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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 16, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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unaccounted for after some of the worst flooding in western europe in decades. record rainfall caused rivers to burst their banks. most of those killed were in germany. the uk has recorded more than 50,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day, for the first time since january. it comes days before the majority of covid restrictions in england are due to be lifted. belgium's prime minister says the flooding could be the most catastrophic his country has ever seen, with at least 20 people dead. a day of national mourning will be held on tuesday. in a speech to the nation, the south african president, cyril ramaphosa, has said the violent unrest that's swept the country was clearly planned and instigated. mr ramaphosa said the effects of the violence would last for months to come.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead what the papers will be bringing us on saturday morning. joining me are jason beattie and martin benson. welcome both of you. thank you as well forjoining us. let me bring you up to date. 0h, burger— that's the headline in the sun. it says the growing nhs pandemic is putting a summer heat wave barbecues at threat. as cases spike across the uk. there's a similar theme to the ft's uk. there's a similar theme to the ft�*s main story. the mail splashes front holiday chaos —— french
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holiday. the story also makes the front of the times. it says the decision was made to concerns of the spreading beta variants which was identified in south africa. different travel changes feature heavily in the telegraph. could result in food shortages. the express is looking more upbeat, focusing on the heatwave forecast across britain. soaring temperatures also make the tar�*s few days. —— the star. let's begin. let's start with france. jason, can you explain what has changed and prompted this headline from the daily mail? weill. headline from the daily mail? well, the explanation _ headline from the daily mail? well, the explanation is _ headline from the daily mail? well, the explanation is the _ headline from the daily mail? well, the explanation is the beta - headline from the daily mail? at the explanation is the beta variant, which is of the strain of a virus with comes from south africa, which is prevalent in france, we gather.
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this must be incredibly frustrating for 500,000 british people going to france on holiday. we've been in the situation before. we saw with portugal and the advice change very quickly. but it's very difficult. people book their holidays, they've now got to come back from their holidays and self—isolate. you can imagine the chaos that will cause. some people won't be able to do it because they can't afford it. there's one other aspect that worries me, and that is this applies to people who are double jab. does that mean that the two vaccinations aren't effective against this variance was mike i don't know the answer, but i presume that possibly is part of the thinking —— variants.
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put out a statement that the news returning from england from france and even if they are double vaccinating came as a surprise. presumably, the implication is it's a very quick change indeed. presumably, if you've got kids, it's less of a problem because they will be off at school, even if you going all the holidays in the next few weeks. but for people working, and it's not the news they were expecting. i it's not the news they were meeting-— it's not the news they were expecting. it's not the news they were exuectin. u, . a, ., expecting. i can correct you on that. i expecting. i can correct you on that- i have — expecting. i can correct you on that. i have children _ expecting. i can correct you on that. i have children and - expecting. i can correct you on that. i have children and i - expecting. i can correct you on that. i have children and i was| expecting. i can correct you on - that. i have children and i was due to go— that. i have children and i was due to go to _ that. i have children and i was due to go to france in three weeks. we have _ to go to france in three weeks. we have two— to go to france in three weeks. we have two young children and you can't _ have two young children and you can't keep— have two young children and you can't keep them indoors for five days— can't keep them indoors for five days a — can't keep them indoors for five da s a. ., ,., i can't keep them indoors for five days a._ i think- can't keep them indoors for five days a._ i think that's| days a. fair point. i think that's actually almost _ days a. fair point. i think that's actually almost harder- days a. fair point. i think that's actually almost harder in - days a. fair point. i think that's| actually almost harder in reality. it certainly is a fairly rapid change _ it certainly is a fairly rapid change. just the same part of france — change. just the same part of france. obviously we're thinking
