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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 16, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the worst floods in europe for decades kill more than 120 people. emergency services in western germany, belgium and the netherlands search for hundreds of people still missing, and try to rescue those stranded by the floodwaters. with three days to go until most covid restrictions are lifted in england, the uk records more than 50,000 new cases in a single day, the highest since january. meanwhile the british government says people arriving from france will still need to quarantine, because of a surge in cases of the beta variant. south africa's president has addressed the nation — after days of rioting and looting —he says efforts to overthrow democracy have failed.
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and a decade after the death of amy winehouse, her parents tell her story in a new documentary. hello and welcome to bbc news. more than 120 people have died in the worst flooding in decades to hit northern europe. hundreds of others are unaccounted for. the german president has called for a more determined battle against climate change. the german states of rhineland—pulatinate and north rhine—westphalia were worst hit with over a 100 people dying there. in belgium, at least 20 people have been killed and the netherlands is also badly affected.
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the power of the water has been immense. here you can see what the village of erfstad blessem looked like before it was hit by floodwater. and look — here it is afterwards. water gushed through causing a huge landslide in the surrounding fields. 0ur correspondentjenny hill sent this report from the nearby town of erfstad. the ground just fell away. this is the town of erfstadt where the ground just fell away. under the weight of water, houses collapsed in the night. it happened so fast one official said there was no time for a warning. rescuers rushed in. this morning the authorities here said people trapped in their homes were calling them for help and in many cases they just couldn't calling them for help and in many cases theyjust couldn't reach them. those who did make it out came to shelters like this. we metjohanna
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this year he and his wife were winched to safety last night. he arrived barefoot and soaking wet. what we are thinking as they winched you out, i asked. what we are thinking as they winched you out, iasked. i had what we are thinking as they winched you out, i asked. i had to leave my cat behind, he says. he has lived here more than 70 years. there been floods but not like this. translation: you can run from fire but not from water.— but not from water. tens of thousands _ but not from water. tens of thousands of _ but not from water. tens of thousands of people - but not from water. tens of thousands of people still i but not from water. tens of i thousands of people still don't but not from water. tens of - thousands of people still don't have power. and they are on alert. water levels have dropped in some areas but few here feel safe. you can see how powerful the water is here still. and what's worrying people in this area is thatjust upstream there is a damn. experts say it is unstable. they are still inspecting up unstable. they are still inspecting up of people here think if that dam breaks the water is heading in this direction. and with every hour news of more death. people are still missing, with mobile networks down it's hard to know how many made it to safety. they are desperate for
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help here. this was a caravan park how to even begin clearing out? we met the owners still visibly in shock. �* ,, �* met the owners still visibly in shock. �* ,, ~ ,. shock. translation: indescribable. we've been here _ shock. translation: indescribable. we've been here since _ shock. translation: indescribable. we've been here since 1979, - shock. translation: indescribable. we've been here since 1979, we - shock. translation: indescribable. l we've been here since 1979, we never we've been here since1979, we never seen anything like we've been here since 1979, we never seen anything like this. if we don't -et seen anything like this. if we don't get any— seen anything like this. if we don't get any help will have to go on benefits — get any help will have to go on benefits. bankrupt.— get any help will have to go on benefits. bankrupt. germany, a country famed _ benefits. bankrupt. germany, a country famed for _ benefits. bankrupt. germany, a country famed for its _ benefits. bankrupt. germany, a country famed for its strength, | benefits. bankrupt. germany, a i country famed for its strength, its security feels vulnerable now. jenny hill, bbc news, erfstadt. the flooding hasn't been restricted to germany. the netherlands, luxembourg and belgium have also seen extreme weather. 0ur correspondent anna holligan has more. homes engulfed, whole villages submerged. parts of liege annihilated by the elements. rescuers are still navigating areas to the west, in the town of pepinster.
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the military was draughted in to assist the stranded on land and by air, and for some it's a desperate wait to find out whether their loved ones made it. translation: my wife | is looking for her mother who lives in a town nearby. we have no means of communication. we don't know where she is or how she's doing. in nearby verviers, the waters have receded, but they're still stunned by the extent of the destruction. translation: this shop has been open for three years. _ we had to go through renovations. we had to live through covid. we were hoping to get back on our feet. and now this. in the netherlands, this was roermond. swathes of the city have disappeared. this region has been declared a disaster zone. these are the remnants of businesses in the spa town of valkenburg. while the emergency services are busy trying to restore power and secure pavements,
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the people have come together to try to bring some form of order to these devastated streets. while covid kept them isolated and apart, this crisis has caused a community to come out in solidarity. we need to stay positive. we can cry all day, but this will not help anything, so better smiling, and keep working! the rain has paused, but the threat, here and in towns and cities across europe, isn't over yet. anna holligan, bbc news, valkenburg. so, why is this happening now? some politicians in germany say the extreme weather is the result of global warming. they're calling for work on climate protection measures to be accelerated. 0ur chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, assesses the role of climate change in the record amounts of rainfall now devastating parts of europe. the floods in germany are not the only extreme weather event we have seen this summer.
