yellow colours, and the heater will contract and intensify to the south, we could get 31 in london on sunday. high—pressure still with us on monday, into tuesday as well. fine weather across western europe, could news, that is what we want, you can see the settled weather continues into the week ahead. it is looking absolute define, i think, most of us. cannot agree with that. gavin will have the sport in about 20 minutes. there are concerns of a "surge" in workers and medical staff having to self—isolate when most covid rules end in england and scotland on monday. it comes as over half a million people were told to stay at home after being 'pinged' by the nhs covid app during the first week ofjuly.
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we're joined now by deputy general secretary of the trade union congress, paul nowack. good morning. things are changing on monday, rules are being relaxed. they are real concerns about the number of people are being gpinged just as the rules are being relaxed. can you give us what you see as the picture for workers you present right now? it picture for workers you present right now?— picture for workers you present riahtnow? . ., , right now? it is a concern that is driven by the — right now? it is a concern that is driven by the fact _ right now? it is a concern that is driven by the fact that _ right now? it is a concern that is driven by the fact that the - driven by the fact that the government has opposed reopening on monday to the prism of politics —— approached reopening, rather than common sense. we have a rising number of people being pinged by the app, notjust in health care but in food manufacturing, hospitality, important to remember that is driven by underlying rise in infections, it is important that the government
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gets it right and talk to unions and employers about how we make sure people who are going to work for the first time in along people who are going to work for the first time in a long time have confidence a workplace is secure, but also the millie's of people who have been going to work that they can feel with this unlocking confident us millions of. can you breakdown _ confident us millions of. can you breakdown any _ confident us millions of. can you breakdown any more _ confident us millions of. can you breakdown any more for - confident us millions of. can you breakdown any more for me - confident us millions of. can you breakdown any more for me the| confident us millions of. can you - breakdown any more for me the areas, the industries or individual organisations that are most worried about not having enough staff to operate? there are some areas, you mention hospitality, issues around that, a lot of younger people involved in that, real concern about the nhs and how it might directly affect in the nhs. do you have any breakdowns or numbers? i affect in the nhs. do you have any breakdowns or numbers?- affect in the nhs. do you have any breakdowns or numbers? i haven't got breakdowns. — breakdowns or numbers? i haven't got breakdowns, but _ breakdowns or numbers? i haven't got breakdowns, but i _ breakdowns or numbers? i haven't got breakdowns, but i will— breakdowns or numbers? i haven't got breakdowns, but i will say _ breakdowns or numbers? i haven't got breakdowns, but i will say this - breakdowns or numbers? i haven't got breakdowns, but i will say this is - breakdowns, but i will say this is happening right across the economy and partly it is also particularly and partly it is also particularly an issue in workplaces where you have large numbers of people working
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relatively close together, that's why areas like manufacturing, food manufacturing in particular, are of real concern stop a lot of the focus is employers, i have concerns or employers being able to run viable operations, we want businesses to run effectively but we have to think about the impact on individuals. the other story is large numbers of people cannot afford to self—isolate when that ping comes through because they are not entitled to statutory sick pay, 2 million people, millions more relying just on sick pay, £96 a week, and in the face of that the government has had a year to fix that, we are going to people turning off that and we do not want to see that stop in health care cosmic is talking about health care staff who have been double jabbed not being required to self—isolate and calls for other parts of the economy for that to happen, but the government needs to fix six pay and make sure workplaces are secure. i
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needs to fix six pay and make sure workplaces are secure.— needs to fix six pay and make sure workplaces are secure. i don't know whether this — workplaces are secure. i don't know whether this is _ workplaces are secure. i don't know whether this is across _ workplaces are secure. i don't know whether this is across your - workplaces are secure. i don't know whether this is across your path - workplaces are secure. i don't know whether this is across your path as. whether this is across your path as well, but we know the requirement now or the advice on people having to work in a workplace or office is relaxing, so it could be an employer is now saying, we would like you backin is now saying, we would like you back in the office, and people may not be comfortable with that. what are you hearing around those situations, which we really haven't had to deal with before? this situations, which we really haven't had to deal with before?— had to deal with before? this is another area _ had to deal with before? this is another area of _ had to deal with before? this is another area of real _ had to deal with before? this is another area of real concern, i another area of real concern, exacerbated by the fact that the guidance the government published so that employers could carry out risk assessments and make sure people had confidence, was published the middle of this week, to full working days before people are due to be back in the office. that places an unfair responsibility on employers and employees, what the government also didn't do is consult with unions and employers about what was in that guidance, we have seen strong workplace guided state unions and employers help shape that keeps
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millions of people safe, replaced by vague exhortations, recommendations, guidelines and i think it poses more question for employers then provides answers. i would urge every employee out there who staff are coming back next week to sit down, talk to the staff, unions, make sure this is a gradual return where people feel confidence, employers are sure that they workplaces are secure, but frankly in that task they had been —— haven't been helped by government. -- haven't been helped by government.— after 9.30 this morning, we'll take you beneath the surface as we follow team gb swimmer, adam peaty, who has let us follow his journey to the olympics, as he prepares to retain his status as british champion. also the sport coming up, see you
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shortly. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning. let's return to our top story now — and the government's announcement that travellers returning from france to england and wales will still have to isolate for ten days, even after many covid restrictions are lifted on monday. so what kind of impact will this change have on the travel industry? let's speak to gemma antrobus from the association of independent tour operators.
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she joins us from surrey. good morning. firstly, this only happened just before 8:30pm yesterday evening and quite a lot of people will be waking up this morning for whom this is brand—new. they thought france was on the amber list and that would fall into place with monday's changes. it's probably worth reiterating the difference this will make to travel to and from france. ~ ,,., , , ,., france. absolutely. it is something the travel industry _ france. absolutely. it is something the travel industry did _ france. absolutely. it is something the travel industry did not - france. absolutely. it is something the travel industry did not expect l the travel industry did not expect to come — the travel industry did not expect to come. all of the information that we have _ to come. all of the information that we have received from the government has pretty— we have received from the government has pretty much been leaked throughout. to receive this very late on— throughout. to receive this very late on a — throughout. to receive this very late on a friday night has caused mass _ late on a friday night has caused mass confusion, yet again. it's going — mass confusion, yet again. it's going to — mass confusion, yet again. it's going to mean hours upon hours of working _ going to mean hours upon hours of working through this weekend for many. _ working through this weekend for many, many travelagencies working through this weekend for many, many travel agencies and specialist — many, many travel agencies and specialist tour operators to look at all of _ specialist tour operators to look at all of their— specialist tour operators to look at all of their client bookings they have _ all of their client bookings they have departing imminently and the rest of— have departing imminently and the rest of the summer. this new level of traffic_ rest of the summer. this new level of traffic light, this fifth traffic light— of traffic light, this fifth traffic
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light that we now have, amber plus, wasn't _ light that we now have, amber plus, wasn't something that has ever been mentioned — wasn't something that has ever been mentioned. nobody expected this to come _ mentioned. nobody expected this to come. really, the travel industry are in— come. really, the travel industry are in as — come. really, the travel industry are in as much shock as the consumers _ are in as much shock as the consumers are right now. really, we would _ consumers are right now. really, we would just— consumers are right now. really, we would just have to pick up the pieces— would just have to pick up the pieces and deal with it and, you know. _ pieces and deal with it and, you know. help _ pieces and deal with it and, you know, help our clients through this pretty— know, help our clients through this pretty terrible situation. do know, help our clients through this pretty terrible situation.— pretty terrible situation. do you have any idea — pretty terrible situation. do you have any idea of _ pretty terrible situation. do you have any idea of the _ pretty terrible situation. do you have any idea of the kind - pretty terrible situation. do you have any idea of the kind of- pretty terrible situation. do you - have any idea of the kind of numbers of people who either have already gone to france who have been caught up gone to france who have been caught up in this or who were planning to go to france whose plans will have to change? have you got any ideas of numbers? we to change? have you got any ideas of numbers? ~ . . ~ to change? have you got any ideas of numbers? ~ ., ., ,, , ., numbers? we are talking hundreds of thousands of — numbers? we are talking hundreds of thousands of people. _ numbers? we are talking hundreds of thousands of people. because, - thousands of people. because, obviously, ten days ago, you know, consumers — obviously, ten days ago, you know, consumers were told that yes, if you have been— consumers were told that yes, if you have been double vaccinated that france _ have been double vaccinated that france was one of the countries you were _ france was one of the countries you were able _ france was one of the countries you were able to — france was one of the countries you were able to return to and you didn't— were able to return to and you didn't have to do self—isolate or take _ didn't have to do self—isolate or take the — didn't have to do self—isolate or take the additional test. effectively, double vaccinated meant the same _ effectively, double vaccinated meant the same as green if you are travelling _ the same as green if you are travelling to an amber destination. there _ travelling to an amber destination. there will— travelling to an amber destination. there will be huge amounts of people. — there will be huge amounts of people, people who have put off their— people, people who have put off their holidays year upon year and not forgetting the amount of people
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that are _ not forgetting the amount of people that are absolutely desperate to see family— that are absolutely desperate to see family members, who have been waiting _ family members, who have been waiting for the opportunity like this from — waiting for the opportunity like this from monday, as they expected, to be able _ this from monday, as they expected, to be able to do that. we mustn't forget _ to be able to do that. we mustn't forget this— to be able to do that. we mustn't forget this is notjust to be able to do that. we mustn't forget this is not just about travelling for leisure purposes, this is— travelling for leisure purposes, this is also about reuniting families— this is also about reuniting families who, again, when i have to wait months, possibly longer, before they can— wait months, possibly longer, before they can do— wait months, possibly longer, before they can do so in a way that is free for them _ they can do so in a way that is free for them to— they can do so in a way that is free for them to return and not have to self-isolate — for them to return and not have to self-isolate— for them to return and not have to self-isolate. one of the differences with france — self-isolate. one of the differences with france in _ self-isolate. one of the differences with france in relation _ self-isolate. one of the differences with france in relation to _ self-isolate. one of the differences with france in relation to travel - with france in relation to travel bans is, you can drive. you can get a ferry or eurotunnel. it's not reliant on flights in the same way that spain or other places are. how does that relate to the problems that might happen? or whether people might go anyway. i that might happen? or whether people might go anyway-— might go anyway. i think people will start to take — might go anyway. i think people will start to take their _ might go anyway. i think people will start to take their own _ might go anyway. i think people will start to take their own decisions - start to take their own decisions about— start to take their own decisions about situations like this. we are getting _ about situations like this. we are getting to — about situations like this. we are getting to the point now on monday where _ getting to the point now on monday where freedom day... it is being left to— where freedom day... it is being left to the — where freedom day... it is being left to the individual to decide
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what — left to the individual to decide what is — left to the individual to decide what is right for them and their families — what is right for them and their families. with travel, people will start— families. with travel, people will start to _ families. with travel, people will start to do — families. with travel, people will start to do the same. at some point, this has— start to do the same. at some point, this has to _ start to do the same. at some point, this has to stop. you have to take your own — this has to stop. you have to take your own decision. we did say pre—pandemic. we decided to get into cars every— pre—pandemic. we decided to get into cars every day and not drive in a way _ cars every day and not drive in a way that — cars every day and not drive in a way that could cause an accident. there _ way that could cause an accident. there will— way that could cause an accident. there will be people who just make the decision on what is best for them — the decision on what is best for them but— the decision on what is best for them. but i do think itjust doesn't help with _ them. but i do think itjust doesn't help with a — them. but i do think itjust doesn't help with a number of entry and exit points— help with a number of entry and exit points to _ help with a number of entry and exit points to france. it is possibly why france _ points to france. it is possibly why france didn't go directly onto a red list because of those different entry— list because of those different entry and exit points, being able to take eurostar cross on the train, being _ take eurostar cross on the train, being able — take eurostar cross on the train, being able to go from the ferry ports— being able to go from the ferry ports and — being able to go from the ferry ports and also being able to fly. the ability to put in hotel quarantines at those points or a ranger— quarantines at those points or a ranger logistics about them is possibly— ranger logistics about them is possibly why it didn't hit red straightaway because it will be logistically impossible to do that on monday. —— those points are bound logistics _ on monday. -- those points are bound louistics. . , on monday. -- those points are bound louistics. ., , ., ., logistics. one last point, what do
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tour operators— logistics. one last point, what do tour operators and _ logistics. one last point, what do tour operators and travel- logistics. one last point, what do tour operators and travel agents i logistics. one last point, what do i tour operators and travel agents do now? grant shapps has made it very plain that he was quite blunt in a way, he said this could happen to any destination at any point. that is where we are at now. how does anyone advise anyone as to where you should or shouldn't go? taste anyone advise anyone as to where you should or shouldn't go?— should or shouldn't go? we 'ust have to roll with it. — should or shouldn't go? we 'ust have to roll with it. we * should or shouldn't go? we 'ust have to roll with it. we just _ should or shouldn't go? we 'ust have to roll with it. we just have _ should or shouldn't go? we just have to roll with it. we just have to - to roll with it. we just have to provide — to roll with it. we just have to provide the information to our clients — provide the information to our clients in _ provide the information to our clients in the manner in which it is given— clients in the manner in which it is given to _ clients in the manner in which it is given to us — clients in the manner in which it is given to us but what it doesn't help us to— given to us but what it doesn't help us to do— given to us but what it doesn't help us to do is— given to us but what it doesn't help us to do is plan for the future. most— us to do is plan for the future. most of— us to do is plan for the future. most of us— us to do is plan for the future. most of us had just started to be able to— most of us had just started to be able to gain some consumer confidence with our clients. we have seen clients — confidence with our clients. we have seen clients booking for the summer and with— seen clients booking for the summer and with information like this, that is completely squashed. it just proves— is completely squashed. it just proves that something can come out of nowhere — proves that something can come out of nowhere at the very last minute. the industry— of nowhere at the very last minute. the industry will now continue and has done — the industry will now continue and has done for the last 18 months is call for— has done for the last 18 months is call for sector specific support. how— call for sector specific support. how any— call for sector specific support. how any government can thank the travel— how any government can thank the travel industry can continue to operate — travel industry can continue to operate like this, with these last—minute decisions that affect our bottom line is, we had decimated industry _ our bottom line is, we had decimated industry. they will be nothing left if they— industry. they will be nothing left if they do — industry. they will be nothing left
