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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 16, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching bbc news. the headlines at 2pm: more than 100 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades. many more are injured or missing. locals say they were caught off guard. nothing you can do. the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. more than three months�* worth of rain fell in 2a hours over parts of western germany, the netherlands and belgium. some local politicians are blaming climate change. after 500,000 people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app, businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers.
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the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication. the five main parties in northern ireland make clear their opposition to the uk government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles. the police and the cps are involved in a blame game over a drop in rape prosecutions, a new report finds. and four—time 0lympic medallist sir mo farah tells us he believes online racism against sportsmen and women is getting worse. he says social media companies must do more. the social media companies need to do a lot more. they have to be held accountable to what people get up to. even myself, i have had some shocking ones.
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hello, good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. more than 100 people are confirmed dead after some of the worst flooding in decades devastated parts of northern europe. many hundreds more are injured or unaccounted for across germany, belgium and the nertherlands. or unaccounted for across germany, the work of the emergency services is being severely restricted because of the difficult conditions. the german president has called for a more determined battle against climate change. anna holligan sent this report. an apocalyptic scene. lives, homes lost to the most devastating floods here in decades. hundreds are still missing and more rain is on the horizon. this is one german village, but the catastrophic images spanned three nations with banks
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on the river. across the border in belgium, it is impossible to capture the scale of the disaster, but this is an indication. a submerged town engulfed in flames. there are fears it is not over yet. translation: i have never seen anything like it. - it is scary. i came by at midday yesterday, you could still see the little barrier there. this morning you cannot see it. the waters are rising more and more. it is scary. many here are asking why events like this appear to be happening more frequently. the atmosphere can hold more moisture and as there is more moisture in the atmosphere, rainfall events can become more extreme, so we have seen before that extreme rainfall events can become more frequent because of climate change.
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here in the netherlands, this part of lindberg province is officially classified as a disaster zone. that means the government will offer financial support to those who have lost almost everything. here they are battling to salvage everything that has not been already lost. a water pipe has just burst and many of the locals were evacuated overnight. they have returned home with shovels and pipes to try to save their own homes. brigitte tried to build her own flood defences to protect her family. she told me how it felt to be inside as the water rose. fearful. yeah. i was afraid any water would come in more and there is nothing you can do. the sound of the water
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dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. ever. it is terrible. it is still too soon for many to comprehend the loss or calculate the cost. anna holligan, bbc news. 0ur correspondentjenny hill is in erftstadt near cologne, and says we are a long way from knowing the full picture of what has happened in germany. well over 90 people are now confirmed dead in these floods, but that number is expected to only rise as the day goes on, and that's because a lot of people are still missing. now, the authorities in western germany say they can't really tell us exactly how many people are unaccounted for. that's because mobile phone signal has gone down in many of the affected areas, so it may be that some people are trying to communicate with their loved ones but are unable to, or it may be that the worst has happened. i'm stood on the banks here of the river erft and you can probablyjust see how powerful this water still is. much of this area is under water.
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and just a little bit further behind me in part of the town here, here, terrible scenes unfolded overnight. a number of houses collapsed and rescue workers have been trying trying to get to other people trapped in their homes using boats because the area has been completely flooded. and earlier, the authorities actually said that they'd been receiving phone calls from people trapped in their houses but that rescue, in theirwords, in many cases, was simply impossible. if anyone here thought that today would bring a little bit of fresh hope, it has really been dashed. and actually overnight, a reservoir in another part of the region overflowed its dam. that caused more flooding, thousands of people evacuated from their homes. well over 165,000 households are without power now. germany is reeling from these floods. they have devastated notjust this region, but the rest of the country and people here right now are having to wait and hope for news of their loved ones.
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jenny hill near:. —— cologne. let's cross live to valkenberg in the netherlands — which has also been badly affected by the record rainfall — and speak to the bbc�*s anna holligan. this area very badly affected by rainfall, bring is up—to—date on what is happening there. rainfall, bring is up-to-date on what is happening there. things are movin: what is happening there. things are moving very — what is happening there. things are moving very quickly. _ what is happening there. things are moving very quickly, it _ what is happening there. things are moving very quickly, it is _ what is happening there. things are moving very quickly, it is a - what is happening there. things are moving very quickly, it is a very - moving very quickly, it is a very precarious rescue effort. he has just managed to stop another water pipe from bursting. at the moment, the emergency services are trying to restore power and secure these pavements because if you have a look at these paving stones, this gives you an idea of the power of the flood water. they have never seen anything like this. any dutch by minister is due to visit any region later —— the dutch prime minister.
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backin later —— the dutch prime minister. back in the early 1990s, there were two major floods here and they spent more than a 2 billion euros, the dutch government, are now trying to improve the flood plains, they were not expecting anything like this. all of these people here when evacuated and are now back in position. this is amber's house, this is amber's mumbles that she had said we can show you what it is like inside. they are trying to sweep and suck and pump the water out. and this is happening right across that this is happening right across that this area and beyond. experts have said the amount of rainfall the experience here over the past few days, so 20 centimetres, is a once in 1000 year occurrence and it should act as a wake—up call. here any limber region, but we have seen
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scenes like these in three countries —— here in the limberg region. we have seen it valkenburg here, in germany and in belgium. there have been some really heart—warming moments i among this devastation does have the children have been coming out with their parents, handing out cakes to emergency workers and i was speaking to one woman earlier her said, actually we count ourselves lucky because we still have our homes. and we are still have our homes. and we are still alive. and when you look at that any context of what is happening in those neighbouring countries, you can understand why there is such a sense of relief here. , , , ., ., there is such a sense of relief here. , , ., ., here. just listening to what you were saying — here. just listening to what you were saying about _ here. just listening to what you were saying about people - here. just listening to what you | were saying about people being here. just listening to what you - were saying about people being told this was a once in 1000 years event, i saw a comment from someone in one part of germany affected by the flooding saying they have been told backin flooding saying they have been told back in 2005 when there were other floods that that was a once in a century event. and in 16 years later, these devastating floods
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happen. when you hear that sort of thing being said, it must leave people feeling very, very unsettled and asking lots of questions about how they are going to be protected in the future?— in the future? exactly. they are. the are in the future? exactly. they are. they are so _ in the future? exactly. they are. they are so worried _ in the future? exactly. they are. they are so worried about - in the future? exactly. they are. they are so worried about the i in the future? exactly. they are. i they are so worried about the flood defences. up here, people have been building their own flood defences. 0vernight, they were battling to get any sandbags in position. they have been filling shopping bags with sand to try to protect their homes. but all of that was it, of course, futile and now this area is considered to be a disaster zone. it was classified as such by the dutch prime minister last night. what it means is that these people, their insurance companies are probably will not be afford to cover the extent of this damage so the government will support people in rebuilding their homes. butjust have a look at this. this is what
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has been pumped out of basements and kitchens. it isjust has been pumped out of basements and kitchens. it is just one street. it is just... kitchens. it is just one street. it isjust... i mean, it is difficult to put this into context of what is happening elsewhere as well because we have seen in germany now hundreds are still missing, the death toll is climbing every day and they are still trying to put this one time back together, but it is much worse than this in many other places so they are rebuilding, but they're also very grateful for what they have left. �* , , , also very grateful for what they have left. , , , ., also very grateful for what they have left. �* , , , ., ., also very grateful for what they have left. , , , ._, ., have left. best wishes to all of the eo - le have left. best wishes to all of the people there- _ have left. best wishes to all of the people there. you _ have left. best wishes to all of the people there. you are _ have left. best wishes to all of the people there. you are in _ have left. best wishes to all of the i people there. you are in valkenburg in the netherlands. estimated coronavirus infections
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rose by 63% in the uk in the week ending 10 july. estimates from the 0ns suggest that just over 650,000 people in the uk would have tested positive for coronavirus last week — around one in 100 people. meanwhile, the coronavirus reproduction number, or r value, in england remains unchanged from last week and is between 1.2 and 1.4 — meaning the epidemic is continuing to grow. an r number between 1.2 and 1.4 means that, on average, every 10 people infected will infect between 12 and 1a other people an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly, because so many staff are being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. more than half a million people were sent an alert last week across england and wales. the rmt union has warned of another surge next week because of confusion about mask wearing on public transport. and meat processing plants have said that they've had to cut production because of staffing issues. downing street has said that the nhs contact tracing app remains "one of the best tools we have" to tackle coronavirus and would be drawn on whether any possible exemptions might be introduced for specific industries. ben king reports.
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pinging as covid cases rise, the app designed to protect us as telling hundreds of thousands to stay home. so many, in fact, some businesses are struggling to stay open. if i get pinged the main problem is the business has to close so far me it is all about safety so i will probably wear a face mask, i still have my screen up in the shop. pinging is such a problem because it shuts everything down, especially at schools, and my customers with their children they have to isolate them for ten days and it is so disruptive to everybody. the number of app users warned they have been close to an infected person passed close to half a million last week in england and wales, an increase of 46% on the previous week.
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at the moment anyone pinged is advised to stay home but from the 16th of august people who are fully vaccinated will not have to. big businesses are also starting to feel the impact of self—isolating staff. car—makers nissan and rolls—royce warned it might hit production and the association of meat processors says its members are close to having to close some production lines down. most of them having between 5% and 10% being pinged and self isolating at home and this is causing quite a few shortages for the industry and quite a few problems for the industry which is already understaffed. and health care providers are warning that staff shortages might hurt their ability to deliver care. in the nhs it's a very significant issue. we are now at the point where we have got so many nhs staff off because of the app pinging that it is beginning to affect patient care. other businesses such as nightclubs are getting ready to open for the first time in a year as most
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coronavirus restrictions are lifted on monday, and crowds are preparing to gather at big sporting events, which could all mean even more pinging. the developers have been asked to adjust the sensitivity but the government says it is doing itsjob. reducing the spread of covid. we are in the middle of a pandemic and we know the virus spreads and it spreads without showing any symptoms and so the app is one of a number of ways in which we are trying to tackle the virus. the key to the fight against covid is still the vaccine and the weekend sees the second "grab ajab" campaign where any adult can get their first vaccination without an appointment at large pop pop—up clinics around the country. lilian edwards is professor of law innnovation and society at the university of newcastle. she was an adviser when the nhs contact tracing app was orginally created. shejoins me now. thank you very much for your time
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this afternoon, professor edwards. ping, pinging, they have entered the vernacular as never before. the ping, pinging, they have entered the vernacular as never before.— vernacular as never before. the real enemy here — vernacular as never before. the real enemy here is _ vernacular as never before. the real enemy here is that _ vernacular as never before. the real enemy here is that the _ vernacular as never before. the real enemy here is that the virus, - vernacular as never before. the real enemy here is that the virus, not i enemy here is that the virus, not the app. we know it is just the canary in the coal mine, right? sol find it very strange this discussion desensitising the app because all you're doing is turning down the volume on your radio. it is not that the original problem is going away, it isjust you the original problem is going away, it is just you cannot heat it has much any more. so the issue, really, is what we should do when we receive pings. as has been the case throughout the pandemic, a lot of people have chosen not to self—isolate when they did get pings, so this is not an on slash of thing. and people are not as whereas they should be that not being advised from the app to self—isolate
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is not a crime, it is not illegal under criminal law, when i was doing that in england, and scotland in relation to a —— in relation to a manual contactor is. relation to a -- in relation to a manual contactor is.— manual contactor is. you have erned manual contactor is. you have likened the — manual contactor is. you have likened the suggestion - manual contactor is. you have likened the suggestion that i manual contactor is. you have l likened the suggestion that the manual contactor is. you have i likened the suggestion that the app should be made less sensitive as taking a battery out of a small climb. if we do not want to make it less sensitive, can we make it more intelligent, more adaptable? that would be the _ intelligent, more adaptable? trust would be the dream, wouldn't it? there are ways of doing that. you could ask people to voluntarily put in at the information that they had been fully vaccinated into the app and that could be encrypted and used in any risk scoring as to whether you get pinged, but obviously there are issues with that that will people lie? 0r are issues with that that will people lie? or you could go for the kind of fill gold standard solution which would be to recode the app and in some way connected to the database we have within the nhs of who has been vaccinated and who has
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been fully vaccinated. that is probably a biggerjob. been fully vaccinated. that is probablya biggerjob. i been fully vaccinated. that is probably a biggerjob. i am been fully vaccinated. that is probably a biggerjob. iam not been fully vaccinated. that is probably a biggerjob. i am not a technical expert on this, but that is certainly a job of weeks, if not months, ratherthan is certainly a job of weeks, if not months, rather than days. that may be one of the reasons why the department of health has so far seemed not to have gone down that route, as far as we know. perhaps they think the issue will be passed over by the time they have got it done. i do not know. bud over by the time they have got it done. i do not know.— over by the time they have got it done. i do not know. and of course, when that there _ done. i do not know. and of course, when that there is _ done. i do not know. and of course, when that there is app _ done. i do not know. and of course, when that there is app first - done. i do not know. and of course, when that there is app first began, i when that there is app first began, we still had rules of six, didn't we? and we had to meet your social distancing, people were not gathering together in large crowd as we have seen at sporting events recently, for example, just to pick one example. what are your concerns now as we move towards monday, masks are being removed, if people want to remove them, lots of people will not be doing that. the rules on social distancing goal. are you concerned that more and more people are simply
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going to turn this delete it or make their own decisions about what to do if they are pinged? yes. their own decisions about what to do if they are pinged?— if they are pinged? yes, i am concerned. — if they are pinged? yes, i am concerned, as _ if they are pinged? yes, i am concerned, as a _ if they are pinged? yes, i am concerned, as a lot _ if they are pinged? yes, i am concerned, as a lot of - if they are pinged? yes, i am i concerned, as a lot of reasonable people are. as i keep saying, i'm not in academia lodges, i am just a layperson —— and epidemiologist. 0ne layperson —— and epidemiologist. one thing that has not been much discussed is one of the big incentives, with young people, to keep the app on their phone and running has been that it was integrated with the qr code for venue checking to get into bars and restaurants and i was anecdotally told, i live in scotland where it is different, that this was one of the main incentives for using the apps. that is also going or has gone and will no longer be required to use the uk app for checking. so the combo of that, yes, i think we will see more people deleting it, more people turning up —— turning off bluetooth, which is easier than deleting it, and more people simply disobeying it. and maybe disobeying it is the right choice if you are
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assured of your risk assessment, but how are you sure of your risk assessment? even if your double vaccinated, we know that depending on which study a look at for which faxing, 60 — 80% of people may still get reinfected —— each vaccine. are you going to assess on the basis of where you are, for example? are you near vulnerable people? in your previous package, ifelt quite wedded to hear people saying, well, the nhs is losing too many people to do so maybe it is a place we should ignore the app —— quite worried. if you are on the nhs you're probably coming into contact with vulnerable people and may be yourself, but at risk of transmitting it. this is what the app was designed to deal with. g , , . ~ what the app was designed to deal with. g , ,.~ ., what the app was designed to deal with. , , ., what the app was designed to deal with. , ., with. just picking on something you alluded to a — with. just picking on something you alluded to a moment _ with. just picking on something you alluded to a moment ago, - with. just picking on something you alluded to a moment ago, do i with. just picking on something you alluded to a moment ago, do you i alluded to a moment ago, do you think there is enough of political will behind this technology to make
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it really function as it is supposed to? ., ., �* 4' it really function as it is supposed to? ., ., �* ~ it really function as it is supposed to? ., ., �* ,, ., ., to? no, i don't think so, not now. as i to? no, i don't think so, not now. as i say. — to? no, i don't think so, not now. as i say. when — to? no, i don't think so, not now. as i say, when we _ to? no, i don't think so, not now. as i say, when we coded - to? no, i don't think so, not now. as i say, when we coded this i to? no, i don't think so, not now. | as i say, when we coded this thing over a year ago, you had a situation of high infection, but low testing. 0ne of high infection, but low testing. one of the issues was how did you get to people who had not been tested. now we have high testing, high infection and high vaccination, a scenario we never dreamt of a year ago. this in that circumstance a very high infection, it is very likely that even if people did obey the app, and at the pings, and to itself isolate and go for test, that test and trace itself following up on that would not be able to cope. in that sense can i keep saying we're right back at march 2020 when it was decided that testing and tracing was helpless because we had such a high rate of infection. and i wonder if we are kind of back there. if we arejust wonder if we are kind of back there. if we are just putting all their eggs into the vaccination basket. it is hard to tell.—
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is hard to tell. professor edwards, really interesting _ is hard to tell. professor edwards, really interesting to _ is hard to tell. professor edwards, really interesting to hear- is hard to tell. professor edwards, really interesting to hear from i is hard to tell. professor edwards, really interesting to hear from you today. professor lilian edwards, professor of innovation, law and society at the university of newcastle. younger adults admitted to hospital with coronavirus are nearly as likely to suffer from complications as people over the age of 50, according to a new study of 70,000 covid patients. four in 10 patients aged between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while being treated. 0ur health correspondent jim reed reports. i'm in icu. my lungs collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on. paul was 31—years—old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things,
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you don't know how to really deal with it but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how. well, before the pandemic, paul was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face that they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could. paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury, followed by lung and heart damage.
