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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  July 16, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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more than 100 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more people are injured or missing. more than three month's worth of rain fell in 2a hours, over parts of western germany, the netherlands and belgium. many local people say they were caught off guard. nothing you can do. the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. as germany's president calls for a more determined fight against climate change, we'll have the latest live from germany and the netherlands. also this lunchtime: the test and trace app — more and more companies say business is being disrupted because so many staff are being told to isolate. young people are almost as likely
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to suffer serious health complications from covid as people over 50, according to a new study of hospital patients. four—time olympic medallist sir mo farah tells us he believes online racism against sportsmen and women is getting worse — he says social media companies must do more. the social media companies need to do a lot more. they have to be held accountable to what people get up to. even myself, i have had some shocking ones. and in the run up to the british grand prix, the head of formula 1 says hydrogen—powered cars could be the more environmentally—friendly future of the sport. and coming up on the bbc news channel: the second round of the open championship is underway at royal st george's — and rory mcilroy�*s battling to make the cut.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. more than 100 people are confirmed as having died after some of the worst flooding in decades devastated parts of northern europe. many hundreds more are injured or unaccounted for, across germany, belgium and the netherlands. the work of the emergency services is being severely restricted because of the difficult conditions. the german president has called for a more determined battle against climate change. anna holligan sent this report. an apocalyptic scene. lives, homes, lost to the most devastating floods here in decades. hundreds are still missing and more rain is on the horizon. this is one german village,
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but the catastrophic energy spanned three nations with banks on the river. across the border in belgium it is impossible to capture the scale of the disaster but this is an indication. a submerged town engulfed in flames. there are fears it is not over yet. translation: i it is not over yet. translation: i have never seen anything like it. it is scary. i came by at midday yesterday had you could still see the little barrier there. this morning you cannot see it. the waters are rising more and more. it is scary. many here are asking why events like this appeared to be happening more frequently. the atmosphere _ happening more frequently. iie: atmosphere can happening more frequently. tie: atmosphere can hold more moisture and as there is more moisture in the atmosphere rainfall events can
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become more extreme, so we have seen before that extreme rainfall events can become more frequent because of climate change. can become more frequent because of climate change-— climate change. here in the netherlands _ climate change. here in the netherlands best _ climate change. here in the netherlands best part - climate change. here in the netherlands best part of. climate change. here in the - netherlands best part of lindberg province is officially classified as a disaster zone. that means the government will offer financial to support to those who have lost almost everything. here they are battling to salvage anything that has not been already lost. a water pipe has just passed has not been already lost. a water pipe hasjust passed on many of has not been already lost. a water pipe has just passed on many of the locals were evacuated overnight. they have returned home with shovels and pipes to try to save their homes. this woman tried to build her own flood defences to protect her family. she told me how it felt to be in sight as the water rose. fearful. yeah. afraid as to whether it would come and more. nothing you
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can do. the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. ever. it is terrible. it want to hear it again. ever. it is terrible. , , ., terrible. it is still too soon for man to terrible. it is still too soon for many to comprehend - terrible. it is still too soon for many to comprehend the - terrible. it is still too soon for many to comprehend the lossj terrible. it is still too soon for. many to comprehend the loss or calculate the cost. in a moment we'll get the latest from jenny hill in germany — but first let's speak to anna now in the dutch town of valkenburg. bring us right up to date with what is happening there. the? bring us right up to date with what is happening there.— bring us right up to date with what is happening there. they were never exectin: is happening there. they were never expecting this _ is happening there. they were never expecting this and _ is happening there. they were never expecting this and the _ is happening there. they were never expecting this and the emergency i expecting this and the emergency services, as you can see, working to restore power, to rebuild these pavements. the dutch prime minister is due in this province at some point this afternoon and has urged disaster tourists to stay away and there were two major floods here in there were two major floods here in the early 1990s that the government invested more than 2 billion euros
