Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 16, 2021 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

8:00 pm
manager this is bbc news i'm celia hatton. the headlines: the worst floods in europe for decades kill more than a 120 people emergency services in western germany, belgium and the netherlands search for hundreds of people still missing, and try to rescue those stranded by the floodwaters. with three days to go until most covid restrictions are lifted in england the uk records more than 50,000 new cases in a single day the highest since january. self africa's president has just addressed the nation after days of rioting and looting and he said efforts to overthrow a democracy has failed. , , a, a, failed. using the pretext of a olitical failed. using the pretext of a political grievance, _ failed. using the pretext of a political grievance, those - failed. using the pretext of a - political grievance, those behind these acts have sought to provoke
8:01 pm
unpopular insurrection amongst our people. and a decade after the death of amy winehouse her parents tell her story in a new documentary. hello and welcome if you re watching on pbs in the us or around the world. more than 120 people have been confirmed dead after parts of northern europe were devastated by some of the worst flooding in decades. hundreds more are injured and others unaccounted for. the work of the emergency services is being severely hampered by the difficult conditions. the german president has called for a more determined battle against climate change. the german states of rhineland—pulatinate and north rhine—westphalia were worst hit. over 100 people have died there.
8:02 pm
in belgium, where at least 20 people have been killed, july the 20th has been declared a national day of mourning. the netherlands is also badly affected. the power of the water has been immense. here you can see what the village of erf—stad blessem looked like before it was hit by floodwater and look here it is afterwards. water gushed through the town causing a huge landslide in the surrounding fields. 0ur correspondent jenny hill has just sent this report from the town of erf—stad. this country is reeling from the enormity. this town, the ground has fallen away under the weight of water. dramatic rescues but this morning, the authorities said people trapped in their homes were calling them for help but in many cases, rescue was impossible. those who did make it out came
8:03 pm
to shelters like this. we met this man here. he and his wife were winched to safety last night and he arrived barefoot and soaking wet. what were you thinking? i had to leave my cat behind. he has lived here for over 70 years. there have been floods, he told us, but not like this. translation: you can run | from afar but not from water. tens of thousands of people still do not have power and they are on alert. what levels have dropped in some areas but few people have returned. what is worrying people in this area is thatjust upstream there is a dam and experts say it is unstable. they are still inspecting it but people think if it breaks, the water will head in this direction. with every hour, news of more deaths.
8:04 pm
people are still missing. with mobile networks down, it is hard to know how many made it to safety. they are desperate for help here. this was a caravan park. how to even begin clearing up? we met the owners, still visibly in shock. translation: indescribable. we have been here since 1979 and we have never seen anything like this. if we don't get any help, we'll have to go on benefits. bankrupt. germany, a country famed for its strength, its security feels vulnerable now. another town severely hit by flooding is insul, outside bonn, damein mcguinness is there. here in the centre of this small village you can see the extent village you can here in the centre of this small village you can see the extent and the impact of the destruction. usually, the two sides of this village are connected by an old
8:05 pm
solid stone bridge. that bridge has been completely washed away. now it is impossible to go from one side of the village to the other. local people have to shout across to see if everyone is ok. you cannot call either, you cannot send e—mails because the internet is down, and telecommunications are down, mobile phones are down, it's a difficult situation for people here. for on this side of the village people are clearing up and mike is being swept away and the sign is being pulled out of peoples houses. 0n away and the sign is being pulled out of peoples houses. on that side of the village the situation is worse because it's not a question of clearing up, it's a question of rebuilding the destruction. so why is this happening now? some politicians say the extreme weather is a result of global warning. their calling on climate protection measures to be accelerated. 0ur correspondent accesses the role of climate change in the record amounts of rainfall now devastating parts of
8:06 pm
