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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 16, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm celia hatton. the headlines: the worst floods in europe for decades kill more than a 120 people emergency services in western germany, belgium and the netherlands search for hundreds of people still missing, and try to rescue those stranded by the floodwaters. with three days to go until most covid restrictions are lifted in england the uk records more than 50,000 new cases in a single day the highest since january. the british government is reversing its recently announced relaxation of rules towards people travelling back to england from france. south africa's president has just addressed the nation — after days of rioting and looting —he says efforts to overthrow democracy have failed.
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using the pretext of the political grievance, those behind these acts have sought to provoke popular insurrection amongst our people. and a decade after the death of amy winehouse her parents tell her story in a new documentary. more than 120 people have been confirmed dead after parts of northern europe were devastated by some of the worst flooding in decades. hundreds more are injured and others unaccounted for. the german president has called for a more determined battle against climate change. the german states of
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rhineland—pulatinate and north rhine—westphalia were worst hit with over a 100 people dying there. in belgium, at least 20 people have been killed and the netherlands is also badly affected. the power of the water has been immense. here you can see what the village of erf—stad blessem looked like before it was hit by floodwater(mix screen 2)and , like before it was hit by floodwater and , look , here it is afterwards. water gushed through... causing a huge landslide in the surrounding fields 0ur correspondent jenny hill sent this report from the nearby town of erf—stad this country is reeling from the enormity of its loss. this is the town of erfstadt where the ground just fell away. under the weight of water, houses collapsed in the night. dramatic rescues, but this morning the authorities said people trapped in their homes were calling them for help but in many cases rescue was impossible. those who did make it out came to shelters like this. we metjohannes here, he and his wife were winched to safety last night.
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he arrived barefoot and soaking wet. "what were you thinking as they winched you up, i asked. "i had to leave my cat behind," he says. johannes has lived here more than 70 years. there have been floods, he told us, but not like this. translation: you can run l from fire but not from water. tens of thousands of people still don't have power. and they're on alert. water levels have dropped in some areas but few here feel safe. you can see how powerful the water is here still, and what's worrying people in this area is thatjust upstream there is a dam and experts say it is unstable. they are still inspecting it but people think if that dam breaks the water is heading in this direction. and with every hour, news of more deaths. people are still missing. with mobile networks down, it's hard to know how many made it to safety. they're desperate for help here.
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this was a caravan park. how to even begin clearing up... we met the owners, still visibly in shock. translation: indescribable. we've been here since 1979. we've never seen anything like this. if we don't get any help, - we'll have to go on benefits. bankrupt. germany, a country famed for its strength, its security, feels vulnerable now. jenny hill, bbc news, erfstadt. another town severely hit by flooding is insul, outside bonn, damien mcguinness is there. here in the centre of this small village you can see the extent and the impact of the destruction. usually the two sides of this village are connected by an old, very solid stone bridge. that bridge has been completely swept away. now it is impossible to go from one side of the village to the other. so local people have to shout across to see
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if everyone is ok. you cannot call either or send e—mail but because the internet is down, telecommunications are down and mobile connections are down. it's a really difficult situation for people here. 0n the side of the village people are clearing up and mud is being swept away and the slime is being pulled out of peoples houses. on that side of the village, the situation even worse because it's not a question of clearing up it's the question of rebuilding the destruction. belgium has also found itself impacted by the floods — at least 20 people have been confirmed dead, and around the same number are reported missing. all anyone is hoping for is a let up in the weather, will they get one? let's talk belgium meteorologist david the—hey—now. thank you forjoining us. what is the answer? is there going to be a laptop in the weather? yes. absolutely. _ laptop in the weather? yes. absolutely. we _ laptop in the weather? yes. absolutely. we would - laptop in the weather? yes.