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there was the dramatic heatwave in canada and western us last month and russia, mexico and new zealand have all been experiencing unusually high—temperatures. the climate science is very clear on this, it has been predicting not just for years but for decades that if we continue to pump huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, we will experience increasingly high temperatures and because warm air holds more moisture, that means heavier rainfall and therefore, floods. you only have to look at the pictures of these devastating floods to know that we need to do better. it is not ok with this number of people to die in 2021 from floods. the next obvious question is, is the world doing
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enough to tackle climate change? it is. the un says we need to reduce carbon emissions by 7% every yearfor the next decade if we are going to stand a reasonable chance of staying within what is reckoned to be the safe limit, 1.5 celsius. we did achieve that last year but in the teeth of the pandemic so the only good outcome from these recent extreme weather events is that it encourages the world to raise its carbon cutting game when it meets at the landmark climate conference in glasgow in november. the uk has recorded more than 50,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day, for the first time since january. it comes as the research suggests one in a hundred people has the virus. on monday, the majority of covid restrictions in england are due to be lifted, but with cases rising sharply there's been growing criticism of the move. here's our medical editor, fergus walsh. queueing for art and for a vaccine — exclusive access to tate modern�*s galleries this evening was on offer
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to those getting a jab at this iconic london setting. with restrictions lifting in england on monday, and cases soaring, the race between the virus and the vaccine is intensifying. in newham, in east london, just over a third of adults are fully immunised, half the uk level. so council teams are going door to door to encourage people to have the jab. hello. how are you? the number of first vaccinations across the uk has halved in the past two weeks as demand from young people starts to falter. yet again, the nhs has appealed to adults to come forward for first and second doses. and that can mean overcoming vaccine hesitancy, especially in the young. i think that on social media, people believe very quickly what they read on whatsapp or other
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online platforms and i think it's trying to change that perception. i think giving human guidance to them, that will show that the benefits outweigh the risks. brothers uresh and diresh are 22 and 19 and are having their first doses. the more people we have vaccinated, it means that the cases will reduce and help us in the long term. it is good for people around you, getting vaccinated, _ so you are protected, as well, and you're . protecting other people. i'm in icu and my lungs collapsed. that was paul godfrey, 18 months ago. in his early 30s, he was susceptible to infection but never imagined the damage that covid could do. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. i couldn't believe that this virus had ruined my body so quickly and the fight i would have to fight.
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a new study has found that one in three younger adults hospitalised with covid suffered complications like kidney, lung and heart damage. although older, frail adults are at the greatest risk, it is a reminder that covid can be indiscriminate in who it targets. fergus walsh, bbc news. in spite of the uk high vaccination rates — the spike in cases has lead to calls for the government to reverse some easing on restrictions — particularly the move to drop the mask mandate for public transport. the uk wouldn't be the first to reverse such a decision. israel reinstated its own mask mandate injune just days after dropping it — after it recorded just 100 cases on two consecutive days. and in the us, los angeles has followed suit. on thursday it reintroduced its own mask mandate for indoor public spaces after only month — after a significant rise in delta variant cases in the city and the wider us.