europe. the floods in germany are not the only extreme weather event we have seen this summer. there was the dramatic heatwave in canada and western us last month and russia, mexico and new zealand have all been experiencing unusually high—temperature is. the climate science is very clear on this, it has been predicting not just for years but for decades that if we continue to pump huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, we will experience increasingly high temperatures and because warm air holds more moisture, that means heavier rainfall and therefore, floods. you only have to look at the pictures of these devastating floods to know that we need to do better. it is not ok with this number of people to die in 2021 from floods. the next obvious question is, is the world doing enough to tackle climate change? it is. the un says we need to reduce carbon emissions by 7% every yearfor the next decade
8:07 pm
if we are going to stand a reasonable chance of staying within what is reckoned to be the safe limit, 1.5 celsius. we did achieve that last year but in the teeth of the pandemic so the only good outcome from these recent extreme weather events is that it encourages the world to raise its carbon cutting game when it meets at the landmark climate conference in glasgow in november. some breaking news now. in the past few minutes, the south african president has been addressing the nation. it comes in the wake of widespread violence in south africa. following the imprisonment of his predecessor on charges of contempt of court. so far, more than 200 people have been killed and in rioting and looting. international
8:08 pm
address a few minutes ago he described the violence as an attack on democracy that had failed. it is clear now that _ on democracy that had failed. it 3 clear now that the events on democracy that had failed. it 1 clear now that the events over the past week were nothing less than a deliberate, coordinated and well planned attack on our democracy. the constitutional order of our country is under threat. the current instability and ongoing incitement to violence constitutes a direct contravention of the constitution of our country and the rule of law. these actions are intended to cripple the economy of our country, to cause social instability, and severity we can or even dislodge the democratic states. using the pretext
8:09 pm
of a political grievance, those behind these acts have sought to provoke unpopular insurrection amongst our people. they have sought to exploit the social and economical under which many south africans live. conditions of poverty, of inequality, and unemployment that have worsened since the onset of coronavirus pandemic and to provoke ordinary citizens and criminal networks to engage in acts of wanton looting. it networks to engage in acts of wanton lootina. , networks to engage in acts of wanton lootina. _ , networks to engage in acts of wanton lootin. _ .,., looting. it is crossed back to our to looting. it is crossed back to our tap story- _ looting. it is crossed back to our tap story- let — looting. it is crossed back to our top story. let us _ looting. it is crossed back to our top story. let us get _ looting. it is crossed back to our top story. let us get more - looting. it is crossed back to our top story. let us get more on i looting. it is crossed back to our. top story. let us get more on that flooding in germany. thousands have been forced to flee their homes. 0ne been forced to flee their homes. one
8:10 pm
of those is a man who fled with his family as water rose around him and a number of his neighbours are still missing. thank you for taking the time to speak with us. it must be a frightening time. can you tell us what led to complementing you knew you were going to have to leave your home? ., , , h, home? hello, yes, there were some terrible themes _ home? hello, yes, there were some terrible themes yesterday. - home? hello, yes, there were some terrible themes yesterday. the - terrible themes yesterday. the situation started yesterday morning a few metres away, about 200 metres down and the water walls were already rising and the threading had started already and it was coming to our side. started already and it was coming to ourside. so started already and it was coming to our side. so our basement was one metre underwater and that military staff were there because they had to back up the fire brigade said he had
8:11 pm
to call the military out as well and they told us that we have to go to a meeting point where we will be connected in some minutes or sometime so i had kids as well and my wife was at work and in the morning there was no flooding on our streets. so that was the point that we decided to go away. 50. streets. so that was the point that we decided to go away.— streets. so that was the point that we decided to go away. so, you and our we decided to go away. so, you and your children _ we decided to go away. so, you and your children left _ we decided to go away. so, you and your children left their _ we decided to go away. so, you and your children left their home. - we decided to go away. so, you and your children left their home. but . your children left their home. but what about your neighbours? what do you know of them? figs what about your neighbours? what do you know of them? $51 what about your neighbours? what do you know of them?— you know of them? as i said earlier, about 200 metres _ you know of them? as i said earlier, about 200 metres down _ you know of them? as i said earlier, about 200 metres down from - you know of them? as i said earlier, about 200 metres down from us, i you know of them? as i said earlier, | about 200 metres down from us, our home was higher up but 200 metres down there were some catastrophic scenes. many elderly people were still staying at their homes although they were told to leave. that they should be evacuated but many stayed and about 6pm yesterday
