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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 16, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. at least 90 dead and hundreds unaccounted for in germany after some of the worst flooding in decades — record rainfall causes rivers to burst their banks, devastating some areas more than three months�* worth of rain fell in 2a hours over parts of western germany, belgium and the netherlands — some local politicians say climate change is to blame. a uk transport union warns of a further surge in self isolation cases in the coming days — due to what they describe as "confusion" over masks on transport services. half of patients admitted to uk hospitals during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart — according to new research.
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the south african president, cyril ramaphosa, says the violence that's swept the country has clearly been planned. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland set out their opposition to the uk government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles. and sir mo farah tells us that racist abuse towards black sportsmen and women is getting worse — and the racist attacks on england players after their defeat to italy in the euros was �*shocking' and �*unacceptable�* hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. emergency services in western germany, supported by hundreds of troops, are resuming their search for dozens
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of people missing after record rainfall caused the worst flooding in living memory. at least 90 people have died in what the chancellor, angela merkel, called a catastrophe. emergency services are trying to rescue people using boats but they say it's difficult to estimate numbers because mobile phone signals are down in many places. at least nine people have also died in the netherlands and belgium, including a 15—year—old girl. unusually heavy rainfall has caused rivers to burst their banks with severe flooding leading to houses collapsing. courtney bembridge reports. the full extent of the damage is only now becoming clear. houses have been ripped apart and roads have all but disappeared. in western germany, three months of rain fell in just 2a hours. the water was so powerful, it crushed a caravan in seconds.
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residents here say the floods came without warning. translation: everything was under water within 15 minutes. _ ourflat, our office, our neighbours�* houses. everywhere was underwater. this motorway in north rhine—westphalia was blocked for kilometres as residents tried to get out. but it was too late for others. translation: i grieve for the people who have lost their lives. _ we don't know the number, but it will be many. some in the basements of their houses, and some who were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. across the border in the east of belgium, cars were picked up and carried by the force of the water. this bridge was submerged and covered in debris. in nearby liege, the river is close to bursting its banks and residents were told to leave.
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translation: i've never seen i anything like this, it's incredible. frankly, i never thought i'd see that in belgium. parts of the netherlands are also underwater and soldiers are on hand in case water levels rise further. translation: we have all seen the images of streets turned - into swirling rivers, neighbourhoods and villages completely flooded. people who are afraid. people who are worried about their business, their homes. scientists have long warned that climate change will make extreme weather events like this more common. and german leaders have also drawn a link between the two. translation: this is a natural disaster. - but the fact it has taken place in this way is certainly connected to the fact climate change is progressing at a speed we have observed for a while. that must be another incentive and also an obligation for those who have become victims here, for us to do everything we can to stop man—made climate change and prevent such disasters at this scale.
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heavy downpours have continued overnight, making the work of rescue teams even more challenging. dozens of people are still missing in germany and the clean—up will take some time. our correspondent anna holligan is in valkenberg, in the netherlands — which has also been badly affected by the record rainfall. sometimes those numbers are just hard to conceptualise and i wanted to bring it home to you, this is one garden on one street in one town, and you can see, have a look at this. the garden furniture is totally submerged. and you know what the residents on the street have told me? they consider themselves to be lucky because they have survived and actually there are two reasons to be optimistic right now for them — the first, look here, you see the water level has gone down slightly and the rain has stopped.
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so i want to bring you around here because this is really incredible. people have been trying to secure their own homes throughout the night. they've been creating their own barriers to try to keep the flood water out so building their own sandbags, and actually, the daughter of this household here, has brought this pump, removing some of the floodwater, their basement entirely flooded, flip—flops and the fridge is floating around, the fire service working all night but they have big jobs at hand so people had been left to fend for themselves and their neighbours, actually, with these types of defences here. i'm going to try to take you a little bit further down this street because you can see the water pumping out, we've seen some fish, dead fish down there, the military have been called in to rebuild one of the bridges. hi. these guys have been
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working all night. down here, they are actually trying to repair a gas pipe because there is a gas leak so they are trying to remove the water and attach a balloon to the gas pipe to stop it from leaking any further. and on the other side of here, i will try to take you down, there's a fire engine coming behind us right now, 10,000 people evacuated from their homes in this region. it might not surprise you to hear this is now officially considered to be a disaster zone. which just means people will be able to access money from the government, the state, to support them because the scale of this damage, the disaster, will be too much for the insurance companies to cope with. if we head down here, i'lljust... we have been here before and checked it is ok, so hopefully that is still the case, but look at this. this bridge collapsed
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because of the floodwater, and now the issue isn't so much, the bridge, you see it's relatively dry now, it's the rising floodwater on these rivers, this riverflooded its banks and that has been pumped down here but actually, the doomsday scenario they feared here in limburg hasn't materialised. and it's thought they mayjust have done enough to protect some people and they've evacuated care homes, some of the elderly residents were put onto tractors to get them to safety. and on the other side of here, the military have built a bridge to get food supplies in and help people to get out. and we will speak to our chief
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environment correspondent in just a few moments. as the number of people getting "pinged" continues to rise, business leaders are also now warning some shops and factories may have to temporarily close because so many employees are isolating. the transport rmt union has also warned of a further surge in self isolation from monday due to confusion over masks on public transport services in england. more than half a million people in england and wales were told to self—isolate by the app last week. that's an increase of 46 per cent compared with the previous week. anyone who receives an alert is advised — but not legally obliged — to self—isolate for ten days. but from the 16th august, people in england who have received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine will no longer need to self—isolate if they receive an alert. richard galpin has been looking at how businesses have been affected. rolls—royce, one of many companies, big and small, now fearful production could be affected by large numbers of staff being told by the nhs covid app to self—isolate for ten days.
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the company says it may have to halve production at its goodwood factory. nissan, another company facing staff shortages after up to 900 workers at its sunderland car plant were sent home — 10% of the workforce. that people will have and without wearing these things, without wearing masks. and the amount of cases will go
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up and we will be back to square one, i think. come and take a seat. at this gp practice in leeds, they fear the worst. they may have to close down now, because members of staff are self—isolating. it seems ridiculous to us that we have staff who are double—vaccinated. you know, i had my first vaccine before christmas. we've been vaccinated for months and yet they're not able to come to work. a government spokesman said it was sticking with the date of august the 16th for the lifting of self—isolation rules. and with covid cases increasing, it was vital to make sure systems for self—isolation were proportionate. richard galpin, bbc news. the solicitor general for england and wales says ministers could consider reimplementing restrictions if the spread of the virus becomes "unacceptable." the comments from lucy frazer come despite borisjohnson saying he wanted the removal of most legal measures in england onjuly i9
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to be "irreversible". i think the position is, we know very clearly that infection rates are going to rise and the health secretary has said they could rise to 100,000. we know therefore that there will be a link, although the link is severely weakened, between infections, hospitalisations and deaths, but those will go up as well. that's why it's important that we keep some measures in place whilst we continue to vaccinate. we've done really well on vaccinations and we have hit the target early for the number of adults to get their second dose. i can now speak to hugh 0smond, who's the founder of the restaurant group various eateries, who has ten sites under the coppa club and �*tavolino brands — he's also the founder of punch taverns. how have you been affected? it's difficult to operate at the moment with people being pinged left right
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and centre, we had a venue, i6 and centre, we had a venue, 16 members of staff work pinged, only a tiny fraction of those ebutt test positive, what with that and all the other regulations that are changing every day, some are guidance, some are low, it's extraordinarily difficult and disruptive, trying to run any kind of business or indeed the nhs, of course. the run any kind of business or indeed the nhs, of course.— the nhs, of course. the venue for 16 --eole the nhs, of course. the venue for 16 peeple were — the nhs, of course. the venue for 16 peeple were pinged _ the nhs, of course. the venue for 16 people were pinged and _ the nhs, of course. the venue for 16 people were pinged and are - the nhs, of course. the venue for 16 people were pinged and are now - the nhs, of course. the venue for 16 people were pinged and are now selfj people were pinged and are now self isolating, presumably you had to shut that? w' , isolating, presumably you had to shut that? w , ., , ., shut that? luckily, it was one we were 'ust shut that? luckily, it was one we were just about _ shut that? luckily, it was one we were just about to _ shut that? luckily, it was one we were just about to open, - shut that? luckily, it was one we were just about to open, one - shut that? luckily, it was one we were just about to open, one of. shut that? luckily, it was one we i were just about to open, one of the recent more members of staff were close to each other than normal, it was the training period so we had to delay the opening. but all over the place, yes, staff are getting pinged and as i say, we test those staff, of course, immediately, very, very, very few end up being positive and so it is genuinely, as people have said, completely paying pandemic,
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from the star, test and trace has not been fit for purpose, that is the thing, if we all thought it was doing any good it would be a different matter but it's clear it has been an absolute shambles from the start with the vast majority of people being pinged probably at no risk at all. and some are turning out to be the other side of walls, all sorts of errors and problems with this app from the start. i think it's just not fit for purpose and not doing any good. the think it's just not fit for purpose and not doing any good. the nhs app is only advisory. _ and not doing any good. the nhs app is only advisory, would _ and not doing any good. the nhs app is only advisory, would you _ and not doing any good. the nhs app is only advisory, would you ever- and not doing any good. the nhs app is only advisory, would you ever say l is only advisory, would you ever say to your staff who had been pinged, i want you to come in, it's not a legal requirement you isolate for ten days? figs legal requirement you isolate for ten da s? �* , ., legal requirement you isolate for tenda s? . , ., ten days? as a licensed and regulated — ten days? as a licensed and regulated business, - ten days? as a licensed and regulated business, that. ten days? as a licensed and i regulated business, that puts ten days? as a licensed and - regulated business, that puts us in an extremely difficult position of course. my view would be that if after a couple of days, people are getting negative tests and negative pcr test, perhaps 2—3 days, it would be safe to return to work but as i
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say, we have a licence, we are licensed in all of our premises, we are regulated and we have to think first and foremost about the health of our staff so if the government guidance says one thing and we do another, it puts us in a very difficult position. i think we know if the pcr test is extremely sensitive and the gold standard, people are testing negative, why should they not be able to work and avoid this disruption to their lives stopped obviously it's a disruption to our business but more important, it's the disruption to their lives, to customers, suppliers, to all the other people effected and indeed, more vital organisations like the nhs, if patients cannot get treated for all manner of conditions, not just covid because so many people are being pinged when they are not even ill, it's going to cause huge disruption and problems, suffering, all across the country. it’s disruption and problems, suffering, all across the country.—
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all across the country. it's not due to england — all across the country. it's not due to england until— all across the country. it's not due to england untilthe _ all across the country. it's not due to england untilthe 16th - all across the country. it's not due to england untilthe16th of- all across the country. it's not due. to england until the 16th of august, in other words, that would be the date from when anybody is double jabbed will not have to self—isolate evenif jabbed will not have to self—isolate even if they are double pinged. would you urge the government to bring that date forward? i would you urge the government to bring that date forward?— bring that date forward? i would urue bring that date forward? i would ura e the bring that date forward? i would urge the government _ bring that date forward? i would urge the government to - bring that date forward? i would urge the government to scrap i bring that date forward? i would l urge the government to scrap test and trace, at no point hasn't actually been shown to be doing any good, we are not reliant on the vaccine programme which has been incredible. the initial result as reported in terms of prevention of serious disease and hospitalisation are incredible. you know, we have moved on from test entries, the solution as we have been told first by matt hancock and by borisjohnson and by chris whitty and by everybody concerned, the solution is the vaccine programme. now that we have 98% of the over 50s showing antibodies and we have got the evidence that this stops zero disease, we should be reliant on the vaccine which has been incredible and test entries should be consigned to the dustbin. it is never worked
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properly from the start, we know it is a shambles, the app does not work properly, it is achieving nothing except causing misery and suffering across the country and potentially shutting down parts of the nhs. thank you. let's get more on our main story, the floods across germany, belgium, the netherlands, some officials now blaming the unprecedented weather and climate change. let's talk to justin unprecedented weather and climate change. let's talk tojustin rhoads, our chief environment correspondent. this intense rain is consistent with climate change, isn't it? absolutely, scientists have been saying for decades that a warming climate, we are going to see more weather extremes, that means heatwaves like we have seen in north america but also more severe rainfall which has of course because this flooding so they have been addicting for a long time this will be the consequence of pumping carbon dioxide ever more into the atmosphere which is what we have been doing so in that sense, it is consistent. but and i think you were
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expecting this, we have to be careful about attributing a single weather event to climate change so yes, it is part of a pattern we expect to see increasing as we continue to emit carbon dioxide but is this one single event down to climate change? we don't know for certain but that said, scientists are getting much better with supercomputers that have been developed in recent years, meaning it is easierfor developed in recent years, meaning it is easier for climate scientists to model how the atmosphere would go without climate change so it's easier for scientists to do what they call attribution modelling, to a tribute event to climate change, you may have seen after the heat dome, that incredible heat wave in north america, western canada and western america, experienced about a week and a half ago, within a few days, eight days, ten days, there were a number of studies which said this would be extremely unlikely, almost impossible without climate change. i expect similar work is being done on this and in a few
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days' time, takes a while, they have to run these models over and over again, we may get an answer saying once again, very unlikely floods this severe without the influence of climate change. i5 this severe without the influence of climate change.— climate change. is the world is auoin climate change. is the world is going quick — climate change. is the world is going quick enough _ climate change. is the world is going quick enough to - climate change. is the world is - going quick enough to decarbonise, to try and prevent these kind of extreme weather events? there is a ve clear extreme weather events? there is a very clear answer — extreme weather events? there is a very clear answer to _ extreme weather events? there is a very clear answer to that _ extreme weather events? there is a very clear answer to that and - extreme weather events? there is a very clear answer to that and that i very clear answer to that and that is no, it is not. we know we need to reduce if we are going to stick to the one and i have set by the un, the one and i have set by the un, the group of nations that come together to try and solve this for the un, if we go for that 1.5 degrees target we need to reduce emissions by six or 7% every year at this decade. that's what we achieved last year, 2020, in the teeth of a pandemic. so it's unlikely, in fact carbon emissions are rising very dramatically around the world as economies begin to unlock. so it's very unlikely we are going to meet those targets are the answer very clearly as know we are not doing enough and i think the only positive that can come out of these really
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dramatic weather events we have seen this summer is that maybe it will force people to think, hold on a second, we need to do more, and that is both politicians but also all of us who give politicians the space to do make the tough decisions and begin to change the way our economies work and emit less carbon dioxide. , , ., ~ economies work and emit less carbon dioxide. , , ., ,, , ., the headlines on bbc news... more than ninety people are dead — and many more are missing — after some of the worst floods to hit germany in decades. an increasing number of uk businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted to hospital during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart — according to new research. younger adults admitted
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to hospital with covid are almost as likely to suffer from complications as those over the age of 50, a new study has found. four in 10 of those between 19 and 49 developed problems with thier kidneys, lungs or other organs while treated. the research looked at over 70,000 adults across all ages in the first wave of covid in 2020. jim reed reports. i'm in icu. my lungs collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on. paul was 31—years—old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things, you don't know how to really deal with it but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how.