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what's _ france. obviously we're thinking what's the — france. obviously we're thinking what's the double jabbed aspect was --oin what's the double jabbed aspect was going to _ what's the double jabbed aspect was going to be removed for double jabbed — going to be removed for double jabbed people. both my partner and i were in_ jabbed people. both my partner and i were in that situation. so, it was a surprise _ were in that situation. so, it was a surprise last— were in that situation. so, it was a surprise. last night, there was special— surprise. last night, there was special action about france going onto the — special action about france going onto the red list. —— speculation. clearly. — onto the red list. —— speculation. clearly. the — onto the red list. —— speculation. clearly, the interesting thing about it is we've — clearly, the interesting thing about it is we've all been worried about the delta — it is we've all been worried about the delta variant across most of europe — the delta variant across most of europe. almost out of nowhere, we -ot europe. almost out of nowhere, we got the _ europe. almost out of nowhere, we got the south african variants, which — got the south african variants, which we — got the south african variants, which we thought we'd almost been and gone _ which we thought we'd almost been and gone. we which we thought we'd almost been and one. ~ ., �* , and gone. we thought we'd been beaten by the — and gone. we thought we'd been beaten by the delic _ and gone. we thought we'd been beaten by the delic to _ and gone. we thought we'd been beaten by the delic to variant -- | beaten by the delic to variant —— delta variant or it wasn't one that was going to be of serious concern. martin, take us onto the sun, which
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is got a lovely headline, lovely picture of three lads booking their barbecue. the suggestion hence the headline, not only is france on the list, but barbecues at home i be in danger. list, but barbecues at home i be in dancer. , , , list, but barbecues at home i be in daner. , , , ., danger. this is the story that we will talk about _ danger. this is the story that we will talk about in _ danger. this is the story that we will talk about in another - danger. this is the story that we will talk about in another page l danger. this is the story that we | will talk about in another page as well, _ will talk about in another page as well, about the nhs app pinging lots of people. in their case, meat processing plans and people in that area not— processing plans and people in that area not being able to carry on —— processing — area not being able to carry on —— processing plans. that's a colourful way of— processing plans. that's a colourful way of depicting it. we could all provide — way of depicting it. we could all provide about —— survive without a burger _ provide about —— survive without a burger or— provide about —— survive without a burger or two, provide about —— survive without a burger ortwo, but it's provide about —— survive without a burger or two, but it's far more serious — burger or two, but it's far more serious if— burger or two, but it's far more serious if all sorts of industries struggle — serious if all sorts of industries struggle to operate. it's a definite
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probtem _ struggle to operate. it's a definite problem that if... on the one hand, you got— problem that if... on the one hand, you got restrictions being lifted, but you've got the same problem of happening _ but you've got the same problem of happening of the same time because peopie _ happening of the same time because peopie are _ happening of the same time because people are being cleaned. all these peopie _ people are being cleaned. all these people are being cleaned. all these people are being cleaned. all these people are being self—isolate —— pinged — people are being self—isolate —— pinged. that is a problem which is clearly— pinged. that is a problem which is clearly down to increasing into the fall clearly down to increasing into the felt every — clearly down to increasing into the fall every day that passes with infection— fall every day that passes with infection rates going up and more and more — infection rates going up and more and more people being pinged. as one ofthe and more people being pinged. as one of the designers _ and more people being pinged. as one of the designers of _ and more people being pinged. as one of the designers of the _ and more people being pinged. as one of the designers of the outset - of the designers of the outset already, it's doing what it was supposed to do. people are criticising it, but this is actually what it wasn't designed to do, to alert us when people have been in contact. jason, do you want to pick