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if they do not support this industry, especially when we appreciate decisions have to be made at short— appreciate decisions have to be made at short notice but they have to look _ at short notice but they have to look at — at short notice but they have to look at who that affects and how they are — look at who that affects and how they are going to support them. let us get to the point where we can get out of this. ., out of this. from the association of independent tour _ out of this. from the association of independent tour operators, - out of this. from the association of independent tour operators, thank| independent tour operators, thank you. the rules in relation to france. thank you very much. it is sunny outside, there are records being broken, gavin, and i am looking forward to the next couple of days! i wish i was there at sandwich _ couple of days! i wish i was there at sandwich in _ couple of days! i wish i was there at sandwich in kent _ couple of days! i wish i was there at sandwich in kent and - couple of days! i wish i was there at sandwich in kent and we - couple of days! i wish i was there at sandwich in kent and we will l couple of days! i wish i was there l at sandwich in kent and we will be there in a moment. south africa's louis oosthuizen heads the leader board heading into day three of golf's open championship in kent. his 36—hole total of 129, is the lowest in the history of the open. the lowest score in the history. let's get more from our reporter ben crouch who's at royal st george this morning. great to see you, we were describing on thursday before the tournament
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how tricky this course can actually beat that we have seen a flurry of players posting a lot of low scores, what's actually going on? —— can actually be. it what's actually going on? -- can actually be— what's actually going on? -- can actually be. it comes down to two thin . s, actually be. it comes down to two things. and _ actually be. it comes down to two things, and even _ actually be. it comes down to two things, and even on _ actually be. it comes down to two things, and even on a _ actually be. it comes down to two things, and even on a sunny - actually be. it comes down to two i things, and even on a sunny morning like here _ things, and even on a sunny morning like here like — things, and even on a sunny morning like here like we have in sandwich, there _ like here like we have in sandwich, there has— like here like we have in sandwich, there has been a lot of rain in kent inthe— there has been a lot of rain in kent inthe weeks— there has been a lot of rain in kent in the weeks leading up to the tournament. that is making the course — tournament. that is making the course a — tournament. that is making the course a little bit easier for the golfers — course a little bit easier for the golfers. secondly, it is not very windy— golfers. secondly, it is not very windy for— golfers. secondly, it is not very windy for top links golf is really notorious— windy for top links golf is really notorious for being especially windy before _ notorious for being especially windy before the last day or so, it has calmed — before the last day or so, it has calmed down and made it a lot easier for the _ calmed down and made it a lot easier for the golfers to control the ball. none _ for the golfers to control the ball. none more so than louis oosthuizen, 11-under_ none more so than louis oosthuizen, ll-under par— none more so than louis oosthuizen, 11—under parand leading none more so than louis oosthuizen, 11—under par and leading the way at the moment. a record low score for the moment. a record low score for the open _ the moment. a record low score for the open championship. he has a two shot lead _ the open championship. he has a two shot lead over the american. as of the english — shot lead over the american. as of the english contingent chasing, andy sullivan— the english contingent chasing, andy sullivan best second best place. 67. nobody _ sullivan best second best place. 67. nobody expects andy sullivan to win
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the open. _ nobody expects andy sullivan to win the open, he is hoping to fly under the open, he is hoping to fly under the radar— the open, he is hoping to fly under the radar even if he is talking about— the radar even if he is talking about himself in the third person. i about himself in the third person. always about himself in the third person. i always admire people who do that. lots of established names who have struggled, phil mickelson missed the cut and rory mcllroy not doing very well at this course, is he?- well at this course, is he? yeah, northern ireland's _ well at this course, is he? yeah, northern ireland's rory - well at this course, is he? yeah, northern ireland's rory mcllroy. well at this course, is he? yeah, i northern ireland's rory mcllroy has been frustrated. his game is not quite _ been frustrated. his game is not quite there, not quite close enough is how— quite there, not quite close enough is how he _ quite there, not quite close enough is how he described it. he is sitting — is how he described it. he is sitting on— is how he described it. he is sitting on level par and there were times— sitting on level par and there were times yesterday when we thought he wasn't _ times yesterday when we thought he wasn't going to make the weekend's play but _ wasn't going to make the weekend's play but he — wasn't going to make the weekend's play but he has. probable you won't be winning — play but he has. probable you won't be winning the tournament from level par but— be winning the tournament from level par but he _ be winning the tournament from level par but he is— be winning the tournament from level par but he is here for the weekend. he is— par but he is here for the weekend. he is teeing — par but he is here for the weekend. he is teeing offjust after 11am, hoping — he is teeing offjust after 11am, hoping to— he is teeing offjust after 11am, hoping to make his way up the leaderboard and get some confidence back into _ leaderboard and get some confidence back into his game. if they were handing — back into his game. if they were handing out claretjugs back into his game. if they were handing out claret jugs for people with the _ handing out claret jugs for people with the most support around here, when _ with the most support around here, when he _ with the most support around here, when he tees off in a couple of hours' — when he tees off in a couple of hours' time, there will be thousands following _ hours' time, there will be thousands following him all the way around the course _ following him all the way around the course and _ following him all the way around the course and you will be able to hear those _
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course and you will be able to hear those roar— course and you will be able to hear those roar echoing around royal saint— those roar echoing around royal saint georges.— those roar echoing around royal saint georues. . ~ ,, , . roared on by his home crowd, lewis hamilton claimed pole position for formula one's first sprint race ahead of the british grand prix. as a government test event 86,000 fans were at silverstone with 140,000 expected on sunday. hamilton's first lap in the final session was quick enough to secure the top spot for the new qualifying race ahead of title rival max verstappen. joe wilson reports. the advance party, the pacesetters. for these fans, silverstone means the whole weekend. friday is the start. sunday will be full capacity — with 140,000 back to watch formula one here. just amazing. i missed it so much last year. i was in agony watching it on tv, so to be here again — you just can't beat it. do you have any anxiety about being with so many people again? i personally don't, no. i think they've organised it well. it should be safe, it should be fun.
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it's just about being sensible and risk assessing. and we're going to be outdoors, so i think we can control to a certain extent what we do, and then we'll make sure we just test ourselves. show your proof of complete vaccination or a negative test result — it is the routine british sport has become accustomed to, but not on this scale. government scientists who know about this are comfortable that a site of this size — and let's not forget this is a 550—acre site. we have as many seats here as a premiership football club, but ours is spread over 3.5 miles. this is an enormous site, and that makes a huge difference. economically, for you, these three days mean you can carry on your business. is that right? without this you are gone, basically. is it as stark as that? it is as stark as that. the silverstone experience includes the on—site museum charting the past and future of motorsport, changes to technology always running in conjunction with the sport's primary goal — to be entertaining.
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well, qualifying on friday brought a roar of celebration from the crowds when they knew that lewis hamilton was quickest, ahead of max verstappen. that means hamilton is on pole for today's sprint race. results in that determine grid positions for sunday's grand prix. it is all exciting. well, that is the intention. the organisers here seem surprised and impressed by the size of the crowd just for friday's event. certainly the sunshine helps, but the desire to rejoin a huge sporting occasion here seems clear. tadej pogacar looks set to win the tour de france for the second year running. the slovenian maintained his overall lead of more than five minutes after yesterday's nineteenth stage. if he's still in the yellowjersey after today's time trial. he'll ride unopposed into paris on the final day. that's where britain's mark cavendish will be hoping to claim
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the outright record for stage wins, after he could only finish in the main group yesterday, well behind winner matjey moric of slovenia. england lost their first t20 match against pakistan, after a thriller at trent bridge. some big hitting from pakistan captain babar azam helped his side to a total of 232 from their 20 overs. it would have been england's biggest run chase ever, and thanks to a century from just 43 balls by liam livingstone they got very close. but in the end it proved too much and pakistan won by 31 runs. the second of the three match series will be at headingley tomorrow. a half—capacity wembley will watch st helens take on castleford in rugby league's challenge cup final. this is one of the government's pilot events with up to 115,000 expected at wembley for a match between two sides who've waited a while to win this competition. joe lynskey reports. # touching me, touching you...# this is the summer when blessings begin. wembley sings again. now, rugby league gets its turn in the noise. it has been the sport's toughest year, but now 115,000 watch
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st helens play castleford. this challenge cup final will look more like old times. archive: castleford, - the little mining town team, wins the rugby league cup. it's a very fine achievement by the boys. castleford have won it four times before, but in west yorkshire it feels distant. they last had the cup in 1986, and in the last ten years have been runners—up both here and in the super league. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 years, and i think for us to be able to win it, we would probably write our names in history. it's a long time coming for a team that has been around for the last seven or eight years. with darryl. we want to be remembered. that is surely the point of everyone's career. you want to get to the top, you want to be remembered. st helens have more recent memories. they last won it in 2008, but for one of this sport's giants, that's too long ago. in the team that day was 22—year—old james roby, a one—club man who now at 35 leads out the team.
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i have been lucky enough to be involved in the challenge cup winning team, but never as captain. and that would really cap it off. it's a fantastic achievement, and obviously great for the town and the team. i thinkjust off the back of what everyone has been through, with covid and everything like that, it will give everyone a real lift. in the third round, castleford won with a golden—point kick. it wasn't the same in the silence. through the year, this sport has battled on through squad outbreaks and called—off games. more than ever, it depends on community. just to be able to repay my - granddad, who got me involved in the game to start off with, - took me to training sessions here, there and everywhere. it would be the ultimate reward for me if i can lift that trophy. i i'd bring it over to him at the end, with him stood in the crowd, - and have a photo with my grandad. at times this year, the cup has felt empty, but the oldest competition
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will finish with a true showpiece. wembley is ready for the noise from the north. one of castleford or st helens will go home singing. joe lynskey, bbc news. 45,000. 115,000. they 45,000. they are so dependent on the supporters being there for the finances of the games and a big spectacle for them. we are gradually getting used to it, after the euros. seeing these crowds in wimbledon, as well, seeing crowd spilled. absolutely. great to see that coming back. with silverstone,, 140,000 for the british grand prix. great to see the british grand prix. great to see the crowds back. test event, we are waiting to see what happens off the back of it. nice to see the atmosphere left and we saw that at the euros. in atmosphere left and we saw that at the euros. ., ., , the euros. in a moment, we will be talkin: the euros. in a moment, we will be talking about _ the euros. in a moment, we will be talking about defibrillators - the euros. in a moment, we will be talking about defibrillators in - talking about defibrillators in sport. there was that moment in time, the beginning of the euros, very shocking scenes for those
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watching a live match and a player goes down. watching a live match and a player goes down-— watching a live match and a player aoes down. ., , ., goes down. yeah, christian eriksen, denmark's opening _ goes down. yeah, christian eriksen, denmark's opening match, - goes down. yeah, christian eriksen, denmark's opening match, really i denmark's opening match, really shocking to see that. the whole world saw a cardiac arrest on the pitch and it has happened before with players who have passed away. since then, protocols have been implemented with defibrillators and first aid. first aid teams are on standby. they are well drilled. the images from the opening game and for denmark, that opening weekend of the tournament, it was a really shocking. very scary. it didn't leave many — shocking. very scary. it didn't leave many people. _ shocking. very scary. it didn't l leave many people. absolutely, shocking. very scary. it didn't i leave many people. absolutely, i don't think _ leave many people. absolutely, i don't think it — leave many people. absolutely, i don't think it will _ leave many people. absolutely, i don't think it will actually - leave many people. absolutely, i don't think it will actually ever. i don't think it will actually ever. great to see he is now back in good health and made a full recovery effectively. figs health and made a full recovery effectively-— health and made a full recovery effectively. as you said, not the first time that _ effectively. as you said, not the first time that has _ effectively. as you said, not the first time that has happened. i effectively. as you said, not the l first time that has happened. two years ago, former tottenham hotspur is player died after suffering a cardiac arrest while working out at the gym. his son now wants to make it law for all sports
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facilities to have public access to the life—saving equipment. we have this report. schoolchildren learning the most valuable lesson of all — how to save a life. one, two, three, four... charlie edinburgh has dedicated his life to this cause. edinburgh gets through. it is after his father, justin edinburgh, former tottenham hotspur player and leyton orient manager, died following a cardiac arrest aged 49 at the gym. he was the cool dad. everyone wanted my dad to be their dad, and i'm not ashamed to say that. i might say i'm big—headed saying that, but he obviously was. he was just a man who gave so much to people. i've lost my best friend, i've lost the person i look up to, and you live with it every day. the grief doesn't go away. the gym wherejustin suffered a cardiac arrest didn't have a defibrillator. if my dad, when he had his cardiac arrest, was in a facility
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where by law it was required, he might still be around, and that will play on my mind forever. charlie has never named the gym. instead, he set up a foundation to change the law to make it compulsory for health and sports facilities to have a defibrillator on site. where lucky, somebody has approached us with a defibrillator. the aim is also to improve access to first aid training. today i've learnt how to do cpr accurately, and how to do that chest presses and how to use defibrillators. we're sending defibrillators to gyms and sports companies and schools, i and if we see anyone in danger, we can do cpr to them. - everyone should know about it so that they can help people in need as well, just likejustin edinburgh. he needed help, but he didn't get it in time. japhet tanganga is a spurs defender, likejustin was. he's lending his support to the campaign, including playing in a friendly against orient to fundraise for the foundation.
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it's asking me to deliver a shock, it's analysed the heart. the role of defibrillators was thrown into sharp focus after his team—mate christian eriksen suffered a cardiac arrest when he collapsed on the pitch earlier this month. with what went on at the euros, it's shocked the world. and i think it made people realise this is something people need to know. i've seen christian smile and trained with him a few times, and to see him in that position was quite upsetting. i think it's a good cause. i think every ticket we sell, the money will be donated to the justin edinburgh foundation. access to a defibrillator i will save many, many lives, because every minute that is lost| before a defibrillator arrives gives a 10% reduction in survival. survival in this country is poor. we could do much better. i from the tragic circumstances of his father's death, charlie hopes will come a positive impact to help save the lives of others. bbc news.