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before the pandemic, paul was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could and i was rushed straight to intensive care. put on every machine possible to help my breathing. they acted amazingly. the nhs are phenomenal. paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury,
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followed by lung and heart damage. while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger. this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are seeing one in three of even the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications. some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. so this virus is particularly nasty. vaccination is the best way to protect people. covid is notjust a disease of the frail and elderly. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage, but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid
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has lasted over a year. a reminder that 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting to learn about this virus and its long—term impact on our health. with me now is chris hopson, chief executive, nhs providers the research today is a timely reminder that we still have to take covid really we do. this virus is continually throwing curve balls at us, we don't know what will happen next. if we had said 13 or 12 months ago we would have a delta variant which was 60% were transmissible and the outfit variant that we saw at the beginning of the year, i don't think people would have known that. this is really worrying stop, in my view. we just don't know what the long—term impact is here and what is particularly significant in the
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report, it seems to me, is it doesn'tjust report, it seems to me, is it doesn't just affect, report, it seems to me, is it doesn'tjust affect, as you said, older people in terms of having complications afterwards, it actually also affects younger people and there is no doubt we just don't know how big the ongoing requirement for treatment is going to be for those who have gone into hospital. so we had 311,000 people at the peak in hospital at the peak of january and about half of those, judging by this kind of study, are basically going to have complications that may well need further treatment. so we just don't know what is happening here but it should serve as a really clear warning, you're absolutely right. i clear warning, you're absolutely riuht. ., ., ., ., right. i want to ask you about the nhs and trace _ right. i want to ask you about the nhs and trace app, _ right. i want to ask you about the nhs and trace app, half- right. i want to ask you about the nhs and trace app, half a - right. i want to ask you about the nhs and trace app, half a million| nhs and trace app, half a million pinged in the latest figures including many people who work in the nhs. i'vejust spoken including many people who work in the nhs. i've just spoken to a business owner who says the app is not fit for purpose, we should abandon test entries, what is your view? i abandon test entries, what is your view? ~ ., ., ., ~ , ,
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view? i think again, covid keeps throwin: view? i think again, covid keeps throwing us _ view? i think again, covid keeps throwing us these _ view? i think again, covid keeps throwing us these really - view? i think again, covid keeps throwing us these really difficult dilemmas and the dilemma here is we have got clearly very high rates of infection and rising in the community. so as i said, we know this variant is 60% more transmissible than the previously dominant variant and this is clearly affecting people. we have about 3000 people, three and a half thousand people, three and a half thousand people in hospital, many of them are younger and as we talked about, there are some consequences of that and we to protect ourselves against covid and at the moment, the app is a very important way of doing that. the other half of the dilemma is exactly what hugh 0smond said earlier which clearly is it is affecting people's ability to kind of do ordinary work and certainly in the nhs, it is a very significant issue. we are now at the point we have got so many nhs staff of because of the app opinion that actually, it is beginning to affect patient care so we are going to have to work out again, what the right balance between in sense these
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completely conflicting objectives. are you happy about things like the gulf taking place in kent? silverstone, the numbers of people massing at both of those events? well, there clearly are concerns here about we know that this virus spreads as a result of close social contact, the government has made the decision that it has made, you can see the logic and our trust leaders can't see the logic for it, we were going to have to pull the restrictions at some point, pulling them nearer winter clearly is not feasible given that we know covid is a seasonal disease, with greater seasonal effects so you can see the reasons why the restrictions were pulled but we are seeing as i said, the infection rates rising sojust to talk to you about what is going on in hospitals, as i said, 3200 people in hospital yesterday, that is doubling every two weeks, 1600 on the 2nd ofjuly. there we were, 13
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days later with the doubling. if it carries on at the same rate, we will see 6500 people in hospital by the end ofjuly, something like 13,000 in the middle of august. we don't know where this is going to camp out in terms of when the infection rates in terms of when the infection rates in the community will start to come down but clearly, this is putting very significant pressure on the nhs. i could not agree more, there is that wonderful phrase ofjonathan van—tam, let's not rip the pants of this because effectively, on monday, we just need to make sure that we do exercise personal responsibility and we don't ensure that we are thinking great, complete freedom, no problems at all, the virus has gone away, it absolutely has not.— the authorities in south africa say more than 100 people are now known to have died in days of violence — that followed the jailing of the former president, jacob zuma. the current south african president, cyril ramaphosa, has described
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the unrest in the country as an assault on democracy. we obviously, as a government, are extremely concerned about what happened here. and we are doing everything to deal with it and it's quite clear that all these incidents of unrest were instigated and we are going after those people, we are going after them, we have identified a good number of them and we will not allow anarchy and mayhem to just unfold in our country. the situation in kwazulu natal province remains especially volatile. the bbc�*s vumani mkhize has more from durban. a sense of normality is returning to south africa again after days of violence and looting. here in durban where i am, i have witnessed
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thousands of people queueing up for basic food and that's because shops, malls and warehouses have been looted and gutted. what is encouraging is that trucks from johannesburg are now coming through the n3 route to come and provide some form of relief for durban residents who have been struggling to get access to food. we do know that fuel trucks, food as well as medicine, are making their way to durban to try and provide some form of relief and also, 25,000 troops are set to be deployed in durban to provide law and orderfor wary south african citizens who have witnessed their businesses and their homes being destroyed and invaded. so south africans at the moment are quite optimistic that the military is going to provide law and order, working with the police. the headlines on bbc news... more than 90 people are dead and many more are missing after some of the worst floods to hit germany in decades.
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an increasing number of uk businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted to hospital during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart — according to new research. the south african president, cyril ramaphosa, says the violence that's swept the country has clearly been planned. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland will set out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles, in a meeting with the secretary of state, brandon lewis. let's talk to our correspondent in northern ireland, dan johnson. what is their opposition to this?
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it's notjust the party leaders across the political spectrum in northern ireland who are opposed to these plans. the irish government and victims of the troubles, groups who speak on behalf of those victims, and that's notjust in northern ireland, that is also bereaved families in england who lost loved ones in attacks committed during the troubles, those years of violence that dogged northern ireland. the british government's position laid out earlier this week was that it thought now was the time for a statute of limitation that would in effect end all criminal investigation and prosecution of anybody who was alleged to have committed a crime during the troubles, whichever side they were on, whichever paramilitary groups, or whether they were part of the security services facing accusations as well. but that has led victims' families saying that is undermining the rule of law here, that it would not deliver justice. the rule of law here, that it would not deliverjustice. the british government thinks that in place of
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prosecutions, it can develop a process to bring information forward to reveal the truth and give answers to reveal the truth and give answers to those families about who may have planted bombs, who may have planned attacks are carried out shootings, whether the security services broke the law. but without that potential for criminaljustice, a lot of the families here, backed by the politicians, are saying it's a plan they can't accept. 50 politicians, are saying it's a plan they can't accept.— politicians, are saying it's a plan they can't accept. so who is going to prevail? _ they can't accept. so who is going to prevail? it _ they can't accept. so who is going to prevail? it will— they can't accept. so who is going to prevail? it will be _ they can't accept. so who is going to prevail? it will be interesting . to prevail? it will be interesting to prevail? it will be interesting to see. to prevail? it will be interesting to see- the _ to prevail? it will be interesting to see. the british _ to prevail? it will be interesting to see. the british government| to prevail? it will be interesting - to see. the british government does call the shots, but there have been agreements on the sorts of legacy issues before which is his now going against. in the face of such fierce and united opposition across the political spectrum, and united opposition across the politicalspectrum, it and united opposition across the political spectrum, it is going to be difficult for brandon lewis, the northern ireland secretary of state, to win people over, and there does have to be consensus. these are complicated, sensitive issues that go back so many years. that is in part by the british government says
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prosecutions are no longer reasonably likely, because of the passage of time and the evidence that has diminished. but there is that has diminished. but there is that strong feeling from families that strong feeling from families that people shouldn'tjust be allowed to walk free. they have described it as an amnesty for murder in some cases, and i think it is not acceptable and that it wouldn't be accepted in any other part of the uk. so there will be fierce opposition over this and there is presumably a big row to come. brandon lewis will be feeling the full. that in that meeting this morning, we expect. dan johnson re-aortin. the uk government has updated its guidance and no longer advises against all but essential travel to bulgaria and croatia. both are currently on the amber list and will move to green list next monday. the travel advice issued by the foreign, commonwealth and development office is independent from the government's traffic light system. senior afghan politicians are heading to doha for a new round of negoatiations
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aiming to end the war in the country. a deal seems unlikely as taliban forces continue to make rapid gains on the ground. among those in the delegation is dr abdullah abdullah — head of the high council for national reconciliation. before he left, he spoke to our cheif international correspondent lyse doucet and told her he was under no illusions about the task ahead of him. a breakthrough is not guaranteed, but i can assure our people that a unified team which will represent different walks of life will represent the islamic republic of afghanistan. is something about to happen that could possibly bring afghanistan away from the war? that's our hope. but i am also realistic that the situation on the ground is very difficult,
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and that is what people see. i don't want to create of false expectations. i can assure our people that we will do our best and utmost to put the interests of the country and the people above everything else, and that requires the same level of determination from the other side. is that guaranteed ? we need to test it. you were briefed on the recent talks in tehran involving a delegation of politicians from here and a delegation of taliban. did something positive come out of that? we understand that the taliban presented more detailed ideas. the atmosphere of the talks was very positive. if you're asking me about the outcome, yes, the preference of the taliban was a political solution
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without giving up on their military adventures. until such a thing happens, more clarity about the future of the country and immediate steps to be taken — what was achieved was more clarity between both sides. so what was clarified? do you believe, as they say, that they want a political solution, or was the main focus on the battlefield? their views about elections, their views about leadership, the road map between now and the end state, all of this was very clear. a big gap between what they want, it's huge still. no doubt. for them, a political solution equals surrender. in the interests of keeping
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the environment positive in the upcoming talks, i wouldn't call it that way. even if it sounds like that, they know that that will not happen. that could not happen. dr abdullah abdullah, talking to the bbc�*s lyse doucet. luke grenfell—shaw was 2a years old when he was diagnosed with rare and aggressive stage 4 cancer. he went through surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy and feared he may not pull through. he scoured the internet, looking for people with similar cancers that had gone on to achieve great thing and taken on challenges. his struggle to find the inspiration he was looking for led him to create his own challenge to ride on a tandum 30,000 kilometres from bristol to beijing. in a bid to honour his 25—year—old brotherjohn, who fell to his death in the lake district as luke
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was undergoing chemo, he named the bike chris after his brother s middle name. luke is now halfway through the challenge and is keen to put the difficulties posed by the pandemic to one side and complete his marathon ride. we can speak to luke now, who joins us from almaty in kazakhstan. where are you right now? yes, i am in almaty in — where are you right now? yes, i am in almaty in kazakhstan, _ where are you right now? yes, i am in almaty in kazakhstan, in - where are you right now? yes, i am in almaty in kazakhstan, in the - in almaty in kazakhstan, in the depths of central asia. haifa in almaty in kazakhstan, in the depths of central asia.- in almaty in kazakhstan, in the depths of central asia. how is it auoin ? depths of central asia. how is it oaian? i depths of central asia. how is it going? i mean. _ depths of central asia. how is it going? i mean, it's— depths of central asia. how is it going? i mean, it's amazing - depths of central asia. how is it going? i mean, it's amazing to l depths of central asia. how is it l going? i mean, it's amazing to be ridina going? i mean, it's amazing to be riding right _ going? i mean, it's amazing to be riding right now. _ going? i mean, it's amazing to be riding right now. i _ going? i mean, it's amazing to be riding right now. i feel— going? i mean, it's amazing to be riding right now. i feel intensely l riding right now. i feel intensely lucky to be able to move and travel at all this year of any years. so many people have supported me and made that possible, but it has had its fair share of challenges. i have gone through 50 degrees heat in the desert. i have been parched in mountains, but there have been so many i have met along the way who have made this not only possible,