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up contact. jason, do you want to pick up on the story in the telegraph? i up on the story in the telegraph? i think the problem here is most of the restrictions being lifted completely. if we have greater freedoms, let's move to a greater number of cases. the argument on the government for lifting freedom was primarily an economic one. they were saying they needed to get the economy back motoring again, but this is proving... i can't say the word. so many people are off work. i'm sure martin will know this as well. it's very hard to find someone who hasn't been pinged recently. that's interesting because the telegraph article also says earlier
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number ten insisted anyone notified by the app should isolate themselves, yet it says it also emerged officials at the treasury and the business department have beenin and the business department have been in touch with is a script to make it clear that being pinged is only advisory. if the messaging government is inconsistent, it doesn't help us very much. what's confusin: doesn't help us very much. what's confusing is _ doesn't help us very much. what's confusing is the _ doesn't help us very much. what's confusing is the whole _ doesn't help us very much. what's confusing is the whole relaxation i doesn't help us very much. what'sl confusing is the whole relaxation is predicated — confusing is the whole relaxation is predicated on the facts that people are double vaccinated. therefore have _ are double vaccinated. therefore have a _ are double vaccinated. therefore have a degree of protection. the whole _ have a degree of protection. the whole relaxation is predicated on that, _ whole relaxation is predicated on that, yet— whole relaxation is predicated on that, yet the pinging applies to everybody. so, you're suddenly being treated _ everybody. so, you're suddenly being treated in— everybody. so, you're suddenly being treated in that situation as if you're — treated in that situation as if you're still at risk, and there may be some — you're still at risk, and there may be some evidence about that. if you're _ be some evidence about that. if you're meant to be able to relax, which _ you're meant to be able to relax, which i _ you're meant to be able to relax, which i would like us to, but it's meant _ which i would like us to, but it's meant to— which i would like us to, but it's meant to be that we're safe because
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we're _ meant to be that we're safe because we're protected largely by the vaccine — we're protected largely by the vaccine. yet that isn't what the pinging — vaccine. yet that isn't what the pinging is— vaccine. yet that isn't what the pinging is acting upon.- vaccine. yet that isn't what the pinging is acting upon. let's move the i. pinging is acting upon. let's move the i- world _ pinging is acting upon. let's move the i. world is _ pinging is acting upon. let's move the i. world is watching _ pinging is acting upon. let's move the i. world is watching johnson i the i. world is watching johnson because my gamble. i suppose this is interesting because i was talking about it on eight line —— dateline ——johnson's gamble. about it on eight line —— dateline —— johnson's gamble. these coalition governments, very much a pro—business, get the economy back to work, pro—libertarian within dutch politics. he lifted the restrictions over three weeks ago. he's had to reimpose a lot of them because they've been oak huge number of increase, and he said they got it wrong. he of increase, and he said they got it wronu. ., ., ., wrong. he had quite a groveling aolo: . wrong. he had quite a groveling apology- it's — wrong. he had quite a groveling apology- it's not _ wrong. he had quite a groveling apology. it's not something - wrong. he had quite a groveling apology. it's not something we| wrong. he had quite a groveling i apology. it's not something we see very often. the problem here for
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borisjohnson is that very often. the problem here for boris johnson is that they very often. the problem here for borisjohnson is that they made very clear that these restrictions would be, quote, irreversible. that was echoed by sajid javid, the health secretary. but it's looking more and more likely that they may have to do this u—turn. as you said earlier, case numbers are 51,000 new cases today. that's the highest since mid—january. although hospitalisations are low, we're still talking about 50 deaths a day, which is a horrific number. but there is a big question mark about why they pressed ahead with things like ending social distancing and the relaxation of rules on face coverings. were they necessary? could we have actually tried a bit more cautiously? that's why the world is watching because it is, as