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absolutely. we would have | laptop in the weather? yes. i absolutely. we would have dry weather for the next five or seven days because we had a terrible summer at the mall with lots of rain and thunderstorms and this dreadful flooding is really hysterical in our country. we are hoping to have good weather and my summer time weather with temperatures around 20 degrees which is normalfor belgium and the rain is evacuated towards germany, the northern part of germany which is my severely affected but to other parts so even that part of germany will have a good weather for the next week. will have a good weather for the next week-— will have a good weather for the next week. ~ ., ., , ., ~ , next week. what do you think caused this massive — next week. what do you think caused this massive weather _ next week. what do you think caused this massive weather event _ next week. what do you think caused this massive weather event across i this massive weather event across europe? this massive weather event across euro e? ., , ., this massive weather event across euroe? ., , europe? there was a very active weather fronts _ europe? there was a very active weather fronts which _ europe? there was a very active weather fronts which moved - europe? there was a very active j weather fronts which moved and although rain fell in place with lots of rain that we have almost ten inches of rain in belgium in two
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days. normally it takes two months to have this amount of rain so this resulted in flooding and the eastern part of belgium and a big part of belgium so the flooding was not on me said they are in the province but also luxembourg, lots of people have lost their homes and you talk about dead people and damage and a lot of people who lost everything. what dead people and damage and a lot of people who lost everything.— people who lost everything. what is it about the — people who lost everything. what is it about the topography _ people who lost everything. what is it about the topography of - people who lost everything. what is it about the topography of the - it about the topography of the region that allowed floodwaters to gain such momentum? mast region that allowed floodwaters to gain such momentum?— region that allowed floodwaters to gain such momentum? most of the rain fell on the highest _ gain such momentum? most of the rain fell on the highest part _ gain such momentum? most of the rain fell on the highest part of— gain such momentum? most of the rain fell on the highest part of belgium - fell on the highest part of belgium so then we had some memories which are recently small valleys so that
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accelerated the flooding and the speed of the water is so the voice of the water destroyed houses which people were still living in and because some people did not want to evacuate they thought it would be safer in their homes and some people lost their lives because their home collapsed because they were in it. this is a story we will continue to cover very close to me. thank you very much. the uk has recorded more than 50,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day, for the first time since january. it comes as the research suggests one in a hundred people has the virus. on monday, the majority of covid restrictions in england are due to be lifted, but with cases rising sharply there's been growing criticism of therehere's our medical editor, fergus walsh. queueing for art and for a vaccine — exclusive access to tate modern's
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galleries this evening was on offer to those getting a jab at this iconic london setting. with restrictions lifting in england on monday, and cases soaring, the race between the virus and the vaccine is intensifying. in newham, in east london, just over a third of adults are fully immunised, half the uk level. so council teams are going door to door to encourage people to have the jab. hello. how are you? the number of first vaccinations across the uk has halved in the past two weeks as demand from young people starts to falter. yet again, the nhs has appealed to adults to come forward for first and second doses. and that can mean overcoming vaccine hesitancy, especially in the young.
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i think that on social media, people believe very quickly what they read on whatsapp or other online platforms and i think it's trying to change that perception. i think giving human guidance to them, that will show that the benefits outweigh the risks. brothers uresh and diresh are 22 and i9 and are having their first doses. the more people we have vaccinated, it means that the cases will reduce and help us in the long term. it is good for people around you, getting vaccinated, so you are protected, as well, and you're protecting other people. i'm in icu and my lungs collapsed. that was paul godfrey, 18 months ago. in his early 30s, he was susceptible to infection but never imagined the damage that covid could do. it was the worst experience
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of my life, obviously. - i couldn't believe that this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight i would have to fight. a new study has found that one in three younger adults hospitalised with covid suffered complications like kidney, lung and heart damage. although old and frail adults are at the greatest risk, it is a reminder that covid can be indiscriminate in who it targets. fergus walsh, bbc news. in spite of the uk high vaccination rates — the spike in cases has lead to calls for the government to reverse some easing on restrictions — particularly the move to drop the mask mandate for public transport. the uk wouldn't be the first to reverse such a decision. israel reinstated its own mask mandate injune just days after dropping it — after it recorded an increase cases. and in the us, los angeles has followed suit.
