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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 16, 2021 10:45pm-11:00pm BST

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that will people who are vulnerable. that will not change — people who are vulnerable. that will not change. how we proceed is always --oin not change. how we proceed is always going to _ not change. how we proceed is always going to have to take account of that, _ going to have to take account of that, and — going to have to take account of that, and the question is how much consideration is given to that in terms _ consideration is given to that in terms ofm _ consideration is given to that in terms of... up until now, what we've been _ terms of... up until now, what we've been doing _ terms of... up until now, what we've been doing is— terms of... up until now, what we've been doing is get through and get a solution _ been doing is get through and get a solution to— been doing is get through and get a solution to the vaccination scheme to find _ solution to the vaccination scheme to find a _ solution to the vaccination scheme to find a way to be able to live with _ to find a way to be able to live with the — to find a way to be able to live with the risk of this in a way that doesn't — with the risk of this in a way that doesn't overwhelm the nhs and cause lar-e doesn't overwhelm the nhs and cause large numbers of deaths. if the vaccine — large numbers of deaths. if the vaccine isn't going to protect us from _ vaccine isn't going to protect us from that— vaccine isn't going to protect us from that in a sufficient way, that it may _ from that in a sufficient way, that it may be — from that in a sufficient way, that it may be that a different approach has to— it may be that a different approach has to be _ it may be that a different approach has to be taken, which is we have to learn _ has to be taken, which is we have to learn to— has to be taken, which is we have to learn to just — has to be taken, which is we have to learn tojust exist has to be taken, which is we have to learn to just exist with it. that's may— learn to just exist with it. that's may be — learn to just exist with it. that's may be a — learn to just exist with it. that's may be a difficult step and maybe it's worth — may be a difficult step and maybe it's worth one more heave and staying — it's worth one more heave and staying on. _ it's worth one more heave and staying on, but we do have to see an end aim _ staying on, but we do have to see an end aim to— staying on, but we do have to see an end aim to it — staying on, but we do have to see an end aim to it. we can't go on forever— end aim to it. we can't go on forever living in this restrictive
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existence _ i know not everybody at home enjoys the heat. a lot of people find it very difficult. but the star has dug out the late comedy weather for highest with a mortal phrase from, i think it's from the 1990s, i hope i'm not that old. scorchio. are you looking forward to this? i am i'm not that old. scorchio. are you looking forward to this?— looking forward to this? i am but i like the heat. _ looking forward to this? i am but i like the heat, and _ looking forward to this? i am but i like the heat, and as _ looking forward to this? i am but i like the heat, and as somebody i looking forward to this? i am but i - like the heat, and as somebody who's not going abroad, i was saying to my wife earlier, there are so many people who have to do state patients. at least we have decent weather. i'm pleased for them, for those who have start to melt, i have some sympathy —— staycations. it was quite a dolejune and earlyjuly. it quite a dole june and earlyjuly. it didn't feel very liberating when we
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were going out in the freezing cold and wet. martin, i have to say the daily star has gotten noticeably more creative. some of them have been really clever and imaginative the last few weeks. it looks as though they really throw a lot of effort out into their front pages. yes, all papers try to. this one is probably— yes, all papers try to. this one is probably more familiar. hot weather always— probably more familiar. hot weather always brings a positive front page. but of _ always brings a positive front page. but of course, yes, it's quite nice. as you _ but of course, yes, it's quite nice. as you are — but of course, yes, it's quite nice. as you are just saying, we had a pretty— as you are just saying, we had a pretty dismal summer so far. the only pretty dismal summer so far. the onty ftib _ pretty dismal summer so far. the only flip side is it gets too hot and it— only flip side is it gets too hot and it probably isn't necessarily a good _ and it probably isn't necessarily a good sign — and it probably isn't necessarily a good sign in the long run if you start— good sign in the long run if you start getting particularly severe temperatures.— start getting particularly severe temeratures. . �* . ~ . . temperatures. we'll talk about that in a minute- —
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temperatures. we'll talk about that in a minute. coming _ temperatures. we'll talk about that in a minute. coming from _ temperatures. we'll talk about that in a minute. coming from a - temperatures. we'll talk about that j in a minute. coming from a tourism area, the last really good weather a few weeks ago, a plea if you are travelling to book ahead to eat because i had conversations with hoteliers and restaurant tour saying there were some very fraught themes with visitors are discovered as you had to book almost every meal, and they were wondering how they were going to feed their kids. i do think about that. devon, cornwalland parts of wales, scotland in the late to district will be tight. plan ahead. —— lake district. let's talk about the other side of weather. the downside. the front of the ft, this is the wake of the storms, more than 100 died in germany. we saw some of the warnings again tonight. some of the biggest floods western europe has seen for most of the century. some of the