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while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger. this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are seeing one in three of even the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications. some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage, but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid has lasted over a year. has lasted over a year — a reminder that 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting
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to learn about this virus and its long—term impact on our health. jim reed, bbc news. drjamie strachan is a consultant anaesthetist and council member at the royal college of anaesthetists. thank you very much, dr strachan, for your time on bbc news this afternoon. does this study back up what you have been saying over the last 18 months, namely patients with severe covid having a high probability of a developing one or more complications?— more complications? absolutely ri . ht. more complications? absolutely right- thank _ more complications? absolutely right. thank you _ more complications? absolutely right. thank you for _ more complications? absolutely right. thank you for having i more complications? absolutely right. thank you for having me. | more complications? absolutely i right. thank you for having me. the patients i have treated with covid as anaesthetist consultant in intensive care have been really sick and sadly many of them have died, but in those who has survived, we are seeing in hospital them developing complications and as the report said, be that with their kidneys, heart or lungs, and it is notjust kidneys, heart or lungs, and it is not just affecting kidneys, heart or lungs, and it is notjust affecting people with coexisting conditions are more elderly, but young people as well. is it too early to say how long
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lasting some of these complications might be? lasting some of these complications miaht be? ., , ~ lasting some of these complications miuht be? . , . ~ ., might be? that is right. we know from people _ might be? that is right. we know from people that _ might be? that is right. we know from people that develop - might be? that is right. we know from people that develop these l from people that develop these convocations in hospital from from people that develop these convocations in hospitalfrom other conditions that some of them will have —— these conditions in hospital. for example if you had an injury to your kidney, you may have follow—up treatment with a specialist in kidneys or even dialysis. it is too early to say what effect covered might have there and the study looked at the first 20 days after patients come into hospital —— what effect covid might happen. the specials are following that up, but we are still really glad to have this data which shows a significant burden of illness that these patients are carrying. i was what we are _ these patients are carrying. i was what we are talking _ these patients are carrying. i was what we are talking about - these patients are carrying. i was what we are talking about here are different from among covid, just to be absolutely clear about that? it is different from long covid. it is not the covid lung problem lasting for months with breathlessness and fatigue that has been termed a long
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covid or post covid syndrome, this is in hospital developing medical complications of disease scratch make the disease covid, so it is different from that. and the length of time these complications lasses not clear from the study, but it is certainly very serious and these are things that are going to have a big impact on young people returning to work and their normal lives after having been hospitalised with covid because of the severity of the complications they are facing. serra; complications they are facing. sorry to interrupt — complications they are facing. sorry to interrupt as _ complications they are facing. sorry to interrupt as we _ complications they are facing. sorry to interrupt as we heard _ complications they are facing. sorry to interrupt as we heard in - complications they are facing. sorry to interrupt as we heard in the introduction, younger adults nearly as likely to develop these convocations as older adults, so what would you say, and there is another big dry this weekend to get people to have their vaccinations, what would you say to younger people who have not been vaccinated yet who may think that they are not at any particular risk from this virus? i would say that this study shows that
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they remain at significant risk of getting long—term or serious complications and that vaccination is a safe and effective way to avoid getting serious coronavirus and by that i mean ending up in hospital with covid, which is what this study looked at. get your vaccine and protect yourself from potentially the serious convocations. we know very clearly. _ the serious convocations. we know very clearly. we — the serious convocations. we know very clearly, we have _ the serious convocations. we know very clearly, we have heard - the serious convocations. we know very clearly, we have heard from . very clearly, we have heard from many, many doctors over the last few weeks about the continued pressure on the nhs dealing with covid, of course, dealing with non—covid katia's, the backlog from the pandemic. with staff having to self—isolate and isolate because of the test and trace app. what are your worries about monday, politicians describing it as freedom day, not everyone saying it has that way, what are your worries about the removal of final restrictions in england? i removal of final restrictions in en . land? �* ., removal of final restrictions in encland? �* ., ., , removal of final restrictions in encland? �* ., .,
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england? i live in britain and is a ersonal england? i live in britain and is a personal view. — england? i live in britain and is a personalview, i— england? i live in britain and is a personal view, i would _ england? i live in britain and is a personalview, i would really- england? i live in britain and is a personal view, i would really like personal view, iwould really like to return to normality. but we must be cautious and follow signs and the evidence also at the royal college of anaesthetists, we recommend people continue to wear facemasks in crowded places, indoors, and transport, and we havejust crowded places, indoors, and transport, and we have just got to take this a bit slowly. we're nearly there and we do not want to get to there and we do not want to get to the final hurdle and to go wrong and have another surge and another pressure on intensive care order in hospitals because that will impact the rest of the ability of the hospital to deal with all of the problems we now have. 5.3 million people on waiting lists, and that will go up if our hospitals once again become unable to cope. and that really does not take very much. we just urge caution and to move slowly. but personal responsibility, we fully agree with. it is really the way forward that we just need to think about ourselves and others and taking as much care as we can. dr
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jamie strachan, thank you very much. dr strachan there from the royal couege dr strachan there from the royal college of anaesthetists. an update for you from police on that accident, that fatal collision on the a1 at bowburn yesterday evening. the police confirming that three people have sadly died. that crash involved four cars, two lorries and one caught fire as a result of the collision. three people died at the scene, a man who was driving it thai water and a man and women who were in another car, a vauxhall car —— toyota. formal identification is expected to take some time. several other people were injured, to requiring hospital treatment. andy 41—year—old man, the driver of one of the lorries, has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving —— and the 41—year—old man. three people have died as a result of that very bad traffic accident on the a1
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m at bowburn evening. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. with high pressure close by, a very hot. cloud, wind, the chance of seeing a little light rain and drizzle. that is the case into north—western scotland. the rest of the day, elsewhere, patchy cloud. a very warm and sunny spells. 13 degrees in merit, 20s in aberdeenshire. 0therwise low and mid 20s. the cloud more extensive tonight and pushing into northern ireland. a few mist and fog patches elsewhere. temperature is mostly getting down towards the mid—teens. we will start saturday with plenty of sunshine around with the exception of northern ireland. the sun will break through and in western scotland. to the whole, and in western scotland in particular, it will stay cloudy, drizzly and there will be wind. eastern scotland
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is in the sunny spells. misty and low cloud around irish sea coast, england and wales having plenty of sunshine, near13 england and wales having plenty of sunshine, near 13 parts of northern england. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: more than 100 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing. after 500,000 people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app, businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland set out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles.
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police and prosecutors are being told to stop blaming each other for the low number of rape convictions in england and wales. sport now and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. we start with golf, because the second round of the open championship is well under way at royal st george's in kent. with its huge bunkers and treacherous rough, the course is one of the toughest tests in golf. but a few of the world's best have been making their way up the leaderboard. well, let's go live to the course and speak to our reporter ben croucher. and speak to our reporter what's and speak to our reporter been happening so far? ' mentioned what's been happening so far? yfri. mentioned how difficult the course is. some of the best in the world have been making it look very easy so far today. the morning was probably the best of the conditions, not quite as sunny as right now and the american debutant is making the
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best of it. he won the us pga championship last year and sits on nine under par with four birdies. slipped back and had a pat lipped out on the hall on the 18th. nine under and he will be very content with that for the weekend. there is a group on six under par including the south african daniel, louis 0osthuizen tees off in half an hour, overnight leader on six under par. tommy fleetwood has not been able to climb the leaderboard today on three under and rory mcilroy was on one under and rory mcilroy was on one under par but as you join me, he has made a bogey on the 16th and is back to level par. that should be enough to level par. that should be enough to make the weekend but sadly it doesn't look like he's going to be in contention for the victory. in the next couple of minutes we are
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expecting brighton, the american, to pass behind us as the afternoon guys tee off. conditions make it tricky for them because the sun will make the ground very hard and golfers don't really like that. than the ground very hard and golfers don't really like that. an exciting afternoon to _ don't really like that. an exciting afternoon to come. _ don't really like that. an exciting afternoon to come. thank i don't really like that. an exciting afternoon to come. thank you, l don't really like that. an exciting i afternoon to come. thank you, ben. lewis hamilton, says winning an eighth formula 1 world drivers' title will be a tall order this year. the mercedes driver, is 32 points behind, max verstappen of red bull, before this weekend's british grand prix. the first practice at silverstone is just getting under way now. then there's qualifying this evening, before the new sprint race to decide the grid tomorrow, and hamilton is hoping the home crowd of more than 140,000 will make a difference for him. the roar of the crowd here is unlike anywhere else. considering we've had a drought in terms of fans not
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being at the races in the past year, the energy has definitely been very much missed. and, yeah. you arrive with this kind of excitement but also this kind of nervousness also because you want to deliver for everyone and you want everyone to have the best weekend. elswhere, england's lewis ludlow has been banned for four matches for kneeing an opponent in the head during the side's win over canada at the weekend. gloucester�*s ludlow had been captaining england on what was just his second appearance, but he'll now miss club games against ealing, hartpury and northampton. the ban was reduced to four games from six because of his admission of guilt. england's cricketers are back in action tonight at trent bridge, with the first of three t20 internationals against pakistan. nine of the players who were recently forced to self—isolate have been named in the squad. eoin morgan will return as captain and, after an unpredictable few weeks, he says the series is a good chance to improve their
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strength in depth. probably not knowing what is ahead of ourselves, we need to... ..sort of look more to a little bit more strength and depth, so probably... the opportunities within our squad at the moment, we will see over the next three games, and going through various different options for possible injury replacements for certain players within the group, we will see as well. well, there's more on all of those stories on the bbc sport website. including live text commentary of stage 19 of the tour de france. mark cavendish going for a record—breaking 35th stage win. but that's all your sport for now. politicians in northern ireland have met the secretary of state brandon lewis to discuss their opposition to the government's plans for dealing with legacy issues.
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proposals to end all prosecutions related to the troubles were widely criticised when they were unveiled earlier this week. danjohnson is at stormont for us. we heard there were frank and robust exchanges this morning. resolving of theissues exchanges this morning. resolving of the issues stemming from northern ireland's troubles was never going to be simple and finding a solution that pleased everyone was perhaps going to be impossible but what the british government has achieved its unanimous opposition to the plans that it has laid out across the political spectrum, across all the groups that represent victims and the irish government as well because there are so many families with so many questions, what happened to their loved one? who planted that bomb? you organise that kidnapping? who carried out that shooting? and what about the soldiers and security services, today always act within the law? those are the sorts of questions that remain for thousands of victims, thousands of people who were injured, notjust in northern ireland. the british government was
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to put an end to all prosecutions, the investigations, the inquests the civil cases, right across the board. in effect, an amnesty as some have described it and that is what has enraged people here because they see it as undermining the rule of law. the secretary of state believes that that will bring people closer to the truth and reconciliation through ending prosecutions but in place putting an information sharing and fact—finding operation but this morning's meeting was responded to by the sinn fein leader mary lou mcdonald saying the british government was acting in total bad faith. the ulster in this leader said victims' families and survivors were being failed. the assembly is being recalled here next week so politicians here can discuss these proposals. the way ahead looks very tricky. police and prosecutors are being told to stop blaming each other for the low number of rape convictions in england and wales. only 3% of recorded rapes resulted in a prosecution in the year 2019—20. a report by two watchdogs is demanding an urgent and fundamental shift in the way
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the crime is investigated and dealt with. wendy williams, her majesty's inspector of constabulary, who worked on the report, has said that the police and prosecutors need change in how they work together to prosecute rape cases in england and wales. we talk about a vicious cycle where everyone has concerns about the low numbers of prosecutions, but that concern can lead to a much more cautious approach to rape cases than other cases, which can result in considerable delays and in victims feeling that the focus is principally on them and their credibility, rather than on the suspect and building strong cases. as a result of those delays and that perception, that can lead to victims withdrawing their support for cases, which in turn contributes
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to low prosecutions, so we've highlighted that vicious cycle and we have said that the cycle must be broken. our home affairs correspondent june kelly told us more. last month the government produced its rape review and one of the key recommendations in that was that police and prosecutors needed to work more closely together. this report today says that there is this blame culture going on. they're pointing the finger at each other and it says that while you have that mindset, you're never going to get any progress on the stats and getting more cases to court because the government is committed to actually getting the prosecution rate back to where it was five years ago. now, the people at the top of the police and the crown prosecution service are saying that they have started working more closely together and, in fact, today they announced even greater collaboration and the watchdogs say, well, that is fine, but where it really matters is what is happening on the ground and that collaboration has
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to filter right down. one example, they say the communication between the two organisations often is done by e—mail. they're saying to them, get on the phone and speak to each other because these cases need to be discussed. it shouldn't all be done by e—mail. if you think that there were 50,000 rape complaints made in england and wales, the latest stats show, that is 50,000 people and the watchdogs are saying today, those people deserve to have their cases properly assessed. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says he'll "sweat blood over months and years to earn respect" from voters. speaking to the bbc after taking questions from former labour voters in blackpool, he admitted, "there is a trust issue" with his party. 0ur political editor, laura kuenssberg, was there. not much holiday for the labour leader. he's planning a summer of hard graft and hearing some hard truths. hello, nice to see you. i'm keir. after nearly a year and a half
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in charge and labour behind in the polls, he's on the road to try to win back respect for his party from the public. the grandest venue first, we gather together a panel of independently selected voters who used to back labour in blackpool�*s tower ballroom to hear him out. pleased to meet you. i don't recall i've seen you before. so you're not out there, are you? at the minute, anyway. i wouldn't know who you were. 0k, thank you, well, we can fix that. no disrespect or anything. it's very nice to see you. can i call you sir keir? 0r keir? first thing is, your party is divided within itself. i get rid of all these bickering people who are losers. i they want to lose further. by doing what they're doing. if someone's in my shadow cabinet, or on my front bench, i can do something about it, because i can fire them. if they're on the back bench, they have more freedom to say what they want.