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it is plenty has been said about the gap about what happened in westminster and the rest of the country. jess phillips is trying to bridge some of the gap with a new book that sets out trying to explain what life is really like for politicians. shejoins us what life is really like for politicians. she joins us on the sofa. politicians. she 'oins us on the sofa. ,., ., politicians. she 'oins us on the sofa. , ., ., ., politicians. she 'oins us on the sofafi now - politicians. she 'oins us on the sofa.i how are l politicians. she 'oins us on the i sofa.i how are things? sofa. good morning. how are things? it is weird, parliament _ sofa. good morning. how are things? it is weird, parliament is _ sofa. good morning. how are things? it is weird, parliament is a _ sofa. good morning. how are things? it is weird, parliament is a word, i it is weird, parliament is a word, the same way that being in the studio is quite weird. and politics is odd at the moment, without question. it is stilted and unusual and not at all like it would be in normal times. and not at all like it would be in normaltimes. because and not at all like it would be in normal times. because we don't see the people as much as well as we don't see westminster as much. {line don't see westminster as much. one ofthe don't see westminster as much. one of the things — don't see westminster as much. one of the things you are very keen to bring across is that question that quite a lot of people think, what do mps do? what do you do all the time? we hear the noise in the comments that maybe
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there are certain issues that mps are known for and get involved in, as you have. things that are important to them and what about the rest of it? ., ., ,., rest of it? yeah, the reason i wanted to — rest of it? yeah, the reason i wanted to write _ rest of it? yeah, the reason i wanted to write the - rest of it? yeah, the reason i wanted to write the book i rest of it? yeah, the reason i| wanted to write the book was, rest of it? yeah, the reason i- wanted to write the book was, when i became a politician, my husband had never met a politician before. he said he had absolutely no idea of half of the things you were meant to be doing that you do all day. and obviously it is different, some mps are better than others. the reality is, what people see on the television, they often see an empty chamber in the house of commons. people will say to me on twitter things like, where are you, why aren't you sitting through every debate? as if politicians would have the time to sit through every single debate on every single thing. or the fact that they are not in that room they are know nothing about that thing and do nothing about that. the public public sees is less than 5% of myjob. —— they are not in that room and that means they know nothing. we are currently negotiating. we are much more in touch with the people the people than people think we are. we spend a
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lot of time working together with each other, notjust shouting at each other, notjust shouting at each other. each other, not 'ust shouting at each other.— each other, not 'ust shouting at each other. ~ , , ., each other. why did you become an mp? i became _ each other. why did you become an mp? i became an _ each other. why did you become an mp? i became an mp _ each other. why did you become an mp? i became an mp because - each other. why did you become an i mp? i became an mp because people that i worked with at women's aid sometimes think maybe i would have been better off if i had stayed... interference— been better off if i had stayed... interference ~ ., ,, ., ., interference was happening to women in refu:e with interference was happening to women in refuge with services _ interference was happening to women in refuge with services not _ interference was happening to women in refuge with services notjust _ in refuge with services notjust being cut, although that was definitely a problem. but how laws in our country were not fit for purpose to serve the very people they were trying to help. i think thatis they were trying to help. i think that is important. politicians don't get things right and they have to try things. but unless you are in touch with the people, and have people in that building who know how law actually affect people and how policies affect people and benefits affect people, you won't be able to actually change anything. and i saw terrible things happening to people that could be rectified so i became a local councillor to try to rectify it like that and when i realised i needed to go up to the next level, i
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will keep on rising until people started saying, yes, you can have this for women in domestic violence refuges. this for women in domestic violence refu . es. ., , this for women in domestic violence refu:es. ., , ., ,, , refuges. that is one issue. it is immensely _ refuges. that is one issue. it is immensely important, - refuges. that is one issue. it is immensely important, no i refuges. that is one issue. it is i immensely important, no denying it. you have alluded to this, as an mp, you are talking to your constituents. what are you learning? what have you learnt? it is all very well that you have something you were vocal about in one area but a steep learning curve.— were vocal about in one area but a steep learning curve. some were as diverse as birmingham. _ steep learning curve. some were as diverse as birmingham. the - steep learning curve. some were as diverse as birmingham. the thing i steep learning curve. some were as| diverse as birmingham. the thing is, you learn something every day. you have to learn it from the people that you represent. if you are not a politician who is directly seeing and sitting in front of your constituents every day, you will be a terrible politician, actually. what do i know currently about what it is like to be a single mum living in a tower block who is on furlough? i don't. i rely on the people in my constituency to speak to me and tell me how things are. there is nothing that any politician, no matter how
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clever we are, no matter which background we come from, no matter what degree is we've got, there is nothing, no law that ever changed in our society they didn't start with a conversation between a politician. we don't go in there saying this is the thing we're going to do, we pick up the thing we're going to do, we pick up those issues. and we don't talk about that enough. one of the reasons i wanted to write a book about empowering people to be more involved in politics is that people don't realise how much power they have to change things and if they use it, they can take part in making their lives better or that little bit of the world.— their lives better or that little bit of the world. ., ., , , bit of the world. how many letters do ou bit of the world. how many letters do you receive _ bit of the world. how many letters do you receive a _ bit of the world. how many letters do you receive a day, _ bit of the world. how many letters do you receive a day, e-mails? i bit of the world. how many letters. do you receive a day, e-mails? you do you receive a day, e—mails? you say they have the power and that is the system, but how do you... how are you heard? the system, but how do you. .. how are you heard?— the system, but how do you... how are you heard? thousands. one of the thins i are you heard? thousands. one of the things i tried — are you heard? thousands. one of the things i tried express _ are you heard? thousands. one of the things i tried express in _ are you heard? thousands. one of the things i tried express in the _ are you heard? thousands. one of the things i tried express in the book, i things i tried express in the book, i probably receive in a week 10,000 e—mails, just e—mails, from my constituents about issues from charities... it is immense. very
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hard to sift through that. politicians shouldn't stand in front of buildings and pretend they have built them and stand in front of 1000 e—mails and pretend i answer them all. i have people who help me. there is an element of honesty but not trying to take credit for all of the stuff that goes on and i'd try to put that into the book. i want to empower people to think that they are... but i can't do everything. that is another thing. the expectation game is so difficult and it is so important for people not to become disillusioned by politicians and politics because they feel disappointed that somebody hasn't done something. because we are not honest. we are not honest when we go out and say you can have the moon on a stick, you can do anything. there is no... whenever i vote on things like war, they will be a division thatis like war, they will be a division that is built up. like this thought or this side. the reality is, there is no decision that politicians make when somebody doesn't lose out and nobody says that. and so the public go around expecting much more than
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can actually be delivered. you can definitely take part in our politics. get involved just by voting alone. and there are all sorts of things about why politicians care about old peter people rather than young people, solely because they vote —— about older people. you can change things but you shouldn't expect it to be easy. like society, politics isn't easy. if you try to take the easy route and pretend... interference around phrases like _ route and pretend... interference around phrases like levelling - route and pretend... interference around phrases like levelling up i route and pretend... interference around phrases like levelling up or. around phrases like levelling up or take back control and that means anything no wonder people end up disappointed and disillusioned. lanthem disappointed and disillusioned. when we interview politicians like you and we don't often do it like this, recently, we will do an interview and sometimes presenters like us will get flakfor and sometimes presenters like us will get flak for interrupting or being rude or asking the wrong questions. asking the right questions. asking the right questions. but, quite often, a lot of the reaction is, why doesn't this
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man, woman, minister, prime minister or, indeed, just in mp... answer the question? give me thejess phillips... because i'm wondering... you always strike me as quite a plain speaking person. i tn;r you always strike me as quite a plain speaking person.- you always strike me as quite a plain speaking person. i try to be. have ou plain speaking person. i try to be. have you ever _ plain speaking person. i try to be. have you ever had _ plain speaking person. i try to be. have you ever had a _ plain speaking person. i try to be. have you ever had a whisper i plain speaking person. i try to be. have you ever had a whisper in i plain speaking person. i try to be. i have you ever had a whisper in your earfrom the have you ever had a whisper in your ear from the people who surround politics going, "do you know what? with the way you are going about things, great, great, but mayjust eased back a bit because there are ways and ways." has anyone tried to change the way you are? yes. ways and ways." has anyone tried to change the way you are?— change the way you are? yes, of course they _ change the way you are? yes, of course they have! _ change the way you are? yes, of course they have! it's _ change the way you are? yes, of course they have! it's not - course they have! it's not necessarily malign, we shouldn't think of it being a bad thing that people say, you have a message to get across. if you are a politician, like me, i am get across. if you are a politician, like me, iam here get across. if you are a politician, like me, i am here to talk about politics generally but the fact is, ministers will come on a tv programme or opposition politicians because they have a message to land. you have to try and have message discipline because that is the thing you want to get across. it is
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tedious as hell, i agree, when you are asking a question and they will keep on saying the line. i'm at home, throwing my slippers at the telly as much as the next person. it is very annoying. there is a whole chapter about how we interact with the media and the reality of what thatis the media and the reality of what that is actually like. i think that people think we are constantly at loggerheads with journalists. whereas, i rely onjournalists loggerheads with journalists. whereas, i rely on journalists and news programmes and the media to get these stories out that i need being told. �* ., . ~ these stories out that i need being told. 1, . ~ ., ,., these stories out that i need being told. ., , ., told. back to where you started, have ou told. back to where you started, have you been — told. back to where you started, have you been told _ told. back to where you started, have you been told to _ told. back to where you started, have you been told to not - told. back to where you started, have you been told to not to i told. back to where you started, have you been told to not to be | told. back to where you started, i have you been told to not to be so, i don't know, blunt? i’gre have you been told to not to be so, i don't know, blunt?— i don't know, blunt? i've been told i don't know, blunt? i've been told i need to land _ i don't know, blunt? i've been told i need to land a _ i don't know, blunt? i've been told i need to land a message. - i don't know, blunt? i've been told i need to land a message. you i i don't know, blunt? i've been told| i need to land a message. you need to go on the telly and you are terrible, because they will try and draw you. they will say to things —— things to you, you're very plain speaking, come on, jess, you will tell us the answer! which is entirely true.— tell us the answer! which is entirely true. tell us the answer! which is entirel true. , , ., , entirely true. this is getting a bit weird! wheels _ entirely true. this is getting a bit weird! wheels within _ entirely true. this is getting a bit weird! wheels within wheels. i entirely true. this is getting a bit i weird! wheels within wheels. people will sa that weird! wheels within wheels. people will say that to _ weird! wheels within wheels. people will say that to me. _ weird! wheels within wheels. people will say that to me. no _ weird! wheels within wheels. people will say that to me. no doubt. - weird! wheels within wheels. people will say that to me. no doubt. but i will say that to me. no doubt. but it is not necessarily that sinister.
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because politicians, we have a genders, rightly, to sell because we have to stand in elections. just that we have agendas. people shouldn't ask me to do it because i cannot deliver a line without sounding terribly robotic. i think that people really like... would really like to see much more of. is politician saying, we tried this and it didn't work. we did our best and we thought this was worth this policy around whatever, the health service, whatever. we really thought it was going to be a good idea and when we went into it we were really honest and said it could be 50—50 and these are the people that will lose. ., , _ lose. can i 'ust say, the thing about that — lose. can ijust say, the thing about that is, _ lose. can ijust say, the thing about that is, that _ lose. can ijust say, the thing about that is, that would i lose. can ijust say, the thing about that is, that would be i lose. can ijust say, the thing i about that is, that would be very well if your labour party would sign up well if your labour party would sign up to the deal and go, well if you do say we get it wrong, we want to point the finger and say that is rubbish, isn't it? there is an honesty think that only goes so far.