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they say, i gamble by the prime minister. they did warn us about this. they never actually said how many cases they regard as acceptable.— many cases they regard as accetable. ., , , acceptable. what people won't be able to see _ acceptable. what people won't be able to see on _ acceptable. what people won't be able to see on screen _ acceptable. what people won't be able to see on screen from - acceptable. what people won't be able to see on screen from that i able to see on screen from that image of the front of the i is that what it says in the detail of it is infection rates appear likely to overtake, ministers plan to... government considers exempting firefighters from staying at home. the last one, doctors fear that... the last one, doctors fear that... the last one, doctors fear that... the last two are generally speculation based partly part of the mobley on —— particularly, but the first rather subjects that something is shifting. to first rather sub'ects that something is shiftinu. ., ., ., ~' first rather sub'ects that something is shiftinu. ., ., ., ,, ., .,
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is shifting. to look at it the other way around. _ is shifting. to look at it the other way around, the _ is shifting. to look at it the other way around, the question - is shifting. to look at it the other way around, the question is, - is shifting. to look at it the other way around, the question is, andj way around, the question is, and this was— way around, the question is, and this was part of the argument, if not now. — this was part of the argument, if not now, when? of course we should say we _ not now, when? of course we should say we should make another month or so. say we should make another month or so but— say we should make another month or so but ifm _ say we should make another month or so but ifm it— say we should make another month or so. but if... it could go on forever! _ so. but if... it could go on forever! we're talking about france having _ forever! we're talking about france having the — forever! we're talking about france having the south african variants re—emerging in effect, sol having the south african variants re—emerging in effect, so i suppose the question is if the vaccines and peopie _ the question is if the vaccines and people being double vaccinating are somehow— people being double vaccinating are somehow deemed not to be well protected and are still at risk of them _ protected and are still at risk of them getting infecting and transmission and its spreading, which _ transmission and its spreading, which is — transmission and its spreading, which is what the crucial thing is, if we're _ which is what the crucial thing is, if we're in — which is what the crucial thing is, if we're in that situation, even with— if we're in that situation, even with double vaccines, what's the solution — with double vaccines, what's the solution to— with double vaccines, what's the solution to it all? that's the other side of— solution to it all? that's the other side of it — solution to it all? that's the other side of it. do you have tojust solution to it all? that's the other side of it. do you have to just live with that? — side of it. do you have to 'ust live with that? g ., , ., side of it. do you have to 'ust live with that? ., ,., , ., side of it. do you have to 'ust live with than—
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side of it. do you have to 'ust live with that? ., , ., ., , ., with that? jason, your thoughts on that. the people _ with that? jason, your thoughts on that. the people i _ with that? jason, your thoughts on that. the people i remember- with that? jason, your thoughts on | that. the people i remember here, it's that. the people i remember here, its estimated _ that. the people i remember here, it's estimated 3.8 _ that. the people i remember here, it's estimated 3.8 million _ that. the people i remember here, it's estimated 3.8 million people i its estimated 3.8 million people are clinically vulnerable. monday is not freedom day for them. they are extremely worried about this. the government advice is they have to go out when it's government advice is they have to go out when its quiet. that's not a great deal of freedom. i come back to my point earlier. yes, there was a case for easing restrictions. the judgment call i think they may have gotten wrong was to lift everything. i think there is a very strong argument for keeping social distancing and facemasks. not to make it a free—for—all and you make the decision. i don't quite understand why they didn't throw that back. ~ . understand why they didn't throw that back-- i _ understand why they didn't throw that back.- i think - understand why they didn't throw that back.- | think it - understand why they didn't throw that back.- i think it goesj that back. martin? i think it goes back to what _ that back. martin? i think it goes back to what i _ that back. martin? i think it goes back to what i just _ that back. martin? i think it goes back to what i just said, - that back. martin? i think it goes back to what i just said, i - that back. martin? i think it goes back to what i just said, i think. back to what ijust said, i think the argument would be if not now, how much— the argument would be if not now, how much different will the situation be? we're always going to have unfortunately a fair proportion of peopie _ have unfortunately a fair proportion of people clinically vulnerable. that's — of people clinically vulnerable. that's always going to be the case.