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but worthwhile. can have made this not only possible, but worthwhile.— have made this not only possible, but worthwhile. can i ask you how, physically. — but worthwhile. can i ask you how, physically. you _ but worthwhile. can i ask you how, physically. you are _ but worthwhile. can i ask you how, physically, you are able _ but worthwhile. can i ask you how, physically, you are able to - but worthwhile. can i ask you how, physically, you are able to do - but worthwhile. can i ask you how, physically, you are able to do it. physically, you are able to do it when you have a stage four cancer and you have been through some gruelling treatment? right and you have been through some gruelling treatment?— and you have been through some gruelling treatment? right now, i am in remission. — gruelling treatment? right now, i am in remission, which _ gruelling treatment? right now, i am in remission, which means _ gruelling treatment? right now, i am in remission, which means i - gruelling treatment? right now, i am in remission, which means i don't - in remission, which means i don't have any active symptoms. but one that was important for me all the way through my treatment was trying to keep as active as possible. physical exercise is one of the most powerful drugs we know about. so whilst i was on chemotherapy every day, i would walk around bristol. sometimes i would cycle on my exercise bike and the doctors told me later that they thought that had probably significantly improved the efficacy of the chemotherapy. and i know it doesn't workjust efficacy of the chemotherapy. and i know it doesn't work just for efficacy of the chemotherapy. and i know it doesn't workjust for me, but for a lot of people.— but for a lot of people. what did the doctors _ but for a lot of people. what did the doctors say _ but for a lot of people. what did the doctors say to _ but for a lot of people. what did the doctors say to you _ but for a lot of people. what did the doctors say to you about - but for a lot of people. what did l the doctors say to you about your prognosis?— the doctors say to you about your araonosis? , , , , ., prognosis? pretty rubbish. i mean, it's a very rare _ prognosis? pretty rubbish. i mean,
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it's a very rare type _ prognosis? pretty rubbish. i mean, it's a very rare type of _ prognosis? pretty rubbish. i mean, it's a very rare type of cancer - prognosis? pretty rubbish. i mean, it's a very rare type of cancer and l it's a very rare type of cancer and the statistics are not worth looking at. so i try to put them out of my mind and i thought, what can i do to put myself on the right side of that percentage line? for me, that was thinking about exercise and diet. it's a situation where there are so much you cannot control and so much is horrible but what can you do to make your life as good as possible, evenin make your life as good as possible, even in a tough situation? that is something that everyone can relate to over the past 18 months. we have all had a tough time. what can we do all had a tough time. what can we do a particularly now as the uk opens up a particularly now as the uk opens up to make the most of the opportunities we have? i up to make the most of the opportunities we have? i said in the introduction — opportunities we have? i said in the introduction that _ opportunities we have? i said in the introduction that you _ opportunities we have? i said in the introduction that you have - opportunities we have? i said in the introduction that you have named . introduction that you have named your bike increase after your brother's middle name. what would he have thought of what you are doing now —— you have named your bike clicks. i now -- you have named your bike clicks. ., , now -- you have named your bike clicks. . , . ., , , ., ., clicks. i mean, is incurably hard to answer that _ clicks. i mean, is incurably hard to answer that because _ clicks. i mean, is incurably hard to answer that because you - clicks. i mean, is incurably hard to answer that because you are - clicks. i mean, is incurably hard to i answer that because you are putting into words what somebody would have told you before. john would have
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told you before. john would have told me what he thought. i know he would be proud, i know he would have joined me and i think he would be delighted to see me at this halfway mark through the adventure, having achieved help from so many people. but it's a tragedy a lot of people can relate to when you have lost someone before their time, that he is not here and ijust have to imagine what he would say. aha, is not here and ijust have to imagine what he would say. a big art of imagine what he would say. a big part of the _ imagine what he would say. a big part of the challenges _ imagine what he would say. a big part of the challenges that - imagine what he would say. a big part of the challenges that you are inviting people to come and join you, and you have come up with this phrase to describe people who live full lives while also living with cancer. tell us about that. there is the term that _ cancer. tell us about that. there is the term that everyone _ cancer. tell us about that. there is the term that everyone has - cancer. tell us about that. there is the term that everyone has heard i cancer. tell us about that. there is l the term that everyone has heard of called cancer survivors. for me, i hate this term because it gives the sense that you have survived, you have won. the journey with cancer is something that is now behind you. and it also implies that you have done better than other people, you
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have somehow been stronger, and that is nonsense. i am incredibly lucky to be here right now. the term can—liver represents the realism that living with cancer is not something i can forget. every scan i have could send me back to hospital, and that is something i have got to live with it by day. everyone with cancer has uncertainties and challenges they are living with each and every day. but on the other side, it's a very optimistic term because we can live with cancer. we can still achieve our dreams, and thatis can still achieve our dreams, and that is what i am trying to show with this cycle ride. 0ne that is what i am trying to show with this cycle ride. one of the special things about this, because i'm doing it on a tandem bike, you can see chris here, and i share the ride with others with a cancer diagnosis. right now, i am sharing the ride with kate price who has also been diagnosed with stage four
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cancer three years ago. she has ridden with me from tashkent to al matty, almost 1000 kilometres. huge hats off to her because we went through some tough times and it shows what can be done with a cancer diagnosis. shows what can be done with a cancer diaanosis. ~ , ., �* shows what can be done with a cancer diaanosis. ~' , ., �* ., ., diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! thank you- _ diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! thank you- i _ diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! thank you. i am _ diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! thank you. i am just _ diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! thank you. i am just the - diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! thank you. i am just the tip - diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! thank you. i am just the tip of. diagnosis. luke, you're amazing! | thank you. i am just the tip of the iceberg. there is an amazing bristol debating team who have made this possible —— bristol to beijing team. we are hoping to raise £300,000 for five charities. we have had semi donations and that has made a huge difference to me when the going has been tough in 50 degrees heat, to keep going. it is really the support of a huge number of people that makes me look a lot better than i am. a huge number of people have made this happen. bud am. a huge number of people have made this happen.— am. a huge number of people have made this happen. and if people want to find out more, _ made this happen. and if people want to find out more, where _ made this happen. and if people want to find out more, where should - made this happen. and if people want to find out more, where should they i to find out more, where should they
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go? go to bristol2beijing.org. i have got it on my t—shirt. check this out. follow the social media, the blog, the podcast. it's all there. and where is next?— blog, the podcast. it's all there. and where is next? next is going further into _ and where is next? next is going further into the _ and where is next? next is going further into the mountains - and where is next? next is going further into the mountains of- further into the mountains of central asia. further into the mountains of centralasia. i'm further into the mountains of central asia. i'm going to go through kyrgyzstan, tadic is done and hopefully end up going through pakistan india and china. but of course, this is a difficult time to cross borders and that doesn't change. i have had a lot of support so far and change. i have had a lot of support so farand many change. i have had a lot of support so far and many pcr tests. my nose feels quite sore by this point, but i know with the help and determination of a lot of people, that it will be possible.— determination of a lot of people, that it will be possible. luke, keep aoain and that it will be possible. luke, keep going and continued _ that it will be possible. luke, keep going and continued success. - that it will be possible. luke, keep going and continued success. we i that it will be possible. luke, keep - going and continued success. we send all our love and luck to you. thank ou so
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all our love and luck to you. thank you so much- _ the headlines on bbc news... more than 90 people are dead and many more are missing after some of the worst floods to hit germany in decades. an increasing number of uk businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted to hospital during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart — according to new research. one of britain's most successful athletes, sir mo farah, says racist abuse towards black sportsmen and women is "getting worse". in an exclusive interview, the four times 0lympic champion has called on authorities to do more to tackle the problem. the 38—year—old has also explained that despite failing to qualify for the tokyo 0lympics,
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he's not ready to hang up his running shoesjust yet. sir mo farah has won multiple medals in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and now he wants to give his support to england's footballers who were racially abused. it's really important for myself to show support throughout the world for black people. do you think the abuse that some black sportsmen and women receive is actually getting worse? it seems like it is getting worse, in my honest opinion. back in the days, back in my time, there was never so much social media. what kind of racist messages have you had on social media? i have had some shocking ones, some saying, "you don't belong here." i've had quite a bit. how does that make you feel? to me, this is my home.
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i have always thought that. social media companies need to do a lot more, they have to be held accountable for what people get up to. even myself, i've had some shocking ones where people have received the message, i have gone delete, i have blocked... i've gone, "report..." gone back to report, nothing happens. i wonder if something should be triggered. as soon as there's racist abuse, something should be triggered. for sure. with technology now, as soon as you... there are words to be said, they should automatically freeze and then the government should see what they can do. how do we make it harder for these people? when you sign up, you put in your passport, your driving licence, your address is automatically there. secondly, i've listened to gary neville and saw a lot a lot of stuff and thse people have jobs
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and families to feed. they might be quite high up in theirjobs. the companies should be aware of what they have been up to. let's shame them in the ways that we can. i know there's more to be done. i think social media companies need to do more. are they actually your spikes? they're my actual spikes. farah, now 38, wanted tokyo to be his last 0lympics but he didn't make the qualifying time for the 10,000 metres. he exclusively revealed that he's battling an injury. i have a stress fracture on my foot — left foot. i've been struggling quite a while. finally got diagnosed with a stress fracture. it is disappointing. you've had a few weeks to reflect on the fact you didn't qualify for tokyo, how are you feeling about it? i am gutted. but this is athletics, this happens. what goes up must come down at some point. what is the race that you are imagining will be the end of your career? i think it would be like a marathon, a half marathon. i'd love to be able to show
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one more track event. so another 10,000 metres? somewhere. the world championships? i don't know, victoria. in 2017, at the world championships, you ran the 10,000 metres in 26 minutes, 49 seconds. the other week in manchester, you did it in 27 minutes 47 seconds, that is a minute slower. yeah. in order for me to compete with the best, i have to be running that time or even faster. can you do that? in the championship, it's tactical. i've always come through in terms of tactics to win as many medals as i have done throughout my career. these are my london... the four—time olympic champion says he still has the desire to run and insists this isn't the end of his career. you know what comes up must come down at some point. i know my career will at some point
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because that's just life, but at the same time, i don't want to end it like this, i want to continue to keep pushing, so when i want to finish, then finish. right now at the minute, it's like, nah! how do you want it to end, then? i want to celebrate with my fans. i want to show people who have supported me throughout my career as a young child. get everyone out and show the appreciation and what i can do. ten years ago, amy winehouse was found dead in herflat in north london. a hugely successful performer, she found it hard to shake her demons. now her parents —janis and mitch — are telling her story in a new bbc documentary called reclaiming amy. they spoke to our music reporter — mark savage — at the jazz caf in camden, where she performed. what am i scared of?
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myself. # love is a losing game. it's ten years since amy winehouse died of alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. i will always remember our last words. i said, "i love you, amy". she said, "i love you, mummy". i can always remember the love she had for me, always there. since then, amy's story has been told countless times but now her parents janis and mitch want to tell their side. people's idea about amy, the very black—and—white image of amy was that she was struggling with addiction to alcohol and drugs. they thought she was a certain way, she wasn't. i knew amy. in a new bbc documentary, the couple and amy's friends look back on the ups and downs of her life. she wanted to be famous, she wanted to be successful. when she got it, it was like,
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oh, god, it all kicked off, it all kicked off. at one point, you say mistakes were made when amy was ill. what were those mistakes? the mistakes were... we didn't know... we didn't know what to do. no—one knew what to do because obviously, the responsibility of the addiction lies with the person who is struggling with the addiction. as a family, we could stand on our heads. how many times we had family interventions, i lost count. how many times i took her into rehab and she'd walk out the next day... i don't think there is no right or wrong way to deal with it. it will be amy's talent that her friends and family remember next week on the anniversary of her death.
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0n the 23rd, we'll all be together at the cemetery. the first ten minutes, we'll be sobbing and then after that we'll be in fits of laughter with a new amy anecdote. although it's not a joyful thing that you would go and celebrate it, but we do — we actually go and remember her. myjoke is, now i know where she is. that's a blackjoke. yes. but true. while amy's family celebrate her humour and kindness, her fans will hold on to her music. mark savage, bbc news. a teenager is to become the youngest person to fly to space when hejoinsjeff bezos on the first human flight launched by his company, blue 0rigin on 20 july. 0liver daemen, whojust turned 18, willjoin 82—year—old wally funk, who will become the oldest ever person in space, on the new shepard rocket.
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paris' iconic eiffel tower is opening today. it was closed in october last year due to the covid crisis. this latest closure was the longest since world war two. visitor numbers will be limited to 10,000 a day to meet social distancing requirements, fewer than half of their pre—covid levels. and, before we go, if you're in the northern hemisphere and minded to go swimming to cool off this summer, you might want to give one siberian lake a miss. the water is mighty chilly in lake baikal in siberia, where international swimmers plunge into icy waters with temperatures as low as 4 degrees centigrade. they were racing in what's known in russia as the great swim, which is almost 44 miles usually. the swim was dedicated to highlighting ecological issues in siberia. it had to be cut short because the water temperature was so unusually cold.