8:12 pm
most of those houses were flooded. but flooded or the first floor, many still missing, there were some deaths and headed cop an military helicopters and fire brigade taking people up from their house is and i think there are still hundreds of them missing. some neighbourhoods, a sister that was always in contact with me, she was not seeing and her husband told me that he cannot contact her and there was no phone contact her and there was no phone contact and the network was also down. we had no electricity since yesterday. down. we had no electricity since esterda . , , , ., ., yesterday. very briefly, what do you know of your — yesterday. very briefly, what do you know of your home? _ yesterday. very briefly, what do you know of your home? is _ yesterday. very briefly, what do you know of your home? is it _ yesterday. very briefly, what do you know of your home? is it all- yesterday. very briefly, what do you know of your home? is it all right? i know of your home? is it all right? is it still there? have you been able to go back?— is it still there? have you been able to go back? no, we have not been able — able to go back? no, we have not been able to _ able to go back? no, we have not been able to go _ able to go back? no, we have not been able to go back _ able to go back? no, we have not been able to go back because - able to go back? no, we have not been able to go back because we| able to go back? no, we have not. been able to go back because we are not allowed. i think the basement is already underwater and i hope the
8:13 pm
water has not risen mark, at least in our house and their neighbourhood from where i got the information and what we saw, we heard from friends who were in the neighbourhood streets, they were mostly flooded. 0ur historic building about... thank our historic building about... thank ou for our historic building about... thank you for taking _ our historic building about... thank you for taking the _ our historic building about... thank you for taking the time _ our historic building about... thank you for taking the time to _ our historic building about... thank you for taking the time to speak - you for taking the time to speak with us. i am afraid he would have to leave it there. thank you for telling us your story. stay with us on bbc world news. still to come. fresh reports of ethnic cleansing integrate as they raised their control over the region.
8:14 pm
after months of talks and missed deadlines, a deal has been struck to keep greece within the eurozone. the immediate prospect of greece going bust in the worst crisis to hit the eurozone has been averted. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worst floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally called the great white way by americans, but tonight, it's completely blacked out. it's a timely reminder to all americans of the problems that the energy crisis has brought to them. leaders meet in paris- fora summit on pollution, inflation and third world debt. this morning, theyjoinedl the revolution celebrations for a show of military might on the champs—elysees. . wildlife officials in australia have been coping with a penguin problem. fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much, they could barely stand. this is bbc news, the latest headlines. at least 120 people have been killed
8:15 pm
and hundreds are unaccounted for in europe's worst floods for decades. south africa's president addressed the nation after days of rioting and looting. he says efforts to overthrow democracy have failed. the uk has recorded more than 50,000 coronavirus cases in a single day for the first time since mid january. in the past 2a hours there were a further 51,870 confirmed cases of coronavirus in the uk. and another 49 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for covid — bringing the uk's death toll to 128,642. earlier this afternoon, official figures suggested that1 in 100 people in the uk had the coronavirus last week. growing numbers of workers have been told to self—isolate, after being "pinged" by an app used by the health service to trace their contacts. our correspondent sarah campbell has more:
8:16 pm
the pressure on business is unrelenting. in the last week we had our head of production, he went and got pinged, then the guy below him, the manufacturing manager, he got pinged. then the distribution manager got pinged and then the guy who is managing our new tap yard which was due to open on friday, he also got pinged. this brewery should have been welcoming 100 business customers to the opening of a new on—site bar this evening but with nine members of staff self isolating the event is off and the new bar will remain closed. you start thinking, the numbers are going down, we've got a deadline, we're going to be out of it, it's all going to be fine, but now you're just thrust straight back into it, into the fear of the pinging and the fear of getting coronavirus, having people on—site, all of those things just make our entire industry very, very nervous, although they are all desperate to open because it has been such a financially crippling period. across town, one of the brewery�*s customers, the royal oak pub. it was closed recently for ten days
8:17 pm