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staying in the united states, the cdc has warned of high infection rates in states with low vaccination levels. it identified four states — nevada, arkansas, missouri and florida as those with the highest transmission. florida itself — now accounts for a quarter of new infection in the whole of the us. president biden has said those spreading covid misinformation are directly responsible for loss of life. they're killing people. i mean, look, the only pandemic we have is among the unvaccinated. and they are killing people. back in the uk, the government is scrapping plans to ease quarantine restrictions for travellers returning from france. the rules were due to be relaxed from monday but it's been announced that arrivals from france will still have to spend ten days isolating. i'm joined now by the travel editor of the independent newspaper, simon calder. good to speak to you again. could you first remind us of what the
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government had said and what the change would mean? yes. government had said and what the change would mean?— government had said and what the change would mean? yes, what we're auoin to change would mean? yes, what we're going to see — change would mean? yes, what we're going to see on _ change would mean? yes, what we're going to see on monday _ change would mean? yes, what we're going to see on monday the _ change would mean? yes, what we're going to see on monday the 19th - change would mean? yes, what we're going to see on monday the 19th of i going to see on monday the 19th of july along with the opening up domestically of the uk was the biggest changes opening restriction freeing, getting rid of the quarantined requirement for the majority countries including all of our favourites like italy, majority countries including all of ourfavourites like italy, croatia, greece and indeed france. what happened tonight as you say is that just in the past few hours the government has said we are worried about the beta varian comma's previously known as the south african berry coming in from france. therefore effectively if you thought you would be coming in from france from 4am local time on next monday morning without quarantine well, you are out of luck. you have to quarantine. this has caused utter dismay. many thousands of travellers have actually delayed their trips
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back because they thought they would avoid quarantine. they're avoid quarantine. they�* re effectively avoid quarantine. they're effectively being told no, just as you were. ten days of self isolation when you come back. it's even going to affect people coming back from other countries if you're in belgium or luxembourg or germany and you're driving and you just go through france along the way without stopping or even opening a window well, you're still going to be in line for self isolation.- well, you're still going to be in line for self isolation. what about those who use _ line for self isolation. what about those who use euro _ line for self isolation. what about those who use euro star - line for self isolation. what about | those who use euro star services? line for self isolation. what about i those who use euro star services? a lot of those start in places like brussels or rotterdam. and they go through friends and then they arrive in the uk. what will happen to passengers on those who say look, i didn't go to france, i was on holiday in the netherlands and i caught the train back and here i am arriving in the uk, i haven't left the carriage. arriving in the uk, i haven't left the carriage-— the carriage. well, there is a little bit of — the carriage. well, there is a little bit of hope _ the carriage. well, there is a little bit of hope for - the carriage. well, there is a little bit of hope for people l the carriage. well, there is a| little bit of hope for people in that position. because the government actually ccppss specifically said that if the train operator euro star can make
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arrangements so that nobody gets on while in france which would either mean going through nonstop or at the normal scheduled stop in neil, only allowing passengers to get on at a certain part of the train then they would be all right. but of course, many, many people, france is the second most popular country in the world for british holiday—makers after spain and many will be driving, flying, the airlines that i have reacted and just said this is getting absolutely ridiculous. every time people think they've got a hope of the holiday it gets covered again. of the holiday it gets covered aaain. ,, ., ., ~ . stay with us on bbc world news, still to come... fresh reports of ethnic cleansing in tigray — in northern ethiopia — as tigrayan forces extend their control over the region. after months of talks
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and missed deadlines, a deal has been struck to keep greece within the eurozone. the immediate prospect of greece going bust in the worst crisis to hit the eurozone has been averted. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worst floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally. called the great white way by americans, but tonight, i it's completely blacked out. it's a timely reminder— to all americans of the problems that the energy crisis has brought to them. - leaders meet in paris for a summit on pollution, inflation and third world debt. this morning, theyjoined the revolution celebrations for a show of military might on the champs—elysees. wildlife officials in australia have been coping with a penguin problem. fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much, they could barely stand.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines... emergency services in western germany, belgium and the netherlands search for hundreds of people still missing, and try to rescue those stranded by the floodwaters. with three days to go until most covid restrictions are lifted in england, the uk records more than 50,000 new cases in a single day, the highest since january. the south african president cyril ramaphosa has been addressing the nation about the recent violence that has rocked the country. the unrest follows the imprisonment of his predecessor, jacob zuma, on charges of contempt of court. so far, more than 200 people have been killed in rioting and looting. president ramaphosa descrived the violence as an attack on democracy that had failed. it is clear now that the events of the last week were nothing less than a deliberate and coordinated and well planned attack
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on oui’ democracy. the constitutional order of our country remains. under threat. the current instability and ongoing incitement to violence constitutes a direct contravention of the constitution of our country and the rule of law. these actions are intended to cripple the economy of our country, to cause social instability and severely weaken or even dislodge the democratic state. using the pretext of a political agreement two grievance goes behind these acts have sought to provoke insurrection amongst our people.
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they have sought to exploit the social and economic conditions under which many south africans live. conditions of poverty, of in and equality that have worsened since the onset of coronavirus. and to provoke ordinary citizens and criminal networks to engage in opportunistic tax of wonton looting. the bbc has heard fresh reports of ethnic cleansing in tigray — in northern ethiopia. tigrayan forces are continuing to extend their control over the region — prompting the ethiopian government to abandon a unilateral ceasefire. more fighting is now expected in the west of tigray — an area close to the border with sudan from where our africa correspondent andrew harding has this report.