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invested more than 2 billion euros in building flood plains but they simply were not prepared for this level of rainfall so they have had more than 20 centimetres in the past three days. experts have said it is a once in 1000 year occurrence and that what is happening here is a wake—up call in this region but resonating well beyond. wake-up call in this region but resonating well beyond. thank you. jenn , in resonating well beyond. thank you. jenny. in germany. _ resonating well beyond. thank you. jenny, in germany, the _ resonating well beyond. thank you. jenny, in germany, the human - resonating well beyond. thank you. jenny, in germany, the human toll| resonating well beyond. thank you. | jenny, in germany, the human toll in germany, we are a long way from knowing how many people have been impacted. knowing how many people have been im acted. , ., ., knowing how many people have been imacted. , ., ., ' :: impacted. yes, we are, well over 90 --eole impacted. yes, we are, well over 90 peeple are — impacted. yes, we are, well over 90 peeple are now— impacted. yes, we are, well over 90 people are now confirmed _ impacted. yes, we are, well over 90 people are now confirmed that - impacted. yes, we are, well over 90 people are now confirmed that in - people are now confirmed that in these floods, but that number is expected to rise as the day goes on and that is because a lot of people are still nothing. the authorities in western germany say they cannot really tell us exactly how many people are unaccounted for because mobile phone signal has gone down in many of the affected areas, so it
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may be some people are trying to communicate with their loved ones but are unable to or it may be that the worst has happened. i am still on the banks of the river and you can probably see how powerful this water don't make much of this area is under water. just behind the impact of the tired, terrible scenes unfolded overnight, number of houses collapsed and rescue workers have been trying to get to other people trapped in their homes using boats because the area has been completely flooded and earlier the authorities said they had been receiving phone calls from people trapped in their houses but that rescue, in their words, in many cases, were simply impossible. if anyone here thought that today would bring fresh hope it has been dashed. overnight in a reservoir in another part of the region overflowed its down causing more flooding, thousands of people evacuated from their homes. 165,000
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households without power. germany is reeling from these floods which have devastated notjust this region but the rest of the country and people right here having to wait and hope for those of their loved ones. thank you to jenny thank you tojenny and anna. an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly, because so many staff are being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. more than half a million people were sent an alert last week across england and wales. the rmt union has warned of another surge next week because of confusion about mask wearing on public transport. and meat processing plants have said that they've had to cut production because of staffing issues, as ben king reports. as covid cases rise, the app designed to protect us as telling hundreds of thousands to stay home.
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so many, in fact, some businesses are struggling to stay open. if i aet are struggling to stay open. if i get pinged the main problem is the business has to close so far me it is all about safety so i will probably wear a facemask, i still have my screen up in the shop. it is a problem — have my screen up in the shop. it is a problem because it shuts everything down, especially at schools. — everything down, especially at schools, and my customers with their children_ schools, and my customers with their children they have to isolate them for ten _ children they have to isolate them for ten days and it is so disruptive.— for ten days and it is so disruptive. for ten days and it is so disrutive. , ., ., , , , , disruptive. the number of app users weren't they — disruptive. the number of app users weren't they have _ disruptive. the number of app users weren't they have been _ disruptive. the number of app users weren't they have been close - disruptive. the number of app users weren't they have been close to - disruptive. the number of app users weren't they have been close to an l weren't they have been close to an infected person passed close to have a million last week that england and wales, an increase of 46% on the previous week. at the moment anyone pinged is advised to stay home but from the 16th of august people who are fully vaccinated will not have to. big businesses are also starting to. big businesses are also starting to feel the impact of self isolating star. car—makers nissan and rolls—royce what it might hit production and the association of meat processors says its members are
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close to having to close some production lines down.- close to having to close some production lines down. most of them havin: production lines down. most of them having between _ production lines down. most of them having between 596 _ production lines down. most of them having between 596 and _ production lines down. most of them having between 596 and 1096 - production lines down. most of them having between 596 and 1096 being i having between 5% and 10% being pinged and self isolating at home and this is causing quite a few shortages for the industry and quite a few problems for the industry which is already understaffed. health care providers are warning that staff shortages might hurt their ability to deliver care. in their ability to deliver care. i�*i the nhs it is a very significant issue. we are at the point where we have got so many nhs staff of because of the app contacting then it is beginning to affect patient care. , , , , , it is beginning to affect patient care. , , ,, ,, . it is beginning to affect patient care. ,, care. other businesses such as nightclubs _ care. other businesses such as nightclubs are _ care. other businesses such as nightclubs are getting - care. other businesses such as nightclubs are getting ready i care. other businesses such as nightclubs are getting ready to| care. other businesses such as i nightclubs are getting ready to open for the first time in a year as most coronavirus restrictions are lifted on monday and crowds are preparing to gather at big sporting events, which could all mean even more pinging. the developers have been asked to adjust the sensitivity but