after a staff member tested positive and the rest of the team were pinged to self—isolate. you have ordered stock in, everything is fresh food, as well, so that will go off, this will happen, you've lost money, all of these things, so it is a concern that if we get pinged today, tomorrow, especially someone from the management team, then it spirals and we have to do the whole thing again. more than half a million people in england and wales alone were pinged by this nhs app in the first week ofjuly, so the impact on business from pubs to major manufacturers has been huge, and if you are not self isolating because of work, you may well be because your child's classroom bubble has burst. at this school in nearby high wycombe, at times a third of staff and almost 300 pupils have been self isolating. this is the most stressful that i think we have all felt and i think the children and their parents have felt that, as well. real fatigue, lots of wonderful positive messages out there that we are heading back towards normality, that we have gone
8:18 pm
to stage four of the road map, but that is not how it has felt in the last couple of weeks. 140,000 people are expected to watch sunday's grand prix at silverstone and many more pings seem almost inevitable, but today downing street insisted that the nhs app is doing what it was designed to do and remains one of the best tools available to help tackle coronavirus. sarah campbell, bbc news. in spite of the uk high vaccination rates — the spike in cases has lead to calls for the government to reverse some easing on restrictions — particularly the move to drop the mask mandate for public transport. the uk wouldn't be the first to reverse such a decision. israel reinstated its own mask mandate injune just days after dropping it — after it recorded just 100 cases on two consecutive days. and the us city of los angeles has followed suit. yesterday it reintroduced its own mask mandate for indoor public spaces after only month —
8:19 pm
amid a significant rise in delta variant cases in the city and the wider us. staying in the united states, the cdc has warned of high infection rates in states with low vaccination levels. it identified four states, nevada, arkansas, missouri and florida, as those with the highest transmission florida itself — now accounts for a quarter of new infection in the whole fo the us. fresh reports of ethnic cleansing in tigray — in northern ethiopia — as tigrayan forces extend their control over the region. more fighting is expected in the west, an area close to west, an area close more fighting is expected in the west, an area close to the border and we are our africa correspondent has this report. three teenaged boys
8:20 pm
emerge from the gloom, trudging their way to safety. they have escaped from a tigray overnight across a river and a well guarded border. carrying nothing except stories of spiralling ethnic conflict. translation: some soldiers came home to home and they gave us two days - to leave because we are from tigray. there is a kind of ethnic cleansing going on in the towns across—the—boa rd here? yes, we feel bad because it is our country, our land. the boys are of fighting age and may soon be needed back in tigray but for now, they are safe just across the border here in sudan. a grim life in this refugee camp beckons. in the makeshift clinic here, one remarkable refugee is looking after thousands. he is part doctor, part, clear of tigray�*s latest agonies.
8:21 pm
there was no food and no water and particularly they were being taught that they were going to be punished by hunger. starved ? his clinic is overwhelmed, notjust by the flood of new arrivals, a single mother of two here, but overwhelmed by their stories. they have killed young men? i heard gunshots and when i turned around, they were there. you think the war is going to go on and on? it is going to go on, for sure. we are not leaving our land, never. so the blood is going to continue. a refugee sings of her yearning for home for tigray. it sounds like a lament
8:22 pm
for ethiopia, two, a nation at risk of unravelling. you get a real sense here that this conflict is far from over. locals have suffered so much in the past few months through famine and conflict that they are now talking about a clean break, full independence from ethiopia, a nation they see as cruel and crumbling. if that means they have to keep fighting for it, then so be it. another young man thrashes his way across the river border out of tigray. better to drown, he says, than to stay behind and be killed by the militias. the refugee doctor doubt if ethiopia can survive all this intact. i don't want to be in the same category with these people that have raped my sisters, that had killed my brothers and sisters and have destroyed my places. so the idea.
8:23 pm
the idea of ethiopia is gone. the summer storm season is beginning, adding to the anxieties here. we cannot sleep at night, just thinking what is going to happen to the kids? what am i going to do the next day? what am i going to feed them? when i see them, i feel sorry for them. and so, thousands of lives remain suspended, communities torn apart. as an tigray�*s war lurches on. the singer amy winehouse was just 27 when she died. she'd struggled with addiction to alcohol and drugs. this month marks the 10th anniversary of her death and now, in a new bbc documentary, her parents janis and mitch want to show a different side of their daughter. they've been speaking to our music reporter, mark savage. what am i scared of? myself.