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you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. sunny skies and temperatures into the high 20s. that's what many of us are in for this weekend. in fact, it could turn a little too hot across some south—eastern parts of the country as temperatures hit 30 on sunday. so big high pressure has established itself over us. it's come in from the azores and is here to stay for the next few days. but there's always going to be a bit more cloud around northern and western scotland and the north of northern ireland. that's because we're closer to weatherfronts here and the wind is blowing off the ocean, so a bit fresher.
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you can see the yellow colours. but elsewhere, easily mid—20s across eastern and south—eastern scotland. high 20s across many parts of england and wales. temperatures aren't the only high thing. uv levels as well, perhaps even very high across southern areas of the uk. it's going to be a bit fresher for the gulf, though, off the coast of kent. temperatures may not even make 20 celsius. the forecast for friday evening and into the early hours of saturday shows quiet weather across england and wales. it is going to stay dry. a bit more cloud overnight across western scotland and northern ireland and that will drift inland, which means that the morning in these areas will be overcast, particularly across northern ireland. i wouldn't be surprised if there's mist and murk around coasts, maybe a bit of drizzle in the western isles. elsewhere, it's sunshine from the word go and many of us are in for a glorious saturday, with temperatures hitting the high 20s widely across the country. eastern scotland and aberdeenshire
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are in the mid—20s. the high pressure is with us on sunday, but around the high pressure, we've got a wind blowing and there's a weatherfront here across the north of scotland, so more cloud and spots of rain for parts of the highlands here, maybe the north coast of northern ireland. but south of that, it is looking sunny once again, every bit as warm if not warmer. temperatures could hit 30 celsius in london. you can see here across western scotland, a bit fresher. temperatures in glasgow around 20 degrees. the temperatures will ease as we head into next week. for example, you can see london hitting the 30 degree mark on sunday, but by the time we get to monday and tuesday, we're into the mid—20s.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 11.00: at least 90 dead and hundreds unaccounted for in germany, after some of the worst flooding in decades — record rainfall causes rivers to burst their banks, devastating some areas. more than three months' worth of rain fell in 2a hours over parts of western germany, belgium and the netherlands — some local politicians say climate change is to blame. an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly — because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart — according to new research.
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politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland set out their opposition to the uk government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles. and visitors return to the farne islands, off the coast of northumberland — an important breeding ground for a number of rare seabirds. good morning and welcome to bbc news. more than 90 people are now known to have died in flooding that's devastated parts of western germany. dozens of people are still missing after heavy rainfall caused the worst flooding in living memory. the german chanceller,
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angela merkel, has described it as a "catastrophe." emergency services are trying to rescue people using boats, but they say it's difficult to estimate numbers because mobile phone signals are down in many places. at least nine people have also died in the netherlands and belgium, including a 15—year—old girl. unusually heavy rainfall has caused rivers to burst their banks, with severe flooding leading to houses collapsing. courtney bembridge reports. the full extent of the damage is only now becoming clear. houses have been ripped apart and roads have all but disappeared. in western germany, three months of rain fell in just 2a hours. translation: everything was under water within 15 minutes. _ 0urflat, our office, our neighbours' houses, everywhere was under water. this motorway in north rhine—westphalia was blocked
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for kilometres as residents tried to get out, but it was too late for others. translation: i grieve for the people who have lost their lives. _ we don't know the number, but it will be many. some in the basements of their houses and some who were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. across the border in the east of belgium, cars were picked up and carried by the force of the water. this bridge was submerged and covered in debris. in nearby liege, the river is close to bursting its banks and residents were told to leave. translation: i have never seen anything like this. - it's incredible. frankly, i never thought i'd see that in belgium. parts of the netherlands are also under water and soldiers are on hand in case water levels rise further. translation: we have all seen the images of streets turned - into swirling rivers, neighbourhoods and villages completely flooded. people who are afraid.
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people who are worried about their business, their homes. scientists have long warned that climate change will make extreme weather events like this more common, and german leaders have also drawn a link between the two. translation: this is a naturalj disaster, but the fact it's taking place in this way is certainly connected to the fact that climate change is progressing at a speed we have observed for a while. that must be another incentive, and also an obligation, for those who have been victims here for us to do everything we can to stop man—made climate change and prevent such disasters at this scale. heavy downpours have continued overnight, making the work of rescue teams even more challenging. courtney bembridge, bbc news. germany has reported over 90 deaths. joining me now is moritz friedenberg, a journalist at radio hagen, the local station for hagen, one of worst affected cities in germany's north
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rhine—westphalia region. thank you forjoining us here in bbc news this morning. pleasejust describe to us how bad things are in hagen. describe to us how bad things are in haaen. ., ., describe to us how bad things are in harem ., ., , hagen. yeah, in the morning we spoke to the fire department _ hagen. yeah, in the morning we spoke to the fire department in _ hagen. yeah, in the morning we spoke to the fire department in hagen - hagen. yeah, in the morning we spoke to the fire department in hagen and i to the fire department in hagen and they told us that the situation starts relaxing a little bit, so the water level drops and the rivers go back, but there are still lots of work to do and you can imagine there are lots of people who have insecurity at the moment. dr philippe when you say the water level is receding, that doesn't necessarily mean the problems are over, does it? necessarily mean the problems are over. does it?— necessarily mean the problems are over, does it? no, because you see the damage — over, does it? no, because you see the damage that _ over, does it? no, because you see the damage that was _ over, does it? no, because you see the damage that was caused, - over, does it? no, because you see the damage that was caused, there | the damage that was caused, there was lots of heavy rain in the last few days. this last night there was no rain and we are really lucky for it, but there are basements that are full of water. water damage to street, lots of main streets in
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hagen which can't be passed, so the fire department and the police have lots of problems to eat the areas which are damaged and there is still lots of work to do until we can go back to normal life. fiur lots of work to do until we can go back to normal life. our evacuation still takina back to normal life. our evacuation still taking place? _ back to normal life. our evacuation still taking place? because - back to normal life. our evacuation still taking place? because i - back to normal life. our evacuation still taking place? because i know. still taking place? because i know whilst the rain had stopped and the waters have started to recede, some areas are still evacuating their residents?— residents? yeah, for sure, especially _ residents? yeah, for sure, especially the _ residents? yeah, for sure, especially the south - residents? yeah, for sure, especially the south of - residents? yeah, for sure, i especially the south of hagen residents? yeah, for sure, - especially the south of hagen is very affected. there are floods which still take cars or trees and you have the problem that you can't reach the areas where people are. lots of people had to leave their homes and the problem now is that the people have to search for a new place to stay. we have two safe spots here in hagen and there are many more coming because lots of people need a new place to stay at the moment. people need a new place to stay at the moment-— people need a new place to stay at the moment. ., ., ., the moment. ok. i am going to come to the subject — the moment. ok. i am going to come to the subject of _ the moment. ok. i am going to come to the subject of climate _ the moment. ok. i am going to come to the subject of climate change - the moment. ok. i am going to come to the subject of climate change and l to the subject of climate change and what the residents think about this, but first of has the area been
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declared an emergency area? will qualify forfederal support? declared an emergency area? will qualify for federal support?- qualify for federal support? yeah, there are two _ qualify for federal support? yeah, there are two or— qualify for federal support? yeah, there are two or three _ qualify for federal support? yeah, there are two or three places - qualify for federal support? yeah, there are two or three places to i there are two or three places to stay where'd you can have a place to sleep and eat. there are emergency areas when there are people hurt, but fortunately in hagen a situation is that we have no deaths as yet, no people hurt really badly. the main people hurt really badly. the main people no problem in the situation of the people have no homes at the whole city is destroyed, you have the possibility to pass the whole city. lots of shops are still closed because they were flooded and i think the situation will stay very bad until the end of the week. in terms of what the residents think about this weather incident, obviously a lot of discussion now over the links to climate change dr philippe devos to the locals think? how does germany look upon this? —— what do the local think? yes. how does germany look upon this? -- what do the local think?— what do the local think? yes, i think there _ what do the local think? yes, i think there are _ what do the local think? yes, i think there are many _ what do the local think? yes, i think there are many people i
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what do the local think? yes, i i think there are many people who speak of climate change, but now first the people just want to help other people and i think the topic of climate change will have a great role in the next weeks. now the main focus is on security and helping the people who are affected by the flooding, but i think the topic of climate change will be bigger and bigger in the next weeks because the flooding is never happened to hagen and it was a catastrophe for the whole city, for the whole region. 0k, moritz friedenberg, thank you very much for your time. well, obviously some of that flooding... flooding does not understand borders. some of that has crossed into belgium as well, where at least nine people have died, including a 15—year—old girl. those living in the belgian city of liege close to the river meuse have been told to evacuate or move to upper floors. let's speak to dr philippe devos, who is a liege resident.
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thank you very much forjoining us. just how serious are things in the city? just how serious are things in the ci ? ~ ., , ,., city? well, there are still some areas that _ city? well, there are still some areas that are _ city? well, there are still some areas that are underwater. - city? well, there are still some areas that are underwater. the | city? well, there are still some - areas that are underwater. the water is still at the level of the first floor in some areas, while in others the water is leaving now, so... some people are just able to go back in the house right now, while others are not yet safe... and the helicopters are just flying now to take them back to the ground. so it is very different, it depends on where you are in area of liege. dr philippe devos, can you explain how you as a family experienced flooding? was it quick? we have heard about the speed at which it caught people out parts of germany.
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what happened to you? yes. caught people out parts of germany. what happened to you?— what happened to you? yes, to me, nothina what happened to you? yes, to me, nothing happened — what happened to you? yes, to me, nothing happened because - what happened to you? yes, to me, nothing happened because i - what happened to you? yes, to me, nothing happened because i am - what happened to you? yes, to me, | nothing happened because i am living on a hill, but my parents are living... 0vera on a hill, but my parents are living... over a river, so they had to move, actually. so two days ago in the evening, the water was flooding, but it was not a big concern for them. there was only 1—2 centimetres in the garden and the garden is 1.5 metres lower than the house, so they went to sleep and said, ok, nothing will happen, but at 2am the police asked them to evacuate because the water reached floor in less than five hours. the level of the river is higher than
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1.5 metres, so they had to move. they went on a hill in a little school and i think for four hours later, the water was on the ceiling of the ground floor of their houses, so i am very happy that the police asked them to evacuate. 0therwise, asked them to evacuate. otherwise, they would have been on the first floor of the house without any help from anyone. they are more than 80, so it would have been a disasterfor them. dr so it would have been a disaster for them. , , , , so it would have been a disaster for them. , ,, , them. dr philippe devos, i hope your famil , them. dr philippe devos, i hope your family. your— them. dr philippe devos, i hope your family, your parents _ them. dr philippe devos, i hope your family, your parents are _ them. dr philippe devos, i hope your family, your parents are able - them. dr philippe devos, i hope your family, your parents are able to - family, your parents are able to stay safe and thank you for your time. , ., ~ stay safe and thank you for your time. , ., ,, i. here in the uk, younger adults admitted to hospital with covid are almost as likely to suffer from complications as those over the age of 50, a new study has found. four in ten of those between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while treated. the research looked at over 70,000 adults across all ages in the first
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wave of covid in 2020. jim reed reports. i'm in icu. my lungs collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on. paul was 31 years old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things, you don't know how to really deal with it, but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how. well before the pandemic, paul was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face
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they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could and i was rushed straight to intensive care. put on every machine possible to help my breathing. they acted amazingly. the nhs are phenomenal. paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury, followed by lung and heart damage. while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger.
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this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are seeing one in three of even the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications. some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. so this virus is particularly nasty. vaccination is the best way to protect people. covid is notjust a disease of the frail and elderly. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage, but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid has lasted over a year. a reminder that 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting to learn about this virus and its long—term impact on our health. jim reed, bbc news.
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and we will have plenty more on this story, as well as more reaction and criticism of the nhs test and trace app coming up shortly. the headlines on bbc news: at least 103 people are dead and many more are missing after some of the worst floods to hit germany in decades. also germany in decades. in parts of wider europe. an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted to hospital during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart, according to new research. well, we stay with the subject of
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coronavirus. the uk government has updated its travel guidance and no longer advises against all but essential travel to bulgaria and croatia. both are currently on the amber list and will move to the green list next monday. the travel advice issued by the foreign, commonwealth and development office is independent from the government's traffic light system. as the number of people getting "pinged" in the uk continues to rise, business leaders are also now warning some shops and factories may have to temporarily close because so many employees are isolating. the transport rmt union has also warned of a further surge in self—isolation from monday due to confusion over masks on public transport services in england. more than half a million people in england and wales were told to self—isolate by the app last week. that's an increase of 46%, compared with the previous week.
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anyone who receives an alert is advised — but not legally obliged — to self—isolate for ten days. but from the 16th august, people in england who have received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine will no longer need to self—isolate if they receive an alert. richard galpin has been looking at how businesses have been affected. rolls royce, one of many companies, big and small, now fearful production could be affected by large numbers of staff being told by the nhs covid app to self—isolate for ten days. the company says it may have to halve production at its goodwood factory. nissan another company facing staff shortages after up to 900 workers at its sunderland car plant were sent home — 10% of the workforce. here in sheffield, this numberplate manufacturing company faces a similar problem of staff shortages. eight members of the team
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here currently self—isolating. that's a problem for our business because we're going to be letting down customers in a very competitive market. it adds cost to a business that's already had significant costs incurred last year through everything that we've had to endure. rob, a member of the team, is now back at work after having to self—isolate along with his family. from monday, there are going to be a lot more cases and the amount of self—isolation will go up because of the amount of contact that people will have and without wearing these things, without wearing masks. and the amount of cases will go up and we will be back to square one, i think. come and take a seat. at this gp practice in leeds, they fear the worst. they may have to close down now, because members of staff are self—isolating. it seems ridiculous to us that we have staff who are double vaccinated. you know, i had my first vaccine before christmas. we've been vaccinated for months and yet they're not able to come to work.