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the government says it is doing its job. the government says it is doing its 'ob. ~ ., the government says it is doing its 'ob. ~ . ., ., job. we are in the middle of a pandemic— job. we are in the middle of a pandemic and _ job. we are in the middle of a pandemic and we _ job. we are in the middle of a pandemic and we know i job. we are in the middle of a pandemic and we know the i job. we are in the middle of a i pandemic and we know the virus spreads and it spreads without showing any symptoms and so the app is one of a number of ways in which we are trying to tackle the virus. the key to the fight against covid is still the vaccine at the weekend sees the second grabbed a jab campaign where any adult can get theirfirst vaccination campaign where any adult can get their first vaccination without an appointment at large pop clinics around the country. new data suggests the number of people infected with covid—19 rose by more than 60% in a week. estimates from the office for national statistics suggest 650,000 people had the virus in the week to the 10thjuly, up from 400,000. our health correspondent philippa roxby is here. how concerned should we be by this increase? ~ .. , , ., ., increase? well, cases are high and risin:
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increase? well, cases are high and rising across _ increase? well, cases are high and rising across much _ increase? well, cases are high and rising across much of _ increase? well, cases are high and rising across much of the - increase? well, cases are high and rising across much of the uk, i increase? well, cases are high and rising across much of the uk, with| rising across much of the uk, with around one in 95 and and around one in one in 90 in scotland, slightly more steady across wales and northern ireland, but the difference between now and the last time we saw these infection numbers as we have two thirds of adults fully vaccinated and they provide very protection. but does not mean that hospitals are not going to be busy and some people will not end up in hospital but the good news is we have the vaccine is in place and for the next few weeks we need to be extremely cautious as things open up. extremely cautious as things open u . _ , ,., extremely cautious as things open u . _ , ., ~' extremely cautious as things open younger adults admitted to hospital with coronavirus are nearly as likely to suffer from complications as people over the age of 50 — according to a new study of 70,000 covid patients. four in ten patients aged between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while being treated. our health correspondent jim reed reports. i'm in icu.
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my lungs collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on. paul was 31—years—old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things, you don't know how to really deal with it but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how. well, before the pandemic, paul was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face that they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could. paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this
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hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury, followed by lung and heart damage. while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger. this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are seeing one in three of even the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications. some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage,
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but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid has lasted over a year. a reminder that, 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting to learn about this virus and its long—term impact on our health. jim reed, bbc news. police and prosecutors are being told to stop blaming each other for the low number of rape convictions in england and wales. only 3% of recorded rapes resulted in a prosecution in the year 2019—20. a report by two watchdogs is demanding an urgent and fundamental shift in the way the crime is investigated and dealt with. our home affairs correspondent june kelly is with me. still desperately low figures. one
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ofthe still desperately low figures. one of the ke still desperately low figures. (me: of the key recommendations still desperately low figures. ©“ie: of the key recommendations in a latest government review was at police and prosecutors needed to work more closely together. the report says there is a blame culture going on, pointing the finger at each other, it says while you have that mindset, you are never going to get any progress on the statistics and getting more cases to court because the government is committed to getting the prosecution right back to where it was five years ago. the people at the top of the police and the crown prosecution service say they have started working more closely together and in fact today they announced even greater collaboration and the watchdog says thatis collaboration and the watchdog says that is fine but where it really matters is what is happening on the ground and that collaboration has to filter right down. one example, they say, the communication between the two organisations is often done by e—mail, they are saying to them, get on the phone and speak to each other because these cases need to be discussed, it shouldn't be done or
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by e—mail. if you think there were 50,000 rate complaints made in england and wales, the latest statistics, that is 50,000 people and the watchdog says today those people deserve to have their cases properly assessed. june people deserve to have their cases properly assessed.— people deserve to have their cases properly assessed. june kelly, thank ou. sir mo farah says he believes online racist abuse towards black sportsmen and women is getting worse. he's called for social media companies to take more action following the racist attacks on england's footballers, after their defeat in the euros final. the four—time olympic champion has been speaking to victoria derbyshire. glorious win! sir mo farah has won multiple medals in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and now he wants to give his support to england's footballers who were racially abused. it's really important for myself to show support throughout the world for black people.