8:24 pm
it is ten years since amy winehouse died of alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. i will always remember our last words. i said, "i love you, amy". she said, "i love you, mummy." i can always remember the love she had for me, always there. since then, amy's story has been told countless times herfamily saved her family saved the meatiest treatment of the singer was unacceptable. it was disgusting, not just amy, but the way they called her names, and they couldn't do that today. it has got better, marginally. ina new in a new documentary about amy's life they want to set the record straight. you cannot airbrush the stuff out but even through the times when she was seriously ill, what got her and us through it,
8:25 pm
it might seem stupid, but it was our sense of humour. how would you like her to be remembered? is the nice person she was, the soulful person, and caring. 0n the 23rd, we are together at the cemetery and the first ten minutes we will be sobbing and after that we will be in fits of laughter with a new amy anecdote. although it is not a joyful thing that you would celebrate it, but we do, we go and remember her. her parents hope her legacy will not just be music but a better understanding of mental health. here is a reminder of our top stories. more than 120 people have died in flooding stories. more than 120 people have died inflooding in parts stories. more than 120 people have died in flooding in parts of northern europe. these drawn pictures in germany show their sheer scale of destruction caused by the flooding and mudslides. 0fficials scale of destruction caused by the flooding and mudslides. officials in the western german district says
8:26 pm
that 1300 people are unaccounted for. stay with us on bbc news. hello. wales, northern ireland and scotland recorded their highest temperatures of the year so far today, the hot spots in the upper 20s. a few places in england, perhaps wales, will reach the 30 celsius mark for the first time this season this weekend. not everywhere is going to have a very warm to hot weekend because there's a weak weather front close to northern scotland keeping things cooler here with cloud, wind and the chance of seeing a little light rain. that's the case overnight as cloud becomes more extensive across western scotland into northern ireland, a few patches in eastern england, temperatures in the mid to low teens. big picture for the weekend, the area of low pressure which has brought that horrific flooding, particularly to germany, moving southeastwards still with heavy downpours. but behind it, the high pressure
8:27 pm
giving us a mainly dry weekend will extend to areas that have been exceptionally wet and turn things drier. we are mainly dry, not everywhere. that weak weather front close to northern scotland on saturday with cloud, breeze and the chance of a little rain. southern and eastern scotland, very warm sunny spells, brightening up in northern ireland after a cloudy start, though some patches of low cloud lingering around some irish sea coasts. any early cloud in eastern england clearing away and temperatures nearing that 30 celsius mark in yorkshire, for example, during saturday afternoon. hot weekend for the grand prix at silverstone, very high track temperatures as well. if you're following the open golf in kent, that stiff northerly breeze will ease a touch. a few words of caution about what's coming this weekend. uv levels widely high to very high, burn quickly without protection, and no let—up for hay fever sufferers — high to very high pollen levels away from those cloudy parts of northern scotland. in fact, in scotland, cloud becomes more extensive as we go through saturday night and into sunday morning. so, there will be more cloud around here, some heavier bursts of rain possible in northern scotland
8:28 pm
for a time. cloudier in northern ireland, a bit more cloud in northern england, perhaps north wales. there will be some sunny spells here, too, but temperatures will be a touchdown on sunday compared with saturday here. the highest temperatures here on sunday will be across central and southern parts of england, south wales. again, a few spots are likely to reach that 30 celsius mark. those highest temperatures will begin to ease a little next week. it stays very warm, mind you, largely dry until later in the week, increasing chance of rain.
8:29 pm
8:30 pm
this is bbc world news, the headlines. flood secured over hundred 20 people in germany and belgium. emergency services are searching for hundred still missing. entire communities are in ruins. a german minister has described it as itasa it as a humanitarian catastrophe. the prime minister of belgium since the flooding could be the most catastrophic his country has ever seen with at least 20 people dead. a day of national mourning will behead on tuesday —— be held. the virus that swept the country was clearly planned and instigated. afghanistan leaders are expected to meet the tele— band in the coming days in an attempt to speed up the peace process. the us and nato forces allowed the taliban to make significant advances.