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a government spokesman said it was sticking with the date of august 16th for the lifting of self—isolation rules. and with covid cases increasing, it was vital to make sure systems for self—isolation were proportionate. richard galpin, bbc news. staff absences — caused by the pingings — could see shortages of meat products, the industry has warned. nick allen is the chief executive of the british meat processors association. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. good morning. first off, just tell us how much of an impact test and trace app is having or could have on the industry.— and trace app is having or could have on the industry. certainly over the last two — have on the industry. certainly over the last two weeks _ have on the industry. certainly over the last two weeks we _ have on the industry. certainly over the last two weeks we have - have on the industry. certainly over the last two weeks we have seen i the last two weeks we have seen increase in calls from members having some problems with people being pinged and having to self—isolate and a brief run round the members yesterday said most of
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them are having anything between 5-10% them are having anything between 5—10% being pinged by the app and therefore self isolating at home and this is actually causing quite a few shortages for the industry and quite a few problems for the industry, which is already understaffed with staff levels running at 10% below normal capacity, for brexit and covid reasons anyway, so this is starting to cause quite a few problems for us.— starting to cause quite a few problems for us. starting to cause quite a few aroblems for us. ., , ., , ., ,, problems for us. could you 'ust take us thranh problems for us. could you 'ust take us through what * problems for us. could you 'ust take us through what those _ problems for us. could you just take us through what those props - problems for us. could you just take us through what those props are - problems for us. could you just take us through what those props are at l us through what those props are at the practicalities? how we feel it in shops, for example?— the practicalities? how we feel it in shops, for example? what a lot of our members — in shops, for example? what a lot of our members are _ in shops, for example? what a lot of our members are having _ in shops, for example? what a lot of our members are having to - in shops, for example? what a lot of our members are having to do - in shops, for example? what a lot of our members are having to do is - our members are having to do is actually cut down the number of products they are doing, so they are possibly managing to get the same amount of product through, but the of lines are having to prioritise the key lines and not pushing out the key lines and not pushing out the variety, so probably in the shops at the moment you are probably seeing less variety on the shelves, rather than necessarily less meat, but it is increasingly getting a struggle, really, to do this and i think the confusion we are trying to
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sort out with our members is what does this being pinged by the app actually mean? i noticed you said earlier on that it is an advisory note, it is not actually compulsory, but unfortunately most people are taking it at face value that it is staying at home and self isolating. as i say, that is causing us quite a few problems in the plant. share as i say, that is causing us quite a few problems in the plant. are you sa ina , few problems in the plant. are you saying. then. _ few problems in the plant. are you saying, then, nick, _ few problems in the plant. are you saying, then, nick, that— few problems in the plant. are you saying, then, nick, that you - few problems in the plant. are you saying, then, nick, that you would j saying, then, nick, that you would like it to be advisory? irate saying, then, nick, that you would like it to be advisory?— like it to be advisory? we would like it to be advisory? we would like it to be _ like it to be advisory? we would like it to be clear... _ like it to be advisory? we would like it to be clear... sorry, - like it to be advisory? we would like it to be clear... sorry, it. like it to be advisory? we would like it to be clear... sorry, it is. like it to be clear... sorry, it is advisory. _ like it to be clear... sorry, it is advisory, would _ like it to be clear... sorry, it is advisory, would you _ like it to be clear... sorry, it is advisory, would you like - like it to be clear... sorry, it is advisory, would you like all. like it to be clear... sorry, it is. advisory, would you like all your members to follow that approach? it is... it is the clarity, of what are they? what does this mean,, when they? what does this mean,, when they are being advised? the app tells you very clearly at the moment you are supposed to self—isolate at home. it is now coming out that actually this is an advisory measure, so actually what should you do? and that clear guidance from government about what should our
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members be saying to staff when they phone up and say they have been pinged? should they go and get tested? should they, you know, have that conversation with them that it is advisory? at the moment, everyone is advisory? at the moment, everyone is taking it at face value, oh, right, you'd better stay at home for ten days, we will live with it. so it is lack of clarity out there, at the moment, that is causing a lot of confusion. , ., , , the moment, that is causing a lot of confusion. , ., , , confusion. obviously your members have a duty — confusion. obviously your members have a duty of _ confusion. obviously your members have a duty of care _ confusion. obviously your members have a duty of care to _ confusion. obviously your members have a duty of care to their- confusion. obviously your members have a duty of care to their staff. i have a duty of care to their staff. absolutely, yes. what decision are you likely to come to? because you are saying confusion but it sounds like you are going to have to take the bull by the horns here. well. like you are going to have to take the bull by the horns here. well, i think we're _ the bull by the horns here. well, i think we're probably _ the bull by the horns here. well, i think we're probably going - the bull by the horns here. well, i think we're probably going to i the bull by the horns here. well, i think we're probably going to be i think we're probably going to be saying to members later on in the day is actually, when star phone in and say they have been pinged, first and say they have been pinged, first and foremost get them tested and get have a conversation with them about where they have been and what the likelihood is that they have actually caught coated and whether
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they are likely to test positive, but the first step would probably be to get tested and we have been in some conversations with the government and that is probably what the advice coming out of government would be, but at the moment it is quite confusing and there is nothing actually written down out there for us to say to our members, this is what you should too. {ltic us to say to our members, this is what you should too.— what you should too. ok. we are aoain to what you should too. ok. we are going to leave — what you should too. ok. we are going to leave it _ what you should too. ok. we are going to leave it there _ what you should too. ok. we are going to leave it there for - what you should too. ok. we are going to leave it there for now. i going to leave it there for now. thank you very much, nick allen. thank you very much, nick allen. thank you. well, as we've been reporting, here in the uk younger adults admitted to hospital with covid are almost as likely to suffer from complications as those over the age of 50, a new study has found. four in 10 of those between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while treated. and separately, the latest figures from public health england show
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there were 36,800 new confirmed or probable cases of the delta variant, in the last week. the total number of reported infections is up by 17% on the week before — at more than a quarter of a million. well, to discuss this — and also the impact the nhs app pinging is having on businesses and why isolating is and why isolating is still important, we have professor adam finn, professor of paediatrics at the university of bristol and member of thejoint committee on vaccination and immunisation. he is with me to hopefully answer those questions. thank you very much. so this study, professor adam finn, what have we learned on how it can be used? 50 finn, what have we learned on how it can be used?— can be used? so good morning, and es, a can be used? so good morning, and yes. a very — can be used? so good morning, and yes, a very interesting _ can be used? so good morning, and yes, a very interesting study, i can be used? so good morning, and yes, a very interesting study, very l yes, a very interesting study, very thoroughly done and it gives us a lot of very important information. what it is telling us is that this infection, when you get it and get sick enough to be hospitalised, is
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notjust going to affect your lungs. it is a high probability you're going to have other organ injury that we can measure. you know, these are things we have got tests for, we can look at a function of the kidneys, heart and the lungs, and these are serious long—term health consequences. and although we have long known that this is a disease that primarily affects older people and men are more than women, what this is showing us is that the young people, men and women, who fall sick with this infection, are similarly injured by the virus. so this is an important message, really, for young people at the moment because the hospitalisations we are seeing this time round are proportionately more in young people because the older folks are being protected by vaccination.— folks are being protected by vaccination. �* , , ., . vaccination. and this is not... we are not talking _ vaccination. and this is not... we are not talking about _ vaccination. and this is not... we are not talking about long - vaccination. and this is not... we are not talking about long covidl are not talking about long covid here, are we? are not talking about long covid here. are we?— are not talking about long covid here, are we? , ., ., ., ,, here, are we? very important to make that distinction. _ here, are we? very important to make that distinction. long _ here, are we? very important to make that distinction. long covid _ here, are we? very important to make that distinction. long covid is - here, are we? very important to make that distinction. long covid is a - that distinction. long covid is a much harder thing to research because we don't have a test for it,
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you know? we are still in the process of understanding what it is and it is eighth in a diverse range of different symptoms that go on, including in people who are only mildly affected. this by contrast is something we can really measure, really get a handle on these organ injury problems because we know how to detect them and measure them. and this is what happens when you come into hospital with covid. when you go home, you are not cured, you are still ill in many cases and with consequences that could go on for months or even for the rest of your life. �* ., ., ., ., ., life. before we move onto other roints life. before we move onto other points around — life. before we move onto other points around the _ life. before we move onto other points around the coronavirus, i life. before we move onto other i points around the coronavirus, we talk about organs being damaged. do they remain damaged? are we talking about a lifetime of damage here? share about a lifetime of damage here? are we about a lifetime of damage here? site: we talking about about a lifetime of damage here? sine we talking about a lifetime of damage you it is possible. it is a bit too soon to say, but what we are certainly looking at is organ damage that doesn't immediately resolve, so as you leave the hospital you are still left, for example, with
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reduced function of your kidneys, you may still be having breathing difficulties in some cases, heart problems, neurological problems and so on. so time will tell how well and how reliably these problems resolve and one would hope they would resolve, at least to an extent, but never this is still a very serious illness for most people. very serious illness for most r-eole. : , ., very serious illness for most r-eole. , :, , very serious illness for most r-eole. , ., people. absolutely, add we cases are aoain u-. people. absolutely, add we cases are going up. hospitalisations _ people. absolutely, add we cases are going up. hospitalisations very i going up. hospitalisations very slowly. does this then underlined the importance of vaccinations and how does that fit in with the test and trace? it is coming in for some heavy criticism.— heavy criticism. well, on the first roint i heavy criticism. well, on the first point i think— heavy criticism. well, on the first point i think it _ heavy criticism. well, on the first point i think it very _ heavy criticism. well, on the first point i think it very much - point i think it very much underlines the one solution we have got and that the only real solution we have got to this problem is to get as many adults fully immunised as we possibly can. there is now crystal clear evidence that if you have two doses of vaccines two weeks after the second dose of your risk of getting seriously ill like this are massively reduced or stopped not
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entirely eliminated, but very, very much reduced. so the more people we can get immunised, the lettuce is going to be a problem. i think with regard to the whole pinning saga, this is a rapidly developing situation. everyone's attention until maybe a week ago was on the number of hospitalisations and now the pinning is dropping that actually having a large epidemic of mother infections with fewer hospitalisations also has ramifications for the country. certainly in my lab and my clinical research group have been very seriously affected by this as well, so all areas of activity are being affected by people needing to isolate because of the very rapidly rising number of cases. so it is a big problem. it rising number of cases. so it is a big problem-— big problem. it certainly is, we werejust _ big problem. it certainly is, we were just talking _ big problem. it certainly is, we were just talking to _ big problem. it certainly is, we were just talking to a - big problem. it certainly is, we were just talking to a member| big problem. it certainly is, we i were just talking to a member of a business association. i just want to go very quickly back to an upcoming event, every important event this
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weekend. 0bviously vaccines, vaccination and immunisation, is your area. we vaccination and immunisation, is yourarea. we are vaccination and immunisation, is your area. we are still looking at those hard to reach this grab a job and that is coming up, are those locations in the correct place? ? he grabbed a jab event. i locations in the correct place? ? he grabbed a jab event.— grabbed a 'ab event. i can't answer that grabbed a jab event. i can't answer that because _ grabbed a jab event. i can't answer that because i _ grabbed a jab event. i can't answer that because i don't _ grabbed a jab event. i can't answer that because i don't know- grabbed a jab event. i can't answer that because i don't know where i grabbed a jab event. i can't answer i that because i don't know where they are, but i certainly hope they are and certainly we are doing everything we can to inform people in areas where uptake has been low, to give them the information they need to make the actually very clear and obvious decision that having a vaccine is a good idea is really what we need to be focusing on at the moment. what we need to be focusing on at the moment-— what we need to be focusing on at the moment. :, , ~ ., the moment. ok. professor adam finn, as ever it is— the moment. ok. professor adam finn, as ever it is always _ the moment. ok. professor adam finn, as ever it is always a _ the moment. ok. professor adam finn, as ever it is always a pleasure. - as ever it is always a pleasure. thank you very much indeed, thank you. thank you very much indeed, thank ou. :, ", , :, thank you very much indeed, thank ou. :, . you. thanks so much, take care. movina you. thanks so much, take care. moving on _ you. thanks so much, take care. moving on now... _ politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland are setting out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles, in a meeting with the secretary