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but i get the point you're making. it doesn't really matter to anybody else, you want to hear one voice. i honestly believe for the labour party, it's the stigma ofjeremy corbyn. 18 months on, it's still there. people think he's toxic. trust is invaluable. if you lose trust in something i or somebody, an organisation, to get that trust back is so difficult. - you're on kind of a death spiral. we lost really badly in 2019. we lost 60 seats in a row, and we've got a lot of work to do to rebuild. and we've got to change. we can't lose that badly and say we'll keep things pretty well as they were, which is what we're doing. i would love to believe you, but i don't know yet whether i can believe you. so i'd have to take a risk, wouldn't i? that's what i'd have to do. i'd have to take a risk. and i'm up for taking a risk because i want to be labour. in my heart, i want to be labour.
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it was far from an easy ride, so did keir starmer take it on the chin? trust, and that trust has to be earned. what i heard tonight was people... they weren't saying, "i will never trust you." what i heard them saying is, "i have lost trust in labour, but i might — i might — have trust in the future, but it's down to you to earn it." and that i will do, sweating blood over the next days, weeks, months and years, until the next general election. no pressure. it's exactly what i expected. this was always going to be a tough gig. but, actually, i'd much rather have the robust discussion i had tonight than the warm bath of simply talking to people who already agree with me. the more important view, the voters that he was trying to persuade. he's got a massive, massive job to do to get people
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to vote labour again. i was accusing him, in my mind, of not having any personality i or much charisma and he did have both of those things, _ which was impressive, i so i'm warmed and hopeful. keir starmer knows the road could be slow, hard and long. but labour wants this summer to be an important step. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, blackpool. and for more from those voters, and laura kuenssberg's interview with sir keir starmer go to the bbc news website or download the latest episode of newscast. it's available on on bbc sounds and is on the bbc news channel tonight at 9:30. the headlines on bbc news: more than 100 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing. after 500,000 people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app — businesses are warning it's becoming
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impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication. more than 100 people are now known to have died in a week of violence in south africa following the imprisonment of the former president, jacob zuma. after visiting the province of kwazulu—natal — one of the worst—hit by the violence — the current south african president, cyril ramaphosa, has described the unrest in the country as an assault on democracy. we obviously, as a government, are extremely concerned about what happened here. and we are doing everything to deal with it and it's quite clear that all these incidents of unrest were instigated and we
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are going after those people, we are going after them, we have identified a good number of them and we will not allow anarchy and mayhem to just unfold in our country. the situation in kwazulu—natal province has been especially volatile, but residents are hoping the violence is now over. the bbc�*s vumani mkhize has more from durban. a sense of normality is returning to south africa again after days of violence and looting. here in durban where i am, i have witnessed thousands of people queueing up for basic food and that's because shops, malls and warehouses have been looted and gutted. what is encouraging is that trucks from johannesburg are now coming through the n3 route to come and provide some form of relief for durban residents who have been struggling to get access to food.
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we do know that fuel trucks, food as well as medicine, are making their way to durban to try and provide some form of relief and also, 25,000 troops are set to be deployed in durban to provide law and orderfor wary south african citizens who have witnessed their businesses and their homes being destroyed and invaded. so south africans at the moment are quite optimistic that the military is going to provide law and order, working with the police. it's a big weekend for fans of formula one — with a capacity crowd of 140,000 due at silverstone on sunday for the british grand prix. as the cars race around the circuit they'll be burning fossil fuels, but the managing director of f1 says that could change. ross brawn has told the bbc that hydrogen—powered cars could be the long—term future for the sport. 0ur chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, has been looking at the efforts the sport is making
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to reduce its environmental impact. the roar of the engines and the smell of the exhaust are what formula one is all about for many fans. so how does a sport born out of the awesome explosive power of fossil fuels go green? that is the challenge ross brawn has taken on. the engineer behind michael schumacher�*s seven world titles says he is determined to put sustainability at the heart of f1. but electric engines are a nonstarter, he told me. there is no electric solution today. we don't want them looking at power conservation modes and trying to make the battery last long enough to get to the end of the race or saving the battery up so in the last five laps they can really go. that doesn't seem to engage the fans. your instinct, it sounds to me, is possibly hydrogen is maybe the solution you are set on? maybe hydrogen is the root formula one could have, we keep the noise, we keep the emotion.
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but we move into a different solution. silverstone, on the day of the season's most i exciting grad prix — i the british grand prix. the cars have come a long way since jackie stewart won the british grand prix in 1969. but for the moment, f1's focus remains on engineering even more efficient hybrid engines and developing biofuels and synthetic e—fuels that will reduce the sport's impact on the environment. in its effort to go net zero by 2030, formula 1 is also reducing the volumes of personnel and freight that travel between races, ensuring all offices, facilities and factories are powered by renewable energy, and using offsets and c02 sequestration to cover all remaining emissions. the recognition that environment is a key issue for the sport runs deep, including with the people
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on the front line of formula one — its drivers. british driver lando norris is a rising star of f1. it's definitely something that over the coming years, i will pay more and more attention to, realising the opportunity you can create for the world and the impact you can have on the world as well, notjust certain people. so of course it means a lot to me and whatever way i can help, in whatever way, then i will try and do that. formula 1 represents the pinnacle of automotive technology but the car industry is going electric and f1 knows it could end up looking like a legacy of a past age. other sports should take note — formula one is going green because it doesn't want to end up a dinosaur. justin rowlatt, bbc news.
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sir mo farah says he believes online racist abuse towards black sportsmen and women is getting worse. he's called for social media companies to take more action, following the racist attacks on england's footballers, after their defeat in the euros final. the four—time olympic champion has been speaking to victoria derbyshire. sir mo farah has won multiple medals in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and now he wants to give his support to england's footballers, who were racially abused. it was really important for myself to show support throughout the world for black people. do you think that the abuse that some black sportsmen and women receive is actually getting worse? it seems like it's getting worse, in my honest opinion, because back in the days — or back in my time,
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should i say — there was never so much social media. what kind of racist messages have you had on social media? i've had some shocking ones. i've had some that say, "you don't belong here." i've had quite a bit. how does that make you feel? to me, this is my home. i've always thought that. the social media companies need to do a lot more, they have to be accountable to what people get up to. have sent the message, i've gone delete, i've blocked, i've reported, gone back to the report, nothing happens. farah, who's now 38, wanted tokyo to be his last 0lympics, but he didn't make the qualifying time for the 10,000 metres. he exclusively revealed that he is battling an injury. i've got a stress fracture on my foot, i've been struggling for quite a while.
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it is disappointing. what is the race that you are imagining will be the end of your career? i think it will be like a marathon, half—marathon. i'd love to be able to show one more track event. so another 10,000 metres? somewhere. so the world championships? i don't know, victoria! in 2017, you ran at the world championships, the 10,000 metres, in 26 minutes 49 seconds. the other week in manchester, you did it in 27 minutes, 47 seconds. that's a minute slower. yeah. in order for me to compete with the best, then i have to run in that time or even faster. the four—time olympic champion says he still has the desire to run and insists this isn't the end of his career. victoria derbyshire, bbc news.
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the eiffel tower has reopened. the paris icon closed in october last year due to the covid crisis. this latest closure was the longest since world war two. visitor numbers will be limited to 10,000 a day to meet social distancing requirements — fewer than half of their pre—covid levels. what will the weekend's weather bring? nick miller has more. hello. much of the uk is set for a fine, dry, very warm to hot weekend. yesterday northern ireland had its warmest day of the year so far. this weekend a few spots in england and perhaps wales reaching 30 degrees for the first time this season. and plenty of warm, sunny spells out there today, just some patchy cloud here and there. yet again, though, thicker cloud in northwest scotland and you could encounter some light rain and drizzle. a brisk southwesterly wind as well. just 15 degrees in lerwick, whereas in aberdeenshire reaching up into the upper 20s and elsewhere
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widely low to mid—20s, just a touch cooler around the coast. the cloud in scotland more extensive, especially across western parts overnight, pushing into northern ireland, a few patches of mist and fog elsewhere and temperatures dipping down into the mid teens. we will take a look at the big picture for the weekend, starting with that low pressure, which has brought the horrific flooding into parts of western europe, especially into germany. slowly moving southeast, with the potential for heavy flooding downpours as it does so, but where it has been so very, very wet it will be turning drier. and with high pressure for the uk, most places dry, the only rain on the way close to this whetherfront, still lurking close to northern, north—western parts of scotland. so again, with thicker cloud and wind, you could encounter a bit of light rain during saturday. elsewhere, there will be decent, sunny spells and again some misty, low cloud maybe hanging around some irish sea coasts. if anything, it is looking warmer away from the cloudier north of scotland. we could get close to 30 celsius in the hottest parts of yorkshire, for example. as ever, this sort of weather coming with words of caution about uv
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levels, highs of very high in the sunshine, you will burn very quickly without protection, and pollen levels widely high to very high throughout this weekend. part two of the weekend and still in northern scotland some outbreaks of rain around on sunday — a few heavier bursts are possible — and a lot of cloud elsewhere in scotland and northern ireland, a few sunny spells coming through, a bit more cloud around parts of northern england as well and here on into north wales temperatures down compared to saturday, but higher for south wales and southern england, again, where some spots will be reaching close to 30 celsius. if you don't like temperatures that high, where it has been quite hot over the weekend, looking into next week it will cool a bit, although it will stay very warm across much of england and wales. into scotland and northern ireland and northern england, temperatures are widely in the low to mid 20s, but stilljust in the teens in northern scotland. chance of a shower, plenty of dry weather for the end of the week.
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this is bbc news, i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 3pm: more than 100 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades. many more are injured or missing. locals say they were caught off guard. nothing you can do. the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. more than three months' worth of rain fell in 24 hours over parts of western germany, the netherlands and belgium. some local politicians are blaming climate change. after half a million people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app, businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed
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at least one extra complication. anarchy in the sex pistols — band members go to the high court to fight each other over a legal battle for music rights. four—time 0lympic medallist sir mo farah tells us he believes online racism against sportsmen and women is getting worse. he says social media companies must do more. the social media companies need to do a lot more. they have to be held accountable to what people get up to. even myself, i have had some shocking ones. hello, good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. more than 120 people are confirmed
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dead after some of the worst flooding in decades devastated parts of northern europe. many hundreds more are injured or unaccounted for across germany, belgium and the nertherlands. the work of the emergency services is being severely restricted because of the difficult conditions. the german president has called for a more determined battle against climate change. anna holligan sent this report. an apocalyptic scene. lives, homes lost to the most devastating floods here in decades. hundreds are still missing and more rain is on the horizon. this is one german village, schuld, but the catastrophic images spanned three nations with banks on the river meuse. across the border in belgium, it is impossible to capture the scale of the disaster, but this is an indication — a submerged town engulfed in flames.
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in liege, there are fears it's not over yet. translation: i have never seen anything like it. i it's scary. i came by at midday yesterday, you could still see the little barrier there. this morning you can't see it. the waters are rising more and more. it's scary. many here are asking why events like this appear to be happening more frequently. in a warmer world, the atmosphere can hold more moisture and, of course, as there is more water, more moisture in the atmosphere, rainfall events can become more extreme, so we've seen before that extreme rainfall events can become more frequent because of climate change. here in the netherlands, this part of lindberg province is now officially classified as a disaster zone, which means the government will offer financial support to those who have lost almost everything.
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here in valkenburg they're battling to salvage everything that hasn't already been lost to the floods. a water pipe has just burst and round here many of the locals were evacuated overnight. they have returned home with shovels and pipes to try to save their own homes. brigitte tried to build her own flood defences to protect her family. she told me how it felt to be inside as the water rose. fearful. yeah. i was afraid that the water would come in more and nothing you can do. the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. ever. it's terrible. it's still too soon for many to comprehend the loss or calculate the cost. anna holligan, bbc news, valkenburg.
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0ur correspondentjenny hill is in erftstadt near cologne, and says we are a long way from knowing the full picture of what has happened in germany. well over 90 people are now confirmed dead in these floods, but that number is expected to only rise as the day goes on, and that's because a lot of people are still missing. now, the authorities in western germany say they can't really tell us exactly how many people are unaccounted for. that's because mobile phone signal has gone down in many of the affected areas, so it may be that some people are trying to communicate with their loved ones but are unable to, or it may be that the worst has happened. i'm stood on the banks here of the river erft and you can probablyjust see how powerful this water still is. much of this area is under water. and just a little bit further behind me in part of the town here, terrible scenes unfolded overnight. a number of houses collapsed and rescue workers have been trying to get to other people trapped in their homes using boats because the area has
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been completely flooded. and earlier, the authorities actually said that they'd been receiving phone calls from people trapped in their houses but that rescue, in theirwords, in many cases, was simply impossible. if anyone here thought that today would bring a little bit of fresh hope, it has really been dashed. and actually overnight, a reservoir in another part of the region overflowed its dam. that caused more flooding, thousands of people evacuated from their homes. well over 165,000 households are without power now. germany is reeling from these floods. they have devastated notjust this region, but the rest of the country and people here right now are having to wait and hope for news of their loved ones. jenny hill. anna holligan has been in valkenberg in the netherlands, which has also been badly affected by the record rainfall. i spoke to her a little earlier.