8:31 pm
newswatch is coming up at 8:a5 but first ros atkins explains how climate change is linked to the heatwaves in the us and canada. this is a story of two heat waves that have set record temperatures started wildfires and killed people. and to connect what we're doing with our planet and how we are tackling climate change. the science is absolutely clear. this is all part of the same story.— absolutely clear. this is all part of the same story. we're seeing the effects of climate _ of the same story. we're seeing the effects of climate change _ of the same story. we're seeing the effects of climate change in - effects of climate change in california and other parts of the country and the world as well but it is already happening. we cannot keep waiting to act. is already happening. we cannot keep waiting to act-— waiting to act. let's take the stage b stare. waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage- looking _ waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage. looking at _ waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage. looking at how- waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage. looking at how these - waiting to act. let's take the stage l by stage. looking at how these heat waves fit into a far bigger picture and we will start up close on the western side of north america. the first heat we've began in latejune. this portland in the us and this is
8:32 pm
british columbia and canada. the temperature records were being smashed, and the previous record was 44.4 celsius. now it is 49.6. that is now canada's highest of the temperature. moving into the us a look from this to this. it further southin look from this to this. it further south in portland, the order record was beaten by another big margin. and none of this is normal. this is how one canadian climatologist put it. nature is telling us that this is not normal too. on the pacific
8:33 pm
coast, over a billion marine creatures have been killed. this man runs an oyster business in canada. cooked the oysters, clams, mussels around here now are all gone. and you can see the sand dollars are all dead. �* ., ., ., ., ., , , dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. _ dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. this _ dead. and now one heatwave has been followed by another. this image - followed by another. this image shows the 10th ofjuly in the us, the red means hotter than average and this is death valley in california. he reached 54.4 celsius which confirms that will equal the highest temperature ever recorded anywhere and if that is the heat, what of its consequences is wildfires. a lot of them. back to the town, it was nearly wiped out by a fire and this is california, across western canada and the us, it's been over a thousand wildfires since april and many in the last two months. in the link to the heat is
8:34 pm
explicit. it months. in the link to the heat is exlicit. , ., months. in the link to the heat is exlicit. , . ., ., explicit. it is all related to extreme _ explicit. it is all related to extreme heat _ explicit. it is all related to extreme heat and - explicit. it is all related to extreme heat and with - explicit. it is all related to - extreme heat and with extreme explicit. it is all related to _ extreme heat and with extreme heat is that triggers a drought which will also experience in california, extreme drought and with that drought, the wildfires are also more severe. �* ., , drought, the wildfires are also more severe. ~ . , ., , severe. and if that is the fire was caused by — severe. and if that is the fire was caused by the — severe. and if that is the fire was caused by the heat, _ severe. and if that is the fire was caused by the heat, next - severe. and if that is the fire was caused by the heat, next trip - severe. and if that is the fire was caused by the heat, next trip to l caused by the heat, next trip to step back again and look at why these two heat waves have happened. the media has a key dome. o, these two heat waves have happened. the media has a key dome.— the media has a key dome. a vast storm of high _ the media has a key dome. a vast storm of high pressure _ the media has a key dome. a vast storm of high pressure above - the media has a key dome. a vast - storm of high pressure above western canada _ storm of high pressure above western canada and _ storm of high pressure above western canada and it's like a lid in the atmosphere trapping warm air and pushing _ atmosphere trapping warm air and pushing it — atmosphere trapping warm air and pushing it down to where it gets even _ pushing it down to where it gets even harder. the heat is held in place _ even harder. the heat is held in place in — even harder. the heat is held in place in the _ even harder. the heat is held in place in the path of the jet stream and so _ place in the path of the jet stream and so tim — place in the path of the jet stream and so tim just kept climbing. that and so tim “ust kept climbing. that is the and so tim just kept climbing. that is the double _ and so tim just kept climbing. trust is the double danger, high pressure they cannot move on. knapp is the double danger, high pressure they cannot move on. know whether s stems they cannot move on. know whether systems can — they cannot move on. know whether systems can move _ they cannot move on. know whether systems can move and _ they cannot move on. know whether systems can move and so _ they cannot move on. know whether systems can move and so we - they cannot move on. know whether systems can move and so we get - they cannot move on. know whether systems can move and so we get no| systems can move and so we get no relief at that. thunderstorms, showers, whisky pure blue skies and sunshine it is very dangerous. fires