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yesterday it reintroduced its own mask mandate for indoor public spaces after only month — amid a significant rise in delta variant cases. staying in the united states, the cdc has warned of high infection rates and sharp increases in cases in states with low vaccination levels. florida itself — now accounts for a quarter of new infections in the whole of the us. back in the uk, the government is reversing its recently announced relaxation of rules towards people travelling back from france. from next monday, travellers arriving in england from france must continue to quarantine for ten days at home even, if they are fully vaccinated. the department of health says that's because of "a persistent presence of cases" of the beta variant in france. people returning from other amber list countries will no longer need to self—isolate. trade body airlines u.k. said what it called random rule changes make it almost impossible
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for travellers and industry to plan ahead. the south african president cyril ramaphosa has been addressing the nation about the recent violence that has rocked the country. the unrest follows the imprisonment of his predecessor, jacob zuma, on charges of contempt of court. so far, more than 200 people have been killed in rioting and looting. president ramaphosa descrived the violence as an attack on democracy that had failed. it is clear now that the events of the last week were nothing less than a deliberate and coordinated and well planned attack on our democracy. the constitutional order of our country remains. the current instability and ongoing incitement to violence constitutes a direct
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contravention of the constitution of our country and the rule of law. these actions are intended to cripple the economy of our country, to cause social instability and severely weaken or even dislodge the democratic state. sam is a journalist, political analyst — and formerly served as a spindoctor for pravin gordhan — a south african cabinet minister under both jacob zuma and cyril ramaphosa. what did you make of his speech? thank you for having me. it was an interesting briefing and you wonder why the president felt the need to make the address. he spoke last sunday evening and based on what the government has done, the public did
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not know about any reforms. he confirmed that alvarez villages had been sent out to support the parties and that is not new. we already knew that. he started gave evidence and some sense of calm has been restored and ordering, he felt the need to make sure he seemed to be doing something about what is going on. what will consent south africans is the fact he says this is a very carefully planned incidents, get to people who planned it there's that large. d0 people who planned it there's that larae. , ., people who planned it there's that larae. ~' people who planned it there's that larae. i. ~ people who planned it there's that larae. ~ ~ , large. do you think south africans will believe _ large. do you think south africans will believe that _ large. do you think south africans will believe that these _ large. do you think south africans will believe that these riots - large. do you think south africans will believe that these riots were l will believe that these riots were carefully planned? doesn't that do away with the idea that the worst —— there were some good reasons why people were so unhappy and felt the need to riots? people were so unhappy and felt the need to rkits?— need to riots? absolutely. there is an elementary _ need to riots? absolutely. there is an elementary you _ need to riots? absolutely. there is an elementary you can _ need to riots? absolutely. there is an elementary you can say - need to riots? absolutely. there is an elementary you can say this - need to riots? absolutely. there is| an elementary you can say this was planned in response to the arrest of
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the former president. but the domestic environment issue here, the poverty levels and unemployment and inequality, the youth unemployment spends close to 50%, that is one into youths who are unemployed. people have felt lumber for the situation is worsened by the covid—19 pandemic and the continuing lockdown and it's a big part of what we've seen. so the environment is very first time and somebody who could reallyjust touch very first time and somebody who could really just touch that at any stage. what you've seen is a confirmation from the president that the state is not equipped to deal with issues and threats they face. he says this date was not properly prepared for the witness and to the response of the parties in the aftermath but also the failure to preempt what's happening. so here is that south africa is a sitting target due to a number of issues and
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political upheavals we have seen just now are also the base issues of poverty and inequality and those issues are quite real and —— structured. he hinted there is going to be a package of measures right about cherries and food parcels given out but there is no indication that there will be long—term attention to this problem. that there will be long-term attention to this problem. thank you for takin: attention to this problem. thank you for taking the _ attention to this problem. thank you for taking the time _ attention to this problem. thank you for taking the time to _ attention to this problem. thank you for taking the time to speak- attention to this problem. thank you for taking the time to speak with - for taking the time to speak with us. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: as japan struggles to host the olympics, we have a special report on the small towns trying to keep the excitement going. after months of talks