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three teenaged boys emerge from the gloom, trudging their way to safety. they have escaped from a tigray overnight across a river and a well guarded border. carrying nothing except stories of spiralling ethnic conflict. translation: some soldiers came home to home and they gave us two days - to leave because we are from tigray. there is a kind of ethnic cleansing going on in the towns across—the—boa rd here? yes, we feel bad because it is our country, our land. the boys are of fighting age and may soon be needed back in tigray but for now, they are safe just across the border here in sudan. a grim life in this refugee camp beckons. in the makeshift clinic here, one remarkable refugee is looking after thousands.
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he is part doctor, part, chronicler of tigray�*s latest agonies. there was no food and no water and particularly they were being taught that they were going to be punished by hunger. his clinic is overwhelmed, notjust by the flood of new arrivals, a single mother of two here, but overwhelmed by their stories. they have killed young men? i heard gunshots and when i turned around, they were there. you think the war is going to go on and on? it is going to go on, for sure. we are not leaving our land, never. so the blood is going to continue. a refugee sings of her yearning
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for home for tigray. it sounds like a lament for ethiopia, t0o, a nation at risk of unravelling. you get a real sense here that this conflict is far from over. locals have suffered so much in the past few months through famine and conflict that they are now talking about a clean break, full independence from ethiopia, a nation they see as cruel and crumbling. if that means they have to keep fighting for it, then so be it. another young man thrashes his way across the river border out of tigray. better to drown, he says, than to stay behind and be killed by the militias. the refugee doctor doubt if ethiopia can survive all this intact. i don't want to be in the same category with these people that have raped my sisters, that had killed my brothers and sisters and have
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destroyed my places. so the idea is gone. the summer storm season is beginning, adding to the anxieties here. we cannot sleep at night, just thinking what is going to happen to the kids? what am i going to do the next day? what am i going to feed them? when i see then, i feel sorry for them. and so, thousands of lives remain suspended, communities torn apart. as an tigray�*s war lurches on. the singer amy winehouse was just 27 when she died. she'd struggled with addiction to alcohol and drugs. this month marks the 10th anniversary of her death and now, in a new bbc documentary, her parents want to show a different side of their daughter. they've been speaking to our music reporter, mark savage.
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i'm scared of myself. music it's ten ears i'm scared of myself. music it's ten years since — i'm scared of myself. music it's ten years since amy _ i'm scared of myself. music it's ten years since amy winehouse - i'm scared of myself. music it's ten years since amy winehouse died . i'm scared of myself. music it's ten years since amy winehouse died of| years since amy winehouse died of alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. i will always remember her last words, i said i will always remember her last words, isaid i i will always remember her last words, i said i love you and she said i love you mommy. i can always remember the love she had for me. her story has been told countless times. but looking back herfamily say the medias treatment of the singer was unacceptable. it say the medias treatment of the singer was unacceptable.- singer was unacceptable. it was disgusting- _ singer was unacceptable. it was disgusting. and _ singer was unacceptable. it was disgusting. and it _ singer was unacceptable. it was disgusting. and it wasn't - singer was unacceptable. it was disgusting. and it wasn'tjust i singer was unacceptable. it was i disgusting. and it wasn't just amy it was_ disgusting. and it wasn't just amy it was way— disgusting. and it wasn't just amy it was way that they treated people. they called her wino, they called heriunkie, — they called her wino, they called herjunkie, they called a drug addict — herjunkie, they called a drug addict. and they couldn't do that today _ addict. and they couldn't do that today it's — addict. and they couldn't do that today. it's got better, marginally. i today. it's got better, marginally. i miss_ today. it's got better, marginally. i miss you. — today. it's got better, marginally. i miss you, hello darling. in today. it's got better, marginally. i miss you, hello darling.- i miss you, hello darling. in the new documentary _ i miss you, hello darling. in the new documentary about - i miss you, hello darling. in the new documentary about amy's | i miss you, hello darling. in the i new documentary about amy's life mitch and janice want to set the record straight. you mitch and janice want to set the record straight.— mitch and janice want to set the record straight. you can't airbrush all the horrible _ record straight. you can't airbrush all the horrible stuff— record straight. you can't airbrush all the horrible stuff out. - record straight. you can't airbrush all the horrible stuff out. we i all the horrible stuff out. we wouldn't _ all the horrible stuff out. we wouldn't do that. but even through the tintes— wouldn't do that. but even through the times when she was seriously