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well, things are moving so quickly here and it is such a precarious rescue effort because if you look down here, he hasjust managed to stop another water pipe from bursting. at the moment, the emergency services are trying to restore power and secure these pavements because, if you have a look at these paving stones, this gives you an idea of the power of the flood water. they have never seen anything like this. may by ministers due to visit the region later this afternoon and actually, backin later this afternoon and actually, back in the early 1990s at —— in the prime minister. in the early 1990s, there were floods here, and at the government spent 2 billion euros to improve the flood plains but they were not expecting anything like this all of these people here when evacuated, but they are now back in position. this is amber's has, this is amber's mumbles that amber has
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said that we can show you what it is like inside. they are trying to sweep and search and pump the water out. —— sweep and a sack and pump. this is happening right across the city and beyond and experts are saying the amount of rain for the experience here over the last few days —— right across this area, 20 centimetres, it is once any of those in your occurrence and should act as a wake—up call here in the lindbergh region, but why do because we have seen things like this in three countries. in germany, in belgium. and there have been some really heart—warming moments are made of this devastation. the children have been coming down with their parents handing out cakes to the emergency workers and i was speaking to one
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woman earlier who said, actually, we count ourselves lucky because we still have our homes and we are still have our homes and we are still alive and when you look at that in the context of what has happened in those neighbouring countries, you can understand why there is such a sense of relief here. �* �* . there is such a sense of relief here. �* ~ ., , , ., here. and anna, 'ust listening to what ou here. and anna, 'ust listening to what you — here. and anna, just listening to what you are saying _ here. and anna, just listening to what you are saying about i here. and anna, just listening to| what you are saying about people being told at this was a once once anyone there is a news event and i heard someone in germany saying they were told back in 2005, when there were told back in 2005, when there were other floods, were told back in 2005, when there were otherfloods, —— once in 1000 year event. they were told it was once in a century event, and 16 years later these floods happen. it must leave people feeling very unsettled and asking questions about how they will be protected in future? .,. , , how they will be protected in future? , , ., , ., future? exactly, they are. they are so worried — future? exactly, they are. they are so worried about _ future? exactly, they are. they are so worried about the _ future? exactly, they are. they are so worried about the flood - future? exactly, they are. they are | so worried about the flood defences and appear people have been building
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on their own flood defences. 0vernight, they were battling to get the sandbags in position. they have been filling shopping bags with sand to try to protect their homes, but all of that, of course, was futile. and now this area is considered to be a disaster zone. it was classified as such by the dutch prime minister last night and what that means it is these people, their insurance companies probably will not be able to afford to cover the extent of this damage so the government will support people in rebuilding their homes. butjust have a look at theirs. this is what has been pumped out of basements and kitchens and this is just one street. it isjust... i mean, yeah, it is difficult to put this into context of what is happening elsewhere as well because we have seenin elsewhere as well because we have seen in germany now hundreds are still missing. the death toll is climbing every day and they are still trying to put this one time
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back together, but it is much worse than this. in many other places. so they are rebuilding, but there are also very grateful for what they have left. �* ., ., ., it's estimated that coronavirus infections in the uk rose by 63% in the week ending the 10thjuly. data from the office for national statistics suggests thatjust over 650,000 people in the uk would have tested positive — around one in 100 people. meanwhile, the coronavirus reproduction number, or r value, in england remains unchanged from last week and is between 1.2 and 1.4 — meaning the epidemic is continuing to grow. an r number between 1.2 and 1.4 means that, on average, every 10 people infected will infect between 12 and 14 other people. an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly, because so many staff are being told to self—isolate
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by the nhs test and trace app. more than half a million people were sent an alert last week across england and wales. the rmt union has warned of another surge next week because of confusion about mask wearing on public transport. and meat processing plants have said that they've had to cut production because of staffing issues. downing street has said that the nhs contact tracing app remains "one of the best tools we have" to tackle coronavirus and would not be drawn on whether any possible exemptions might be introduced for specific industries. ben king reports. phones pinging as covid cases rise, the app designed to protect us is telling hundreds of thousands to stay home. so many, in fact, that some businesses are struggling to stay open. if i get pinged, my main problem is the business has to close so far me it is all about safety so i will probably wear a face mask, i still have my
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screen up in the shop. pinging is such a problem because it shuts everything down, especially at schools, and my customers with their children they have to isolate them for ten days and it is so disruptive to everybody. the number of app users warned they have been close to an infected person passed half a million last week in england and wales, an increase of 46% on the previous week. at the moment, anyone pinged is advised to stay home but from the 16th of august people who are fully vaccinated will not have to. big businesses are also starting to feel the impact of self—isolating staff. car—makers nissan and rolls—royce warned it might hit production, and the association of meat processors says its members are close to having to close some production lines down. most of them are having between 5% and 10% being pinged and self—isolating at home and this is causing quite a few shortages for the industry and quite a few problems for the industry
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which is already understaffed. and health care providers are warning that staff shortages might hurt their ability to deliver care. in the nhs, it's a very significant issue. we are now at the point where we have got so many nhs staff off because of the app pinging that it is beginning to affect patient care. other businesses such as nightclubs are getting ready to open for the first time in a year as most coronavirus restrictions are lifted on monday, and crowds are preparing to gather at big sporting events, which could all mean even more pings. app providers have been asked to reduce the sensitivity but the government says it is doing itsjob. reducing the spread of covid. we are in the middle of a pandemic and we know the virus spreads and it spreads without showing any symptoms and so the app is one of a number of ways in which we are trying to tackle the virus.
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the key to the fight against covid is still the vaccine and the weekend sees the second "grab ajab" campaign where any adult can get their first vaccination without an appointment at large pop—up clinics around the country. ben king, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... more than 120 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades. many more are injured or missing. after half a million people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app — businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication. younger adults admitted to hospital with coronavirus are nearly as likely to suffer from complications as people over the age of 50, according to a new study of 70,000
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covid patients. four in ten patients aged between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while being treated. 0ur health correspondent jim reed reports. i'm in icu. my lungs collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on. paul was 31—years—old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things, you just don't know how to really deal with it but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how. well, before the pandemic, paul was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus
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had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face that they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could. that they were quite shocked, paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury, followed by lung and heart damage. while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger. this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are seeing one in three of even
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the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications, some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage, but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid has lasted over a year — a reminder that 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting to learn about this virus and its long—term impact on our health. jim reed, bbc news. politicians in northern ireland have met the secretary of state, brandon lewis, to discuss their opposition to the government's plans for dealing with legacy issues. proposals to end all prosecutions related to the troubles were widely criticised when they were unveiled earlier this week. danjohnson reports from stormont.
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we were told there were frank and robust exchanges this morning. resolving all the issues stemming from northern ireland's troubles was never going to be simple and finding a solution that pleased everyone was perhaps going to be impossible but what the british government has achieved its unanimous opposition to the plans that it has laid out. his proposal is to reduce all prosecutions related to the troubles. it would be better to put in place and information in fact fading —— fact—finding process that will hopefully bring families the truth and communities closer to
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reconciliation, but that is not how people in northern ireland feel about this because there are so many questions that bereaved family members and survivors who were wounded during the troubles have built up who carried out that attack? who planned that bombing? who was responsible for that kidnapping? and what about the role of the army and security services — did the act of late all times? these are the questions people are asking and the issues they want to see justice and accountability on. we got a bit of reaction from political leaders. the sinn fein leader said the british government was acting in bad faith. and another mla said... the british government says this is the least worst option and the best way forward now, but northern ireland's chief commissioner for human rights says these proposals would appear to disregard the right
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for an investigation to be carried out under the european convention on human rights. let's return to the story that business groups and unions are warning that companies are increasingly struggling for staff because of the numbers being told to self—isolate by the nhs covid app. more than half—a—million people across england and wales were sent alerts last week. the rmt union has warned of another surge next week because of confusion about mask wearing on public transport. eddie dempsey is from the rmt union, which represents people across the transport industry. thank you further time this afternoonjoining us on bbc news. do you have any sense of how many of the members of your union are out of are violating the moment? ida. the members of your union are out of are violating the moment?— are violating the moment? no, well it is a growing _ are violating the moment? no, well it is a growing picture _ are violating the moment? no, well it is a growing picture as _ are violating the moment? no, well it is a growing picture as the - are violating the moment? no, well it is a growing picture as the hours i it is a growing picture as the hours and days move on. this is not helped by the botched government
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announcement on face coverings and confuse messaging depending on where you are in the country and what transport service you're using. transport services are already short—staffed and it does not take a genius to work out what is going to happen on so—called freedom monday when people will be piling on to transport services, social distancing measures and face covering measures out of the window. it is pretty clear what will happen. there will be an overwhelming number of transport numbers and —— transport members and staff being pinged. d0 transport members and staff being inued. ,, , transport members and staff being ..ined. , ., pinged. do you believe a lot ofj people chose not to any mass, pinged. do you believe a lot of- people chose not to any mass, they can, of course, and borisjohnson has asked them to exercise response ability and wear one, but do you feel lots of people will not? == feel lots of people will not? -- wear a mass — feel lots of people will not? » wear a mass because i think a lot of passengers will be confused about what they do. if you're in the one area, you're asked to any mask but
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if you're in a national real england area who do not have to do. but in scotland and wales you have to. that confusion will put our members at risk of conflict with passengers who are confused about the messaging, particularly if services become overcrowded, so what we are expecting, come monday, is complete chaos. . . expecting, come monday, is complete chaos. ., ., , , ., ., , expecting, come monday, is complete chaos. ., ., , ., ., , chaos. train and bus operators say the not chaos. train and bus operators say they not requiring _ chaos. train and bus operators say they not requiring passengers i chaos. train and bus operators say they not requiring passengers to l they not requiring passengers to wear a facemask in the absence of government legislation enforcing masks, they will not be requiring passengers to do so. yet, and she had pointed out some of the devolved administrations, some of the companies that have asked people to wear masks and say they will be enforcing that, transport for london, eurostar, the devolved governments as we have mentioned. just a couple of days from monday, what would you like train operators and bus companies to do?- and bus companies to do? beyond train operators _ and bus companies to do? beyond train operators and _ and bus companies to do? beyond train operators and bus _ and bus companies to do? beyond l train operators and bus companies, this comes down to the government's message. what we need is the
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government had a clear position. because if you have the mayor saying they want people to wear face coverings in tfl services, that is not backed up by law, therefore the btp and others are not enquired to enforce that. what this will lead to is an expectation on transport front line transport staff enforcing this confused messaging, asking people to obey different regimes and that will ultimately lead to conflict between members of the public and railway staff and, as i said, transport is already short—staffed, it does not take a genius to figure out what will happen on monday when these new rules coming and the old rules go out, i should say. we will see a lot more people pinged, whether transport workers are members of the public and it will have a clear impact on transport services. 50 public and it will have a clear impact on transport services. so you think it has — impact on transport services. so you think it has to _ impact on transport services. so you think it has to come _ impact on transport services. so you think it has to come from _ think it has to come from government, that there is no no point individual companies are taking a stand and saying we still
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wanted to do this quest might guess because it comes down to enforcement. ii because it comes down to enforcement.— because it comes down to enforcement. , ,., ., enforcement. if it is something that is rovided enforcement. if it is something that is provided for— enforcement. if it is something that is provided for in _ enforcement. if it is something that is provided for in law _ enforcement. if it is something that is provided for in law by _ enforcement. if it is something that is provided for in law by the - is provided for in law by the government. then there is a mandate requirement for british transport police and others in authority to enforce that. if it is simply a case of a change in policy with a particular operator, what they will be expecting a transport workers to police that. that will ultimately put our members at a point of conflict and so far, we have sent to remember is that it is not your responsibility to police the law, thatis responsibility to police the law, that is a matter for the authorities to do that. they are supposed to police these things, transport workers are supposed to deliver the services so we do not want to see our members come to conflict. we will be getting our members clear guidelines if they find themselves any situation as being unsafe, they are to go to a safe place and a step away from the journey. just are to go to a safe place and a step away from the journey.— away from the “ourney. just to be absolutel away from the journey. just to be absolutely clear, _ away from the journey. just to be absolutely clear, will— away from the journey. just to be absolutely clear, will they - away from the journey. just to be absolutely clear, will they be i away from the journey. just to be j absolutely clear, will they be told if they can, to facilitate a situation where people are wearing masks, but if there is conflict to step away from that? because when i travel on trains, not once have i
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seen anyone checking on people who are not willing masks.— are not willing masks. effectively, we have said _ are not willing masks. effectively, we have said to _ are not willing masks. effectively, we have said to our— are not willing masks. effectively, we have said to our members i are not willing masks. effectively, l we have said to our members right away through the pandemic, the mandatory waiting of face coverings as a matter for the government and law and it should be placed by british transport police and others. railway workers are not supposed to police at these things themselves any point of conflict. we will be continuing to give that advice to our members and also centre members, if you find yourself any situation that you regard as being unsafe, either due to overcrowding or potential conflict situations, you are to go to a place of safety and a step away from the job. that is the advice we are giving to remember study pandemic and the advice we will be giving to our members. i can see what you're _ will be giving to our members. i can see what you're saying _ will be giving to our members. i can see what you're saying because it is more likely a member of your union will find themselves any position, that are not any transport police immediately around and they are being called on to deal with the situation of conflict between passengers potentially. let's bring
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this back then, if we may, to the self—isolation issue. clearly, if more people are back on trains, if more people are back on trains, if more people are not willing masks, you have, as we know from the scientist, the ideal situation for this virus to be transmitted. if more people are having to self—isolate as a result, including train drivers, etc, do you think we are in danger of seeing a noticeable reduction in services, potentially? i think we are in danger of saying that. we have had some warning signs through the pandemic when these types of things have gotten out of control before. but ultimately, transport workers have been working right the way through that there is pandemic, keeping the country moving, keeping our vital staff going to the nhs and into care homes and other vital places that we need them to and at the moment, we are being thrown into conflict with the public with unclear messaging and also come on top of it, we have been
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thanked for our service by the government, we have booked transport cleaners, we have basically been keeping the country safe by protecting against the virus spreading through the transit network. and they have had their sick pay scheme is removed and, as a consequence, are rmt members and cleaners will be done at pilot lobbying on the 20th for decent conditions and to be rewarded for their effort during the pandemic. as i said previously, this announcement from monday onwards does not take a genius to figure out what is going to happen. transport services are already short—staffed, we have confused messaging from the government on wearing a face covering and social distancing. it is not going to be mandated by law in most places. and ultimately, what is going to happen as members of the public will come into conflict with front line railway workers and our advice members will be about protecting their safety in the first instance. , , , , ., instance. 0k, eddie dempsey from the rmt, thank you _ instance. 0k, eddie dempsey from the rmt, thank you very _ instance. 0k, eddie dempsey from the
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rmt, thank you very much. _ now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. hello. with high pressure close by, much of the uk fine, very warm to hot this weekend. the exception — northern scotland, close to a weather front, cloud, wind, the chance of seeing a little light rain and drizzle. that's the case into north—west scotland for the rest of the day. elsewhere, patchy cloud, very warm sunny spells. 15 degrees in lerwick, ppper—20s in aberdeenshire. upper—20s in aberdeenshire. elsewhere, widely into the low to mid—20s. a bit more bearable around the coast. into tonight, cloud more extensive in scotland, especially into the west, pushing into northern ireland. a few mist and fog patches elsewhere. temperatures mostly heading down towards the mid—teens. we will start saturday with plenty of sunshine around, with the exception of northern ireland, but the sun will break through, and in western scotland — a few sunny spells but, on on the whole, towards the north—west of scotland in particular, it will stay rather cloudy and drizzly and there will still be quite a brisk wind, whereas eastern and southern scotland seeing the sunny spells. some misty low cloud around some irish sea coasts, england and wales plenty of sunshine, near 30 in parts of northern england.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: more than 120 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing. after half a million people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app — businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland set out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles. police and prosecutors are being told to stop blaming each other for the low number of rape convictions in england and wales.