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and likewise with the media. interference the and likewise with the media. interference— and likewise with the media. interference ., , . interference the one sentence where ou said we interference the one sentence where you said we got — interference the one sentence where you said we got it _ interference the one sentence where you said we got it wrong, _ you said we got it wrong, minister, got it wrong. the whole ecosystem creates a system where... interference— creates a system where... interference ., ., interference people say, you are all the same and — interference people say, you are all the same and the _ interference people say, you are all the same and the idea _ interference people say, you are all the same and the idea that _ interference people say, you are all the same and the idea that i _ interference people say, you are all the same and the idea that i am - interference people say, you are all the same and the idea that i am the i the same and the idea that i am the same as, like a borisjohnson or jacob rees—mogg! it is easily proven to be untrue. the fact that the matter is that the whole system is set up to sort of fall down. and that the people who opt out of the people whose lives it changes. that is what upsets me and what i would like to change. is what upsets me and what i would like to change-— like to change. interesting read, thank you. _ like to change. interesting read, thank you. jess. _ like to change. interesting read, thank you, jess, no _ like to change. interesting read, thank you, jess, no doubt - like to change. interesting read, thank you, jess, no doubt we i like to change. interesting read, | thank you, jess, no doubt we will speak again soon, look after yourself. jess's book is called everything you really need to know about politics. see you in a moment.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today... a surprise change to
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the quarantine rules for travellers to france — fully vaccinated holidaymakers will still have to self—isolate on return, sparking anger and confusion in the travel industry. i've booked everything 2a hours ago and now everything's changing, so, quite disappointing. the race to find survivors of the floods that have wreaked havoc across western europe — more than 150 people are dead, hundreds are still missing. more than 35 million people in england will be offered a flu jab this winter — they'll include the over 50s and children up to the age of 16. plenty of fun in the sun for the thousands heading to this weekend's sporting events. at the open — breaking records — louis oosthuizen leads by two shots at the half way point. and at silverstone, more than 80,000 fans are expected for the new qualifying race ahead of tomorrow's british grand prix. preparing for the olympics, gold medal winning swimmer adam peaty on the importance of training, determination and his baby son in the build
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up to the tokyo games we have just had a very balmy nights, it promises to be a sunny, very warm day, guess what, same tomorrow. it's saturday the 17th ofjuly. our top story... fully vaccinated travellers returning to england and wales from france will still have to spend ten days in quarantine. the change in the rules, announced last night, takes effect from monday — when many other covid restrictions, including those around travel to amber list countries, are being eased. it is thought hundreds of thousands of holiday—makers will be affected, here is what some of them are told us. i here is what some of them are told us. . . here is what some of them are told us, ., . ., us. i am french and i live in the uk, we us. i am french and i live in the uk. we had _ us. i am french and i live in the uk, we had plans— us. i am french and i live in the uk, we had plans with - us. i am french and i live in the uk, we had plans with my- us. i am french and i live in the uk, we had plans with my voice us. i am french and i live in the i uk, we had plans with my voice to go to france for a state to see my
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family —— with my boys, starting next tuesday. it difficult position right now in the uk, needed to rest, really needed for the boys to see their family, really needed for the boys to see theirfamily, it is a little bit disheartening. i am glad we are still going, tojust a disheartening. i am glad we are still going, to just a fact of having to change plans at the very last minute. having to change plans at the very last minute-— last minute. haven't seen our son and his partner — last minute. haven't seen our son and his partner for _ last minute. haven't seen our son and his partner for about - last minute. haven't seen our son and his partner for about nine i and his partner for about nine months. _ and his partner for about nine months, so we decided to come out to see them _ months, so we decided to come out to see them. and we did that a couple of weeks _ see them. and we did that a couple of weeks agojust see them. and we did that a couple of weeks ago just angry, frustrated. depressed _ of weeks ago just angry, frustrated. depressed that it is happening. angry— depressed that it is happening. angry and frustrated because we cannot— angry and frustrated because we cannot see the logic in it, the logic— cannot see the logic in it, the logic of— cannot see the logic in it, the logic of france going onto the green list let— logic of france going onto the green list let alone going onto a super amber— list let alone going onto a super amber list. | list let alone going onto a super amber list-— amber list. i am travelling on a rivate amber list. i am travelling on a private car. _ amber list. i am travelling on a private car, will _ amber list. i am travelling on a private car, will be _ amber list. i am travelling on a private car, will be using - private car, will be using eurotunnel, _ private car, will be using eurotunnel, i— private car, will be using eurotunnel, i will- private car, will be using eurotunnel, i will have i private car, will be usingl eurotunnel, i will have to quarantine _ eurotunnel, i will have to quarantine on _ eurotunnel, ! will have to quarantine on my- eurotunnel, ! will have to quarantine on my way- eurotunnel, i will have to i quarantine on my way back to eurotunnel, i will have to _ quarantine on my way back to london because _ quarantine on my way back to london because i_ quarantine on my way back to london because i will— quarantine on my way back to london because i will be _ quarantine on my way back to london because i will be spending _ quarantine on my way back to london because i will be spending 30 - because i will be spending 30 half—an—hour_ because i will be spending 30 half—an—hour in _ because i will be spending 30
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half—an—hour in france. i because i will be spending 30 half—an—hour in france. my. because i will be spending 30 i half—an—hour in france. my wife works— half—an—hour in france. my wife works as — half—an—hour in france. my wife works as a — half—an—hour in france. my wife works as a nurse _ half—an—hour in france. my wife works as a nurse in _ half—an—hour in france. my wife works as a nurse in the - half—an—hour in france. my wifel works as a nurse in the hospital, she cannot — works as a nurse in the hospital, she cannot really— works as a nurse in the hospital, she cannot really take _ works as a nurse in the hospital, she cannot really take another. works as a nurse in the hospital, i she cannot really take another ten days off _ she cannot really take another ten days off. because _ she cannot really take another ten days off. because it _ she cannot really take another ten days off. because it is— she cannot really take another ten days off. because it is impacting i days off. because it is impacting their— days off. because it is impacting their patient _ days off. because it is impacting their patient and _ days off. because it is impacting their patient and colleagues i days off. because it is impacting their patient and colleagues and| their patient and colleagues and everyone — their patient and colleagues and everyone -- _ their patient and colleagues and everyone. —— patients. - our political correspondent jessica parkerjoins us now. monday has been billed as the day for lifting restrictions — so this is a change that's surprised some, isn't it? we didn't know this category existed. it we didn't know this category existed. , ., ., ., existed. it is a new invention, that is artl existed. it is a new invention, that is partly why _ existed. it is a new invention, that is partly why the — existed. it is a new invention, that is partly why the government i existed. it is a new invention, that is partly why the government is i is partly why the government is facing criticism this morning that it has caused even more confusion with this traffic light system, france is now essentially in its own subcategory of the amber list. this has happened, the government says, due to concerns about the beater variants, ministers defend the move saying they were always clear that they could take rapid action if they
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thought that was necessary —— beta variant, but a lot of disappointed travellers today, these accusations that the government is causing confusion to days out from when various restrictions are set to be lifted in england, changes were set to come into force for travellers returning from france, that is now no longer the case, but somebody this morning said the government is doing the right thing, jeremy hunt, former health secretary, current chair of the health select committee, said police dog words, the nhs warning lights are flashing red and he has suggested there could be, in his view, a return to restrictions later in the year around the automatic surrender run trajectory. around the automatic surrender run tra'ecto . ., ~' , ., around the automatic surrender run trajectory-_ -- _ around the automatic surrender run trajectory-_ -- if- around the automatic surrender run trajectory._ -- if things i trajectory. thank you. -- if things are on the — trajectory. thank you. -- if things are on the wrong _ trajectory. thank you. -- if things are on the wrong trajectory. - more than 35 million people in england will get a free flu jab this winter. over—50s and all children up to 16 will be eligible. the expanded
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programme will be delivered alongside booster jabs for covid—19. here s our health and science flu all but disappeared last winter. the restrictions, social distancing and mask wearing that slowed down the spread of coronavirus also prevented the usual round of winter bugs. but now we're getting closer to normal, the fear is we could have a bigger than usual flu season. that could combine with covid and other infections to put the nhs under intense pressure, so england is launching its biggest ever flu vaccination programme. more than 35 million people will be offered the vaccine for free. so who can get it? doctors, nurses, care home staff and otherfront—line and care workers, anyone over the age of 50, pregnant women, people at higher risk from flu, including those with asthma, and there will be a significant expansion of the number of children offered the vaccine. children get a nasal spray instead of an injection. two— and three—year—olds as well as all primary school children will be offered
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the vaccine as usual. last year only secondary school pupils up to the age of 12 were included, but this will increase to all those 16 and under. it's desperately important that we all get vaccinated if we're invited this year, because last year cases were very low. they were partly low because people weren't going out and about and they weren't mixing, but they were also partly low because so many people were vaccinated. over 80% of over 65s took up the invitation to get vaccinated. this year we've got more people than ever being invited, and that is going to be one of the best ways of preventing the hospitals from being unable to cope. meanwhile, there could also be more covid jabs this winter. the nhs is drawing up plans to give a third dose to more than 30 million people if they are needed. pop—up vaccine centres are opening across england in shops and parks this weekend as part
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of an nhs "grab a jab" initiative. the vaccination hubs will be set up in primark stores, the tate modern and even the open championship. the aim is to boost the vaccine uptake among young people ahead of monday, when the majority of coronavirus restrictions are set to be lifted. i would urge you to come in, get yourself vaccinated. you know, there will be a wonderful atmosphere and there will be lots of help and support and advice and guidance for you. you know, to anybody who is over 18 and eligible to have a vaccine, please do come forward if you haven't had the jab, and we're here and ready and waiting for you. from today, there will no longer be a limit on the number of people meeting outside in wales as some coronavirus restrictions from different households to meet indoors and organised indoor events can start taking place with up to one—thousand people seated and 200 standing.
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at least 150 people are now known to have died as a result of this week's flooding in western europe.rescue rescue operations are continuing across parts of germany, belgium and the netherlands as hundreds of people are still missing. earlier on breakfast we spoke to gregorjericho who was forced to evacuate his home. yesterday revisited the city again and it was very serious, everywhere people sat crying in front of their houses and the city looks like a battlefield, the sheets are torn open everywhere, bridges collapsed and cars in places where they normally never get. it was really, you can't believe it if you see it here. meanwhile, thousands
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of residents of an area west of the german city of cologne have been evacuated after a dam was breached by floodwater overnight. our correspondent anna holligan join us now, anna, what more do we know about this? the pictures are just of utter devastation. the pictures are 'ust of utter devastation.— the pictures are 'ust of utter devastation. , ., ., ., ., ~' the pictures are 'ust of utter devastation. , ., ., ., devastation. they are, and look at this, this devastation. they are, and look at this. this is _ devastation. they are, and look at this, this is normally _ devastation. they are, and look at this, this is normally a _ devastation. they are, and look at this, this is normally a residential| this, this is normally a residential area, it is now officially a disaster zone here, the people were evacuated overnight, this is what they are coming back to. this is cecile's fishing lake, she told me the fish are everywhere, in a playpark over there, they have just disappeared in the floodwaters, so what this gentleman over here is trying to do is go round these fields and find them. recover those fish so that she can keep the business alive, added that as a
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picture we are seeing reflected right across this region and beyond. more than 10,000 people have been evacuated. the problem now is that the rescue workers cannot get any yet, so people are having to fend for themselves, what their own pumps and generators to get rid of the water but there is no way for it to 90, water but there is no way for it to go, so the river has reached its limits, no way for the river to flow to, that's why they are ending up here. this is something they are going to have to deal with now but they say it has a wake—up call, something they will have to deal with in the future and they want to be ready the next time.— with in the future and they want to be ready the next time. every saturday all your questions come in for which we are very grateful, we run those ideas pass them to get some thoughts, that is coming up. monday is the day that
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lots of coronaviruses chicks are easing, we will get their view on that. ahead of that, glorious sunshine for many of us us stop looking glorious this weekend, hot sunshine, if that is what you like, but a lot of us do enjoy blue skies— what you like, but a lot of us do enjoy blue skies that's what will be ha - ccenin enjoy blue skies that's what will be happening this _ enjoy blue skies that's what will be happening this weekend. - enjoy blue skies that's what will be happening this weekend. high i happening this weekend. high pressure over us right now, giving us the clear skies, not going to be sunny and everywhere, in fact across northern and western scotland there will be more cloud around, even a little grisly in some spots, and as a result also fresher, you can see on the temperature and the colours yellow, temperatures around 17 celsius in stornoway, in the northern as around 1a, eastern scotland and the south you can see orange colours, a lot warmer, 26
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expected in belfast. and from yorkshire, southwards, damages today could hit 30 celsius. high 20s i'd think on the south coast. read about the mid—20s for places like plymouth and st ives. the british grand prix will have hot and sunny weather all the way through, we could just about nudge up to 30 celsius tomorrow. with the hot sunshine are also high uv levels, especially in the south, elsewhere across the country it is going to be generally quite high. the evening is looking clear, beautiful weather out there, lasting until the late evening hours. through the night we are going to see thicker cloud moving into scotland and northern ireland, so by the end of the night it could be quite overcast in places like belfast at glasgow, inverness as well, that is because we have slightly cooler air riding around the area of high pressure. with that comes more cloud add moisture off
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the atlantic, so tomorrow from yorkshire northwards will have more clouds in the sky, not cloudy but it will be a little more cloudy, with temperatures dropping to around 21 celsius, maybe a 5 degrees drop in some places in the south, it could get up to 31 celsius on sunday. for example in london often the hotspot. high pressure with us monday, tuesday, probably will hang around for most of the week, at least until around wednesday or thursday, can see it will stay settled with temperatures into the mid—20s. beyond that, it was the end of the week, a question of some showers, bond hole it is looking fine for a few more days. enjoy. —— but on the whole. it's the final weekend before almost all legal restrictions around covid are lifted in england — but after more than 50,000 cases of the virus were recorded yesterday, some people argue it's too soon.
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we can speak about this and other developments to do with the pandemic with professor linda bauld and dr chris smith. good morning. we have spoken over the months and theories different times of great importance. —— at various different times. you know the scenario, the relaxation is starting on monday. everybody knows the rate of infection is going up. i think, correct me if i'm wrong, doubling every three weeks is what is expected. talk us through what you see when you see the easing and the figures. you see when you see the easing and the fiaures. ,., ., you see when you see the easing and the fiaures. _, ., ., . the figures. good morning. when the prime minister _ the figures. good morning. when the prime minister announced _ the figures. good morning. when the prime minister announced that - the figures. good morning. when the prime minister announced that july i prime minister announced thatjuly i9 prime minister announced thatjuly 19 was rossi the date for opening up, that was around the middle of june —— roughly the date, it has increased fourfold, we are in a
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different place from where we were when that decision was taken. we are seeing around the uk that for the first time since the spring we are early spring, 1% of the uk population roughly from the infection surveys you would have had covid in the week up to the 10th of july, big numbers, getting around 700 people a day admitted to hospital, rates of mortality are still low, so links have been weakened. as we will go on to discuss it as hospital admissions that are causing real concern at the moment, projections on how they could go are quite alarming. it is not the situation we wanted to be in, we didn't want to be opening up in, we didn't want to be opening up in quitea in, we didn't want to be opening up in quite a dramatic way at a time when we have so many infections, that's why you are hearing many people expressing concern. chris, where are you _ people expressing concern. chris, where are you on _ people expressing concern. chris, where are you on this? _ people expressing concern. chris, where are you on this? i - people expressing concern. chris, where are you on this? i am - people expressing concern. chris, i where are you on this? i am looking at the grass. _ where are you on this? i am looking at the grass. a _ where are you on this? i am looking at the grass, a siam _ where are you on this? i am looking at the grass, a siam sure _ where are you on this? i am looking at the grass, a siam sure many i where are you on this? i am looking at the grass, a siam sure many are, and in— at the grass, a siam sure many are, and in some— at the grass, a siam sure many are, and in some respects i am alarmed and in some respects i am alarmed and then— and in some respects i am alarmed and then other respect i am reassured. in the position where i