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do you think the abuse that some black sportsmen and women receive is actually getting worse? it seems like it is getting worse, in my honest opinion. because back in the days, back in my time, there was never so much social media. what kind of racist messages have you had on social media? i have had some shocking ones, some saying, "you don't belong, move here." i've had quite a bit. how does that make you feel? to me, this is my home. i have always thought that. social media companies need to do a lot more, they have to be held accountable to what people get up to. even myself, i've had some shocking ones where people have received the message, i have gone delete, i have blocked... i've gone, "report..." gone back to report, nothing happens. nothing happens, no. farah, now 38, wanted tokyo to be his last olympics but he didn't make the qualifying time for the 10,000 metres.
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he exclusively revealed that he's battling an injury. i have a stress fracture on my foot — left foot. i've been struggling for quite a while. finally got diagnosed with a stress fracture. it is disappointing. what is the race that you are imagining will be the end of your career? i think it would be like a marathon, a half marathon. i'd love to be able to show one more track event. so another 10,000 metres? somewhere. what, the world championships? i don't know, victoria! in 2017, at the world championships, you ran the 10,000 metres in 26 minutes, 49 seconds. the other week in manchester, you did it in 27 minutes, 47 seconds, that's a minute slower. yeah. in order for me to compete with the best, then i have to be running that time or even faster.
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the four—time olympic champion says he still has the desire to run and insists this isn't the end of his career. victoria derbyshire, bbc news. the time is 20 past one. our top story this lunchtime... more than 100 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more are injured or missing and coming up, i am here at sandwich, and american leads the way in the open championship. and coming up on the bbc news channel — a break with tradition for formula one. the sport will introduce a new format across the weekend at silverstone, with a sprint race instead of traditional qualifying ahead of the british grand prix. it's a big weekend forfans of formula one with a capacity crowd of 140,000 due at silverstone on sunday for the british grand prix. as the cars race around the circuit,
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they'll be burning fossil fuels but the managing director of f1 says that could change. ross brawn has told the bbc that hydrogen—powered cars could be the long—term future for the sport. our chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, has been looking at the efforts the sport is making to reduce its environmental impact. the roar of the engines and the smell of the exhaust are what formula one is all about for many fans. so how does a sport born out of the awesome explosive power of fossil fuels go green? that is the challenge ross brawn has taken on. the engineer behind michael schumacher�*s seven world titles says he is determined to put sustainability at the heart of f1. but electric engines are a nonstarter, he told me. there is no electric solution today. we don't want them looking at power conservation modes and trying to make the battery last long
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enough to get to the end of the race or saving the battery up so in the last five laps they can really go. that doesn't seem to engage the fans. your instinct, it sounds to me, is possibly hydrogen is maybe the solution you are set on? maybe hydrogen is the root formula one could have, we keep the noise, we keep the emotion. but we move into a different solution. silverstone, on the day of the season's most i exciting grand prix — the british grand prix. the cars have come a long way since jackie stewart won the british grand prix in 1969. but for the moment, f1�*s focus remains on engineering even more efficient hybrid engines and developing biofuels and synthetic e—fuels that will reduce the sport's impact on the environment. in its effort to go net zero by 2030, formula 1 is also reducing the volumes of personnel and freight that travel between races, ensuring all offices,
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facilities and factories are powered by renewable energy, and using offsets and co2 sequestration to cover all remaining emissions. there has been criticism from environmentalists who say formula 1 is relying too much on offsetting. the recognition that environment is a key issue for the sport runs deep, including with the people on the front line of formula one — its drivers. british driver lando norris is a rising star of f1. it's definitely something that over the coming years, i will pay more and more attention to, realising the opportunity you can create for the world and the impact you can have on the world as well, not just certain people. so of course it means a lot to me and whatever way i can help, in whatever way, then i will try and do that.