8:35 pm
ha en sunshine it is very dangerous. fires happen because — sunshine it is very dangerous. fires happen because the _ sunshine it is very dangerous. fires happen because the temperatures have been because the heat domes happen. let's take another step back. how did he domes connect with climate change. —— heat. if did he domes connect with climate change. -- heat.— change. -- heat. if we are not warming _ change. -- heat. if we are not warming up — change. -- heat. if we are not warming up the _ change. -- heat. if we are not warming up the planet - change. -- heat. if we are not| warming up the planet through change. -- heat. if we are not - warming up the planet through carbon pollution, _ warming up the planet through carbon pollution, we would not see this more _ pollution, we would not see this more than — pollution, we would not see this more than 100,000 years but climate change _ more than 100,000 years but climate change has _ more than 100,000 years but climate change has made this a much more probable _ change has made this a much more probable event.— probable event. science is used to bein: probable event. science is used to being more _ probable event. science is used to being more reticent _ probable event. science is used to being more reticent about - probable event. science is used to being more reticent about making| probable event. science is used to i being more reticent about making an explicit link between a weather event and climate change. but increased computing powers means increased computing powers means increased confidence in the accuracy of climate mounted —— climate modelling. -- climate modelling. without emissions _ -- climate modelling. without emissions of _ -- climate modelling. without emissions of greenhouse i -- climate modelling. withoutl emissions of greenhouse gases -- climate modelling. without i emissions of greenhouse gases and you just don't see this sort of extraordinary temperatures that were sitting at the moment. this extraordinary temperatures that were sitting at the moment.— sitting at the moment. this climate modellin: sitting at the moment. this climate modelling is _ sitting at the moment. this climate modelling is providing _ sitting at the moment. this climate modelling is providing clarity i sitting at the moment. this climate modelling is providing clarity and i modelling is providing clarity and look at this from the doctor from the university of oxford.
8:36 pm
ifan if an event like this occurs, it occurs once in a million times. the equivalent of never, she says. linking from the forest of the temperatures to climate change, the final part of the equation is us and why we are the cause of this. humanity is waging war on nature. this is suicidal. nature always strikes back and it is already doing so with growing force in fury. he is riuht. so with growing force in fury. he is right- nature _ so with growing force in fury. he is right. nature is _ so with growing force in fury. he is right. nature is providing - so with growing force in fury. he is right. nature is providing a number of warnings. just look at the last few weeks. europe has recorded the second hottestjune, moscow with its highestjune temperature and will go to mexico, recorded its highest ever temperature injune. 0r to mexico, recorded its highest ever temperature injune. or you can look
8:37 pm
at new zealand, it is winter there and it too has recorded its hottest june. the list goes on and bob are going through all of this, pressure thinking, we know this, we know climate change is an issue, we know we need to act and we are acting. but there are two important things to note here, the first is that these heat waves in north america have scientists worried. most climate modelling anticipates gradual warming, climate modelling anticipates gradualwarming, but climate modelling anticipates gradual warming, but as we have seen, there is nothing gradual about this. the climatologist puts it like this. in other words, what is starting to happen with climate change may be worse than has been projected. and if that's the first point, the second is this. deciding to act is the same as taking the right action. let me show you what i mean. this
8:38 pm
has been full of board commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, this is the decade were we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences for the climate crisis. £31 will avoid the worst consequences for the climate crisis.— for the climate crisis. of that is the us, for the climate crisis. of that is the us. cure — for the climate crisis. of that is the us, cure is— for the climate crisis. of that is the us, cure is china, - for the climate crisis. of that is | the us, cure is china, promising for the climate crisis. of that is i the us, cure is china, promising to be carbon neutral by 2060 and this is borisjohnson. lode be carbon neutral by 2060 and this is boris johnson.