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of state, brandon lewis. let's talk to our correspondent in northern ireland, dan johnson. is this meeting going on? what are we expecting? the is this meeting going on? what are we expecting?_ is this meeting going on? what are we expecting? the meeting has 'ust broken u ., we expecting? the meeting has 'ust broken up. that i we expecting? the meeting has 'ust broken up. that was i we expecting? the meeting has 'ust broken up. that was a i we expecting? the meeting has 'ust broken up. that was a virtuali broken up. that was a virtual meeting involving the secretary of state, brandon lewis, representatives of the irish government, and the leaders of the five main political parties in the northern ireland. the instant reaction we are getting out of that meeting was that there was a frank exchange of views, that there had been a lot of straight talking and that some of the political leaders remain sceptical about the consultation process, when they believe the government will press ahead with its plan to end prosecutions relating to the troubles. the sinn fein leader mary lou mcdonald said that this meeting showed the government was acting with total bad faith and trying to facilitate a process to give cover to the british government. we
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understand the assembly here will be recalled from recess next week to discuss the government's plan to enact that statute of limitations, which some have described as an amnesty for murders that were committed during the years of the troubles. it would effectively end all criminal investigations, civil cases and inquests into the deaths that happened during northern ireland's troubles, into attacks as well, and that has been met by fierce opposition by victims, survivors, bereaved families, who don'tjust want to survivors, bereaved families, who don't just want to know what happened, what happened to their loved one and who was responsible, but want to see people held to account with justice. the but want to see people held to account withjustice. the british government's plan proposal is that prosecutions are not realistic after so much time and that it is better to invest time and energy in an information sharing process, where families would at least get some information, some facts, the truth, if not proper criminal prosecutions. but there has been further reaction this morning from northern ireland's
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human rights chief commissioner, who said, these proposals appear to disregard the requirements for an effective investigation under article two of the european convention on human rights and the decision to halt existing inquests and other civil actions also raises profound issues about the veracity of rule of law. so brandon lewis has got a clear inside this morning to the level of opposition, which has united political opinion here in northern ireland against the british government's plan so far. {ltiq northern ireland against the british government's plan so far.— government's plan so far. ok, dan johnson at — government's plan so far. ok, dan johnson at stormont _ government's plan so far. ok, dan johnson at stormont there, - government's plan so far. ok, dan johnson at stormont there, thankl johnson at stormont there, thank you. let's speak to stephen farry mp, deputy leader of the alliance party in northern ireland. frank exchanges. can you give us an idea what was said?— idea what was said? there is near universal revulsion _ idea what was said? there is near universal revulsion in _ idea what was said? there is near universal revulsion in northern i universal revulsion in northern ireland at these plans from the uk government and legacy. this has been a very difficult process over the last 20 years but we had an agreement, called the stormont house
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agreement, that involved the british and i was government and the political parties, which has now been set aside. this process is framed almost entirely around its agenda of a false narrative that we have for having vexatious investigations into british army veterans. in return to that the government is holding on to this general amnesty because they know they have to do that to get it over they have to do that to get it over the line. it undermines the rule of law, thejustice the line. it undermines the rule of law, the justice system and human rights here in northern ireland. there is huge opposition traits. what would you do about it? taste there is huge opposition traits. what would you do about it? we will fiaht it in what would you do about it? we will fight it in the — what would you do about it? we will fight it in the house _ what would you do about it? we will fight it in the house of— what would you do about it? we will fight it in the house of commons i what would you do about it? we will| fight it in the house of commons and the rest of parliament. also, the assembly has been recalled on tuesday and they will make their views known, as well. no doubt the biden administration will have something to say on this also, given the huge interest that the united states is taken in the peace process. ultimately, ithink states is taken in the peace process. ultimately, i think this will end up in the courts because
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there isn't the basis for doing a general amnesty under international human rights law, and particularly the european convention on human rights. there will be a legal challenge if this law proceeds. that could make — challenge if this law proceeds. that could make the _ challenge if this law proceeds. that could make the whole process pretty protracted. what will that mean for families, and also this proposal of an information process being used instead, what is that likely to give the victims and families? the arocess the victims and families? the process of — the victims and families? the process ofjustice _ the victims and families? the process ofjustice is - the victims and families? tie process ofjustice is difficult and most families know that there is a slim chance of prosecutions, but they are holding on to that hope. the truth recovery is largely self—serving and people will say that they want to say and not disclose what they want to disclose, so there is not much trust in that
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particular angle. there are victims here literally in tears upset at what is happening, how the government is letting them down. there are also issues for veterans themselves. the vast majority of people who served in the police and army during the troubles did so honourably. they got up every morning to uphold the rule of law, whereas terrorists got up to murder people. it creates that false equivalence between the actors of the rule of law and terrorism by saying you all need the protection of this amnesty. many veterans are saying we did nothing wrong, we don't need protection of an amnesty, we are perfectly happy for things to be investigated if it is appropriate.— be investigated if it is appropriate. be investigated if it is auro-riate. : , . appropriate. thank you very much indeed. sport now and, for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's austin halewood. good morning. well, there is only one place to start today. the second round of golf�*s open championship is well under way at royal st george's in kent. today, it's all about making the cut and keeping in the hunt for that
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famous claretjug over the weekend. well, let's go live to the course and speak to our reporter ben croucher. ben, we had 47 players under par yesterday. it's been another good morning today, hasn't it? and we have a new leader? we do indeed. it has been a glorious morning here and just like i was on thursday the best of the scoring looks to be happening right about now. we do have a new leader, the american collin morikawa, on his 0pen american collin morikawa, on his open championship debut. he is six under par through 12 holes of his round today. he birdied four of the front nine and has birdied 11 and 12, so he currently has a three shot lead over the south african geo.
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jordan spieth tease out a little bit later this afternoon on five under par. tommy fleetwood is out on the course, first—rate parts for him. rory mciiroy is one of those that look sticky is going to be struggling to make the cut. he okayed his first two holes today, although he has since picked up a shot. later on this afternoon, when the wind might be swirling more, the greens and fairways will be a bit tougher, that is when the likes of louis is tasting, bryson dechambeau and jordan speith will be teeing off. there's been a bit of all fall—out between bryson dechambeau and his club manufacturer. what's happend ? bryson dechambeau shot one over par yesterday, he only found four fairways. he is notorious for being one of the longest hitters in the game and he prides himself on
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whacking the ball for miles, but he only found four fairways. at the end of his round he set his driver sacked. this equipment manufacturer came out and said, you are throwing your toys out of the pram, saying he was behaving like an eight—year—old. that created a bit of a farce, but bryson dechambeau back down, apologising for his actions. the comments i said in my post—round interview on thursday were very unprofessional. my frustrations and emotions over the way i drove the ball boiled over. i suck today, not my equipment. he said i deeply regret the words are used earlier. i am relentless in the pursuit of improvement and perfection, part of that causes me to be outwardly frustrated at times. it could be a difficult afternoon for him. the conditions are lovely for the 30,000 orso conditions are lovely for the 30,000 or so spectators in sandwich, but
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they could be very tricky for the golfers. they could be very tricky for the aolfers. : ~ they could be very tricky for the aolfers. :, ~' ,, away from the golf, england's lewis ludlow has been banned for four matches for kneeing an opponent in the head during the side's win over canada at the weekend. gloucester�*s ludlow had been captaining england on what was just his second appearance, but he will now miss club games against ealing, hartpury and northampton. the ban was reduced to four games from six because of his admission of guilt. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's at bbc.co.uk/sport. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says he will "sweat blood over months and years to earn respect" from voters.
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speaking to the bbc after taking questions from former labour voters in blackpool, he admitted, "there is a trust issue" with his party. 0ur political editor, laura kuenssberg, was there. not much holiday for the labour leader. he's planning a summer of hard graft and hearing some hard truths. hello, nice to see you. i'm keir. after nearly a year and a half in charge and labour behind in the polls, he's on the road to try to win back respect for his party from the public. the grandest venue first, we gather together a panel of independently selected voters who used to back labour in blackpool�*s tower ballroom to hear him out. pleased to meet you. i don't recall i've seen you before. so you're not out there, are you? at the minute, anyway. i wouldn't know who you were. 0k, thank you, well, we can fix that. no disrespect or anything. it's very nice to see you. can i call you sir keir? 0r keir? first thing is, your party is divided within itself. i
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get rid of all these bickering people who are losers. i they want to lose further. by doing what they're doing. if someone's in my shadow cabinet, or on my front bench, i can do something about it, because i can fire them. if they're on the back bench, they have more freedom to say what they want. but i get the point you're making. it doesn't really matter to anybody else, you want to hear one voice. i honestly believe for the labour party, it's the stigma ofjeremy corbyn. 18 months on, it's still there. people think he's toxic. trust is invaluable. if you lose trust in something i or somebody, an organisation, to get that trust back is so difficult. - you're on kind of a death spiral. we lost really badly in 2019. we lost 60 seats in a row, and we've got a lot of work to do to rebuild. and we've got to change. we can't lose that badly and say we'll keep things
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pretty well as they were, which is what we're doing. i would love to believe you, but i don't know yet whether i can believe you. so i'd have to take a risk, wouldn't i? that's what i'd have to do. i'd have to take a risk. and i'm up for taking a risk because i want to be labour. in my heart, i want to be labour. it was far from an easy ride, though did keir starmer take it on the chin? trust, and that trust has to be earned. what i heard tonight was people... they weren't saying, i will never trust you. what i heard them saying is, i have lost trust in labour, but i might, i might have trust in the future, but it's down to you to earn it. and that i will do, sweating blood over the next days, weeks, months and years, until the next general election. no pressure. it's exactly what i expected. this was always going to be a tough gig.
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but, actually, i'd much rather have the robust discussion i had tonight than the warm bath of simply talking to people who already agree with me. the more important view, the voters he was trying to persuade. he's got a massive, massive job to do to get people to vote labour again. i was accusing him, in my mind, of not having any personality i or much charisma and he did have both of those things, _ which was impressive. so i'm warmed and hopeful. keir starmer knows the road could be slow, hard and long. but labour wants this summer to be an important step. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, blackpool. why is rape so infrequently prosecuted? an enquiry by hm inspectorate of constabulary and the fire and rescue service has tried to answer that question. the inspectorates spoke directly to women who had been raped and have today published a separate report,
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providing their experiences of the police and prosecutor response and the wider criminal justice system. this is what one of them told the inspectorate — her words are spoken for her. i felt more like they were investigating me. ijust thought, "why am i the one that's being judged?" after a while i kind of lost faith. they even described him, the suspect, as "an upstanding member of society." wendy williams, her majesty's inspector of constabulary, who worked on the rape response report, has said that the police and prosecutors need change in how they work together to prosecute rape cases in england and wales. we talk about a vicious cycle where everyone has concerns about the low numbers of prosecutions, but that concern can lead to a much more
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cautious approach to rape cases than other cases, which can result in considerable delays and in victims feeling that the focus is principally on them and their credibility, rather than on the suspect and building strong cases. as a result of those delays and apperception, that can lead to victims withdrawing their support for cases, which in turn contributes to low prosecutions, so we've highlighted that vicious cycle and we have said that the cycle must be broken. the headlines on bbc news: at least 100 people are dead and many more are missing after some of the worst floods to hit germany in decades. an increasing number of businesses are warning it's becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted
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to hospital during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart, according to new research. next week the olympics is due to open, but tokyo is back under a covid state of emergency. in the capital, enthusiasm for the games is hard to find. but in some small towns there is still excitement, especially among those acting as the adopted home for foreign 0lympics teams. 0ur correspondent rupert wingfield hayes has been to murayama in northern japan as they prepare to welcome the bulgarian rhythmic gymnastics team. not many japanese kids are lucky enough to have a former
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international gymnast as their teacher. and notjust any gymnast. antoinette vitale was once a world—class rhythmic gymnast competing for bulgaria. but, for the last two years, she has been teaching here in the mountains of northern japan. for me, it is really like dreams come true to experience — to come here in the place that i already love. and to work with terrific gymnasts. that was my childhood — i grew with gymnastics. this is my passion. five years ago, murayama invited the bulgarian women's gymnastic team to make this place their 0lympic hometown. but that was before covid. the hotel manager shows me the route the bulgarian team will now have to take to get back to their rooms. ok, so there is a screen here. can't go any further. at every stage, the team members will have to be kept separate from other guests. news that two ugandan athletes tested positive for covid after arriving injapan has added
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to his worries. translation: when i heard about the ugandan team, i i was a bit concerned. if we have an athlete infected after they arrive, the infection could spread around the team. that is what i'm most worried about. moriyama is really an exemplar of what the whole 0lympic spirit is supposed to be about. but, because of covid, the tremendous enthusiasm here is tempered with anxiety. that is because places like this in ruraljapan, have lots and lots of old people, and so far almost no covid infections. that is not going to stop this woman. she is the founder of murayama's bulgarian gymnastic support club. she said she thinks of the team as her adopted granddaughters. and she can't wait to see them compete.