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how we _ that's always going to be the case. how we proceed is always going to have to _ how we proceed is always going to have to take account of that. the question— have to take account of that. the question is— have to take account of that. the question is how much consideration is given— question is how much consideration is given to — question is how much consideration is given to them in terms of... up until— is given to them in terms of... up until now. — is given to them in terms of... up until now, what we've done is try to -et until now, what we've done is try to get through— until now, what we've done is try to get through and find a solution. to find a _ get through and find a solution. to find a way— get through and find a solution. to find a way to be able to live with the risk— find a way to be able to live with the risk of— find a way to be able to live with the risk of this in a way that doesn't _ the risk of this in a way that doesn't overwhelm the nhs and causing — doesn't overwhelm the nhs and causing large numbers of death. if the vaccination isn't going to protect— the vaccination isn't going to protect us from that enough is an efficient— protect us from that enough is an efficient way, then it may be that a different _ efficient way, then it may be that a different approach has to be taken, which _ different approach has to be taken, which is _ different approach has to be taken, which is that we have to learn to exist— which is that we have to learn to exist with — which is that we have to learn to exist with it. that's may be a difficult — exist with it. that's may be a difficult slip, but maybe it's worth staving _ difficult slip, but maybe it's worth staying on — difficult slip, but maybe it's worth staying on. but you do have to see an end _ staying on. but you do have to see an end game to it.—
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an end game to it. daily star. i know not _ an end game to it. daily star. i know not everybody _ an end game to it. daily star. i know not everybody enjoys - an end game to it. daily star. i know not everybody enjoys the j an end game to it. daily star. i - know not everybody enjoys the heat. the star has dug out the immortal phrase from the 99 these, i hope i'm not that old, are you looking forward to this? i not that old, are you looking forward to this?— not that old, are you looking forward to this? ., , ~ forward to this? i am but i like the heat, but i — forward to this? i am but i like the heat, but i was _ forward to this? i am but i like the heat, but i was saying _ forward to this? i am but i like the heat, but i was saying to - forward to this? i am but i like the heat, but i was saying to my - forward to this? i am but i like the heat, but i was saying to my wife, | heat, but i was saying to my wife, at least people who have to do staycations have some decent weather. forthose staycations have some decent weather. for those who start to melt when it goes above 60, i have some sympathy. i'm glad we have hot weather at wise.— sympathy. i'm glad we have hot weather at wise. didn't feel very 's
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liberatin: . weather at wise. didn't feel very 's liberating- -_ weather at wise. didn't feel very 's liberating. . this— weather at wise. didn't feel very 's liberating. . this might _ weather at wise. didn't feel very 's liberating. . this might be - weather at wise. didn't feel very 's liberating. . this might be one - weather at wise. didn't feel very 's| liberating. . this might be one they would've done really clever and imaginative. it looks as if they really throw a lot of effort into their front pages. really throw a lot of effort into theirfront pages. i really throw a lot of effort into their front pages.— really throw a lot of effort into their front pages. i suppose this one probably — their front pages. i suppose this one probably is _ their front pages. i suppose this one probably is more _ their front pages. i suppose this one probably is more familiar, l their front pages. i suppose this i one probably is more familiar, and hot that— one probably is more familiar, and hot that weather always brings up positive _ hot that weather always brings up positive front page. of course, it's quite _ positive front page. of course, it's quite nice — positive front page. of course, it's quite nice. not very many hot days at all~ _ quite nice. not very many hot days at ad i_ quite nice. not very many hot days at all. i suppose the only flip side is it gets — at all. i suppose the only flip side is it gets too hot and it seems it probably— is it gets too hot and it seems it probably isn't necessarily a good si-n probably isn't necessarily a good sign in _ probably isn't necessarily a good sign in the — probably isn't necessarily a good sign in the long run if you start getting — sign in the long run if you start getting particularly severe hot temperatures. will getting particularly severe hot temperatures.— getting particularly severe hot temeratures. . ., ~ ., ., temperatures. will talk about that in a minute- _ temperatures. will talk about that in a minute. coming _ temperatures. will talk about that in a minute. coming from - temperatures. will talk about that in a minute. coming from a - temperatures. will talk about that l
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in a minute. coming from a tourism area, the last really good weather a few weeks ago. hopefully if you are travelling, book ahead to eat because i had a conversation with hoteliers and restaurant who said they were very fraught scenes with visitors who discovered that as you had to book almost every meal, and they were kind of wondering how they were to feed their kids. parts of its going to be tight. let's talk about the other side of weather, the downside. the front of the ft, this is the wake of the... they're talking about the storm in germany. for the rough weather, some of the biggest floods western europe has seen for most of the century. some of the pictures have been very, very
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harrowing. it’s of the pictures have been very, very harrowina. �*, ., , , harrowing. it's absolutely horrendous, _ harrowing. it's absolutely horrendous, isn't - harrowing. it's absolutely horrendous, isn't it? - harrowing. it's absolutely horrendous, isn't it? this harrowing. it's absolutely i horrendous, isn't it? this is germany— horrendous, isn't it? this is germany and belgium, those are countries — germany and belgium, those are countries that are fairly well developed. your correspondent was saying _ developed. your correspondent was saying germany is famous for being strong, _ saying germany is famous for being strong, every sort of cliche about germany — strong, every sort of cliche about germany. you can't blame it on for infrastructure. it'sjust a phenomenon as the people, the victims — phenomenon as the people, the victims of— phenomenon as the people, the victims of this have been saying, they lived — victims of this have been saying, they lived in this area for a long time _ they lived in this area for a long time a — they lived in this area for a long time a lot— they lived in this area for a long time. a lot of that scale in western europe _ time. a lot of that scale in western europe to _ time. a lot of that scale in western europe to flooding, it seems inconceivable. but unfortunately it isn't, _ inconceivable. but unfortunately it isn't, it's _ inconceivable. but unfortunately it isn't, it's happened. thing it's another— isn't, it's happened. thing it's another indication of climate kind, and i'm _ another indication of climate kind, and i'm sure the right.