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expected — reassured. in the position where i expected we would be in terms of when _ expected we would be in terms of when we — expected we would be in terms of when we opened things up, we get more _ when we opened things up, we get more meetings between people, people iioii'i more meetings between people, people going about their business, that is translating into more cases, we knew that would _ translating into more cases, we knew that would happen. what we are not seeing, _ that would happen. what we are not seeing, this— that would happen. what we are not seeing, this is the reassuring bits, is that— seeing, this is the reassuring bits, is that they— seeing, this is the reassuring bits, is that they are not translating at the moment into casualties. we have casesh _ the moment into casualties. we have cases. no— the moment into casualties. we have cases, no casualties. as linda is saying. — cases, no casualties. as linda is saying. the _ cases, no casualties. as linda is saying, the link between where we .et saying, the link between where we get a _ saying, the link between where we get a case — saying, the link between where we get a case and it turns into a person— get a case and it turns into a person becoming severely unwell, a proportion— person becoming severely unwell, a proportion of the time, as people passing _ proportion of the time, as people passing away unfortunately, that leg has been _ passing away unfortunately, that leg has been significantly weakened by vaccination. nearly 90% of uk adults has had _ vaccination. nearly 90% of uk adults has had their first don't, nearly 16% have — has had their first don't, nearly 16% have had two doses, two doses is critical— 16% have had two doses, two doses is critical because it is required to reign _ critical because it is required to reign in — critical because it is required to reign in the dominant variant of the virus _ reign in the dominant variant of the virus which — reign in the dominant variant of the virus which we have in the uk. if that status — virus which we have in the uk. if that status quo is maintained and we see very—
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that status quo is maintained and we see very low levels are people becoming severely unwell and end up in hospital— becoming severely unwell and end up in hospital and regrettably pass away. _ in hospital and regrettably pass away. if — in hospital and regrettably pass away. if it — in hospital and regrettably pass away, if it stays low, we are going to be _ away, if it stays low, we are going to be ok — away, if it stays low, we are going to be ok if— away, if it stays low, we are going to be ok. if we do see a big uptake in people _ to be ok. if we do see a big uptake in people going into hospital then obviously— in people going into hospital then obviously i would expect government will have _ obviously i would expect government will have to _ obviously i would expect government will have to change tack, reversal of this, _ will have to change tack, reversal of this, but— will have to change tack, reversal of this, but at the moment i think they are _ of this, but at the moment i think they are being reassured by the fact they are being reassured by the fact the graph— they are being reassured by the fact the graph does look very flat and if you talk— the graph does look very flat and if you talk to — the graph does look very flat and if you talk to people running health care at— you talk to people running health care at the moment, i have been talking _ care at the moment, i have been talking to — care at the moment, i have been talking to managers of various hospitals, they say the number of people _ hospitals, they say the number of people coming in, it is going up, but the — people coming in, it is going up, but the of— people coming in, it is going up, but the of people coming in and staying — but the of people coming in and staying in— but the of people coming in and staying in is lower, people are staying — staying in is lower, people are staying on— staying in is lower, people are staying on for less long as they are recovering — staying on for less long as they are recovering and getting off home. we have changed the course of the outbreak, — have changed the course of the outbreak, we have changed the dynamic— outbreak, we have changed the dynamic of ditties with the vaccination, let's hope that the continued — vaccination, let's hope that the continued drive to vaccinate more people _ continued drive to vaccinate more people continues to bear fruit —— dynamic— people continues to bear fruit —— dynamic of— people continues to bear fruit —— dynamic of the disease. she people continues to bear fruit -- dynamic of the disease. she asked, how is the opening _
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dynamic of the disease. she asked, how is the opening likely _ dynamic of the disease. she asked, how is the opening likely to - dynamic of the disease. she asked, how is the opening likely to impact | how is the opening likely to impact on the new mutations occurring? the viruses are spread through the population changes, all varices do that. _ population changes, all varices do that. all— population changes, all varices do that, all living things do that, because — that, all living things do that, because of genetic spelling mistakes that creep into the genetic code as a thing _ that creep into the genetic code as a thing replicates itself. thatjust happens — a thing replicates itself. thatjust happens. most of the time it happens and it— happens. most of the time it happens and it disables viruses all disabled things. _ and it disables viruses all disabled things, make them less reproductively fit, they do not spread — reproductively fit, they do not spread as— reproductively fit, they do not spread as well, but occasionally one will emerge which is better than all the others — will emerge which is better than all the others and it is like putting a bigger— the others and it is like putting a bigger engine in your race car, it will have — bigger engine in your race car, it will have an _ bigger engine in your race car, it will have an advantage in the race and push — will have an advantage in the race and push out of the way all the other— and push out of the way all the other cars _ and push out of the way all the other cars in the race. that is what has happened with the delta variant, and the _ has happened with the delta variant, and the more cases there are the more _ and the more cases there are the more likelihood there ask that you will disclose more of these variants _ will disclose more of these variants. there is a game of cat and mouse _ variants. there is a game of cat and mouse between cases and consequences. we are hoping that with the _ consequences. we are hoping that with the surveillance we have where
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we are _ with the surveillance we have where we are reading the genetic code of the cases— we are reading the genetic code of the cases that we are diagnosing, because _ the cases that we are diagnosing, because whenever someone has a positive _ because whenever someone has a positive growth of irish test, we take _ positive growth of irish test, we take a _ positive growth of irish test, we take a sample of that test that has run up _ take a sample of that test that has run up a _ take a sample of that test that has run up a positive and we need at the genetic— run up a positive and we need at the genetic code, we are keeping tags, and we're _ genetic code, we are keeping tags, and we're hoping that we will spot it if it _ and we're hoping that we will spot it if it happens early and we can spot— it if it happens early and we can spot if— it if it happens early and we can spot if there is a threat posed by variant— spot if there is a threat posed by variant two like that so we can change — variant two like that so we can change tack accordingly. this works, it gave _ change tack accordingly. this works, it gave us _ change tack accordingly. this works, it gave us four warning about the kent _ it gave us four warning about the kent variant alpha was going to do last winter— kent variant alpha was going to do last winter and that helped us to tackle _ last winter and that helped us to tackle that more effectively than we would _ tackle that more effectively than we would have done. we tackle that more effectively than we would have done.— would have done. we had been re-cortin would have done. we had been reporting in _ would have done. we had been reporting in the _ would have done. we had been reporting in the news _ would have done. we had been reporting in the news that i would have done. we had been i reporting in the news that france, if you return from their even if you have been double jab, you will have to isolate even though it is like an amber list class, but the concern regarding france is about the beta variant, adding terms of the
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message, it is like the delta variant was the one we should be concerned about and the accuracy, the vaccines we have had are effective against it. how do we balance what we are hearing? it is difficult, balance what we are hearing? it is difficult. this _ balance what we are hearing? it 3 difficult, this variant, the beta variant we have had in the uk for some time, public health england produces a report every week on the variants of interest and concern, if you look at the most recent report there were no new cases of beta variant in the past reporting period at about just over variant in the past reporting period at aboutjust over 1000 so far, so the uk government wants to keep more of that variant out. there is about 3.5% of cases in france that account for beta variant, the question is around vaccines, the vaccines we have are still effective in the face of all the varieds we know about but they may be slightly less effective, and there are a couple of studies with this variant in south africa
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that suggest it may challenge vaccines. i would say about travel restrictions as they can have an impact, you can see that internationally, but the question is how long will they be effective for. if we get more cases of this variant, how will it respond in relation to delta, so there are lots of questions, but it is a precautionary move. of questions, but it is a recautiona move. , precautionary move. this came in from maggie _ precautionary move. this came in from maggie who _ precautionary move. this came in from maggie who is _ precautionary move. this came in from maggie who is asking, - precautionary move. this came in from maggie who is asking, do i precautionary move. this came in| from maggie who is asking, do we know how many of the deaths within 28 days of a positive covid test had been double vaccinated? this 28 days of a positive covid test had been double vaccinated?— been double vaccinated? this is an im ortant been double vaccinated? this is an important question, _ been double vaccinated? this is an important question, something - been double vaccinated? this is an important question, something i l important question, something i think... i was discussing with a family member the other day, in the last technical briefing that i was just describing, thereby to hodge and 47 deaths in that briefing from their delta variant, —— they were
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247. i have the figures, ii8 their delta variant, —— they were 247. i have the figures, 118 people from that group are people who sadly died with this disease, had both doses, that is 46% of cases, that sounds terrifying, why would 46% of cases of people dying in our hospitals who had both doses of the vaccine in that period? the main reason is that vaccines are not 100% protective, the second thing is it relates to age and vulnerability, so when you have all the population vaccinated, which we would any perfect world, you would still have sadly people dying with covid map and they would have been double vaccinated. the risk of becoming unwell and going into hospital is far greater for people who haven't had the vaccine and for everybody who hasn't had vaccines the risk of mortality is obviously greater than if they had been vaccinated but we will the —— still see death of people who had both doses, we always
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knew that was the case. fiflen people who had both doses, we always knew that was the case.— knew that was the case. often our scratches are _ knew that was the case. often our scratches are practical, _ knew that was the case. often our scratches are practical, here - knew that was the case. often our scratches are practical, here is - scratches are practical, here is one. —— often our questions. scratches are practical, here is one. -- often our questions. prices do dwell on — one. -- often our questions. prices do dwell on surfaces _ one. -- often our questions. prices do dwell on surfaces for _ one. -- often our questions. prices do dwell on surfaces for a - one. -- often our questions. prices do dwell on surfaces for a while - one. -- often our questions. pricesj do dwell on surfaces for a while but it is all_ do dwell on surfaces for a while but it is all down to the infectious dose. — it is all down to the infectious dose. you _ it is all down to the infectious dose, you need to come into contact with a _ dose, you need to come into contact with a threshold amount of virus in order_ with a threshold amount of virus in order for— with a threshold amount of virus in order for that is tied a reasonable chance _ order for that is tied a reasonable chance of— order for that is tied a reasonable chance of infecting you. to get a reasonable dose of virus and there has to— reasonable dose of virus and there has to he — reasonable dose of virus and there has to be enough they and the first place _ has to be enough they and the first place which fa surface has been in for a _ place which fa surface has been in for a period — place which fa surface has been in for a period of time and you touch it, for a period of time and you touch it. you _ for a period of time and you touch it. you have — for a period of time and you touch it, you have to pick up an infectious dose and transfer into a multiple _ infectious dose and transfer into a multiple part of your body and infectious dose come into your mouth or nose _ infectious dose come into your mouth or nose or— infectious dose come into your mouth or nose or eyes, all connected. while _ or nose or eyes, all connected. while we — or nose or eyes, all connected. while we were very cautious about this in— while we were very cautious about this in the — while we were very cautious about this in the first place when the pandemic— this in the first place when the pandemic first broke because we didn't— pandemic first broke because we didn't really understand very much about— didn't really understand very much about the — didn't really understand very much about the biology of the virus, we
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understand this is a respiratory infection — understand this is a respiratory infection. most of the transmitters occur— infection. most of the transmitters occur through things carried through the air— occur through things carried through the air and _ occur through things carried through the air and people breathing it in, so the _ the air and people breathing it in, so the chances of you touching an infected _ so the chances of you touching an infected dose from a package left on your doorstep, unless you eat the package, — your doorstep, unless you eat the package, the likelihood is, you don't _ package, the likelihood is, you don't normally eat the package, although— don't normally eat the package, although in some fast—food outlets, the packaging was probably more nutritious... the packaging was probably more nutritious. . .— the packaging was probably more nutritious... that says more about ou than nutritious... that says more about you than anything _ nutritious... that says more about you than anything else! _ nutritious... that says more about you than anything else! most - nutritious... that says more about you than anything else! most of i nutritious... that says more about. you than anything else! most of the time it is down _ you than anything else! most of the time it is down to _ you than anything else! most of the time it is down to what _ you than anything else! most of the time it is down to what you - you than anything else! most of the time it is down to what you breathe | time it is down to what you breathe in, time it is down to what you breathe in. that's— time it is down to what you breathe in. that's a — time it is down to what you breathe in. that's a thing _ time it is down to what you breathe in, that's a thing to _ time it is down to what you breathe in, that's a thing to watch - time it is down to what you breathe in, that's a thing to watch out - time it is down to what you breathe in, that's a thing to watch out for. i in, that's a thing to watch out for. avoid _ in, that's a thing to watch out for. avoid crowded _ in, that's a thing to watch out for. avoid crowded spaces, _ in, that's a thing to watch out for. avoid crowded spaces, infectiousl avoid crowded spaces, infectious people _ avoid crowded spaces, infectious people with symptoms, wash your hands, _ people with symptoms, wash your hands, you — people with symptoms, wash your hands, you are adding a little between _ hands, you are adding a little between the equation but really it is not _ between the equation but really it is not the — between the equation but really it is not the dominant way in which i going _ is not the dominant way in which i going to _ is not the dominant way in which i going to get exposed. i wouldn't worry— going to get exposed. i wouldn't worry about it. we going to get exposed. i wouldn't worry about it.— going to get exposed. i wouldn't worry about it. we are not good to see ou worry about it. we are not good to see you for — worry about it. we are not good to see you for three _ worry about it. we are not good to see you for three weeks _ worry about it. we are not good to see you for three weeks because l worry about it. we are not good to | see you for three weeks because of the olympics. we will not have the covid panel, how —— thank you for
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the flowers, they have brought a lot ofjoy, how are you going to spend the next e weeks? the ofjoy, how are you going to spend the next e weeks?— the next e weeks? the weather is fantastic in _ the next e weeks? the weather is fantastic in edinburgh, _ the next e weeks? the weather is fantastic in edinburgh, i - the next e weeks? the weather is fantastic in edinburgh, i am - the next e weeks? the weather is fantastic in edinburgh, i am sure| fantastic in edinburgh, i am sure you have seen the forecast —— the next three weeks. we have to check in with chris to see how the track race went. did in with chris to see how the track race went-— in with chris to see how the track race went._ it - in with chris to see how the track race went._ it is - in with chris to see how the track. race went._ it is going race went. did you win? it is going relatively got _ race went. did you win? it is going relatively got a _ race went. did you win? it is going relatively got a flat _ race went. did you win? it is going relatively got a flat tyre. _ race went. did you win? it is going relatively got a flat tyre. i - race went. did you win? it is going relatively got a flat tyre. i got - race went. did you win? it is going relatively got a flat tyre. i got a i relatively got a flat tyre. i got a flat tyre — relatively got a flat tyre. i got a flat tyre about a mile or so from barrington — flat tyre about a mile or so from barrington where we told everyone to be. unfortunately i was a bit late, took me _ be. unfortunately i was a bit late, took me half—an—hour, there was a nice guy— took me half—an—hour, there was a nice guy who— took me half—an—hour, there was a nice guy who took —— came along and .ot nice guy who took —— came along and got the _ nice guy who took —— came along and got the tube — nice guy who took —— came along and got the tube out of the front wheel of his— got the tube out of the front wheel of his tractor, a piece of metal on the road — of his tractor, a piece of metal on the road had gone through, we did a roadside _ the road had gone through, we did a roadside wheel repair and got me going _ roadside wheel repair and got me going again, it took me a while to catch— going again, it took me a while to catch up — going again, it took me a while to catch up it — going again, it took me a while to catch up. it was great fun, absolutely brilliant, we raised a lot of— absolutely brilliant, we raised a lot of money, thank you very much to everyone _ lot of money, thank you very much to everyone who came along and supported, when we finally got through— supported, when we finally got through there, more than 100