— be carbon neutral by 2060 and this is boris johnson. we are halfway to net zero we — is boris johnson. we are halfway to net zero we have _ is boris johnson. we are halfway to net zero we have carbon _ is boris johnson. we are halfway to net zero we have carbon emissions| net zero we have carbon emissions lower— net zero we have carbon emissions lower than— net zero we have carbon emissions lower than any point since the 19th century. _ lower than any point since the 19th century. we — lower than any point since the 19th century, we are ending support for fossil— century, we are ending support for fossil fuels— century, we are ending support for fossil fuels overseas and doubling our international climate finance. the language is urgent, more urgent than ever. the policies to go further than before but there are concerns that all of this might not be enough. here is the senior claimant official on the uk plan to remove as much carbon is it puts into the atmosphere. something called net zero. we into the atmosphere. something called net zero.— called net zero. we look at the oli to called net zero. we look at the policy to deliver _ called net zero. we look at the policy to deliver it, _ called net zero. we look at the policy to deliver it, i'm - called net zero. we look at the policy to deliver it, i'm afraid l called net zero. we look at the i policy to deliver it, i'm afraid we are very—
8:39 pm
policy to deliver it, i'm afraid we are very off—track, substantially off-track, — are very off—track, substantially off—track, the policy commitments of the government has made will take us towards _ the government has made will take us towards that goal of net zero admissions.— and all of these commitments and questions feed into the preparations for the latest climate summit. it is happening in glasgow in november and it's another opportunity to set ambitious targets and look at the funding for technology in the policies needed to deliver them. while we build up to that, there is a profound tension in plain sight. a tension between the long—term global response and what is happening now. look at this graph. this shows
8:40 pm
global carbon emissions, they go up and up. the highest missions in history was 2019. admissions seven consequences now, which brings us right back to the heat waves in north america. and why they matter so much. because the individual experiences of those caught up in this make real the dangers of changing our climate. they make real why 26 is receiving so much attention and offer another reason whyjust attention and offer another reason why just a few attention and offer another reason whyjust a few months ago, david attenborough meet this demand of the worlds leaders. attenborough meet this demand of the worlds leaders-— worlds leaders. never before has been so important _ worlds leaders. never before has been so important that _ worlds leaders. never before has been so important that should i worlds leaders. never before hasj been so important that should be worlds leaders. never before has l been so important that should be a playing field, of debate where we can come to an agreement. because unless we all agree, we are lost.
8:41 pm
welcome to news watch. should thoughts you posted on nine years ago bar you from working for the bbc? admin bbcjournalists express their opinions on social media, does that damage public perceptions of bbc impartiality? social media activity in regard to journalist is at the heart of the week's dominant news story after the disappointment for england supporters of the teams defeat at the euro football finals and attention swiftly moved to the online races to abuse directed some of the black members of the team. after the dream, the abuse, a torrent of racial abuse against england black players on social media. emma wilkins at this
8:42 pm
reaction. the day on tuesday evening, bbc reported on the parliamentary debate of a proposed government cuts to its overseas aid budget. britain has long given humanitarian aid like this to the roads poorest people, but the government is cutting that aid in what was promised to be temporary has not become much longer term and all the prime minister says is to save money. he was watching that and had this to say.
8:43 pm
now, last friday, the financial times reported that the person who worked at the news website huffington post and the bbc was in line for a seniorjob bank the corporation overseeing its news channels. but formally theresa may's communications chief and i'll executive director had tried to block the move. sir robbie had texted the director of news to say that she cannot make this the belief that some politicians is that huffington post uk have
8:44 pm
left—wing or antigovernment sympathies in the affair prompted leader of the house to say... 0thers felt the bbc independence and impartiality were being damaged from the opposite direction. robbie gibb has not commented directly on the financial times story, but newspaper said that a source close to him said they denied the words attributed.
8:45 pm
if concerns about impartiality were prompted by the previousjobs held, there was another row over impartiality this week with social media at its heart. it emerged recently as reported on news watch that a journalist had posted offensive tweets about israel and hitler three years previous to her employment there. on wednesday, she put out a statement saying that she had been dismissed from herjob and objecting to the decision and offering a heartfelt apology for posting without thinking. news watch contacted her when she had this. in my early 20s, social media was the only way to vent my helplessness and
8:46 pm
angen only way to vent my helplessness and anger. living under

9 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on