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so... one of the interesting things is that we are _ so... one of the interesting things is that we are told _ so... one of the interesting things is that we are told by _ so... one of the interesting things is that we are told by the - so... one of the interesting things is that we are told by the weather| is that we are told by the weather specialists that hotter temperatures suck up more moisture into the air, and therefore there's more to come down. whatever you talk about man—made climate change —— climate change, if we are in an environment thatis change, if we are in an environment that is cotton hotter, we will end with more to come down again. is exactly what the scientists forecast, and climate crisis leads to more extreme weather. we saw it this weekend. we saw in north america with record—breaking temperatures. both lead to loss of life, and it will probably get worse. , ., ., ., , ., , life, and it will probably get
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worse. , ., ., ., worse. the photograph of the ft is a lovely image — worse. the photograph of the ft is a lovely image of— worse. the photograph of the ft is a lovely image of one _ worse. the photograph of the ft is a lovely image of one of _ worse. the photograph of the ft is a lovely image of one of the _ worse. the photograph of the ft is a lovely image of one of the black - lovely image of one of the black power protest, tammy smith and john carlos. no protest this year the olympics. do you think they'll succeed with that?— olympics. do you think they'll succeed with that? good luck with that. i succeed with that? good luck with that- i always— succeed with that? good luck with that. i always think _ succeed with that? good luck with that. i always think they _ succeed with that? good luck with that. i always think they say - succeed with that? good luck with that. i always think they say the i that. i always think they say the olympic sport isn't about politics. i also... you think about the politics that goes into getting the successful bid. that's more complicated than anything... laughter martin, last thought. laughter martin, last thou:ht. ., martin, last thought. the whole thin will martin, last thought. the whole thing will be _ martin, last thought. the whole thing will be very _ martin, last thought. the whole thing will be very different - martin, last thought. the whole i thing will be very different anyway. not quite _ thing will be very different anyway. not quite the event people were anticipating when they first won. and they're paying for something they won't get much back for. martin and jason, thank you very much. thank you too for watching. that's
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the papers. bye for now. hello. golfer louis 0ostheuizen has broken the record for the lowest score after two rounds at an open championship. the south african is three shots clear at the top of the leaderboard on 11 under par. 0ur correspondent andy swiss reports from royal st george's. it's the closest most of us will get to the trophy — the 0pen's favourite photo op doing a roaring trade. but others here are chasing the real thing. louis 0ostheuizen already won it once 11 years ago. commentator: oh, my word! and after another stunning display, he just might do it again on a remarkable 11 under par. but in the sandwich sunshine, he wasn't the only one making hay. this is collin morikawa's debut at the open. as first impressions go, not bad.