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tractors — through there, more than 100 tractors took part, 33 mile loop, we made _ tractors took part, 33 mile loop, we made it— tractors took part, 33 mile loop, we made it and — tractors took part, 33 mile loop, we made it and it was great fun and the weather— made it and it was great fun and the weather held, thank you for asking and to— weather held, thank you for asking and to everyone who came and supported, lovely to see you. what colours attractive? _ supported, lovely to see you. what colours attractive? it _ supported, lovely to see you. what colours attractive? it was _ supported, lovely to see you. what colours attractive? it was a - supported, lovely to see you. what colours attractive? it was a blue i colours attractive? it was a blue tractor. colours attractive? it was a blue tractor- ford — colours attractive? it was a blue tractor. ford boss _ colours attractive? it was a blue tractor. ford boss mike - colours attractive? it was a blue tractor. ford boss mike original| tractor. ford boss mike original colours, — tractor. ford boss mike original colours, empire blue is the official painting _ colours, empire blue is the official painting name. | colours, empire blue is the official painting name-— colours, empire blue is the official painting name. i know entertain you down flat. linda _ painting name. i know entertain you down flat. linda missed _ painting name. i know entertain you down flat. linda missed out - painting name. i know entertain you down flat. linda missed out big i down flat. linda missed out big time, down flat. linda missed out big time. you _ down flat. linda missed out big time, you should _ down flat. linda missed out big time, you should have - down flat. linda missed out big time, you should have come, i down flat. linda missed out big l time, you should have come, we down flat. linda missed out big i time, you should have come, we had down flat. linda missed out big - time, you should have come, we had a party— time, you should have come, we had a party trailer. _ time, you should have come, we had a party trailer, one group had a trailer— party trailer, one group had a trailer that had a sofa in it, they really— trailer that had a sofa in it, they really knew how to do this in style, champagne, the only thing they didn't— champagne, the only thing they didn't have was a television, i was quite _ didn't have was a television, i was quite surprised. i now know how to do this— quite surprised. i now know how to do this properly next time. | quite surprised. i now know how to do this properly next time.- do this properly next time. i have three weeks _ do this properly next time. i have three weeks to _ do this properly next time. i have three weeks to develop _ do this properly next time. i have three weeks to develop an - do this properly next time. i have l three weeks to develop an unusual hobby of my own, we will check in on that when we get there. look forward to seeinr that when we get there. look forward to seeing you — that when we get there. look forward to seeing you both _ that when we get there. look forward to seeing you both again _ that when we get there. look forward to seeing you both again as _ that when we get there. look forward to seeing you both again as sounessl to seeing you both again as souness
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happens, have a nice few weeks in the meantime, could to catch up, thank you. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. i was enjoying the tractor chat. i love a tractor.— i was enjoying the tractor chat. i love a tractor. champagne on the sofa? that _ love a tractor. champagne on the sofa? that sounds _ love a tractor. champagne on the sofa? that sounds nice. - love a tractor. champagne on the sofa? that sounds nice. our i love a tractor. champagne on the i sofa? that sounds nice. our special ruest sofa? that sounds nice. our special guest today — sofa? that sounds nice. our special guest today is _ sofa? that sounds nice. our special guest today is the _ sofa? that sounds nice. our special guest today is the funny _ sofa? that sounds nice. our special guest today is the funny miles i sofa? that sounds nice. our special guest today is the funny miles job. | guest today is the funny miles job. you have panicked me now. if you you have panicked me now. if you could be meek. _ you have panicked me now. if you could be meek. i _ you have panicked me now. if you could be meek. i am _ you have panicked me now. if you could be meek. i am very- you have panicked me now. if you could be meek. i am very lucky. you have panicked me now. if you could be meek. i am very lucky toj you have panicked me now. if you i could be meek. i am very lucky to be here. we could be meek. i am very lucky to be here- we will — could be meek. i am very lucky to be here. we will talk _ could be meek. i am very lucky to be here. we will talk more _ could be meek. i am very lucky to be here. we will talk more about - could be meek. i am very lucky to be here. we will talk more about your i here. we will talk more about your new novel. — here. we will talk more about your new novel, took— here. we will talk more about your new novel, took a _ here. we will talk more about your new novel, took a long _ here. we will talk more about your new novel, took a long time i here. we will talk more about your new novel, took a long time to i new novel, took a long time to write, i am sure your publishers were thrilled about that. we were taught more about that later. food heaven, food health. l taught more about that later. food heaven, food health.— heaven, food health. i really like indian food. _ heaven, food health. i really like indian food, prawn _ heaven, food health. i really like indian food, prawn puree, i- heaven, food health. i really like indian food, prawn puree, i will. indian food, prawn puree, i will have _ indian food, prawn puree, i will have that — indian food, prawn puree, i will have that as a mean if it was offered _
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have that as a mean if it was offered i_ have that as a mean if it was offered. i like the idea of tuna stick— offered. i like the idea of tuna stick but — offered. i like the idea of tuna stick but i _ offered. i like the idea of tuna stick but i have all signed it disappointing. my food hail is tuna stick that— disappointing. my food hail is tuna stick that i— disappointing. my food hail is tuna stick that i have previously had. raw onions i find it infuriating. it isjust— raw onions i find it infuriating. it isjust them being there... you probably— isjust them being there... you probably have a few years on me, but i... probably have a few years on me, but lm when— probably have a few years on me, but i... when something turns out to have _ i... when something turns out to have raw— i... when something turns out to have raw onion in it unexpectedly, we will see which way the viewers familiarface familiar face and a familiarface and a new familiar face and a new one familiarface and a new one in familiar face and a new one in the kitchen what have you got for us? it kitchen what have you got for us? it has raw onion in it, actually. slightly— has raw onion in it, actually. slightly cooked. _ has raw onion in it, actually. slightly cooked. pork- has raw onion in it, actually. slightly cooked. pork chop i has raw onion in it, actually. i slightly cooked. pork chop with a butchers — slightly cooked. pork chop with a butchers source, _ slightly cooked. pork chop with a butchers source, lovely- slightly cooked. pork chop with a i butchers source, lovely gelatinous chicken _ butchers source, lovely gelatinous chicken stock _
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butchers source, lovely gelatinous chicken stock.— chicken stock. nice and light for this weather. _ chicken stock. nice and light for this weather. remarkably i chicken stock. nice and light for this weather. remarkably light. j chicken stock. nice and light for- this weather. remarkably light. our newest member _ this weather. remarkably light. our newest member of _ this weather. remarkably light. our newest member of the _ this weather. remarkably light. our newest member of the team, i this weather. remarkably light. our newest member of the team, good | this weather. remarkably light. our i newest member of the team, good to have you here. i newest member of the team, good to have you here-— have you here. i will be making my mouth and — have you here. i will be making my mouth and arming _ have you here. i will be making my mouth and arming new— have you here. i will be making my mouth and arming new doors, i have you here. i will be making my i mouth and arming new doors, noodles with apr_ mouth and arming new doors, noodles with apr and chili oil source with a fresh _ with apr and chili oil source with a fresh pickle — with apr and chili oil source with a fresh pickle over top —— noodles. the nrouth— fresh pickle over top —— noodles. the mouth numbing they come from the peppercorns _ the mouth numbing they come from the peppercorns which i can tell you about _ peppercorns which i can tell you about in— peppercorns which i can tell you about in a — peppercorns which i can tell you about in a bit.— peppercorns which i can tell you about in a bit. , ., ., ,, , about in a bit. pushing our glasses. i am very well. _ about in a bit. pushing our glasses. ! am very well. i— about in a bit. pushing our glasses. i am very well, i have _ about in a bit. pushing our glasses. i am very well, i have some - about in a bit. pushing our glasses. i am very well, i have some really l i am very well, i have some really lovely— i am very well, i have some really lovely wines — i am very well, i have some really lovely wines for— i am very well, i have some really lovely wines for these _ i am very well, i have some really lovely wines for these dishes, i lovely wines for these dishes, including _ lovely wines for these dishes, including given— lovely wines for these dishes, including given the _ lovely wines for these dishes, including given the weather, i lovely wines for these dishes, i including given the weather, rose. very nice. — including given the weather, rose. very nice. neck— including given the weather, rose. very nice, neck and _ including given the weather, rose. very nice, neck and you _ including given the weather, rose. very nice, neck and you like - very nice, neck and you like humiliating me quite often, you will find out this no expense spared trophy at the back is for a little later on, a little bit cheesy, see you at ten. later on, a little bit cheesy, see you at ten-— later on, a little bit cheesy, see ou at ten. ~ . . i. later on, a little bit cheesy, see you at ten. i you at ten. what, reflecting you? i am not answering _ you at ten. what, reflecting you? i am not answering that. _
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you at ten. what, reflecting you? i am not answering that. i _ you at ten. what, reflecting you? i am not answering that. i am i you at ten. what, reflecting you? i i am not answering that. i am shutting that down. , ., , ., that down. everyone is laughing around you- _ that down. everyone is laughing around you. have _ that down. everyone is laughing around you. have brilliant i around you. have brilliant programme. as we've been reporting this morning — travellers returning from france to england and wales will have to quarantine for ten days, even after many covid restrictions are lifted on monday. the government made the announcement last night, leaving many to wake up to the news. we're joined now our correspondent, hugh schofield — hugh what has been the reaction in france? this announcement came at 8:30pm yesterday evening. a surprise to many, what reaction has there been in france? ., .g . ., , in france? nonofficialyet. in the ast, in france? nonofficialyet. in the past. they _ in france? nonofficialyet. in the past. they said — in france? nonofficialyet. in the past, they said if _ in france? nonofficialyet. in the past, they said if neighbouring i past, they said if neighbouring countries impose measures on french people, france reserves the right to do something reciprocal. we will
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have to see after the weekend if there will be some kind of reciprocal measure. among observers, as they say, there is a certain amount of puzzlement because they justification, as it has been reported in britain is concerning the so—called beta variant of the illness. and the spread in france. in coverage here of covid, we haven't been concentrating on that. it is the big rise in delta that is obsessing everyone, to get technical. obsessing everyone, to get technical-— obsessing everyone, to get i technical._ the one obsessing everyone, to get technical. the one the technical. interference the one they sa is linked technical. interference the one they say is linked to — technical. interference the one they say is linked to south _ technical. interference the one they say is linked to south africa _ technical. interference the one they say is linked to south africa and i say is linked to south africa and all the rest of it is about 10% of all the rest of it is about 10% of all cases. if you look at the graphs, the proportion of beta is actually going down. perhaps that is because the overall number is going up because the overall number is going up at the moment. there is a big
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surge in the delta variant. all i can say is that there are people out there, i have seen lots of people tweeting saying this is an absolute nonsense, this is politics, not based on science, this is the diversionary tactics from boris johnson's government because it knows that monday is a big day and they will draw attention away from they will draw attention away from the surge in cases in the uk. i would not dare to pronounce so categorically on this. it may well be that there is evidence that beta is concerning, considering most people in france are vaccinated with pfizer and most people in britain are vaccinated with astrazeneca stop and maybe that is a concern because there are questions, it seems, but whether astrazeneca is as strong against peter as pfizer. —— against beta. some people are saying this is a cynical gesture on the part of the brits but we don't know enough. it
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seems that the beta variant is causing concern.— seems that the beta variant is causing concern. thank you for the moment. where _ causing concern. thank you for the moment. where does _ causing concern. thank you for the moment. where does this - causing concern. thank you for the moment. where does this leave i causing concern. thank you for the i moment. where does this leave many business owners who are relying on a busy summer season? james and jayne wheeler run a holiday park in western france. we can speak to them now. a holiday park in western france. tell a holiday park in western france. me about the kir you tell me about the kind of customers you have. and how dependent you are on british customers, british holiday—makers. on british customers, british holiday-makers. absolutely, it reall is holiday-makers. absolutely, it really is the — holiday-makers. absolutely, it really is the mainstay - holiday-makers. absolutely, it really is the mainstay of i holiday-makers. absolutely, it really is the mainstay of our i really is the mainstay of our business here. although we do have, obviously, french clients arriving. dutch, as well.— obviously, french clients arriving. dutch, as well. , ., , ., ., dutch, as well. customers from other arts of dutch, as well. customers from other parts of europe- _ dutch, as well. customers from other parts of europe. but _ dutch, as well. customers from other parts of europe. but absolutely, i parts of europe. but absolutely, many british customers arriving. predicated on the fact that we do quite a lot of english caravan storage here, as well. in quite a lot of english caravan storage here, as well. in terms of numbers. — storage here, as well. in terms of numbers, business, _ storage here, as well. in terms of numbers, business, have - storage here, as well. in terms of numbers, business, have you i storage here, as well. in terms of numbers, business, have you hadj storage here, as well. in terms of i numbers, business, have you had any cancellation since the announcement yesterday evening? you cancellation since the announcement yesterday evening?— yesterday evening? you broke up then. yesterday evening? you broke up
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them have _ yesterday evening? you broke up then. have you _ yesterday evening? you broke up then. have you had _ yesterday evening? you broke up then. have you had many- yesterday evening? you broke up i then. have you had many cancellation since the announcement _ then. have you had many cancellation since the announcement yesterday i since the announcement yesterday evening? since the announcement yesterday evenina ? , ., since the announcement yesterday eveninu? , ., ., ., since the announcement yesterday eveninl? , ., ., ., ., evening? yes, i am on e-mail all the time with the — evening? yes, i am on e-mail all the time with the families. _ evening? yes, i am on e-mail all the time with the families. they - evening? yes, i am on e-mail all the time with the families. they are i evening? yes, i am on e-mail all the time with the families. they are so . time with the families. they are so devastated — time with the families. they are so devastated they have got to cancel because _ devastated they have got to cancel because it — devastated they have got to cancel because it is their summer holidays with the _ because it is their summer holidays with the children and we have a lot of families— with the children and we have a lot of families that store here and come — of families that store here and come. and the kids have grown up together— come. and the kids have grown up together here. and this is where they come — together here. and this is where they come and have a good time. interference— they come and have a good time. interference cancelto... yeah, it isn't aood. interference cancelto... yeah, it isn't good- that — interference cancel to. . . yeah, it isn't good. that might _ interference cancelto... yeah, it isn't good. that might cancelled. i isn't good. that might cancelled. what's _ isn't good. that might cancelled. what's the — isn't good. that might cancelled. what's the impact going to be on your business? == what's the impact going to be on your business?— what's the impact going to be on i your business?_ we your business? -- cancelled... we are 'ust your business? -- cancelled... we are just managing _ your business? -- cancelled... we are just managing to _ your business? -- cancelled... we are just managing to keep - your business? -- cancelled... we are just managing to keep our- your business? -- cancelled... we i are just managing to keep our heads above water. obviously, the announcement round about this time last year had a huge effect on us. we were really hoping that this season, you know, we would get back to some normality. we've obviously
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lostjust to some normality. we've obviously lost just over half of to some normality. we've obviously lostjust over half of this season. interference james... lostjust over half of this season. interference james... apologies for interference james. .. apologies for the interference james... apologies for the technical glitches. james and jayne wheeler run a holiday park in western france. it is 9:37am. so much going on in the sport. can exciting. the open is what is happening right now, halfway through and records already being broken. absolutely, this man, louis oosthuizen has smashed it. south africa's louis oosthuizen heads the leader board heading into day 3 of golf's open championship in kent. his 36—hole total of 129 is the lowest in the history of the open. let's get more from our reporter, ben croucher, who's at royal st george this morning. ben, who's looking good heading off what s known as moving day? who has lifted the claretjug, louis
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oosthuizen. top of the leaderboard on 11 under— oosthuizen. top of the leaderboard on 11 under par. four birdies and an eagle _ on 11 under par. four birdies and an eagle on_ on 11 under par. four birdies and an eagle on his — on 11 under par. four birdies and an eagle on his round yesterday. mr consisteht— eagle on his round yesterday. mr consistent over the first couple of days _ consistent over the first couple of days and — consistent over the first couple of days. and to give you an idea of how good _ days. and to give you an idea of how good he _ days. and to give you an idea of how good he is, — days. and to give you an idea of how good he is, six times since he last won the _ good he is, six times since he last won the claretjug, and run up in a major— won the claretjug, and run up in a major tournament, won the claretjug, and run up in a majortournament, he won the claretjug, and run up in a major tournament, he turns it on when _ major tournament, he turns it on when it— major tournament, he turns it on when it matters. he will be teeing offjust _ when it matters. he will be teeing offjust before 4pm this afternoon alongside collin morikawa. he has a two shot— alongside collin morikawa. he has a two shot lead of the english contingent and andy sullivan and paul casey on six under par and five under power respectively will stop you have — under power respectively will stop you have to wonder about the leaderboard to find rory mcllroy. he hasn't _ leaderboard to find rory mcllroy. he hasn't found his best game so far this week — hasn't found his best game so far this week. he struggled just to make the cut— this week. he struggled just to make the cut ttut— this week. he struggled just to make the cut but he made a birdie on the last yesterday and he admits that his game — last yesterday and he admits that his game isn't quite where it wants to be _ his game isn't quite where it wants to be i _ his game isn't quite where it wants to be. ., �* ~' �* his game isn't quite where it wants tobe. to be. i don't think i've played that poorly- — to be. i don't think i've played that poorly- i _ to be. i don't think i've played that poorly. i played - to be. i don't think i've played that poorly. i played hit - to be. i don't think i've played that poorly. i played hit a - to be. i don't think i've played. that poorly. i played hit a really shots —