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sport and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here's austin. the second round of golf�*s oldest major tournament — the open championship — is well under way at royal st george's in kent. the course is known for being one of the toughest tests in golf. but some of the world's best have been enjoying the conditions so far today on the kent coast. so this is the latest leaderboard and it's american colin morikawa that leads the way. the 24—year—old, already a major winner, shot a six under par 64 today to sit top of the shop on nine under... 0vernight leader louis 0osthuizen has just started his second round, but he's already made a move — he's two shots behind on seven under with jordan spieth. englishman andy sullivan is the best placed on the brits —
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three shots off the lead. rory mcilroy finished on level par, so as it stands he's the right side of the cut line for the weekend — that's at one over at the moment. now to football and the new tottenham manager nuno espirto santo has insisted that harry kane is "our player". the england captain's future has been the cause of plenty of speculation over the last few months. the bbc understands kane has an "agreement" that would allow him to leave this summer. but the club's new boss wouldn't be drawn on the striker�*s future. he is our player, period. no need to talk about anything _ he is our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. _ he is our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. now i he is our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. now is i he is our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. now is the moment to recover his energy, to rest and when harry comes again, we will have time to speak and i'm looking forward to him joining the group and start working together. when he arrives, he will feel that
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every one of us wants to commit ourselves to becoming better and we are ambitious people, we want to do it will and we count on harry in that. lewis hamilton says winning an eighth, formula 1 world drivers' title will be a tall order this year. and it's looking like the 32—point gap to max verstappen will widen during this weekend's british grand prix. the championship leader topped the time sheets ahead of britain's lando norris in first practice at silverstone. mercedes couldn't match red bull's pace with hamilton three quarters of a second slower in third place. in a change to tradition, qualifying gets under way at six o'clock tonight before the new sprint race tomorrow to decide the grand prix grid. elswhere, england's lewis ludlow has been banned for 4 matches for kneeing an opponent in the head during, the side's win over canada gloucester�*s ludlow had been captaining england on what was just his second appearence, but he'll now miss club
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games against ealing, hartpury and northampton. the ban was reduced to four games from six because of his admission of guilt. england's cricketers are back in action tonight at trent bridge, with the first of three t20 internationals against pakistan. nine of the players who were recently forced to self—isolate have been named in the squad. eoin morgan will return as captain and, after an unpredictable few weeks, he says the series is a good chance to improve their strength in depth. probably not knowing what is ahead of ourselves, we need to... ..sort of look more to a little bit more strength and depth, so probably... the opportunities within our squad at the moment, we will see over the next three games, and going through various different options for possible injury replacements for certain players within the group,
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we will see as well. meanwhile, ireland are taking on south africa in a one—day international in dublin right now. victory today would give them their first—ever series win over south africa, but the tourists have been magnificiant so far — both openers reached centuries, helping the south africans to 346—4 from their 50 overs. ireland have just started their reply but they're already 47—3. well, there's more on all of those stories on the bbc sport website including live text commentary of stage 19 of the tour de france. but that's all your sport for now. a line on the death toll in the floods in europe. a minister, a belgian minister, quoted as saying to a newsagency that the death toll in belgium rises to 20 with 20
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people missing and we are clearly talking about hundreds missing overall when you take into account the situation in belgium, the netherlands and germany as well. the government minister in belgium being quoted as saying that the death toll from that flooding has risen to 20 with a further 20 people missing. police and prosecutors are being told to stop blaming each other for the low number of rape convictions in england and wales. only 3% of recorded rapes resulted in a prosecution in the year 2019—20. a report by two watchdogs is demanding an urgent and fundamental shift in the way the crime is investigated and dealt with. wendy williams, her majesty's inspector of constabulary, who worked on the report, has said that the police and prosecutors need to change how they work together to prosecute rape cases.
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we talk about a vicious cycle where everyone has concerns about the low numbers of prosecutions, but that concern can lead to a much more cautious approach to rape cases than other cases, which can result in considerable delays and in victims feeling that the focus is principally on them and their credibility, rather than on the suspect and building strong cases. as a result of those delays and that perception, that can lead to victims withdrawing their support for cases, which in turn contributes to low prosecutions, so we've highlighted that vicious cycle and we have said that the cycle must be broken. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, told us more. last month, the government produced its rape review and one of the key
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recommendations in that was that police and prosecutors needed to work more closely together. this report today says that there is this blame culture going on. they're pointing the finger at each other and it says that while you have that mindset, you're never going to get any progress on the stats and getting more cases to court because the government is committed to actually getting the prosecution rate back to where it was five years ago. now, the people at the top of the police and the crown prosecution service are saying that they have started working more closely together and, in fact, today they announced even greater collaboration and the watchdogs say, well, that is fine, but where it really matters is what is happening on the ground and that collaboration has to filter right down. one example, they say the communication between the two organisations often is done by e—mail. they're saying to them, get on the phone and speak to each other because these cases need to be discussed. it shouldn't all be done by e—mail.
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if you think that there were 50,000 rape complaints made in england and wales, the latest stats show, that is 50,000 people and the watchdogs are saying today, those people deserve to have their cases properly assessed. a lorry driver has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving following a crash on the mm in county durham that killed three people. the collision between four cars and two lorries occurred at around 6.20pm yesterday, close to the village of bowburn. durham police said several other people were injured, with two needing hospital treatment. let's get more now on warnings from an increasing number of businesses that it's becoming impossible to operate properly because a large number of staff are being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. more than 500,000 people were sent an alert last week across england and wales. downing street has said that the contact tracing app remains "one of the best tools we have" to tackle coronavirus and would not be drawn on whether any possible exemptions might be introduced
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for specific industries. lilian edwards is a professor of law innovation and society at the university of newcastle — she was an adviser when the nhs contact tracing app was originally created. i asked her what she made about the criticism that has been direct at the covid app. i find it very strange, this discussion about desensitising the app because all you're doing is turning down the volume on your radio. it is not that the original problem is going away, it's just you cannot hear it as much any more. what are your concerns about the removal of masks and the lifting of social distancing restrictions? do you think more people will delete the app or make their own decisions
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about what they will do if they are pinged? i about what they will do if they are in . ed? . about what they will do if they are inued? . .., . about what they will do if they are rained? ., . about what they will do if they are ..ined? ., . ., ., ., pinged? i am concerned as a lot of reasonable — pinged? i am concerned as a lot of reasonable people _ pinged? i am concerned as a lot of reasonable people are. _ pinged? i am concerned as a lot of reasonable people are. i'm - pinged? i am concerned as a lot of reasonable people are. i'm not i pinged? i am concerned as a lot of reasonable people are. i'm not an| reasonable people are. i'm not an epidemiologist, i'mjusta reasonable people are. i'm not an epidemiologist, i'm just a lay in this. it was integrated with the qr code for venue checking. i live in scotland but it is different but this was one of the main incentives for using the app. that has gone and it will no longer be required to use the uk app for check—in. so the combo of that, yes, i think we will see more people deleting it, more people turning off bluetooth, which is easier than deleting it, and more people simply disobeying it. and maybe disobeying it is the right choice if you are sure of your risk assessment,
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but how are you sure of your risk assessment? even if you're double vaccinated, we know that depending on which study you look at for which vaccine, 60—80% of people may still get reinfected. are you going to assess on the basis of where you work, for example? are you near vulnerable people? in your previous package, i felt quite worried to hear people saying, well, the nhs is losing too many people to this so maybe it is a place we should ignore the app. if you are on the nhs, you're probably coming into contact with vulnerable people and you might be not only a risk to yourself, but at risk of transmitting it to other people. this is what the app was designed to deal with. just picking on something you alluded to a moment ago, do you think there is enough political will behind this technology to make it really function as it's supposed to? no, i don't think so, not now.
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as i say, when we coded this thing over a year ago, you had a situation of high infection, but low testing. one of the issues was how did you get to people who had not been tested? now we have high testing, high infection and high vaccination, a scenario we never dreamt of a year ago. in that circumstance of very high infection, it is very likely that even if people did obey the app and the pings and did self—isolate and go for tests, that test and trace itself following up on that would not be able to cope. in that sense , i keep saying we're right back at march 2020 when it was decided that testing and tracing was helpless because we had such a high rate of infection. and i wonder if we are kind of back there, if we are just putting all our eggs into the vaccination basket. the high court in london has been hearing a case between two
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former members of the sex pistols and their frontmanjohn lydon, akajohnny rotten. stevejones and paul cook are suing him because he won't allow the band's music to be featured in a new tv series. 0ur correspondent steve holden is here. let's talk about the sex pistols. let's talk about the sex pistols. let's remind everyone how influential they wear. can you believe they _ influential they wear. can you believe they only _ influential they wear. can you believe they only released i influential they wear. can you | believe they only released one studio album in their career? because it feels like they really set the benchmark for modern day rock and roll in the �*70s, songs like god save the queen and anarchy in the uk and pretty vacant really set the bar for other bands to come. they were fronted byjohn lydon, known asjohnny rotten, charismatic, controversial, one—of—a—kind and for anyone that knows him or has seen him, has never been one to conform. so they want to use the ban's music
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in a television series. some of the band wanted to happen, he doesn't. what is john band wanted to happen, he doesn't. what isjohn lydon saying? this band wanted to happen, he doesn't. what is john lydon saying? this show is directed by — what is john lydon saying? this show is directed by danny _ what is john lydon saying? this show is directed by danny boyle, _ what is john lydon saying? this show is directed by danny boyle, it's i is directed by danny boyle, it's called pistol and it's based on the memoir of stevejones, another band member, and john lydon believes that the book shows him in a hostile and unflattering light. he has previously called the project disrespectful, he told a newspaper in april that he feels like he was backed into a corner like a rat with it so he won't give permission for his music and the band's music to be used in this unless a court orders him to, and that's where we've ended up, in the high court with the two band mates bringing legal action. what is the argument stevejones and paul cook's legal team have made? they say in 1998, the members of the
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sex pistols, the four originally and later joined sex pistols, the four originally and laterjoined by sid vicious who died, they made an agreement that if somebody wanted to use their music and license it, it would be a majority rules basis, if the majority rules basis, if the majority approved it, it would be used. they say thatjohn lydon is the only one holding out on this. the other original member, glen matlock, agrees with them and the estate of the late sid vicious also agrees so essentially they say it is for against one so the high court in london has been hearing legal arguments for the last couple of days and this legal action is expected to continue into next week. thank you for exploding back to us. we await the decision. the headlines on bbc news... more than 120 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing. after 500,000 people
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were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app, businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication. more than 100 people are now known to have died in a week of violence in south africa — following the imprisonment of the former president, jacob zuma. after visiting the province of kwazulu—natal — one of the worst—hit by the violence — the current south african president, cyril ramaphosa, has described the unrest in the country as an assault on democracy. we obviously, as a government, are extremely concerned about what happened here. and we are doing everything to deal with it and it's quite clear that
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all these incidents of unrest and looting were instigated and we are going after those people, we are going after them, we have identified a good number of them and we will not allow anarchy and mayhem to just unfold in our country. the situation in kwazulu—natal province has been especially volatile, but residents are hoping the violence is now over. the bbc�*s vumani mkhize has more from durban. a sense of normality is returning to south africa again after days of violence and looting. here in durban where i am, i have witnessed thousands of people queueing up for basic food and that's because shops, malls and warehouses have been looted and gutted. what is encouraging is that trucks from johannesburg are now coming through the n3 route to come and provide some form of relief
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for durban residents who have been struggling to get access to food. we do know that fuel trucks, food as well as medicine, are making their way to durban to try and provide some form of relief and also, 25,000 troops are set to be deployed in gauteng and durban to provide law and order for wary south african citizens who have witnessed their businesses and their homes being destroyed and invaded. so south africans at the moment are quite optimistic that the military is going to provide law and order, working with the police. danish siddiqui, a pulitzer prize—winning journalist working for the reuters news agency, has been killed while covering a clash between security forces and taliban fighters near a border crossing with pakistan. siddiqui, an indian national, had been embedded with afghan special forces based in the southern province of kandahar. these are some of the pictures he took of the conflict only earlier this week.
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his photo essays on india's covid crisis, particularly pictures that showed funeral pyres in open spaces, drew global attention. it's a big weekend for fans of formula one — with a capacity crowd of 140,000 due at silverstone on sunday for the british grand prix. as the cars race around the circuit, they'll be burning fossil fuels — but the managing director of f1 says that could change. ross brawn has told the bbc that hydrogen—powered cars could be the long—term future for the sport. 0ur chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, has been looking at the efforts the sport is making to reduce its environmental impact. the roar of the engines and the smell of the exhaust are what formula one is all about for many fans. so how does a sport born out of the awesome explosive power of fossil fuels go green? that is the challenge
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ross brawn has taken on. the engineer behind michael schumacher�*s seven world titles says he is determined to put sustainability at the heart of f1. but electric engines are a nonstarter, he told me. there is no electric solution today. we don't want them looking at power conservation modes and trying to make the battery last long enough to get to the end of the race or saving the battery up so in the last five laps they can really go. that doesn't seem to engage the fans. your instinct, it sounds to me, is possibly hydrogen is maybe the solution you are set on? maybe hydrogen is the route that formula one could have, we keep the noise, we keep the emotion, but we move into a different solution. silverstone, on the day of the season's most i exciting grad prix — i the british grand prix. the cars have come a long way since jackie stewart won the british grand prix in 1969. but for the moment, f1's focus remains on engineering even more
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efficient hybrid engines and developing biofuels and synthetic e—fuels that will reduce the sport's impact on the environment. in its effort to go net zero by 2030, formula 1 is also reducing the volumes of personnel and freight that travel between races, ensuring all offices, facilities and factories are powered by renewable energy, and using offsets and c02 sequestration to cover all remaining emissions. been all remaining emissions. criticism from environmentalists been criticism from environmentalists who say f1 is relying too much on offsetting. the recognition that environment is a key issue for the sport runs deep, including with the people on the front line of formula one — its drivers. british driver lando norris is a rising star of f1. it's definitely something that
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over the coming years, i will pay more and more attention to, realising the opportunity you can create for the world and the impact you can have on the world as well, notjust certain people. so of course it means a lot to me and whatever way i can help, in whatever way, then i will try and do that. formula 1 represents the pinnacle of automotive technology but the car industry is going electric and f1 knows it could end up looking like a legacy of a past age. other sports should take note — formula one is going green because it doesn't want to end up a dinosaur. justin rowlatt, bbc news. sir mo farah says he believes online racist abuse towards black sportsmen and women is getting worse. he's called for social media companies to take more action — following the racist attacks on england's footballers, after their defeat in the euros final. the four time olympic champion has been speaking to victoria derbyshire.