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and missed deadlines, a deal has been struck to keep greece within the eurozone. the immediate prospect of greece going bust in the worst crisis to hit the eurozone has been averted. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worst floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally called the great white way by americans, but tonight, it's completely blacked out. it's a timely reminder to all americans of the problems that the energy crisis has brought to them. leaders meet in paris- fora summit on pollution, inflation and third world debt. this morning, theyjoinedl the revolution celebrations for a show of military might on the champs—elysees. . wildlife officials in australia have been coping with a penguin problem. fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much, they could barely stand. more fighting is expected in the west, an area close
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this is news, the latest headlines. at least 120 have been killed and hundreds are unaccounted for in europe's worst floods for decades. south africa's president has just addressed the nation — after days of rioting and looting —he says efforts to overthrow democracy have failed. next week the olympics is due to start, while tokyo is back under a covid state of emergency. in the capital, enthusiasm for the games is hard to find. but in some small towns there is still excitement among those acting as the adopted home for foreign 0lympics teams. 0ur correspondent rupert wingfield hayes has been to mura—yama in northern japan as they prepare to welcome the bulgarian rhythmic gymnastics team. not many japanese kids are lucky
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enough to have a former international gymnast as their teacher. and notjust any gymnast, and tenant was once a world class with nick gymnast competing for bulgaria. fortwo with nick gymnast competing for bulgaria. for two years she has been teaching here in the mountains of northern japan. for teaching here in the mountains of northern japan-— teaching here in the mountains of northern japan. for me it was like a dream come _ northern japan. for me it was like a dream come true _ northern japan. for me it was like a dream come true to _ northern japan. for me it was like a dream come true to come - northern japan. for me it was like a dream come true to come here - northern japan. for me it was like a dream come true to come here in i northern japan. for me it was like a i dream come true to come here in the place that i already love and to work with teaching gymnastics. that was my childhood. this is my passion. was my childhood. this is my assion. , ., , was my childhood. this is my assion. , ., ., , passion. five years ago, she invited the bulgarian _ passion. five years ago, she invited the bulgarian women's _ passion. five years ago, she invited the bulgarian women's gymnastics. the bulgarian women's gymnastics team to make this place their 0lympic hometown. but that was before covid—19. hotel manager shows me the route the bulgarian team will now have to take to get back to their rooms. so there is a screen
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here. at every stage, the team members would have to be kept separate from other guests. it's really an exemplar of what the whole 0lympic spirit is supposed to be about. but because of covid—19, the tremendous enthusiasm here is tempered with anxiety and that's because places like this in rural japan have lots and lots of old people and so far almost no covid—19 infections. that is not going to stop this woman. she is the founder of the bulgarian gymnastics support club. she says she thinks of the team as her adoptive granddaughters. and she can't wait to see them compete. i and she can't wait to see them com ete. ,. ., and she can't wait to see them com ete. .. ., , and she can't wait to see them compete-— and she can't wait to see them com ete. .. ., , ., ., ., compete. i know there is a lot of criticism because _ compete. i know there is a lot of criticism because of— compete. i know there is a lot of criticism because of covid-19. i l criticism because of covid—19. i really wanted to be until get to see them perform. theirfamilies and friends cannot come so that's why i
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wanted to be there to make sure the girls know we are all behind them. the majority of japanese may still be very sceptical about the games taking place, but here there is to be in excitement as they await the arrival of their bulgarian granddaughters. the singer amy winehouse was just 27 when she died. she'd struggled with addiction to alcohol and drugs. this month marks the 10th anniversary of her death and now, in a new bbc documentary, her parents janis and mitch want to show a different side of their daughter. they've been speaking to our music reporter, mark savage. it is ten years since amy winehouse died of alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. i will always remember
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our last words. i said, "i love you, amy". she said, "i love you, mummy." i can always remember the love she had for me, always there. since then, amy's story has been told countless times but now her parents janis and mitch want to tell their side. people's idea about amy, the very black—and—white image of amy that she was struggling with addiction to alcohol and drugs. they thought she was a certain way, she wasn't. i knew amy. in a bbc documentary, the couple and amy's friends look back on the ups and downs of her life. she wanted to be famous, she wanted to be successful. when she got it, it was like, oh, god and it all kicked off, it all kicked off. at one point you say mistakes were made when amy was ill. what were the mistakes? the mistakes were... we didn't know... we didn't know what to do. no—one knew what to do
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because obviously the responsibility of the addiction lies with the person who is struggling with the addiction. as a family we could stand on our heads. how many times we had family interventions i lost count. how many times i took her into rehab and she would walk out the next day... i don't think there is no right or wrong way to deal with it. 0n the 23rd 0n the 23rd, we will get together at the cemetery.