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that poorly. i played hit a really shots i— that poorly. i played hit a really shots. i haven't _ that poorly. i played hit a really shots. i haven't been _ that poorly. i played hit a really shots. i haven't been efficient. that poorly. i played hit a really. shots. i haven't been efficient with my scoring — shots. i haven't been efficient with my scoring if_ shots. i haven't been efficient with my scoring if i _ shots. i haven't been efficient with my scoring. if i was _ shots. i haven't been efficient with my scoring. if i was really - shots. i haven't been efficient with my scoring. if i was really on - shots. i haven't been efficient with my scoring. if i was really on my. my scoring. if i was really on my game _ my scoring. if i was really on my game and — my scoring. if i was really on my game and if— my scoring. if i was really on my game and it im— my scoring. if i was really on my game and if i'm sharp... - my scoring. if i was really on my game and if i'm sharp... not- my scoring. if i was really on myl game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm not— game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm not sharp. _ game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm not sharp. i_ game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm not sharp, i played _ game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm not sharp, i played a - game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm not sharp, i played a lot- game and if i'm sharp... not that i'm not sharp, i played a lot of. i'm not sharp, i played a lot of lolf i'm not sharp, i played a lot of golf ttut— i'm not sharp, i played a lot of golf but i— i'm not sharp, i played a lot of golf but i could _ i'm not sharp, i played a lot of golf but i could have _ i'm not sharp, i played a lot of golf but i could have been- i'm not sharp, i played a lot of golf but i could have been sixl golf but i could have been six or seven— seven under after these last two days and not even par. not got anything to work on apart from just... interference making more utts. the just... interference making more putts- the early _ just... interference making more putts. the early starters _ just... interference making more putts. the early starters are - just... interference making more putts. the early starters are underl putts. the early starters are under way including _ putts. the early starters are under way including the _ putts. the early starters are under way including the big _ putts. the early starters are under way including the big hitting - putts. the early starters are under way including the big hitting brian| way including the big hitting brian dechambeau. way including the big hitting brian dechambeau— dechambeau. absolutely. bryson dechambeau _ dechambeau. absolutely. bryson dechambeau instant _ dechambeau. absolutely. bryson dechambeau instant among - dechambeau. absolutely. bryson dechambeau instant among the l dechambeau. absolutely. bryson - dechambeau instant among the gaggle of fans— dechambeau instant among the gaggle of fans -- _ dechambeau instant among the gaggle of fans -- in— dechambeau instant among the gaggle of fans —— in among. he hasn't been playing _ of fans —— in among. he hasn't been playing well— of fans —— in among. he hasn't been playing well over the first couple of days — playing well over the first couple of days. one over par. onlyjust made _ of days. one over par. onlyjust made the — of days. one over par. onlyjust made the cut. his big hitting is great _ made the cut. his big hitting is great on — made the cut. his big hitting is great on long and wide courses in america _ great on long and wide courses in america but on the undulating fairways— america but on the undulating fairways with thick rough in kent, he hasn't found it that easy at all. he is going — found it that easy at all. he is going to — found it that easy at all. he is going to be hoping to move up the leaderboard on moving day, as you
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mentioned — leaderboard on moving day, as you mentioned. all of the leaders are going _ mentioned. all of the leaders are going out— mentioned. all of the leaders are going out a little bit later on in the afternoon. the top guys on the leaderboard round about 3:30pm is when _ leaderboard round about 3:30pm is when we _ leaderboard round about 3:30pm is when we will see them on the course. the one _ when we will see them on the course. the one thing you can be assured of, when _ the one thing you can be assured of, when bryson— the one thing you can be assured of, when bryson dechambeau is on the course, _ when bryson dechambeau is on the course, there will be thousands of cheering _ course, there will be thousands of cheering him on.— course, there will be thousands of cheering him on. absolutely. en'oy the da . cheering him on. absolutely. en'oy the day. rhankfi cheering him on. absolutely. en'oy the day. thank you i cheering him on. absolutely. en'oy the day. thank you for i cheering him on. absolutely. en'oy the day. thank you for that, i cheering him on. absolutely. enjoy the day. thank you for that, ben i the day. thank you for that, ben crouch at royal saint georges. roared on by his home crowd, lewis hamilton claimed pole position for formula one's first sprint race ahead of the british grand prix. as a government test event, 86,000 fans were at silverstone with 140,000 expected on sunday. hamilton's first lap in the final session was quick enough to secure the top spot for the new qualifying race ahead of title rival max verstappen. on this bumper sporting weekend, 115,000 fans will be at wembley for rugby league's challenge cup final later — castleford take on st helens. castleford won with a golden point kick on their way to the final — they haven't won this competition since 1986, but have come so close to both league and cup success in recent years.
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this st helens, though, will be favourites. that and lots of people back at wembley. we are talking about the build—up to the olympic games. this time next week! , ~ the olympic games. this time next week! , . ., ., the olympic games. this time next week! , . ., , week! yes! we also have some matches in the women's — week! yes! we also have some matches in the women's football _ week! yes! we also have some matches in the women's football on _ in the women's football on wednesday. kicking off from wednesday, opening ceremony on the friday. wednesday, opening ceremony on the frida . . , w' wednesday, opening ceremony on the frida. . , friday. exciting times. kicking off! i see what you _ friday. exciting times. kicking off! i see what you did _ friday. exciting times. kicking off! i see what you did there! - friday. exciting times. kicking off! i see what you did there! very - friday. exciting times. kicking off! l i see what you did there! very good. it will be a tokyo olympics like no other, obviously. but despite the changes, the hopes and dreams of the athletes competing will be the same. here on breakfast we've been following the journey of team gb swimmer adam peaty as he hopes to bring back gold once more. legacy is something that you can't create. ., it legacy is something that you can't create._ it creates - create. here we go. it creates itself. i
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create. here we go. it creates itself- i just — create. here we go. it creates itself. i just want _ create. here we go. it creates itself. i just want to _ create. here we go. it creates itself. i just want to be - create. here we go. it creates itself. i just want to be the . create. here we go. it creates i itself. ijust want to be the best. come on, daddy! come on, daddy! acclaim come on, daddy! come on, daddy! adam pea takes come on, daddy! come on, daddy! adam peaty takes olympic _ come on, daddy! come on, daddy! adam peaty takes olympic gold. i _ come on, daddy! come on, daddy! adam peaty takes olympic gold. i had - come on, daddy! come on, daddy! adam peaty takes olympic gold. i had mad - peaty takes olympic gold. i had mad dreams last night, _ peaty takes olympic gold. i had mad dreams last night, i _ peaty takes olympic gold. i had mad dreams last night, i hadn't _ peaty takes olympic gold. i had mad dreams last night, i hadn't raced - dreams last night, i hadn't raced for so long. i dreams last night, i hadn't raced forso long. i had dreams last night, i hadn't raced for so long. i had dreams of getting beat. a year in it's like a siege. edit out that bit.— beat. a year in it's like a siege. edit out that bit. there's been news about the olympics _ edit out that bit. there's been news about the olympics being _ edit out that bit. there's been news about the olympics being on - edit out that bit. there's been news about the olympics being on and i edit out that bit. there's been news l about the olympics being on and then off and then on and then. it doesn't really change anything for us. keep building, keep getting faster, just two lengths, innit? when you are the best in the world, you do think people beating you. it's natural, you have a target on your back. i've had a target on my back for the last six, years now. and, you know, you'vejust six, years now. and, you know, you've just got to be one step ahead of the opponent. you've just got to be one step ahead of the opponent-— you've just got to be one step ahead of the opponent._ at i you've just got to be one step ahead| of the opponent._ at the of the opponent. adam peaty. at the ace of 21, of the opponent. adam peaty. at the age of 21, adam peaty _ age of 21, adam peaty became olympic
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champion. now he is back in the water preparing... he will swim like he's being chased and that's because he's being chased and that's because he is. he went home, you've been filming for us for months and we are at the point now... i filming for us for months and we are at the point now. . .— at the point now... i 'ust said to m self at the point now... i 'ust said to myself treasure i at the point now... ijust said to myself treasure these _ at the point now... ijust said to! myself treasure these moments because we'll never get this back. it's been a very, very enduring and hard two years because there's been highs, obviously, there's been lows. i've had times when i think why do i even do this because it's demanding? when yourjob requires you to be extremely disciplined and extremely focused 365 days of the year, that is not normal. he chuckles. so ijust had to completely sweep the whole drive sunday night. train on monday morning. for on monday morning. interference for about six weeks _ on monday morning. interference for about six weeks. we _ on monday morning. interference for about six weeks. we go _ on monday morning. interference for about six weeks. we go to _ on monday morning. interference for about six weeks. we go to australia. i about six weeks. we go to australia. there is normally about 35 degrees,
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a0 degrees on the gold coast and now it's about —3 and we've got about interference this it's about -3 and we've got about interference— it's about -3 and we've got about interference , , ., , , ., interference this is the app we have to do. you check _ interference this is the app we have to do. you check it _ interference this is the app we have to do. you check it in _ interference this is the app we have to do. you check it in the _ interference this is the app we have to do. you check it in the morning. i to do. you check it in the morning. training. tick. how do you feel? physically normal? and physically normal? interference and that an one physically normal? interference and that anyone in — physically normal? interference and that anyone in your— physically normal? interference and that anyone in your household, - physically normal? interference and that anyone in your household, do i that anyone in your household, do they have covid—19 symptoms? if you have any of them. .. interference you submit it. take the _ have any of them. .. interference you submit it. take the thermometer. in i submit it. take the thermometer. in sport, i think you need to believe in yourself, you need to back yourself because no one else is. you know, when it's quiet and the blocks 90, know, when it's quiet and the blocks go, take your marks, go, complete data science, you've got to be right in your mind saying, look, i'm going to beat anyone here. for me, you've got to work on those mindset skills
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every single day. is that good on the last one, mel? very good. it’s the last one, mel? very good. it's not what you're doing but to me, it is the _ not what you're doing but to me, it is the journey, how you are doing it. is the 'ourney, how you are doing it. ., �* ., , , . , is the 'ourney, how you are doing it. how we'll do the olympics feel? how are near. _ it. how we'll do the olympics feel? how are near, how _ it. how we'll do the olympics feel? how are near, how close? -- i it. how we'll do the olympics feel? how are near, how close? -- how| how are near, how close? —— how real. how are near, how close? -- how real. , . .,, ., how are near, how close? -- how real. , . ., , ., ., real. very close was that we have sent a real. very close was that we have spent a long _ real. very close was that we have spent a long time _ real. very close was that we have spent a long time in _ real. very close was that we have spent a long time in the - real. very close was that we have spent a long time in the dark i real. very close was that we have i spent a long time in the dark with covid _ spent a long time in the dark with covid and — spent a long time in the dark with covid and all the restrictions will stop starting to get close now, getting — stop starting to get close now, getting excited about going and i've said to _ getting excited about going and i've said to the athletes, we need to go and get _ said to the athletes, we need to go and get what we deserve this summer. you've _ and get what we deserve this summer. you've got— and get what we deserve this summer. you've got 25 _ and get what we deserve this summer. you've got 25 seconds. the nhs has taken _ you've got 25 seconds. the nhs has taken care _ you've got 25 seconds. the nhs has taken care of health and it is sport because _ taken care of health and it is sport because my— taken care of health and it is sport because myjob to take care of hope. we need _ because myjob to take care of hope. we need to— because myjob to take care of hope. we need to go and represent this country— we need to go and represent this country and represent that people have found a way to still achieve things— have found a way to still achieve things and — have found a way to still achieve things and make progress, even though— things and make progress, even though it — things and make progress, even though it has been really difficult. for the _ though it has been really difficult. for the average person who would probably— for the average person who would probably be terrified, but - probably be terrified, but for adam, knowing that — probably be terrified, but for adam, knowing that he _ probably be terrified, but for adam, knowing that he is _ probably be terrified, but for adam, knowing that he is going _ probably be terrified, but for adam, knowing that he is going to - knowing that he is going to inspire
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interference _ knowing that he is going to inspire interference i _ knowing that he is going to inspire interference— interference i have arrived interference _ interference i have arrived interference in _ interference i have arrived interference in a - interference i have arrived interference in a few - interference i have arrived - interference in a few minutes. whilst we have _ interference in a few minutes. whilst we have been _ interference in a few minutes. whilst we have been given, i interference in a few minutes. whilst we have been given, like, | whilst we have been given, like, certain slots to get into the hotel. i think i am three until 3:30pm. it is quite creepy, i am in the car filming mel. i don't know why she has so many cases, she's only a coach, she doesn't even need that much! this is the covid test. and my number. we much! this is the covid test. and my number. ~ ., , , ., _ number. we will not be beaten by the andemic. number. we will not be beaten by the pandemic- we — number. we will not be beaten by the pandemic. we will _ number. we will not be beaten by the pandemic. we will not _ number. we will not be beaten by the pandemic. we will not be _ number. we will not be beaten by the pandemic. we will not be beaten i number. we will not be beaten by the pandemic. we will not be beaten by l pandemic. we will not be beaten by the pandemic! i�*ve pandemic. we will not be beaten by the pandemic!— the pandemic! i've got to wait here and then we _ the pandemic! i've got to wait here and then we are _ the pandemic! i've got to wait here and then we are free _ the pandemic! i've got to wait here and then we are free to _ the pandemic! i've got to wait here and then we are free to roam. i the pandemic! i've got to wait here| and then we are free to roam. well, not even free to roam. good evening, manchester! obviously, downstairs, we have to wait in line and get almost like a takeaway meal. this is nowhere near enough food for me. what do they think i do? that is not enough food! it looks lovely, though. enough food! it looks lovely, thou~h. , ., , though. there is the man himself, adam peaty- _ though. there is the man himself, adam peaty. the _ though. there is the man himself,
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adam peaty. the greatest - though. there is the man himself, adam peaty. the greatest breastl adam peaty. the greatest breast stroke of all time. —— stroker. eaten stroke of all time. -- stroker. even the coaches — stroke of all time. -- stroker. even the coaches aren't _ stroke of all time. -- stroker. even the coaches aren't allowed - stroke of all time. -- stroker. even the coaches aren't allowed to i stroke of all time. —— stroker. even the coaches aren't allowed to shout because of covid. you are literally on the block and it is really quiet. you can hear a pin drop. that is the thing. if we create a hard environment now, hopefully by the olympics it will become normal. the mature approach now as an athlete, got to take each competition as it goes and as it comes. my muscles are tired, my body is tired but my mind is fresh. d0 tired, my body is tired but my mind is fresh. ,, ~ tired, my body is tired but my mind is fresh. ~' ., is fresh. do you think you tend to ush too is fresh. do you think you tend to push too hard? _ is fresh. do you think you tend to push too hard? is _ is fresh. do you think you tend to push too hard? is that _ is fresh. do you think you tend to push too hard? is that in - is fresh. do you think you tend to push too hard? is that in you? it| is fresh. do you think you tend to l push too hard? is that in you? it is in my blood- _ push too hard? is that in you? it is in my blood- it _ push too hard? is that in you? it is in my blood. it is _ push too hard? is that in you? it is in my blood. it is hard-wired, i in my blood. it is hard—wired, unfortunately. my dad was like it. he was a bricky. i always chose sport. in my head i would rather die than lose. if you want to be the best in the world you need that mentality but it is how you use that to your advantage and don't get consumed by it. some days, now, i'm obviously older, i now have my own
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son... it is about the balance. some days you are like i mean it is ok to takea days you are like i mean it is ok to take a loss today. and not be as hard on myself. i am still training through a pandemic and trying to race through a pandemic and try to make the most of what we have got every single day. sometimes you think what is the point?— think what is the point? yeah, that's daddy! _ think what is the point? yeah, that's daddy! for— think what is the point? yeah, that's daddy! for me, - think what is the point? yeah, that's daddy! for me, and i think what is the point? yeah, i that's daddy! for me, and when george. — that's daddy! for me, and when george, the emotional support that i don't need. — george, the emotional support that i don't need, some separation from the pool, _ don't need, some separation from the pool, somewhere he can come home and not have _ pool, somewhere he can come home and not have to _ pool, somewhere he can come home and not have to talk about his technique at times— not have to talk about his technique at times and stuff like that, somewhere he can escape from it. the ol mics is somewhere he can escape from it. inez olympics is what i somewhere he can escape from it. ii9: olympics is what i live somewhere he can escape from it. ii9 olympics is what i live for. today is moving day. i had literally forgot my pants and socks and spare trousers and everything you need in the morning, that was a great start!