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sir mo farah has won multiple medals in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and now he wants to give his support to england's footballers, who were racially abused. it was really important for myself to show support throughout the world for black people. do you think that the abuse that some black sportsmen and women receive is actually getting worse? it seems like it's getting worse, in my honest opinion, because back in the days — or back in my time, should i say — there was never so much social media. what kind of racist messages have you had on social media? i've had some shocking ones. i've had some that say, "you don't belong here." i've had quite a bit. how does that make you feel? to me, this is my home. i've always thought that. the social media companies
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need to do a lot more, they have to be accountable to what people get up to. even myself, i've had some shocking ones where people have sent the message, i've gone delete, i've blocked, i've gone report, gone back to the report, nothing happens. farah, who's now 38, wanted tokyo to be his last 0lympics, but he didn't make the qualifying time for the 10,000 metres. he exclusively revealed that he is battling an injury. i've got a stress fracture on my foot, i've been struggling for quite a while, finally got diagnosed with a stress fracture, so it is disappointing. what is the race that you are imagining will be the end of your career? i think it will be like a marathon, half—marathon. i'd love to be able to show one more track event. so another 10,000 metres? somewhere. so the world championships?
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i don't know, victoria! in 2017, you ran at the world championships, the 10,000 metres, in 26 minutes 49 seconds. the other week in manchester, you did it in 27 minutes, 47 seconds. that's a minute slower. yeah. in order for me to compete with the best, then i have to run in that time or even faster. the four—time olympic champion says he still has the desire to run and insists this isn't the end of his career. victoria derbyshire, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick. hello. much of the uk is set for a fine, dry, very warm to hot weekend. yesterday, northern ireland had its warmest day of the year so far. this weekend, a few spots in england and perhaps wales reaching 30 degrees for the first time this season. and plenty of warm, sunny spells out there today, just some patchy cloud here and there. yet again, though, thicker cloud
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in northwest scotland and you could encounter some light rain and drizzle. a brisk southwesterly wind as well. just 15 degrees in lerwick, whereas in aberdeenshire reaching up into the upper 20s and elsewhere widely low to mid—20s, just a touch cooler around the coast. the cloud in scotland more extensive, especially across western parts overnight, pushing into northern ireland, a few patches of mist and fog elsewhere and temperatures dipping down into the mid teens. we will take a look at the big picture for the weekend, starting with that low pressure, which has brought the horrific flooding into parts of western europe, especially into germany. slowly moving southeast, with the potential for heavy flooding downpours as it does so, but where it has been so very, very wet it will be turning drier. and with high pressure for the uk, most places dry, the only rain on the way close to this weatherfront, still lurking close to northern, north—western parts of scotland. so again, with thicker cloud and wind, you could encounter a bit of light rain during saturday. elsewhere, there will be decent, sunny spells and again some misty, low cloud maybe hanging around some
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irish sea coasts. if anything, it is looking warmer away from the cloudier north of scotland. we could get close to 30 celsius in the hottest parts of yorkshire, for example. as ever, this sort of weather coming with words of caution about uv levels, highs of very high in the sunshine, you will burn very quickly without protection, and pollen levels widely high to very high throughout this weekend. part two of the weekend and still in northern scotland some outbreaks of rain around on sunday — a few heavier bursts are possible — and a lot of cloud elsewhere in scotland and northern ireland, a few sunny spells coming through, a bit more cloud around parts of northern england as well and here on into north wales temperatures down compared to saturday, but higher for south wales and southern england, again, where some spots will be reaching close to 30 celsius. if you don't like temperatures that high, where it has been quite hot over the weekend, looking into next week it will cool a bit, although it will stay very warm across much of england and wales. into scotland and northern ireland and northern england, temperatures are widely in the low to mid 20s, but stilljust in the teens in northern scotland. chance of a shower, plenty of dry
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weather for the end of the week.
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this is bbc news, i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 4pm: more than 120 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades. many more are injured or missing. locals say they were caught off guard. nothing you can do. the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. more than three months' worth of rain fell in 24 hours over parts of western germany, the netherlands and belgium. some local politicians are blaming climate change. after half a million people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app, businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication.
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anarchy in the sex pistols — band members go to the high court to fight each other over a legal battle for music rights. four—time 0lympic medallist sir mo farah tells us he believes online racism against sportsmen and women is getting worse. he says social media companies must do more. the social media companies need to do a lot more. they have to be held accountable to what people get up to. even myself, i have had some shocking ones. hello, good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. more than 120 people are confirmed dead after some of the worst flooding in decades devastated parts
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of northern europe. many hundreds more are injured or unaccounted for across germany, belgium and the nertherlands. the work of the emergency services is being severely restricted because of the difficult conditions. the german president has called for a more determined battle against climate change. the power of the water has been immense. here you can see what this village looked like before the floods. and here it is afterwards. the flood water has gushed through the town causing immense destruction. you can see here — it had such power it has destroyed this bridge. for more on the devastation caused by the flooding, here's anna holligan. an apocalyptic scene. lives, homes lost to the most devastating floods here in decades. hundreds are still missing and more rain is on the horizon.
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this is one german village, schuld, but the catastrophic images spanned three nations with banks on the river meuse. across the border in belgium, it is impossible to capture the scale of the disaster, but this is an indication — a submerged town engulfed in flames. in liege, there are fears it's not over yet. translation: i have never seen anything like it. i it's scary. i came by at midday yesterday, you could still see the little barrier there. this morning you can't see it. the waters are rising more and more. it's scary. many here are asking why events like this appear to be happening more frequently. in a warmer world, the atmosphere can hold more moisture and, of course, as there is more water,
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more moisture in the atmosphere, rainfall events can become more extreme, so we've seen before that extreme rainfall events can become more frequent because of climate change. here in the netherlands, this part of lindberg province is now officially classified as a disaster zone, which means ——limburg, which means the government will offer financial support to those who have lost almost everything. here in valkenburg they're battling to salvage everything that hasn't already been lost to the floods. a water pipe has just burst and round here many of the locals were evacuated overnight. they have returned home with shovels and pipes to try to save their own homes. brigitte tried to build her own flood defences to protect her family. she told me how it felt to be inside as the water rose. fearful. yeah. i was afraid that the water would come in more and nothing you can do.
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the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. ever. it is terrible. it is still too soon for many to comprehend the loss or calculate the cost. anna holligan, bbc news, valkenburg. 0ur correspondentjenny hill is in erftstadt near cologne, and says we are a long way from knowing the full picture of what has happened in germany. well over 90 people are now confirmed dead in these floods, but that number is expected to only rise as the day goes on, and that's because a lot of people are still missing. now, the authorities in western germany say they can't really tell us exactly how many people are unaccounted for. that's because mobile phone signal has gone down in many of the affected areas, so it may be that some people are trying to communicate
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with their loved ones but are unable to, or it may be that the worst has happened. i'm stood on the banks here of the river erft and you can probablyjust see how powerful this water still is. much of this area is under water. and just a little bit further behind me in part of the town here, terrible scenes unfolded overnight. a number of houses collapsed and rescue workers have been trying to get to other people trapped in their homes using boats because the area has been completely flooded. and earlier, the authorities actually said that they'd been receiving phone calls from people trapped in their houses but that rescue, in theirwords, in many cases, was simply impossible. if anyone here thought that today would bring a little bit of fresh hope, it has really been dashed. and actually overnight, a reservoir in another part of the region overflowed its dam. that caused more flooding,
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thousands of people evacuated from their homes. well over 165,000 households are without power now. germany is reeling from these floods. they have devastated notjust this region, but the rest of the country and people here right now are having to wait and hope for news of their loved ones. jenny hill. anna holligan has been in valkenberg in the netherlands, which has also been badly affected by the record rainfall. i spoke to her a little earlier. well, things are moving so quickly here and it's such a precarious rescue effort, because if you look down here, he has just managed to stop another water pipe from bursting. at the moment, the emergency services are trying to restore power and secure these pavements, because if you have a look at these paving stones, this gives you an idea of the power of the floodwater. they've never seen anything like this here. the dutch prime minister, mark rutte, is due to visit the region later on this afternoon. and actually, back in the early 1990s, there were two major floods here and they spent more
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than two billion euros, the dutch government, on trying to improve the flood plains, but they just weren't expecting anything like this. so all of these people here were evacuated. they're now back in position. this is amber's house, this is amber's mum. amber has said that we can show you what it's like inside. so they are trying to sweep and suck and pump the water out. this is happening right across this area and beyond. and experts have said that the amount of rainfall they experienced here over the past few days, so 20 centimetres, is a once—in—1000—year occurrence and that it should act as a wake up call here in the limburg region, but beyond, of course, because we have seen scenes
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like these in three countries that border this area we're in now — in valkenburg, in germany, in belgium. and, you know, there have been some really heart—warming moments amid this devastation. children have been coming down with their parents, handing out cakes to the emergency workers. and i was speaking to one woman earlier who said, well, actually, we count ourselves lucky because we still have our homes and we are still alive, and when you look at that in the context of what's happening in those neighbouring countries, you can understand why there is such a sense of relief here. anna, just listening to what you were saying about people being told that this was a once—in—1000—year event. i saw a comment from someone in one of the parts of germany affected by the flooding saying that they'd been told back in 2005 when there were other floods, that that was a once—in—a—century event and then, 16 years later, these devastating floods happen. i just wonder when you hear that
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sort of thing being said, it must leave people feeling very, very unsettled and asking lots of questions about how they're going to be protected in the future? exactly. exactly, they are. they are so worried about the flood defences and, you know, up here, people have been building their own flood defences. 0vernight, they were battling to get the sandbags in position. they've been filling shopping bags with sand to try to protect their homes. but all of that, of course, was futile and now this area is considered to be a disaster zone. it was classified as such by the dutch prime minister, mark rutte, last night. and what that means is that these people, their insurance companies, probably won't be able to afford to cover the extent of this damage, so the government will support people in rebuilding their homes. but i mean, just have a look at this. this is what's being pumped out of basements and kitchens,
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and this is just one street. it's just... i mean, yeah, it's difficult to put this into context of what's happening elsewhere as well, because we've seen in germany now hundreds are still missing. the death toll is climbing every day and they are still trying to put this one town back together. but it's much worse than this in many other places, so they're rebuilding, but they're also very grateful for what they have left. now we want to bring you, which we have just received in the last few moments, the latest figures on at the number of people testing positive for covid in the uk. at the latest daily total, you can see it there on the left—hand side of your screens, about halfway down, 51,870. that is the highest daily total of
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the people testing positive since mid january this year, 501000, 870. -- 501870. and mid january this year, 501000, 870. —— 501870. and you will see, sadly, the latest figure for deaths within 28 days of a positive covid test and thatis 28 days of a positive covid test and that is 49. and just above that, you will see the total now for the number of people who have had their first dose of a coronavirus jab, more than 46 million. to the right of that, the total number now fully vaccinated having had a second dose, fully vaccinated a couple of weeks after having their second dose to allow that immunity to build—up and that stands at 35,000,540 those are the latest figures coming into us on
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covid. an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly, because so many staff are being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. more than half a million people were sent an alert last week across england and wales. the rmt union has warned of another surge next week because of confusion about mask wearing on public transport. and meat processing plants have said that they've had to cut production because of staffing issues. downing street has said that the nhs contact tracing app remains "one of the best tools we have" to tackle coronavirus and would not be drawn on whether any possible exemptions might be introduced for specific industries. ben king reports. phones pinging as covid cases rise, the app designed to protect us is telling hundreds of thousands to stay home. so many, in fact, that some businesses are struggling to stay open. if i get pinged, my main problem is the business has to close
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so for me it is all about safety so i will probably wear a face mask, i still have my screen up in the shop. pinging is such a problem because it shuts everything down, especially at schools, and my customers with their children they have to isolate them for ten days and it is so disruptive to everybody. the number of app users warned they have been close to an infected person passed half a million last week in england and wales, an increase of 46% on the previous week. at the moment, anyone pinged is advised to stay home but from the 16th of august people who are fully vaccinated will not have to. big businesses are also starting to feel the impact of self—isolating staff. car—makers nissan and rolls—royce warned it might hit production, and the association of meat processors says its members are close to having to close some production lines down. most of them are having between 5% and 10% being pinged and self—isolating at home and this is causing quite a few shortages
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for the industry and quite a few problems for the industry which is already understaffed. and health care providers are warning that staff shortages might hurt their ability to deliver care. in the nhs, it's a very significant issue. we are now at the point where we have got so many nhs staff off because of the app pinging that it is beginning to affect patient care. other businesses such as nightclubs are getting ready to open for the first time in a year as most coronavirus restrictions are lifted on monday, and crowds are preparing to gather at big sporting events, which could all mean even more pings. app providers have been asked to reduce the sensitivity but the government says it is doing itsjob. reducing the spread of covid. we are in the middle of a pandemic and we know the virus spreads and it spreads without showing any symptoms and so the app is one of a number
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of ways in which we are trying to tackle the virus. the key to the fight against covid is still the vaccine and the weekend sees the second "grab ajab" campaign where any adult can get their first vaccination without an appointment at large pop—up clinics around the country. ben king, bbc news. an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly, because so many staff are being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. more than half a million people were sent an alert last week across england and wales. earlier, i spoke to lilian edwards, professor of law innnovation and society at the university of newcastle. she was an adviser when the nhs contact tracing app was orginally created. i find it very strange, this discussion about desensitising the app because all you're doing is turning down the volume on your radio. it is not that the original problem is going away, it's just you cannot hear it
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as much any more. what are your concerns as we head towards monday, masks are being removed, if people want to remove them, lots of people will not be doing that, of course. at the rules on social distancing go. are you concerned that more and more people will certainly turn this at off or delete this app or make their own decisions about what to do if they are pink? decisions about what to do if they are ink? , ., . .,, are pink? yes, i am concerned as i think a lot — are pink? yes, i am concerned as i think a lot of _ are pink? yes, i am concerned as i think a lot of reasonable _ are pink? yes, i am concerned as i think a lot of reasonable people i think a lot of reasonable people are. as i keep saying, i'm notan epidemiologist, i am just a lay person. i think one of the things that has not been much discussed is one of the big incentives, particularly for young people to keep the app on their phone and running, has been it was integrated with the qr code for venue checking to get into bars and restaurants. i was anecdotally told, i live in scotland where it is different, that this was one of the main incentives
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for using the app and now that is going or has gone and it will no longer be required to use the uk app to check—in. so the combo of that, yes, i think we will see more people deleting it, more people turning off bluetooth, which is easier than deleting it, and more people simply disobeying it. and maybe disobeying it is any right choice if you are assured of your risk assessment, but how are you sure of your risk assessment? even if you're a double vaccinated, we know that depending on which a at for which a vaccine, 60-80% of on which a at for which a vaccine, 60—80% of people may still get reinfected. even after they have had the double vaccination. are you going to assess on any basis of where you are, for example? are you niall vulnerable people? and in your previous package, ifelt quite worried to hear people say, well the nhs is losing too many workers to this, so it is a place where we should think about maybe ignoring the app. because if you're working