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translation: i know there is a lot of criticism because of covid. i i really wanted to be in tokyo to see them perform. their families and friends can't come, so that's why i wanted to be there — to make sure the girls know we are all behind them. the majority of japanese may still be very sceptical about the games taking place. but here in murayama, there is real excitement as they await the arrival of their bulgaria granddaughters. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, northern japan. ten years ago, amy winehouse was found dead in her flat in north london. a hugely successful performer, she found it hard to shake her demons. now her parents, janis and mitch, are telling her story in a new bbc documentary called �*reclaiming amy�*. they spoke to our music reporter mark savage at the jazz cafe in camden,
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where she performed. what am i scared of? myself. # love is a losing game #. it�*s ten years since amy winehouse died of alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. i will always remember our last words. i said, "i love you, amy". she said, "i love you, mummy". i can always remember the love she had for me, always there. since then, amy�*s story has been told countless times but now her parents, janis and mitch, want to tell their side. people's idea about amy, the very black—and—white image of amy was that she was struggling with addiction to alcohol and drugs. they thought she was a certain way, she wasn�*t. i knew amy. in a new bbc documentary, the couple and amy�*s friends look back on the ups and downs of her life. she wanted to be famous,
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she wanted to be successful. when she got it, it was like, oh, god, it all kicked off, it all kicked off. at one point, you say mistakes were made when amy was ill. what were those mistakes? the mistakes were... i think we didn�*t know... we didn�*t know what to do. no—one knew what to do because obviously, the responsibility of the addiction lies with the person who is struggling with the addiction. as a family, we could stand on our heads. how many times we had family interventions, i lost count. how many times i took her into rehab and she'd walk out the next day... i don't think there is no right or wrong way to deal with it. it will be amy�*s talent that her friends and family remember next week on the anniversary of her death. 0n the 23rd, we'll all be
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together at the cemetery. the first ten minutes, we'll be sobbing and then after that we'll be in fits of laughter with a new amy anecdote. although it�*s not a joyful thing that you would go and celebrate it, but we do — we actually go and remember her. myjoke is, now i know where she is. that's a blackjoke. yes. but true. while amy�*s family celebrate her humour and kindness, her fans will hold on to her music. mark savage, bbc news. the fame islands, off the coast of northumberland, are an important breeding ground for a number of rare seabirds including the arctic tern and the puffin. for much of the last 18 months there haven�*t been any visitors or staff and while the humans have been away, the birds have started to behave a little differently. fiona trott reports. finally setting foot on inner farne.
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after 18 months, visitors are coming back and they�*re delighted. there are so many birds. i know it sounds ridiculous, it�*s full of birds. it�*s just wonderful — seeing mother nature like this. it�*s like puffin city — it�*s really brilliant. it'sjust wonderful. you just want to keep coming back to this place. such a variety of birds to see, fantastic. we picked a brilliant day, haven't we? i've got a soft spot for the puffins. i it's jasper's first proper holiday. he's going to probably make the same bird noise the whole way round. - but they will notice a change. there have been fewer wardens and fewer visitors to scare the gulls away — that�*s bad news for the arctic terns who nest here. normally, there would be about 200 or so arctic terns in this area in the courtyard — making an absolute racket. probably dive—bombing our heads. we wouldn�*t be able to hear each other in a conversation like this. what we found after we prepared
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all the areas for them nesting is that they came back late and also that they came back in not very strong numbers. because only ten of them laid eggs, we think that there wasn�*t a strong enough number of them and that�*s why they didn�*t survive. it worries you. yes, it does. it�*s quite heartbreaking. so where are the arctic terns? we had to set sail to find them. it looks and feels very different here, harriet, on staple island. yes, staple is such a different island to inner farne. i can already hear the terns. i can hear that... click, click, click. they do, don�*t they? clicking. so where are they? 0ver there. you can see they�*ve just flown out. oh, good grief! how many? there�*s a couple of hundred there. there�*s 200 there. and you see they�*ll come back and they�*ll nest in that long grass. they�*ve just flown out and they�*re chasing away this gull. it�*s important for them to do that in a group. the gulls are after the chicks are the eggs, are they? yeah, they�*ll be after the chicks or the eggs. after they�*ve chased away the gull,
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they�*ll sit back down on the chicks and eggs. back on inner farne, the puffin count is under way. the pandemic has affected that too. with fewer wardens for fewer days, it�*s been limited. so far there are signs that the breeding season has been good. the wardens live and breathe this beautiful island. as more visitors return, they�*ll be watching the effects very closely. fiona trott reporting there from the farne islands. paris�* iconic eiffel tower is opening today. it was closed in october last year due to the covid crisis. this latest closure was the longest since world war two. visitor numbers will be limited to 10,000 a day to meet social distancing requirements, fewer than half of their pre—covid levels. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz.
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sunny skies and temperatures into the high 20s, that�*s what many of us are in for this weekend. in fact, it could turn a little too hot across south—eastern parts of the country as temperatures hit 30 on sunday. so big high pressure has established itself over us. it is coming from the azores and it is here to stay for the next few days. there will always be a bit more cloud around northern, western scotland, and the northern, western scotland, and the north of northern ireland, that�*s because we are closer to weather frontier and the winds are blowing off the ocean. elsewhere, easily mid 20s across eastern and south—eastern scotland. high 20s across many parts of england and wales. temperatures are the only high thing, eg fee levels up to even very high and southern parts of the uk. it will be fresher for the golf on the coast of kent with the breeze coming off the north sea. temperatures may not even
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make 20. the forecast for friday evening and into the early hours of saturday see quiet weather across england and will. it will stay dry. a little bit more cloud overnight across western scotland and northern ireland. that will drift inland, meaning that the morning in these areas will be overcast, particularly across northern ireland. there could be missed and murkiness around the coast, particularly in the western isles. forthe coast, particularly in the western isles. for the rest of us, sunshine from the word go, temperatures hitting the high 20s widely across the country. in aberdeenshire for example, the mid—20s. the high pressure is with us on sunday, but around the high pressure there is a wind blowing and there is a weather front stock across the north of scotland. so more cloud and spots of rain for the highlands, may be the north coast of northern ireland, but south of that it is looking sunny. every bit as warm if not warmer.
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temperatures could hit 30 in london. in western scotland, a bit fresher, temperatures in glasgow around 20 degrees. the temperatures will ease heading into next week. for london, hitting that 30 degrees mark on sunday, but the time we get to monday and tuesday we are into the mid—20s.
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this is bbc news. iam liquid i am liquid to be iraq. —— mike i am liquid to be iraq. the headlines: more than 100 dead and hundreds more unaccounted for in germany — after some of the worst flooding in decades — record rainfall causes rivers to burst their banks, devastating some areas. more than three months�* worth of rain fell in 2a hours over parts of western germany, belgium and the netherlands — some local politicians say climate change is to blame. an increasing number of businesses are warning it�*s becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted to hospitals during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart, according to new research.
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politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland set out their opposition to the uk government�*s plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles. and on the tenth anniversary of the death of amy winehouse, her parents her parents say they want to show a different parents say they want to show a different side of their daughter. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. emergency services in western germany, supported by hundreds of troops, are resuming their search for the many people who are missing after record rainfall caused the worst flooding in living memory.
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more than 100 people are now known to have died in flooding in parts of germany, belgium and the netherlands. german chancellor angela merkel has called it a "catastrophe." hundreds of people are still unaccounted for, and the emergency services are struggling to know where they need to look because mobile phone signals are down in many places. the german states of rhineland—palatinate and north rhine—westphalia were worst hit. 93 people have died. 15 people have also died in belgium and the netherlands is also badly affected. this is the village of bad neuenahr—ahrweiler, in the german region of rhineland—palatinate. here you can see what it looked like before the floods... ..and here it is afterwards. the floodwater has gushed through the town, causing immense destruction. you can see here it has had such power that it has
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destroyed this bridge. in these aerial pictures you can see the scale of the devastation caused by a landslide in the city of erfstadt—blessem near cologne, in the germany�*s north rhine—westphalia state. authorities there say they are often not able to reach those making emergency calls. as you can see, a number of houses there collapsed overnight and roads washed away, making getting in and out extremely difficult. well, for more on the devastation caused by the flooding, here�*s courtney bembridge. the full extent of the damage is only now becoming clear. houses have been ripped apart and roads have all but disappeared. in western germany, three months of rain fell in just 2a hours. translation: everything was under
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water within 15 minutes. _ 0urflat, our office, our neighbours�* houses, everywhere was under water. this motorway in north rhine—westphalia was blocked for kilometres as residents tried to get out, but it was too late for others. translation: i grieve for the people who have lost their lives. _ we don�*t know the number, but it will be many. some in the basements of their houses and some who were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. across the border in the east of belgium, cars were picked up and carried by the force of the water. this bridge was submerged and covered in debris. in nearby liege, the river is close to bursting its banks and residents were told to leave. translation: i have never seen anything like this. i it�*s incredible. frankly, i never thought i�*d see that in belgium. parts of the netherlands are also under water and soldiers are on hand in case water levels rise further.
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translation: we have all seen the images of streets turned i into swirling rivers, neighbourhoods and villages completely flooded. people who are afraid. people who are worried about their business, their homes. scientists have long warned that climate change will make extreme weather events like this more common, and german leaders have also drawn a link between the two. translation: this is a naturalj disaster, but the fact it's taking place in this way is certainly connected to the fact that climate change is progressing at a speed we have observed for a while. that must be another incentive, and also an obligation, for those who have been victims here for us to do everything we can to stop man—made climate change and prevent such disasters at this scale. heavy downpours have continued overnight, making the work of rescue teams even more challenging. courtney bembridge, bbc news.
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just going to show you the latest fascinating pictures that have come to us. these are aerial photos. it almost looks surreal, doesn�*t it? so thatis almost looks surreal, doesn�*t it? so that is the town that we mentioned a short while ago, erfstadt—blessem, and you can see how it is simply swept away great chunks of soil, taking houses with it. you can see there a roof collapsing and you can actually see the soil dropping into the waters, can�*t you? that roof presumably very soon to slide into those brown waters below and i don�*t know if you can see, if it is evident on the screen, but many of the residents saying that the waters were just flowing so fast and strongly. and of the rescue services having huge amounts of trouble trying to reach those that need rescuing because they can�*t pick up a mobile signal, so that is really
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slowing people down. you can see also the amount of rubbish, it is rubbish now, but presumably belongings from residents, washed up against banks. and there the scale of the damage to residential areas. that pipe there, not sure if that has been washed up or put in as part of the clear up, but holmes, half of the houses just washed away completely gone. and the land, there is just chunks of land that are now missing. you�*re watching bbc news. staying with this story... earlier i spoke with moritz friedenberg, a journalist at radio hagen, the local station for hagen, one of the worst affected cities in germany�*s north rhine—westphalia region. in the morning we spoke to the fire department in hagen and they told us that the situation starts relaxing a little bit, so the water level drops and the rivers go
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back, but there is still lots of work to do and you can imagine there are lots of people who have insecurity at the moment. moritz, when you say the water level is receding, that doesn�*t necessarily mean the problems are over, does it? no, the problems start now because now you see the damage that was caused, there was lots of heavy rain in the last few days. this last night there was no rain and we are really lucky for it, but there are basements that are full of water. the water damage to streets, lots of main streets in hagen which can�*t be passed, so the fire department and the police have lots of problems to reach the areas which are damaged and there is still lots of work to do until we can go back to normal life. are evacuations still taking place? because i know whilst the rain has stopped and the waters have started to recede, some areas are still evacuating their residents.
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yeah, for sure, especially the south of hagen is very affected. there are floods which still take cars or trees and you have the problem that you can�*t reach the areas where people are. lots of people had to leave their homes and the problem now is that the people have to search for a new place to stay. we have two safe spots here in hagen and there are many more coming because lots of people need a new place to stay at the moment. that was moritz friedenberg speaking to me earlier. let�*sjust that was moritz friedenberg speaking to me earlier. let�*s just bring you the latest figures coming from the office of national statistics, the ons, office of national statistics, the 0ns, which says that more than half a million people in private households, you can see it on your screen there, in england, are likely to have had a covid—19 in the week to have had a covid—19 in the week tojuly the 10th to have had a covid—19 in the week to july the 10th stock that is according to the 0ns, the estimate of the number testing positive is
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570,700. that is the equivalent of one in 95 people, up from one in 160 in the previous week. and the key thing here is that this is the highest number since the week two february sixth, so you can see that on the screen and when it comes to wales, we are talking one in 360, northern ireland will one in 290 and in scotland that figure is one in 90. so those are statistics coming from the office for national statistics. you can find more of a breakdown on their website as well. let�*s stay with covid and the main lines concerning the pandemic. as the number of people getting "pinged" in the uk continues to rise, business leaders are also now warning some shops and factories may have to temporarily close because so many employees are isolating. the transport rmt union has also
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warned of a further surge in self—isolation from monday, due to confusion over masks on public transport services in england. more than half a million people in england and wales were told to self—isolate by the app last week. that�*s an increase of 46%, compared with the previous week. anyone who receives an alert is advised — but not legally obliged — to self—isolate for 10 days. but from the 16th august, people in england who have received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine will no longer need to self—isolate if they receive an alert. richard galpin has been looking at how businesses have been affected. rolls royce, one of many companies, big and small, now fearful production could be affected by large numbers of staff being told by the nhs covid app to self—isolate for ten days. the company says it may have to halve production at its goodwood factory.