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ill, the times when she was seriously iii, what— the times when she was seriously ill, what got her through it and what _ ill, what got her through it and what got — ill, what got her through it and what got us through it may seem like a stupid _ what got us through it may seem like a stupid thing to say was her sense of humon — a stupid thing to say was her sense of humor. ., ., i. a stupid thing to say was her sense of humor. ., ., ,, ~' a stupid thing to say was her sense of humor. ., ., ,, ~ ., of humor. how would you like her to be remembered? _ of humor. how would you like her to be remembered? as _ of humor. how would you like her to be remembered? as a _ of humor. how would you like her to be remembered? as a nice - of humor. how would you like her to be remembered? as a nice person l of humor. how would you like her to l be remembered? as a nice person she was, a be remembered? as a nice person she was. a social— be remembered? as a nice person she was. a social person — be remembered? as a nice person she was, a social person and _ be remembered? as a nice person she was, a social person and caring. i be remembered? as a nice person she was, a social person and caring. on i was, a social person and caring. on the was, a social person and caring. 0n the 23rd were all together for the first ten— the 23rd were all together for the first ten minutes will be sobbing and after— first ten minutes will be sobbing and after that we will beat it in fits of— and after that we will beat it in fits of laughter. a and after that we will beat it in fits of laughter.— fits of laughter. a new amy antidote- — fits of laughter. a new amy antidote. although - fits of laughter. a new amy antidote. although it's- fits of laughter. a new amy antidote. although it's notl fits of laughter. a new amy | antidote. although it's not a fits of laughter. a new amy i antidote. although it's not a joyful thing that you would go in celebrated but we do. we actually go and remember her. bud celebrated but we do. we actually go and remember her.— celebrated but we do. we actually go and remember her. and amy's parents ho -e her and remember her. and amy's parents hope her legacy _ and remember her. and amy's parents hope her legacy will — and remember her. and amy's parents hope her legacy will not _ and remember her. and amy's parents hope her legacy will not just _ and remember her. and amy's parents hope her legacy will notjust be - hope her legacy will notjust be music but a better understanding of mental health. a reminder of our top story this hour more than 120 people died and flooding in parts of northern europe. these drone pictures from the town of starch in germany showed the town of starch in germany showed the sheer scale of destruction caused by flooding and mudslides. 0fficials caused by flooding and mudslides. officials say up to 100 thousand
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people are still unaccounted for. a very worrying time for her relatives. this is bbc news. hello. a few places get close to 29 degrees on friday. it's likely that over the weekend we will get above 30 for the first time this summer. mostly dry with hot sunshine and it is all because of high pressure which is taking up residence right on top of the uk. notice there is a frontal system up to the north. that will be providing more clout especially across the northwest of scotland. but cloud to start the day across my receipt codes certainly lock off and on an island in a little bit across the southeast of england as well. that will tend to clear quite quickly. some but cloud will be more stubborn so saint quite grey, damp and windy for northwest college is 70 degrees. but in the sunshine in
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aberdeen highs of 25. the crowd in northern ireland retreating to the coast, 26 inland through the afternoon. a bit murky for some of these irish because in northwest england and north wales as well. but come and land, temperatures in a few places up to 29 or 30 degrees. always a little cooler around the coast with sea breezes developing. sufficient for the british grand prix it looks hot through saturday and more especially for the race day on sunday with lots of sunshine. strong sunshine at that. very high view the levels are many especially towards the south and west. make sure you protect yourself if you are out and about for any length of time. as we had through saturday night we will see long, clear spells especially down towards england and wales. northern ireland and scotland see more clout. some filtering across the irish sea towards north wales in northwest england was a pretty mild and quite warm night in places, 1a, 15, 16 degrees. sunday the further south you are the expect
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more sunshine. further north generally more clout in the mix by the stage and some patchy rain. across the north of scotland. temperatures will a bit lower across the northern half of the uk but for the northern half of the uk but for the stock very warm or hot day for that one or two places in the london area could get up to 30 or even 31 degrees. into the start of next week our area of high pressure will still be with us but it will tend to slide a little further westwards. that will allow something of a northerly wind. that should just not the edge of the temperatures planning a little bit less hot and the odd shower in the south on monday and some rain later in the week.
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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley.
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the headlines this hour: at least 120 people have died and hundreds more are unaccounted for after some of the worst flooding in western europe in decades. record rainfall caused rivers to burst their banks. most of those killed were in germany. the uk has recorded more than 50,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day, for the first time since january. it comes days before the majority of covid restrictions in england are due to be lifted. belgium's prime minister says the flooding could be the most catastrophic his country has ever seen, with at least 20 people dead. a day of national mourning will be held on tuesday. in a speech to the nation, the south african president, cyril ramaphosa, has said the violent unrest that's swept the country was clearly planned and instigated. mr ramaphosa said the effects of the violence would last for months to come.

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