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on the nhs, you're probably coming into contact with vulnerable people and you might be, not only risk for yourself, but at risk of transmission. so this is what the 3pp transmission. so this is what the app was designed to deal with. just ickin: app was designed to deal with. just picking up on something related to a mum to go, do think there is enough political behind this technology to make it a really function as it is supposed to?— make it a really function as it is su osed to? ., ., �* ,, supposed to? no, i don't think so, not now. supposed to? no, i don't think so, not now- when _ supposed to? no, i don't think so, not now. when we _ supposed to? no, i don't think so, not now. when we coded - supposed to? no, i don't think so, not now. when we coded this i supposed to? no, i don't think so, | not now. when we coded this thing over a year ago, you had a situation of high infection, but low testing. one of the issues was how did you get to people who had not been tested? now we have high testing, high infection and high vaccination, a scenario we never dreamt of a year ago. in that circumstance of very high infection, it is very likely that even if people did obey the app and the pings and did self—isolate and go for tests, that test and trace itself following up on that
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would not be able to cope. in that sense, i keep saying we're right back at march 2020 when it was decided that testing and tracing was helpless because we had such a high rate of infection. and i wonder if we are kind of back there, if we are just putting all our eggs into the vaccination basket. professor lilian edwards. i'm joined now by kate nicholls, chief executive of uk hospitality. thank you very much forjoining us. i know you have been involved in a lot of meetings today that all of this and the impact on the hospitality sector. i do not know if you have heard at the latest daily total for the you have heard at the latest daily totalfor the uk you have heard at the latest daily total for the uk for positive covid cases, it is nearly 52,000 new cases. and obviously, that is going to be generating a lot of things. just tell us to what extent is at this affecting the hospitality sector right now as far as you have been able to gauge?— been able to gauge? well, it is havin: a been able to gauge? well, it is having a major— been able to gauge? well, it is having a major impact - been able to gauge? well, it is having a major impact on - been able to gauge? well, it is having a major impact on the i having a major impact on the hospitality sector at the moment as we are seeing higher cases, so we
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are seeing more ping through the app with a notification about potential exposure. and we are saying about one in five hospitality workers currently self—isolating in certain parts of the country it is going up to as high as one in three and we anticipate we will get to that as cases continue to increase. this is having a very real impact on business viability and business potential to continue trading because they cannot cover those high numbers of staff absences about them and about 80% of the country it is going up to as high as one in three and we anticipate we will get to that as cases continue to increase. this is having a very real impact on business viability and business potential to continue trading because they y cannot cover those high numbers of staff absences and about 80% app, so only a small proportion are being notified because there is a case notifications are people who are self—isolating is coming through the 3pp, self—isolating is coming through the app, so only a small proportion are being notified because there is a significant impact on hospitality�*s ability to restart and positively come into contact with or a case at work where one of their colleagues has been tested positive. so it is having a significant impact on hospitality�*s ability to restart so once you get to monday, social distancing requirements are removed,
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the requirement and compulsion to wear a mask is presumably anticipate the number of cases going up and the number of businesses affected going up number of businesses affected going up because more and more people are having to self—isolate. potentially, yes, depending on what happens. the best information we have coming out of government is cases will continue to rise and we will have continued high prevalence. obviously, we are taking steps in doing your own risk assessment as employers ahead of monday to make sure that we are taking steps to keep our teams and customers say. many of those businesses will be having voluntary measures, including facemasks, as well as good ventilation, hygiene and sanitation to limit the number of cases, but we do urgently need a more effective, more nuanced self—isolation policy so that we can keep the economy moving and avoid putting those businesses back into some form of lockdown. when putting those businesses back into some form of lockdown. when you say more nuanced — some form of lockdown. when you say more nuanced self-isolation _ some form of lockdown. when you say more nuanced self-isolation policy, i more nuanced self—isolation policy, what do you mean by that? what more nuanced self-isolation policy, what do you mean by that? what we really would — what do you mean by that? what we really would like _ what do you mean by that? what we really would like to _ what do you mean by that? what we really would like to say, _ what do you mean by that? what we really would like to say, the - really would like to say, the government has announced there will be removal of the requirement for
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self—isolation for those who are fully vaccinated from the 16th of august. we would like to see that brought forward to the 19th ofjuly. so that we can start that process of keeping people in work who want to with daily testing to make sure that they are continuing to test negative. and then we would like to see a test and release system in place in the same way we have international travel that allows people early release if they are continuing to test negative or if they are not fully vaccinated. find they are not fully vaccinated. and 'ust they are not fully vaccinated. and just before _ they are not fully vaccinated. and just before i _ they are not fully vaccinated. and just before i let _ they are not fully vaccinated. and just before i let you go, you are talking about businesses taking their own measures, their own steps, perhaps continuing with what they have already been doing. can you give us an idea of what proportion of businesses are choosing to do that rather than going wholesale down the road of, ok, no masks, no social distancing, etc question it is very difficult to be able to gauge at the moment. we is very difficult to be able to gauge at the moment. is very difficult to be able to uuaue at the moment. ~ ., , ., gauge at the moment. we only got the uuidance gauge at the moment. we only got the guidance and — gauge at the moment. we only got the guidance and advice _ gauge at the moment. we only got the guidance and advice from _ gauge at the moment. we only got the guidance and advice from government| guidance and advice from government yesterday for businesses to start that process of carrying out their own risk assessments. but all hospitality businesses will have an
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individualised risk assessment that keeps mitigation measures — like ventilation, hygiene, sanitation, the key measures that sage has told us how the biggest impact on infection control and any biggest impact on health and people will adapt according to their business model to keep a table service where that might work, took keep at ordering when that might work and our priority is to make sure we can keep as many of our team and work as possible by keeping them healthy and safe. 50 possible by keeping them healthy and safe, y., ., , ., possible by keeping them healthy and safe. ., , ., ,, . . safe. so you only got the specific advice yesterday? _ safe. so you only got the specific advice yesterday? yes, - safe. so you only got the specific advice yesterday? yes, the - safe. so you only got the specific - advice yesterday? yes, the guidance from government _ advice yesterday? yes, the guidance from government came _ advice yesterday? yes, the guidance from government came out - advice yesterday? yes, the guidance | from government came out yesterday for their sector. a, from government came out yesterday for their sector.— for their sector. a bit late in the da , for their sector. a bit late in the day. kate? _ for their sector. a bit late in the day, kate? given _ for their sector. a bit late in the day, kate? given that _ for their sector. a bit late in the day, kate? given that we - for their sector. a bit late in the day, kate? given that we are i for their sector. a bit late in the day, kate? given that we are a | day, kate? given that we are a couple of days away from the 19th? it is quite challenging. there are a large number of risk assessment is being carried out by businesses now. but most businesses are taking as a starting point the risk assessment that they carried out injuly last year and are looking at adjusting that to take into account the new normal, but it is undoubtedly a tough ask for a lot of small businesses to be able to carry out that risk assessment in such a short space of time. that risk assessment in such a short space of time-—
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space of time. kate, thank you so much. it nichols, _ space of time. kate, thank you so much. it nichols, chief— space of time. kate, thank you so much. it nichols, chief executive | space of time. kate, thank you so i much. it nichols, chief executive of uk hospitality. —— kate nicholls. younger adults admitted to hospital with coronavirus are nearly as likely to suffer from complications as people over the age of 50, according to a new study of 70,000 covid patients. four in ten patients aged between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while being treated. our health correspondent jim reed reports. i'm in icu. my lungs collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on. paul was 31—years—old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things, you just don't know how to really deal with it but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how.
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well, before the pandemic, paul was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face that they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could. paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury, followed by lung and heart damage. while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications
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in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger. this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are seeing one in three of even the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications, some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage, but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid has lasted over a year — a reminder that 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting to learn about this virus and its long—term impact on our health. jim reed, bbc news. we have just had a statement in the
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last couple of minutes from uber who are making masks are mandatory. they say there is nothing more important than our drivers and riders who use the uber app than our drivers and riders who use the uberapp and than our drivers and riders who use the uber app and as it is open up, we will ensure facemasks are continuing to be a mandatory exec meant while travelling with uber across the uk. it is understood there were consultations with drivers on this. uber to make masks mandatory in their cars for the safety of their drivers and riders are using the uber app. away from covid now. politicians in northern ireland have met the secretary of state brandon lewis, to discuss their opposition to the government's plans for dealing with legacy issues. proposals to end all prosecutions related to the troubles were widely criticised when they were unveiled earlier this week. danjohnson is at stormont for us. we are told that there was a robust
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and frank exchange of views at this morning's meeting and there were some very straight talking between political leaders here and at the northern ireland secretary, brandon lewis. resolving all of the issues stemming from the troubles was never going to be easy, and finding a solution to please everyone has not going to be easy. but the british government has found a unanimous... his proposal is to end all prosecutions, inquests and civil cases relating to the troubles. he believes that any likelihood of criminal prosecution is a now diminished and that it would be more helpful to put in place a helpful information that would bring families closer to the truth and hopefully bring communities closer to reconciliation. that is not how people here in northern ireland feel about this. there are so many questions that believed family members and the survivors who are
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wounded during the troubles have, who carried out the attack, who plan that bombing question right who was responsible for that kidnapping? and what about the role of the army and security services as well? that the act lovely at all times? those are the sorts of questions people keep asking and the sorts of issues they want to see justice and accountability on. at the end of today's meeting, we got a bit of reaction from some of the political it is possible at the sinn fein leader said at the british government was acting in total bad faith. at the ulster unionist leader said victims' families and survivors were being filled. assembly members here at stormont will be recalled next week, they will interrupt their holiday to discuss these proposals on tuesday. the british government says this is the least worst option and at the best way forward now, but northern ireland's chief commissionerfor human northern ireland's chief commissioner for human rights said these proposals would appear to disregard the right for an investigation to be carried out under the european convention on human rights. danjohnson in
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belfast. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. with high pressure close by, much of the uk fine, very warm to hot this weekend. the exception — northern scotland, close to a weather front, cloud, wind, the chance of seeing a little light rain and drizzle. that's the case into north—west scotland for the rest of the day. elsewhere, patchy cloud, very warm sunny spells. 15 degrees in lerwick, upper—205 in aberdeenshire. elsewhere, widely into the low to mid—20s. a bit more bearable around the coast. into tonight, cloud more extensive in scotland, especially into the west, pushing into northern ireland. a few mist and fog patches elsewhere. temperatures mostly heading down towards the mid—teens. we will start saturday with plenty of sunshine around, with the exception of northern ireland, but the sun will break through, and in western scotland — a few sunny spells but, on on the whole, towards the north—west of scotland in particular, it will stay rather cloudy and drizzly and there will still be quite a brisk wind, whereas eastern and southern scotland seeing the sunny spells. some misty low cloud around some irish sea coasts, england and wales plenty of sunshine, near 30 in parts
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of northern england. of sunshine, near 30 in parts hello, this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines: more than 50,000 daily coronavirus cases have been reported in the uk for the first time since mid—january. after 500,000 people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app, businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. the cost of severe covid — new research shows that half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave developed at least one extra complication. more than 120 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland set out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles.
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sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's austin halewood. good afternoon. the sun is shinning in on the kent coast and the world's best golfers are enjoying the conditions for the second round of the open championship. american colin morikawa leads the way on nine under par, but there's still plenty of golf to come this afternoon. so let's take you live to the course and speak to our reporter, ben croucher. and speak to our reporter, some and speak to our reporter, impressive scoring this but some impressive scoring this morning but the afternoon starters are beginning to make their way up the leaderboard. beginning to make their way up the leaderboard-— leaderboard. absolutely. we've talked for a _ leaderboard. absolutely. we've talked for a few _ leaderboard. absolutely. we've talked for a few days _ leaderboard. absolutely. we've talked for a few days about - leaderboard. absolutely. we've| talked for a few days about what leaderboard. absolutely. we've i talked for a few days about what a challenge royal st george's poses, both the course and conditions, but the world's best showing just why they are so good at this game. colin morikawa enjoyed the best of the morning, he sits at the top of the leaderboard on nine under par on his
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open debut. a wonderful round, seven birdies in total, came very close to the course record here at saint george's. i was on the 18th hole as he made the final putt but he had to settle. the south african is the overnight leader, and jordan spieth made a birdie on his first two holes so he is a seven under par. looking at the english contingent, andy sullivan has shot back—to—back 67 so he is on six under and will be well placed going into the weekend along with jack senior who would celebrate his 33rd birthday with victory. not a great day for tommy fleetwood, he started on three under and dropped back to two under. justin rose made bogeys and rory mcavoy had to battle back but it doesn't look like he
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will be in contention for a second claretjug. we are on the second hole at royal st george's and it looks like the crowds are quite sparse, but about 25, 30 minutes ago whenjordan spieth and brighton were coming back here, they —— there were throngs of spectators. the american is another one struggling to make the cut at the minute on two under par. lewis hamilton, says winning an eighth formula i world drivers' title will be a tall order this year. and it's looking like the 32—point gap to max verstappen will widen during this weekend's british grand prix. the championship leader topped the time sheets ahead of britain's lando norris in first practice at silverstone. mercedes couldn't match red bull's pace with hamilton three quarters of a second slower in third place. in a change to tradition,
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qualifying gets under way at six o'clock tonight before the new sprint race tomorrow to decide the grand prix grid. mark cavendish will have to wait until sunday's final stage of the tour de france in paris to try and make history. the briton is tied on 3a stage wins with the great eddy merckx, who wished him luck before today's 19th stage. but it turned out to be a day for a breakaway with slovenia's moric completing his second solo victory of this year's race. taday retained his five minute lead going into tomorrow's decisive time trial. now to football and the new tottenham manager nuno espirto santo has insisted that harry kane is "our player". the england captain's future has been the cause of plenty of speculation over the last few months. the bbc understands kane has an "agreement" that would allow him to leave this summer, but the club's new boss wouldn't be
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drawn on the striker�*s future. harry's our player, period. no need to talk about anything else. now is the moment for harry to recover his energy, to rest, and when harry comes again, we will have time to speak and i'm looking forward to him joining the group and start working together. when he arrives, he will feel that every one of us has to commit ourselves to becoming better and we are very ambitious people, we want to do it will, and we count on harry in that. that's all the sport for now. as we've been hearing, more than 50,000 daily coronavirus cases have been reported in the uk for the first time since mid—january. there were almost 52,000 cases recorded — the highest figure since isjanuary — and 49 deaths within 28 days of a positive test.