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what a day he's having. he's two shots back, while hopes of a home winner are led by andy sullivan, another impressive day keeping him in contention. rory mcilroy. the rory mcilroy fan club was out in force, and they got a few decent moments — but 11 shots back, his hopes looked remote. what they'd all have done for a little bit of this. england'sjonathan thompson thrilling the crowd with a hole—in—one. oh, it's in! itjust doesn't get any better. well, it's been a day of glorious weather and some equally glorious golf, but none brighter than louis 0ostheuizen's. on this form, he'll take some stopping. andy swiss, bbc news, sandwich. roared on by his home crowd, lewis hamilton claimed pole position for formula 0ne's first sprint race ahead of the british grand prix on sunday. as a government test event, 86,000 fans were at silverstone
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with 140,000 expected on sunday. hamilton's first lap in the final session was quick enough to secure the top spot for the new qualifying race ahead of title rival max verstappen. i'm so grateful to see everyone here. we've missed you for a whole year, so to come to the silverstone grand prix and have a full crowd like this, to see the energy... when i was coming into it, i was hopeful that with the great work that we've done together in the team, plus the energy of the fans would get us there. so, this is down to the fans, i think. england have been beaten by pakistan in the first of three t20 internationals. it was a highly entertaining game with 27 sixes at trent bridge. pakistan bowled first and hit their biggest t20 tally, reaching 232 — captain babarazam top scoring with 85. it would also have been england's highest run chase, and after a shaky start, liam livingstone gave them hope scoring england's fastest t20 century —
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a spectacular 103 off 43 balls. but once he was out, the task was too great and pakistan went on to win by 31 runs. the t20 world cup is later this year in the middle east. tottenham's new manager, nuno espirito santo, insists harry kane is, in his words, "our player". the england captain's future has been the subject of much speculation over the last few months. the bbc understands kane has an "agreement" that would allow him to leave spurs this summer. but his new manager wouldn't be drawn on kane's future. he is our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. now is the moment to recover his energy, to rest, and when harry comes again, we will have time to speak and i'm looking forward to him joining the group and start working together. when he arrives, he will feel that every one of us wants to commit
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ourselves to becoming better and we are ambitious people, we want to do it well, and we count on harry in that. mark cavendish will have to wait until sunday's final day of the tour de france if he's to break the record for the number of stage wins at the tour. he was hoping to take his 35th on today's 19th stage, but it was won by matej mohoric. nick parrott has the details. this was the day mark cavendish was hoping to surpass the record he shares with eddy merckz for stage wins at the tour de france. for belgium telling him before the start, "i hope you get your 35th stage today." if only life was that easy. this relatively flat 128 mile ride was far from smooth. an early crash almost took cavendish out. the man far enough away to avoid the domino effect. but another held him
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and much of the peloton up. along the road, a breakaway got away. with 16 miles to go, matej mohoric went for it. a sense of deja vu as the slovenian so load to his second win soloed to his second win of this year's race, exactly two weeks after his first. tomorrow's time trials should see the overall victory confirmed. cavendish will have to wait until sunday to make his history. nick parrott, bbc news. and on this bumper sporting weekend, a5,000 fans will be at wembley for rugby league's show—piece — the challenge cup final. castleford will take on st helens at 3 o'clock tomorrow. castleford reached the final with a golden point kick, and they haven't won this competition since 1986, but have come so close to both league and cup success in recent years. st helens, though, will be favourites. castleford haven't won the cup for 30 years, and i think for us to be able to win it will write our names in history.
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it's a long time coming for the team. it's been around for the last seven or eight years. we want to be remembered. that surely the point of everyone's career — you want to be remembered. and that's all the sport for now. mostly dry with hot sunshine for many, bit of cloud around to start off saturday morning across parts of east anglia and the southeast. generally more cloud further north and west, retreating to the store still might coast northern ireland. it will stay windy with the odd spot of rain. a bit cooler here as a consequence, but go further south, 29 or 30 degrees.
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that sunshine will be strong with very high uv levels. especially for southern and southwestern areas. as we head through saturday night, we will continue to see clear spells towards the south. more cloud up towards the south. more cloud up towards the south. more cloud up towards the north and a bit of rain across the far north of scotland. sunday, we will see more cloud across the northern half of the uk, but further south, a lot of sunshine and temperatures perhaps 30 or 31 degrees.
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this is bbc news, i'm celia hatton with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. europe's flooding disaster western germany and belgium search by hundreds of people still missing. with three days to go until most covid restrictions are lifted in england —— the uk records more than 50,000 new cases in a single day —— the highest since january. in the us president biden slam social media companies are not doing enough to tackle vaccine misinformation. they are killing people. look, the only endemic we have is among the unvaccinated and they are killing people.

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