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the first ten minutes will be sobbing and then after that will be in fits of laughter with a new amy anecdote. although it's not a joyful thing that you would go and celebrate it, but we do — we actually go and remember her. myjoke is, now i know where she is. yes. but true. amy's family celebrate her humour and kindness, herfans will hold on to her music. mark savage, bbc news. the eiffel tower in paris has re—opened, eight months after being closed to tourists. that's its longest such shutdown since the second world war. a marching band played to mark the occasion and an official declared that tourism was coming back. but stil coronavirus restrictions remain in place, and only half the usual number of sightseers were allowed up the tower. but the romance is still there. 0ne german visitor took advantage of the moment to propose to his girlfriend. of course! she accepted.
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that's all for now on bbc world news. stay with us. willis, northern ireland, and scotland recorded their highest temperature sulphide today. the hotspots and sunshine reaching into the upper 20s. a few places in england perhaps wales will reach 30 celsius the first time this season this weekend. not everywhere is going to have a warm to hot weekend. there is a weak weather front keeping things cooler here with cloud, wind and light rain. the crowd becomes a few patches in eastern england and temperatures in the mid to low teens. big picture for the weekend. no pressure brought flooding into germany and moving southeast with heavy downpour is an
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high—pressure giving us a dry weekend while extending to the areas that have been left and turning things dry. we are dry, not everywhere, but the week whether fund is close to northern scotland on saturday with cloud, breeze, and the chance of rain. southern and eastern scotland has sunny spells bringing up after a cloudy start by some patches of low cloudiness and lingering in the coast and the early cloudiness clearing away and temperatures in the 30 celsius mark in yorkshire for example during saturday afternoon. very high temperatures elsewhere and the stiff neither eddie breeze luis. but behind it, the high pressure giving us a mainly dry weekend will extend to areas that have been exceptionally wet and turn things drier. we are mainly dry, not everywhere. that weak weather front close to northern scotland in fact, in scotland, cloud becomes more extensive as we go through saturday night and into sunday morning.
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so, there will be more cloud around here, some heavier bursts of rain possible in northern scotland for a time. cloudier in northern ireland, a bit more cloud in northern england, perhaps north wales. there will be some sunny spells here, too, but temperatures will be a touchdown on sunday compared with saturday here. the highest temperatures here on sunday will be across central and southern parts of england, south wales. again, a few spots are likely to reach that 30 celsius mark. those highest temperatures will begin to ease a little next week. it stays very warm, mind you, largely dry until later in the week, increasing chance of rain.
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this is bbc world news, the headlines floods have killed over 120 people in germany and belgium. emergency services are searching for hundreds still missing. entire communities are in ruins. a german minister has described it as a humanitarian catastrophe. the prime minister of belgium says the flooding could be the most catastrophic his country has ever seen, with at least 20 people dead. a day of national mourning will be held on tuesday. britain has said it's scrapping a planned relaxation of covid quarantine rules for travellers from france into england which had been due to take effect on monday. it's due to "a persistent presence of cases" of the beta variant in france. in a speech to the nation the south african president, cyril ramaphosa, has said the violent unrest that's swept the country was clearly planned and instigated. he said the effects would last for months to come

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