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our health correspondent, james gallagher, is here. the highest figure since mid—january. put that number, nearly 52,000, in context for us. does it mean the same thing it did in january or last year? absolutely not, january or last year? absolutely not. nothing — january or last year? absolutely not, nothing like _ january or last year? absolutely not, nothing like what - january or last year? absolutely not, nothing like what it - january or last year? absolutely not, nothing like what it did - january or last year? absolutely not, nothing like what it did in l january or last year? absolutely i not, nothing like what it did in the previous waves and the differences vaccination. if you went back to 50,000 cases last time in early january, we were at the peak of the second wave, having to lock down in order to prevent the nhs being overwhelmed with patients with covid and the differences be vaccinated huge swathes of the population, more than two thirds of people have had two jabs,, and that has protected large numbers of people meaning that 50,000 cases a day in terms of the pressure on the nhs and people who will die from covid is not the same as it was injanuary and i think we need to reprogram our minds a little bit around that. but it isn't
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completely without risk or problems because it's going to keep going higher. we are easing restrictions on monday, cases are going to continue to go higher, and that comes with problems. the sheer number of people who will be isolating will be hugely disruptive. my isolating will be hugely disruptive. my kids couldn't get into a nursery this morning because too many staff were isolating at home with covid, one small example, but that will be all over the place. things like long covid and vaccines will still require hospital treatment which will put pressure on. it require hospital treatment which will put pressure on.— will put pressure on. it has affected — will put pressure on. it has affected staffing _ will put pressure on. it has affected staffing levels - will put pressure on. it hasj affected staffing levels and will put pressure on. it has - affected staffing levels and the ability of some businesses to carry out the work that they normally do. tell us a bit more about where you think this is going to go, given that the government is calling monday freedom day, a lot of people are rejecting that title because they have concerns. where do the numbers go from here, inevitably
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upwards? numbers go from here, inevitably uwards? . , , numbers go from here, inevitably uwards? , ,, , , upwards? inevitably uppers, the big auestion is upwards? inevitably uppers, the big question is how _ upwards? inevitably uppers, the big question is how high _ upwards? inevitably uppers, the big question is how high and _ upwards? inevitably uppers, the big question is how high and how- upwards? inevitably uppers, the big question is how high and how far . upwards? inevitably uppers, the big| question is how high and how far and that's what we don't know the answer to because lots of things you cannot account for when doing the modelling to predict what's going to happen. england's success in the euros would have had an impact on the steepness of cases around about now because if we only made it to the quarterfinals versus the finals, it would change what the epidemic looked like because we would socialise in a different way depending on what happened so that shows you how difficult it is to predict how high we are going to go but what is anticipated is eventually we will hit a wall of immunity, we will either have vaccinated enough people or the vaccine will have found its way into an of people. does that happen before we get to the point that chris whitty has been warning about where hospitals start to have difficulties coping with the volume of patients? that's the question. that point you made is effectively herd immunity.
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that point you made is effectively herd immunity-— that point you made is effectively herd immunity. yes, i could have a ve lona herd immunity. yes, i could have a very long scientific— herd immunity. yes, i could have a very long scientific argument - herd immunity. yes, i could have aj very long scientific argument about precise wording because that might be beyond the point of herd immunity, the way it works in a real—life pandemic, but what you would be talking about is there are so much protection out there that cases are coming down again because the virus cannot find enough other people to infect.— people to infect. let's talk about another virus _ people to infect. let's talk about another virus because _ people to infect. let's talk about another virus because you - people to infect. let's talk about another virus because you were l another virus because you were telling me an interesting tidbit before we came on air, norovirus which we normally talk about in the wintertime, what can you tell us? is known as the winter vomiting bug and it has a very clear pattern, it peaks around wintertime and causes problems in care homes but also hospital wards and it didn't really happen this winter because of all the restrictions be placed on our lives, all the social distancing to clamp down on covid, it clamps down on a whole lot of other diseases, but now in the middle ofjuly we are seeing a spike in norovirus cases, three times the number of outbreaks
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you would expect at this time of year according to public health england. this is what we will be dealing with over the next couple of months or years, how we have thrown the rhythm of normal viruses out of sync as well and seeing where they are going to settle down to. we've talked about covid for so long but there is so much else that can affect us and make us ill and lead to hospital treatment so we got to deal with all that as well.- deal with all that as well. james, thank ou deal with all that as well. james, thank you very — deal with all that as well. james, thank you very much. _ police and prosecutors are being told to stop blaming each other for the low number of rape convictions in england and wales. only 3% of recorded rapes resulted in a prosecution in the year 2019—20. a report by two watchdogs is demanding an urgent and fundamental shift in the way the crime is investigated and dealt with. wendy williams, her majesty's inspector of constabulary, who worked on the report, has said that the police and prosecutors need to change how they work together to prosecute rape cases in england and wales. we talk about a vicious cycle where everyone has concerns about the low numbers
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of prosecutions, but that concern can lead to a much more cautious approach to rape cases than other cases, which can result in considerable delays and in victims feeling that the focus is principally on them and their credibility, rather than on the suspect and building strong cases. as a result of those delays and that perception, that can lead to victims withdrawing their support for cases, which in turn contributes to low prosecutions, so we've highlighted that vicious cycle and we have said that the cycle must be broken. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly, told us more. last month, the government produced its rape review and one of the key recommendations in that was that police and prosecutors needed to work more closely together. this report today says that there
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is this blame culture going on. they're pointing the finger at each other and it says that while you have that mindset, you're never going to get any progress on the stats and getting more cases to court because the government is committed to actually getting the prosecution rate back to where it was five years ago. now, the people at the top of the police and the crown prosecution service are saying that they have started working more closely together and, in fact, today they announced even greater collaboration and the watchdogs say, well, that is fine, but where it really matters is what is happening on the ground and that collaboration has to filter right down. one example, they say the communication between the two organisations often is done by e—mail. they're saying to them, get on the phone and speak to each other because these cases need to be discussed. it shouldn't all be done by e—mail. if you think that there were 50,000 rape complaints made in england and wales, the latest stats show, that is 50,000 people and the watchdogs are saying today, those people deserve to
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have their cases properly assessed. the headlines on bbc news: more than 50,000 daily coronavirus cases have been reported in the uk for the first time since mid—january. after 500,000 people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app, businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. more than 120 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing. the high court in london has been hearing a case between two former members of the sex pistols and their frontmanjohn lydon, akajohnny rotten. stevejones and paul cook are suing him because he won't allow the band's music to be featured in a new tv series. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent steve holden, starting with just how
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influential the band were. songs like god save the queen and anarchy in the uk and pretty vacant , absolute punk anthems, set the bar for other bands to come. they were fronted byjohn lydon, known asjohnny rotten, charismatic, controversial, one—of—a—kind and for anyone that knows him or has seen him, you could argue has has never been one to conform to things either. so tv producers want to use the band's music to use the band's music in a series. some of the band wanted to happen, he doesn't. what isjohn lydon saying? this show is directed by danny boyle, it's called pistol and it's based on the memoir of stevejones, another bandmate, and john lydon believes that the book shows him in a hostile and unflattering light.
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he's previously called the project "disrespectful". he told a newspaper back in april that he feels like he was backed into a corner like a rat with it, so he won't give permission for his music and the band's music to be used in this unless a court orders him to, and that's where we've ended up — in the high court with the two bandmates bringing legal action. what is the argument that stevejones and paul cook's legal team are making? they say in 1998, the members of the sex pistols — there was four originally and laterjoined by sid vicious, who died — they made an agreement that if somebody wanted to use their music and license it, it would be a majority rules basis, ie if the majority approved it, then it would be used. they say thatjohn lydon is the only one holding out on this. the other original member, glen matlock, agrees with them and the estate of the late
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sid vicious also agrees so, essentially, they say it's four to one so the high court in london has been hearing legal arguments for the last couple of days and this legal action is expected to continue into next week. sir mo farah says he believes online racist abuse towards black sportsmen and women is getting worse. he's called for social media companies to take more action, following the racist attacks on england's footballers, after their defeat in the euros final. the four time olympic champion has been speaking to victoria derbyshire. sir mo farah has won multiple medals in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and now he wants to give his support to england's footballers, who were racially abused. it was really important for myself to show support throughout the world for black people. do you think that the abuse that some black sportsmen and women receive is actually getting worse?
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it seems like it's getting worse, in my honest opinion, because back in the days — or back in my time, should i say — there was never so much social media. what kind of racist messages have you had on social media? i've had some shocking ones. i've had some that say, "you don't belong here." i've had quite a bit. how does that make you feel? to me, this is my home. i've always thought that. the social media companies need to do a lot more. they have to be accountable to what people get up to. even myself, i've had some shocking ones where people have sent the message, i've gone delete, i've blocked, i've gone report, gone back to the report, nothing happens. farah, who's now 38, wanted tokyo to be his last olympics, but he didn't make the qualifying time for the 10,000 metres.
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he exclusively revealed that he's battling an injury. i've got a stress fracture on my left foot. i've been struggling for quite a while, finally got diagnosed with a stress fracture, so it is disappointing. what is the race that you are imagining will be the end of your career? i think it will be like a marathon, half—marathon. i'd love to be able to show one more track event. so another 10,000 metres? somewhere. so the world championships? i don't know, victoria! in 2017, you ran at the world championships, the 10,000 metres, in 26 minutes 49 seconds. the other week in manchester, you did it in 27 minutes, 47 seconds. that's a minute slower. yeah. in order for me to compete with the best, then i have to be running that time or even faster. the four—time olympic champion says he still has the desire to run and insists this isn't the end of his career. victoria derbyshire, bbc news.
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it's a big weekend for fans of formula one — with a capacity crowd of 140,000 due at silverstone on sunday for the british grand prix. as the cars race around the circuit, they'll be burning fossil fuels — but the managing director of f1 says that could change. ross brawn has told the bbc that hydrogen—powered cars could be the long—term future for the sport. our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, has been looking at the efforts the sport is making to reduce its environmental impact. the roar of the engines and the smell of the exhaust are what formula one is all about for many fans. so how does a sport born out of the awesome explosive power of fossil fuels go green? that is the challenge ross brawn has taken on. the engineer behind michael schumacher�*s seven world titles says he is determined to put sustainability at the heart of f1.
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but electric engines are a nonstarter, he told me. there is no electric solution today. we don't want them looking at power conservation modes and trying to make the battery last long enough to get to the end of the race or saving the battery up so in the last five laps they can really go. that doesn't seem to engage the fans. your instinct, it sounds to me, is possibly hydrogen is maybe the solution you are set on? maybe hydrogen is the route that formula one could have, we keep the noise, we keep the emotion, but we move into a different solution. silverstone, on the day of the season's most. exciting grad prix — i the british grand prix. the cars have come a long way since jackie stewart won the british grand prix in 1969. but for the moment, fi's focus remains on engineering even more efficient hybrid engines and developing biofuels and synthetic e—fuels that will reduce the sport's impact on the environment.
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in its effort to go net zero by 2030, formula i is also reducing the volumes of personnel and freight that travel between races, ensuring all offices, facilities and factories are powered by renewable energy, and using offsets and co2 sequestration to cover all remaining emissions. but there has been criticism from environmentalists who say fi is relying too much on offsetting. the recognition that environment is a key issue for the sport runs deep, including with the people on the front line of formula one — its drivers. british driver lando norris is a rising star of f1. it's definitely something that over the coming years, i will pay more and more attention to, realising the opportunity you can create for the world and the impact you can have on the world as well, notjust certain people. so of course it means a lot to me
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and whatever way i can help, in whatever way, then i will try and do that. formula i represents the pinnacle of automotive technology but the car industry is going electric and f1 knows it could end up looking like a legacy of a past age. other sports should take note — formula one is going green because it doesn't want to end up a dinosaur. justin rowlatt, bbc news. the eiffel tower has reopened. the paris icon closed in october last year due to the covid crisis. this latest closure was the longest since world war two. visitor numbers will be limited to 10,000 a day to meet social distancing requirements, fewer than half of their pre—covid levels.
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a reminder of our top story — over 120 people have died in flooding in parts of northern europe, with more than 1,000 people missing in regions of western germany and belgium. these drone pictures show the town of erftstadt in germany, and the sheer scale of the destruction caused by the flooding and mudslides. roads around the town at impossible after being washed away by the floods —— impassable. they have been communicating via walkie—talkies and getting around on boats. the number of dead in germany, more than 100 people,
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many people missing. hello. much of the uk is set for a fine, dry, very warm to hot weekend. yesterday, northern ireland had its warmest day of the year so far. this weekend, a few spots in england and perhaps wales reaching 30 degrees for the first time this season. and plenty of warm, sunny spells out there today, just some patchy cloud here and there. yet again, though, thicker cloud in northwest scotland and you could encounter some light rain and drizzle. a brisk south—westerly wind as well. just 15 degrees in lerwick, whereas in aberdeenshire reaching up into the upper 20s and elsewhere widely low to mid—205, just a touch cooler around the coast. the cloud in scotland more extensive, especially across western parts overnight, pushing into northern ireland, a few patches of mist and fog elsewhere and temperatures dipping down into the mid teens. we will take a look at the big picture for the weekend, starting with that low pressure, which has brought the horrific flooding into parts of western europe, especially into germany. slowly moving southeast, with the potential for heavy flooding downpours as it does so, but where it has been so very, very wet it will be turning drier. and with high pressure for the uk, most places dry, the only rain
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on the way close to this weather front, still lurking close to northern, north—western parts of scotland. so again, with thicker cloud and wind, you could encounter a bit of light rain during saturday. elsewhere, there will be decent, sunny spells and again some misty, low cloud maybe hanging around some irish sea coasts. if anything, it is looking warmer away from the cloudier north of scotland. we could get close to 30 celsius in the hottest parts of yorkshire, for example. as ever, this sort of weather coming with words of caution about uv levels, highs of very high in the sunshine, you will burn very quickly without protection, and pollen levels widely high to very high throughout this weekend. part two of the weekend and still in northern scotland some outbreaks of rain around on sunday — a few heavier bursts are possible — and a lot of cloud elsewhere in scotland and northern ireland, a few sunny spells coming through, a bit more cloud around parts of northern england as well and here on into north wales temperatures down compared to saturday, but higher for south wales and southern england, again, where some spots will be reaching close to 30 celsius. if you don't like temperatures that high, where it has been quite hot over the weekend,
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looking into next week it will cool a bit, although it will stay very warm across much of england and wales. into scotland and northern ireland and northern england, temperatures are widely in the low to mid 20s, but stilljust in the teens in northern scotland. chance of a shower, plenty of dry weather for the end of the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... more than 50,000 daily coronavirus cases have been reported in the uk for the first time since mid—january — it comes just three days ahead of the lifting of restrictions on monday in england. half a million people were advised to self—isolate by the test and trace app in a single week — businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate because of the impact on staff numbers. more than 120 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing. four time olympic medallist sir mo farah tells us he believes online racism against sportsmen and women is getting worse — he says social media companies must do more.
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are you ready black people? are you ready?

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