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formula one represents the pinnacle of automotive technology but the car industry is going electric and f1 knows it could end up looking like a legacy of a past age. other sports should take note — formula one is going green because it doesn't want to end up a dinosaur. justin rowlatt, bbc news. well, as we heard, 140,000 spectators will be at the british grand prix on sunday with strict covid protocols in place. joe wilson is at silverstone. for formula 1 fans, there's no mistaking the sense of occasion, this is wonderful, days of sunshine to look forward to, qualifying today, interesting events on saturday, the race itself on sunday. what is going on over my shoulder, you can see many of the ticket holders arriving, they are showing proof of either a negative lateral flow test or a double vaccine. we have got used to that kind of thing
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in sport. the other key element silverstone has put forward to gain permission to run at full capacity here, is the fact it's a three and a half mile circuit, big area, mainly outdoors, maybe we should think a bit more like a small town rather than a sporting stadium but one thing is absolutely clear, consistently silverstone have said they have to run at full capacity, they have to run at full capacity, they need that revenue to continue as a business. in terms of innovation, very interesting talk about hydrogen in the car is, in terms of the former, tomorrow what we will see is a sprint race for the first time which will decide and define rid positions for the grand prix on sunday. there's always innovation, and i think there is one eternal motor sport. generally, the driver with the fastest car wins and lewis hamilton in particular, needs to summon any kind of inspiration that he can from the silverstone occasion because the driver with the fastest formula 1 car right now is not him! joe, thank you.
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politicians in northern ireland have met the secretary of state, brandon lewis, to discuss their opposition to the government's plans for dealing with legacy issues. proposals to end all prosecutions related to the troubles were widely criticised when they were unveiled earlier this week. danjohnson is at stormont. what do we know about the tone of this meeting? we what do we know about the tone of this meeting?— what do we know about the tone of this meeting? we heard there were frank and robust _ this meeting? we heard there were frank and robust exchanges - this meeting? we heard there were frank and robust exchanges this i frank and robust exchanges this morning, resolving all the issues stemming from the troubles in northern ireland was never going to be simple, finding a solution that pleased everyone was perhaps going to be impossible but what the british government has achieved is unanimous opposition to the plans it has laid out, across the political spectrum, across all the groups that represent victims and the irish government as well. because there are so many families with so many questions, what happened to their loved one? who planted that bomb, who organised the kidnapping,
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carried out the shooting? what about the soldiers and security services? did they always act within the law? those are the questions that remain for thousands of victims, thousands of people who were injured, notjust in northern ireland. the british government wants to put an end to all the prosecutions, the investigations, the inquests and the civil cases as well, right across the board, in effect, an amnesty as some have described it and that is what has enraged people here. they see it as undermining the rule of law. the secretary of state believes that will bring people closer to the truth and to reconciliation through ending prosecutions, putting an information sharing and fact—finding operation but the meeting this morning was responded to by the sinn fein leader mary lou mcdonald saying the british government was acting in total bad faith, doug beattie, the leader of the ulster unionists said victims families and survivors would being failed. the assembly is being recalled here next week so
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politicians can discuss the proposals, the way ahead looking very tricky. dan, thank you. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has acknowledged that the party has a "trust issue" with its former voters. in a bbc interview, he said he was determined to win back their support, but it would be a "slow, long, hard road". he was also filmed taking questions from former labour voters in blackpool. i honestly believe the labour party is a stigma ofjeremy corbyn. still, 18 months on. it's still there. people think he's toxic. trust is invaluable. if you lose trust in something, or somebody, oran organisation, to get the trust back, is so difficult. you're on a kind of a death spiral. i mean, we lost really badly. in 2019, we lost 60 seats in a i row, we've got a lot of work to doi to rebuild and we've got to change. you can't lose that
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badly and say, we i will keep things pretty well as they were, i which is what we're doing. and for more from those voters, and laura kuenssberg s interview with sir keir starmer go to the bbc news website — or download the latest episode of newscast. it's available on on bbc sounds and is on the bbc news channel tonight at 9.30. the second round of golf�*s open championship is underway at royal st george's in kent. the world's best players are competing to win the famous claretjug over the weekend. our sports correspondent andy swiss is watching. it's about the closest most of us will get to the trophy, the open's favourite photo op doing a roaring trade. but for others here, getting their hands on the real claretjug is what it's all about. rory mcilroy. cheering. after a mixed opening round, the rory mcilroy fan club was out in force but they did not have much to cheer at first, as the putts slipped by and he slipped down the
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leaderboard. others though were flourishing. especially collin morikawa, a stunning round from the american and soon he led the way. yes! what a day he is having. among a cluster of english players in contention is tommy fleetwood, and he soon gave the home crowd plenty to get excited about. but if you thought that was good, just watch this. carlos ortiz, taking a direct route. at the other extreme though, paul francesco molinari, twice trying and twice failing to get out of a bunker. eventually he did it, but the damage was done. among a few unheralded names going well south africa's daniel van tonder as he surged right into contention. but it's been collin morikawa's morning — he is the man they have all been trying to catch.
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yes, a great day from the american,

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