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pictures have been very, very harrowing. pictures have been very, very harrowing-— harrowing. it's actually her in this, and _ harrowing. it's actually her in this, and this _ harrowing. it's actually her in this, and this is _ harrowing. it's actually her in this, and this is germany - harrowing. it's actually her inj this, and this is germany and belgium _ this, and this is germany and belgium -- _ this, and this is germany and belgium —— horrendous. these are very well— belgium —— horrendous. these are very well developed countries. germany's fame for being strong and powerful— germany's fame for being strong and powerful and every cliche about germany — powerful and every cliche about germany. they're very well organised, so you can't blame it on for infrastructure. —— poor infrastructure. the people who are unfortunate, saying they've been... of unfortunate, saying they've been... of course _ unfortunate, saying they've been... of course they've had floods in the of course they've had floods in the past, _ of course they've had floods in the past, but _ of course they've had floods in the past, but not to this degree. it seems — past, but not to this degree. it seems inconceivable. unfortunately, it isn't, _ seems inconceivable. unfortunately, it isn't, it's— seems inconceivable. unfortunately, it isn't, it's happened. the german botiticians — it isn't, it's happened. the german politicians are looking at this and saying _ politicians are looking at this and saying it's — politicians are looking at this and saying it's another indication of potential— saying it's another indication of potential climate change, of climate change. _ potential climate change, of climate change. in _ potential climate change, of climate change, in fact, and i'm sure there
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quite— change, in fact, and i'm sure there quite right — change, in fact, and i'm sure there quite right. even every single event can be _ quite right. even every single event can be a _ quite right. even every single event can be a phenomenon. but the pattern of these _ can be a phenomenon. but the pattern of these extreme circumstances is ever more — of these extreme circumstances is ever more frequent. gne of these extreme circumstances is ever more frequent.— ever more frequent. one of the interesting _ ever more frequent. one of the interesting things, _ ever more frequent. one of the interesting things, jason, - ever more frequent. one of the interesting things, jason, is - ever more frequent. one of the interesting things, jason, is we j ever more frequent. one of the - interesting things, jason, is we are interesting things, jason, is we are obviously told by the weather specialists that hotter temperatures suck up more moisture into the air, therefore there's more to come down again when the conditions chains and rain follows. whatever you talk about, whatever your view on that, if we are factually in an environment that has gotten hotter, we will end up with more water to come back down. it is we will end up with more water to come back down.— we will end up with more water to come back down. it is exactly what the scientists _ come back down. it is exactly what the scientists forecast. _ come back down. it is exactly what the scientists forecast. climate - the scientists forecast. climate crisis leads to more extreme weather. we've seen it this weekend. we saw last weekend in north america, where they had record—breaking temperatures. both have led to law because of life —— loss of life.
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have led to law because of life -- loss of life-— loss of life. the last, the photograph _ loss of life. the last, the photograph from - loss of life. the last, the photograph from the - loss of life. the last, the photograph from the ft. | loss of life. the last, the - photograph from the ft. the us sprinters tammy smith and john carlos. no political protest this year at the tokyo olympus. do you think they'll succeed with that? they say olympic sport isn't about politics. i think as we've seen from the euros, you think about what goes into getting the big successful gig. that's much more complicated. martin? the whole thing will be very different anyway. martin? the whole thing will be very different anyway-— different anyway. quite the event nobody was _ different anyway. quite the event nobody was anticipating. - different anyway. quite the event nobody was anticipating. and - different anyway. quite the event. nobody was anticipating. and they're -a in: for nobody was anticipating. and they're paying for something _ nobody was anticipating. and they're paying for something they _ nobody was anticipating. and they're paying for something they won't - nobody was anticipating. and they're paying for something they won't get| paying for something they won't get much back for. thank you both very
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much. that's it for the papers. sport and weather coming next. more news at the top of the hour. bye for now. hello. golfer louis oostheuizen has broken the record for the lowest score after two rounds at an open championship. the south african is three shots clear at the top of the leaderboard on 11 under par. our correspondent andy swiss reports from royal st george's. it's the closest most of us will get to the trophy — the open's favourite photo op doing a roaring trade. but others here are chasing the real thing. louis oostheuizen already won it once 11 years ago. commentator: oh, my word! and after another stunning display, he just might do it again on a remarkable 11 under par. but in the sandwich sunshine, he wasn't the only one making hay. this is collin morikawa's debut at the open.