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we are literally 30 seconds from the new house. it is very exciting. it took two days to pack up. i new house. it is very exciting. it took two days to pack up.- new house. it is very exciting. it took two days to pack up. i have so many butterflies _ took two days to pack up. i have so many butterflies in _ took two days to pack up. i have so many butterflies in my _ took two days to pack up. i have so many butterflies in my tummy. i many butterflies in my tummy. george. — many butterflies in my tummy. george, are you excited? i feel so emotional! — george, are you excited? i feel so emotional! get a mac that is the messiest — emotional! get a mac that is the messiest bit of the kitchen. this is wh the messiest bit of the kitchen. this is why the hard _ messiest bit of the kitchen. this is why the hard work _ messiest bit of the kitchen. this is why the hard work is _ messiest bit of the kitchen. this is why the hard work is worth - messiest bit of the kitchen. this is why the hard work is worth it. i messiest bit of the kitchen. this is why the hard work is worth it. -- i why the hard work is worth it. —— thatis why the hard work is worth it. —— that is the messiest bit. having your own home and providing and having yourfamily. i don't think anything can prepare to that. ifeel more motivated now to push on than ever. the kitchen is a mess! how much has george changed you? having a son comes a lot of people down. it's more about broadening my vision and my purpose. excited for the olympics? yeah!
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yeah, to me, it's all about being obviously, you know, the right role model that every parent wants to be. they want to be the best person they can be. so they look up to you. there'sjust such a difference in him. i think it's like an added motivation as well for him to do well in sports and outside of sports. and because he has his son watching his every move really takes watching his every move... really takes a whole team effort to get the performance we're going to need in the olympics. and you play a little part in that, too, didn't you? but i think also in terms of motivation, that i want to prove that you can be a dad and you can be the best performer in the world. people were, you know, on comments on this kind of swim site, and he's not going to be the athlete.
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he was meant to be at the olympics because he's had a child now. right. challenge accepted. overseas ticket holders for the delayed tokyo games have been left disappointed after organisers confirmed the event will go ahead this summer without them. so the announcement was this week there will be no international visitors allowed at tokyo olympics, which is a little bit disappointing as an athlete. you know, this scenario is that enough is not going to be. you walk out and you see tens of thousands of people, which is unfortunate. we've looked at sport and how it's adapted around, you know, look at football and how it's adapted around new crowds. i think the olympics is still going to have that aura. can you explain to us what adam is doing now, is this sprints? we're preparing to kick ass. so this is basically his race specific stuff. so he's trying to swim exactly how we would like him to swim when it matters. how has adam's year been? talk about whirlwind. he's become a father. he's had to survive a pandemic. he's had lockdowns where it'sjust been him and and his partner and obviously george all in a house. it's about basically putting down, you know, some good times. and a bit of rest.
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you've grown so much, my boy. you have. and then really, it's all about rest. he gets the gold that was a master class. oh, what can adam achieve this summer? the best thing to do is to wait and see. i know he's prepared really well. i know he's up to battle through the challenges of sport within a pandemic. i know he's given me 110%. not long now till olympics. i go in... i go to olympics in four days and holding camp in yokohama. obviously, i'm going to miss my little boy, miss my family, but, you know, it'sjust going to be amazing. and i've got a good feeling about good performance in there.
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i'm just going to enjoy it and have a smile on my face like george, you know. yeah. he said daddy's going to go really, really fast. we love you, and no matter what happens, we're so proud of you and we're looking forward to cheering you on. so i'm going to show you what goes into packing for the olympics. and potentially this bag is going to be my weighted blanket. i've still got to put my pillow in here. taking my weighted blanket because i sleep better with that. mel says you are going to carry hope with you. yeah, and i think i want to prove to people back home that, yes, we've been under water. yes. you know, we haven't had the perfect, perfect preparation. we haven't been in training camps like the rest of these countries. we haven't done all the competitions that we normally do. but i'm still going to show fury down there, and i'll show it. and if you can see that and if one person wakes up that day and goes, i'm going to do that today, myjob is done.
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it's a little insight into what goes on behind the scenes. adam peaty going for glory at the tokyo olympics. we wish him well. the london underground is the world's oldest and one of the busiest networks used by millions of people every day, but how much do we really know about it? now a new series explores the hidden parts of the tube system and some of it's more curious stories. its presenters are historian tim dunn and siddy holloway from the london transport museum and theyjoin us now. good morning. who wants to give it the hard sell? it is just the tube, it takes you somewhere, get on it, tim, kick us off, what is the fascination about the london underground? it fascination about the london underground?— fascination about the london underuround? , , : , underground? it is this incredible network with _ underground? it is this incredible network with this _ underground? it is this incredible network with this remarkable i network with this remarkable heritage that is still operating now. it is this evolving beast of different lines in touch er intertwined with a couple of hundred
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stations. so many stories —— different lines intertwined. {sine stations. so many stories -- different lines intertwined. give us exam - les, different lines intertwined. give us examples. maybe _ different lines intertwined. give us examples, maybe when _ different lines intertwined. give us examples, maybe when it - different lines intertwined. give us examples, maybe when it first i different lines intertwined. give us i examples, maybe when it first began. the london underground is the oldest underground network in the world, 158 years _ underground network in the world, 158 years old and opened in 1853 and has evolved into the megalith that we know _ has evolved into the megalith that we know today. it has continually changed — we know today. it has continually changed and evolved. the first underground line with the metropolitan line, which opened from paddington to farringdon street in the city— paddington to farringdon street in the city of london. it was just to alleviate — the city of london. it was just to alleviate the amount of congestion that was— alleviate the amount of congestion that was accumulating in central london — that was accumulating in central london during victorian times. it became — london during victorian times. it became such a success. and then it started _ became such a success. and then it started rolling and they built more and more — started rolling and they built more and more. what most people don't know— and more. what most people don't know is— and more. what most people don't know is that many of the underground lines were _ know is that many of the underground lines were actually separate companies, privately owned companies that later— companies, privately owned companies that later on _ companies, privately owned companies that later on got amalgamated. different styles, different lines, different techniques. it is almost
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this brilliant living museum. and in this brilliant living museum. and in this series. — this brilliant living museum. and in this series, you _ this brilliant living museum. and in this series, you get _ this brilliant living museum. and in this series, you get access - this brilliant living museum. and in this series, you get access of i this brilliant living museum. and in this series, you get access of the i this series, you get access of the people are always fascinated. this is the blurring of myth and reality and you can explain a bit. are there bits of the network disused sitting empty? this picture here, you can explain. empty? this picture here, you can exlain. : , : empty? this picture here, you can exlain. : ,~ ,:, :, explain. aldwych station. closed in that particular _ explain. aldwych station. closed in that particular platform _ explain. aldwych station. closed in that particular platform actually i that particular platform actually closed — that particular platform actually closed in — that particular platform actually closed in 1917. it that particular platform actually closed in 1917.— closed in 1917. it sits there mothballed? _ closed in 1917. it sits there mothballed? yeah, i closed in 1917. it sits there mothballed? yeah, sort. closed in 1917. it sits there | mothballed? yeah, sort of. closed in 1917. it sits there i mothballed? yeah, sort of. what closed in 1917. it sits there - mothballed? yeah, sort of. what is interestin: mothballed? yeah, sort of. what is interesting that _ mothballed? yeah, sort of. what is interesting that bit _ mothballed? yeah, sort of. what is interesting that bit of— mothballed? yeah, sort of. what is interesting that bit of track - mothballed? yeah, sort of. what is interesting that bit of track is i mothballed? yeah, sort of. what is interesting that bit of track is cut i interesting that bit of track is cut off, but the other platform for aldwych is still connected to the main network of the tube. it is actually run and staffed almost as if it a live tube station because it is secure, it has access to the underground and those tracks are live. tfl staff are looking after it. it had a whole new life since then. they have done filming down
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there. sliding doors and v for vendetta. i there. sliding doors and v for vendetta-— there. sliding doors and v for vendetta. ~ :, , , : :, , vendetta. i know the series charts all different _ vendetta. i know the series charts all different things, _ vendetta. i know the series charts all different things, some - vendetta. i know the series charts all different things, some of- vendetta. i know the series charts all different things, some of them | all different things, some of them quite important about how important it is to london. i am curious. when i see a place like that abandoned and mothballed i am thinking it is spooky. are there apocryphal or tales you hear about what is left? sort of ghost stories? things like that? _ sort of ghost stories? things like that? :, , ,:, sort of ghost stories? things like that? :, , :, , that? yeah, there is something airy about it. people _ that? yeah, there is something airy about it. people ask _ that? yeah, there is something airy about it. people ask me _ that? yeah, there is something airy about it. people ask me about i that? yeah, there is something airy about it. people ask me about that| about it. people ask me about that all the time _ about it. people ask me about that all the time and _ about it. people ask me about that all the time and i _ about it. people ask me about that all the time and i have _ about it. people ask me about that all the time and i have been i about it. people ask me about that all the time and i have been doing | all the time and i have been doing —— i all the time and i have been doing -- i have — all the time and i have been doing —— i have been doing that for a long time _ —— i have been doing that for a long time and _ —— i have been doing that for a long time and i_ —— i have been doing that for a long time and i had never experienced anything — time and i had never experienced anything spooky and i have been doing _ anything spooky and i have been doing it — anything spooky and i have been doing it for a long time. some staff members _ doing it for a long time. some staff members have told me sometimes there have been— members have told me sometimes there have been footsteps that they hear or things _ have been footsteps that they hear or things like that. being in kind of a strange environment like that atready. _ of a strange environment like that already, your imagination does start runningm _ already, your imagination does start runnina . .. already, your imagination does start running- - -_ at - already, your imagination does start running. . ._ at bull- already, your imagination does start| running. . ._ at bull and running... interference at bull and bush running... interference at bull and lhush station. — running... interference at bull and
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bush station, do _ running... interference at bull and bush station, do you _ running... interference at bull and bush station, do you remember? i running... interference at bull and| bush station, do you remember? oh, actuall . bush station, do you remember? oh, actually- there _ bush station, do you remember? 0h, actually. there is the station which never _ actually. there is the station which never got — actually. there is the station which never got finished underneath hampstead heath. this never got finished underneath hampstead heath.— never got finished underneath hamstead heath. , , : , hampstead heath. this is incredible. peo - le hampstead heath. this is incredible. people don't — hampstead heath. this is incredible. people don't know— hampstead heath. this is incredible. people don't know about _ hampstead heath. this is incredible. people don't know about this. i hampstead heath. this is incredible. people don't know about this. all i people don't know about this. all the platform spaces are there, the staircases around it. the trains go past it on the way up the northern line. it never got opened for various reasons that we uncover in the show. they built a cold war bunker in there. as the trains go past, it creates a vacuum and these doors are slamming around you and the whole thing starts coming alive as the trains go past. and then it goes silent again. and you are standing going... ok, right, need to get out of here soon! and standing going... ok, right, need to get out of here soon!— get out of here soon! and also it is like, the get out of here soon! and also it is like. the air— get out of here soon! and also it is like, the air pressure _ get out of here soon! and also it is like, the air pressure in _ get out of here soon! and also it is like, the air pressure in there, i like, the air pressure in there, because — like, the air pressure in there, because it _ like, the air pressure in there, because it is a very small shaft, it is like _ because it is a very small shaft, it is like every— because it is a very small shaft, it is like every three or four minutes when _ is like every three or four minutes when the — is like every three or four minutes when the trains go past, it is like being _ when the trains go past, it is like being in— when the trains go past, it is like being ina— when the trains go past, it is like being in a plane that is taking off, your ears— being in a plane that is taking off, your ears pop and you go, oh... sill your ears pop and you go, oh... all this your ears pop and you go, oh... this colour your ears pop and you go, oh... fill this colour stuff, which is so fascinating, thank you for coming,
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lovely to see you here. secrets of the london underground starts on monday, 19thjuly at 8pm on yesterday. that's all from us this morning. have a great weekend. breakfast will be back from 6am tomorrow.
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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the race to find survivors of the floods that have wreaked havoc across western europe — more than 150 people are dead, most of them in germany, hundreds of others are still missing. european leaders blame the extreme weather on climate change. experts say global warming makes torrential rainfall more likely. i'm kasia madera here in erfstadt in germany. the army is assessing the scale of the devastation. a change to the quarantine rules for travellers to france — double vaccinated people arriving
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back in england and wales will still have to self—isolate.

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