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as first impressions go, not bad. what a day he's having. these two shots back, while hopes of a home winner are led by andy sullivan, another impressive day keeping him in contention. rory mcilroy. the rory mcilroy fan club was out in force, and they got a few decent moments — but 11 shots back, his hopes looked remote. what they'd all have done for a little bit of this. england'sjonathan thompson thrilling the crowd with a hole—in—one. oh, it's in! itjust doesn't get any better. well, it's been a day of glorious weather and some equally glorious golf, but none brighter than louis oostheuizen's. on this form, he'll take some stopping. andy swiss, bbc news, sandwich. roared on by his home crowd, lewis hamilton claimed pole position for formula one's first sprint race ahead of the british grand prix on sunday.
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as a government test event, 86,000 fans were at silverstone with 140,000 expected on sunday. hamilton's first lap in the final session was quick enough to secure the top spot for the new qualifying race ahead of title rival max verstappen. i'm so grateful to see everyone here. we've missed you for a whole year, so to come to the silverstone grand prix and have a full crowd like this, to see the energy... when i was coming into it, i was hopeful that with the great work that we've done together in the team, plus the energy of the fans would get us there. so, this is down to the fans, i think. england have been beaten by pakistan in the first of three t20 internationals. it was a highly entertaining game with 27 6's at trent bridge. pakistan bowled first and hit their biggest t20 tally, reaching 232 — captain babarazam top scoring with 85. it would also have been england's highest run chase, and after a shaky start,
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liam livingstone gave them hope scoring england's fastest t20 century — a spectacular 103 off 43 balls. but once he was out, the task was too great and pakistan went on to win by 31 runs. the t20 world cup is later this year in the middle east. tottenham's new manager, nuno espirito santo, insists harry kane is, in his words, "our player". the england captain's future has been the subject of much speculation over the last few months. the bbc understands kane has an "agreement" that would allow him to leave spurs this summer. but his new manager wouldn't be drawn on kane's future. he is our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. now is the moment to recover his energy, to rest, and when harry comes again, we will have time to speak and i'm looking forward to him joining the group and start working together. when he arrives, he will feel that
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every one of us wants to commit ourselves to becoming better and we are ambitious people, we want to do it well, and we count on harry in that. mark cavendish will have to wait until sunday's final day of the tour de france if he's to break the record for the number of stage wins at the tour. he was hoping to take his 35th on today's 19th stage, but it was won by matej mohoric. nick parrott has the details. this was the day mark cavendish was hoping to surpass the record he shares with eddy merckz for stage wins at the tour de france. for belgium telling him before the start, i hope you get your 35th stage today. if only life was that easy. this relatively flat stage today. if only life was that easy. this relatively fiat 128 mile ride was far from smooth. an early crash almost took cavendish out. the makes man far enough away to avoid the domino effect. but another hold
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him in much of the peloton up. along the road, a breakaway got away. with 16 miles ago, matej mohoric went for it. a sense of deja vu as the slovenian so load to his second win of this year's race. exactly two weeks after his first. tomorrow's time trials should see the overall victory confirmed. cavendish will have to wait until sunday to make his history. nick parrott, bbc news. and on this bumper sporting weekend, 16,000 fans will be at wembley for rugby league's show—piece — the challenge cup final. castleford will take on st helens at 3 o'clock tomorrow. castleford reached the final with a golden point kick, and they haven't won this competition since 1986, but have come so close to both league and cup success in recent years. st helens, though, will be favourites. castle heard haven't won the cup for
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30 years, and i think for us to be able to win it will put our names in history. it's a long time coming for the team. we want to be remembered. that surely the point of everyone because my career — you want to be remembered. and that's all the sport for now. hello. some very warm to hot weather on the way for much of the uk this weekend. there is a weak weather front in northern scotland, and that will bring windier conditions, some cloud and the chance of a little rain, and temperatures just into the mid to high teens. in fact, this cloud becomes more extensive across western scotland into northern ireland overnight. some patches of cloud through eastern parts of england as well as temperatures drop into the mid to low teens. so, tomorrow then, eastern and southern scotland seeing some sunny spells. northwest scotland, breezy, cloudy and in places, damp. in northern ireland, a few spots of drizzle early on,
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but then it brightens up, though some irish sea coasts may hold onto a bit of low cloud. any early cloud across parts of eastern england will clear away. the lion's share of the sunshine will be across england and wales, and this is where we'll see the highest temperatures. light winds for the most part, but notice it is really quite windy across north and northwest scotland. these are average speeds — gusts will be a bit higher than that. as for temperatures, we could well see 30 degrees in yorkshire on saturday.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the worst floods in europe for decades kill more than 120 people. emergency services in western germany, belgium and the netherlands search for hundreds of people still missing, and try to rescue those stranded by the floodwaters. with three days to go until most covid restrictions are lifted in england, the uk records more than 50,000 new cases in a single day, the highest since january. meanwhile the british government says people arriving from france will still need to quarantine, because of a surge in cases of the beta variant. south africa's president has addressed the nation — after days of rioting and looting —he says efforts to overthrow democracy have failed.

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