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nissan another company facing staff shortages after up to 900 workers at its sunderland car plant were sent home — 10% of the workforce. here in sheffield, this numberplate manufacturing company faces a similar problem of staff shortages. eight members of the team here currently self—isolating. that�*s a problem for our business because we�*re going to be letting down customers in a very competitive market. it adds cost to a business that�*s already had significant costs incurred last year through everything that we�*ve had to endure. rob, a member of the team, is now back at work after having to self—isolate along with his family. from monday, there are going to be a lot more cases and the amount of self—isolation will go up because of the amount of contact that people will have and without wearing these things, without wearing masks. and the amount of cases will go up and we will be back to square one, i think. come and take a seat. at this gp practice in leeds,
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they fear the worst. they may have to close down now because members of staff are self—isolating. it seems ridiculous to us that we have staff who are double vaccinated. you know, i had my first vaccine before christmas. we�*ve been vaccinated for months and yet they�*re not able to come to work. a government spokesman said it was sticking with the date of august 16th for the lifting of self—isolation rules. and with covid cases increasing, it was vital to make sure systems for self—isolation were proportionate. richard galpin, bbc news. the care sector is already at crisis point with not enough staff to cover shifts. joining me is nadra ahmed of the national care association. thanks forjoining us on bbc news. what are your members are
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experiencing?— what are your members are experiencing? what are your members are ex-eariencin ? ~ ~ experiencing? while, i think we already know — experiencing? while, i think we already know that _ experiencing? while, i think we already know that we _ experiencing? while, i think we already know that we have i experiencing? while, i think we already know that we have got i experiencing? while, i think we i already know that we have got this massive recruitment and retention problem that has been looming for quite some time. it is decades, but obviously it has got worse as we have gone through covid. we have got exhausted staff, people looking at other options and with the mandatory vaccination issue coming up we are seeing people leave the service. and i top of that, of course we have got these things going off left, right and centre and the self isolation in and centre and the self isolation in a care setting will have an enormous impact when you are already short—staffed. we are enabling visitors coming into the services, we are enabling people to go out of the services, we are trying to open up the services, we are trying to open up to all professionals coming in, double vaccinated, but all of this just doesn�*t seem enough when you kind of look at the actual
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practicalities, which is if you get a ping you have got a member of staff for ten days. 50 a ping you have got a member of staff for ten days.— a ping you have got a member of staff for ten days. so how are you balancina staff for ten days. so how are you balancing need — staff for ten days. so how are you balancing need to _ staff for ten days. so how are you balancing need to protect - staff for ten days. so how are you balancing need to protect the i staff for ten days. so how are you | balancing need to protect the most vulnerable in society, as well as your staff and provide that care? as well as giving families access to their family well as giving families access to theirfamily members? how are well as giving families access to their family members? how are you struggling to balance?— struggling to balance? well, it is enormously _ struggling to balance? well, it is enormously difficult. _ struggling to balance? well, it is enormously difficult. just - struggling to balance? well, it is enormously difficult. just this i enormously difficult. just this morning, i have had about eight or nine different messages from providers, saying, we are really worried. they are having to try to use agencies. agencies had the same issues, they are also enormously expensive, but it is the goodwill of the very workforce that has been sending by residents all the way through, where they are picking up extra shifts, but actually we can�*t go on like this. you know, we need that recruitment opened up, really, for people wanting to come to work in social care and being rewarded and valued in the same way as our health colleagues. because, you
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know, from what we understand health there is going to be an exemption around the pins, but we are not going to have any such thing, so as soon as one of our staff get that pain may have to isolate. you mention some _ pain may have to isolate. you mention some of _ pain may have to isolate. you mention some of your - pain may have to isolate. you mention some of your members looking at other options. you mentioned agencies, but what else?- agencies, but what else? well, i think agencies _ agencies, but what else? well, i think agencies is _ agencies, but what else? well, i think agencies is the _ agencies, but what else? well, i think agencies is the only - agencies, but what else? well, i think agencies is the only other. think agencies is the only other option that we have. we don�*t have many other options. volunteers do not come into social care settings and even if they did it is such a skilled role, we can�*t work with volunteers. it is a totally different setup. we are caring for some very frail, vulnerable people, who have specific needs that are individual to them, so it is our staff that get to know people and we try and move that forward to make sure we can give them the best possible outcomes in life as we possibly can, whilst they are with us. but we also want to open up and we do want to enable them to see their loved ones, but, you know, we need to acknowledge that maybe the
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system isn�*t working as well as it could be. i had one provider who said one of their staff had a ping and the setting is supposed to be the care home, even though the person hadn�*t been in the care home. nadra ahmed, ijust want person hadn�*t been in the care home. nadra ahmed, i just want to jump person hadn�*t been in the care home. nadra ahmed, ijust want tojump in because we are running out of time and there are two more issues i want to touch on. what is the rate of vaccination. �*? to touch on. what is the rate of vaccination.— to touch on. what is the rate of vaccination. ? well, it is as high as 8196. vaccination. ? well, it is as high as 81%- in _ vaccination. ? well, it is as high as 8196. in some _ vaccination. ? well, it is as high as 8196. in some areas, - vaccination. ? well, it is as high as 8196. in some areas, it - vaccination. ? well, it is as high as 8196. in some areas, it is i vaccination. ? well, it is as high. as 8196. in some areas, it is much as 81%. in some areas, it is much higher, but i think london it is quite low and that is the one that is causing the problems. {ltic quite low and that is the one that is causing the problems. ok. what would hel- is causing the problems. ok. what would help to _ is causing the problems. ok. what would help to make _ is causing the problems. ok. what would help to make the _ is causing the problems. ok. what would help to make the situation i would help to make the situation better? are your care home is likely to put in stricter measures, may be, as cases continue to climb?- as cases continue to climb? well, i think it is having _ as cases continue to climb? well, i think it is having the _ as cases continue to climb? well, i think it is having the right - think it is having the right guidance that will support us to enable people who are coming into our service to wear the masks, make sure that they are absolutely clear they are going to have to wear ppe and at the moment people are taking out. the guidance must have a
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responsibility of people coming to our service, as well as what we have to do, which we are happy to do as much as we possibly can. {ltiq to do, which we are happy to do as much as we possibly can. ok, nadra ahmed, thank _ much as we possibly can. ok, nadra ahmed, thank you _ much as we possibly can. ok, nadra ahmed, thank you very _ much as we possibly can. ok, nadra ahmed, thank you very much - much as we possibly can. ok, nadra ahmed, thank you very much for i much as we possibly can. ok, nadral ahmed, thank you very much for your time. the uk government has updated its travel guidance and no longer advises against all but essential travel to bulgaria and croatia. both are currently on the amber list and will move to the green list next monday. the travel advice issued by the foreign, commonwealth and development office is independent from the government�*s traffic light system. the headlines on bbc news: the time is 12:18pm. at least 100 people are dead and many more are missing after some of the worst floods to hit germany in decades. an increasing number of businesses are warning it�*s becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. half of patients admitted to hospital during the first wave
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of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart, according to new research. sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here�*s austen halewood. good afternoon. we start with golf because the second round of golf�*s open championship is well under way at royal st george�*s in kent. today, it�*s all about making the cut, but already a number of players have been making their way up the leaderboard. well, let�*s go live to the course and speak to our reporter ben croucher. ben, a busy morning already! and we have a new leader? we do indeed. every now and then, every ten minutes or so, we hear a cheerfrom every ten minutes or so, we hear a cheer from somewhere every ten minutes or so, we hear a cheerfrom somewhere in every ten minutes or so, we hear a cheer from somewhere in the course and for the last half an hour or so they have been coming from the far end because that is when colin is
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butane, the american who moved to ten under par a short time ago. he hasjust dropped back ten under par a short time ago. he has just dropped back to nine under, he hasjust bogeyed has just dropped back to nine under, he has just bogeyed the 15th hole, three to play and he could well be on course for a championship record if he could pick up a couple of shots in the last few holes. that leaves him three shots clear of the south african geo duo there. the american bear tees off at 5pm this afternoon and a little bit further down we are looking at rory mcilroy and really his battle to make the cut. he is currently one over par. he was even when he teed off this morning really struggled, bogeyed his first couple of holes and for him with a half of his aunt still to go in these very calm conditions at the moment, the wind not swelling too much, he is really going to have too much, he is really going to have to get a move on if he wants to be playing this weekend.— playing this weekend. yes, he is indeed. then _ playing this weekend. yes, he is indeed. then capture _ playing this weekend. yes, he is indeed. then capture their i playing this weekend. yes, he is indeed. then capture their force |
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playing this weekend. yes, he is i indeed. then capture their force at royal st george�*s, thanks very much. —— then cratchit there. away from golf, england�*s lewis ludlow has been banned for four matches for kneeing an opponent in the head during, the side�*s win over canada at the weekend. gloucester�*s ludlow had been captaining england on what was just his second appearance, but he�*ll now miss club games against ealing, hartpury and northampton. the ban was reduced to four games from six because of his admission of guilt. england�*s cricketers are back in action tonight at trent bridge, with the first of three t20 internationals against pakistan. nine of the players who were recently forced to self—isolate have been named in the squad. eoin morgan will return as captain and, after an unpredictable few weeks, he says the series is a good chance to improve their strength in depth. are probably not knowing what is ahead of ourselves, we need to... sort of look more to a little bit more strength and depth, so probably... the opportunities with us at the moment, we will see over
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the next three games and going through various different options of possible injury replacements for certain players within the group, you will see as well. meanwhile, ireland are taking on south africa in a one—day international in dublin. the irish currently lead the three match series 1—0. the first match was actually rained off, before the irish won the second. victory today would give them their first ever series win over south africa, but the tourists have started well. they�*re currently 137 without loss after 23 overs. that�*s all the sport for now. thank you very much. here in the uk, younger adults admitted to hospital with covid are almost as likely to suffer from complications as those over the age of 50, a new study has found. four in ten of those between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while treated.
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the research looked at over 70,000 adults across all ages in the first wave of covid in 2020. i m nowjoined by professor calum semple, a specialist in outbreak medicine at the university of liverpool and one of the report authors. he�*s also a member of the government�*s scientific advisory group sage, but is speaking in a personal capacity today. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. first off, as you are putting together this study, what really jumped out at you and what were you surprised at? tara jumped out at you and what were you surprised at?— surprised at? two aspects. the first bia surprised at? two aspects. the first big surprise — surprised at? two aspects. the first big surprise was _ surprised at? two aspects. the first big surprise was that _ surprised at? two aspects. the first big surprise was that the _ surprised at? two aspects. the first big surprise was that the risk - surprised at? two aspects. the first big surprise was that the risk of i big surprise was that the risk of complications did not follow the risk of death. we know that covid causes death in the frail and elderly, but we were saying complications even in those aged 19-29 complications even in those aged 19—29 years old. one in three people 19-29
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19—29 years old. one in three people 19—29 years old. one in three people 19—29 years old. one in three people 19—29 years old suffered a significant injury to either their heart, lungs, liver or kidney and this could go some way to explaining the problems they go on to have after discharge with long covid. gosh, so that is as well as damage to lungs, they are possibly living with long covid as that is a double whammy. with long covid as that is a double whamm . ~ , , ., whammy. well, it is understanding that some aspects _ whammy. well, it is understanding that some aspects of _ whammy. well, it is understanding that some aspects of long - whammy. well, it is understanding that some aspects of long covid i that some aspects of long covid could actually be the consequences of damage to any of the lungs, the liver, the heart and kidneys, and in some cases we know some people have brain injuries as well. so that is not going to repair instantly. it is going to take some time to repair or stabilise and in the case of scarring on the lungs in adults, thatjust scarring on the lungs in adults, that just doesn't scarring on the lungs in adults, thatjust doesn't really get better. do we know why these organs are attacked? we do we know why these organs are attacked? ~ ., �* ., , ~ ., attacked? we don't, really, we know that the virus — attacked? we don't, really, we know that the virus can _ attacked? we don't, really, we know that the virus can get _ attacked? we don't, really, we know that the virus can get into _ attacked? we don't, really, we know that the virus can get into places - that the virus can get into places that the virus can get into places that you wouldn't expect a respiratory virus to get into and that may be to do with the inherent biology of this particular virus. it is notjust any old flu or common
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cold virus, this is a really nasty virus that gets inside people and causes harm all over the body. maw. causes harm all over the body. now, i know the study _ causes harm all over the body. now, i know the study was _ causes harm all over the body. now, i know the study was for _ causes harm all over the body. now, i know the study was for last - causes harm all over the body. now, i know the study was for last year . i know the study was for last year and that first wave. could you forecast a repeat during subsequent waves, with, for example, the delta, the beta variants?— the beta variants? here we have got some aood the beta variants? here we have got some good news. _ the beta variants? here we have got some good news. because _ the beta variants? here we have got some good news. because we - the beta variants? here we have got some good news. because we know| the beta variants? here we have got - some good news. because we know that patients' risk of complications was defined mostly on how sick they were at the front door, by vaccinating and preventing disease, we know we are presenting many, many of these cases. 50 that is the good news. the other aspect here is a lot of people in hospital now are either unvaccinated or were vaccinated so recently they have not had time to benefit and sadly they will be likely to have complications, so the take—home message here is get vaccinated, even if you are younger than 50. you don't want to catch the virus, you don't want to get this damage. virus, you don't want to get this damaie, ., u ., .,
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virus, you don't want to get this damae. ., ., , damage. vaccination will prevent this from happening. _ damage. vaccination will prevent this from happening. and - damage. vaccination will prevent this from happening. and finallyl damage. vaccination will prevent. this from happening. and finally and briefly, we heard so much about treatments that were used or repurposing drugs and treatments, have they gone some way to help reduce the effects of organ failure? we don't have that data at our fingertips yet. that is something we are looking at. we would expect it to reduce the risk of complications some degree, but as i said the greatest predictor of complications is how sick you are at the front door and that is to do with damage done on the pathway getting into hospital. done on the pathway getting into hosital. h, done on the pathway getting into hosital. ,., , h, done on the pathway getting into hosital. h, , ., , hospital. ok, so the message really is net hospital. ok, so the message really is get vaccinated? _ hospital. ok, so the message really is get vaccinated? i'm _ hospital. ok, so the message really is get vaccinated? i'm afraid - hospital. ok, so the message really is get vaccinated? i'm afraid so, - is get vaccinated? i'm afraid so, and it does _ is get vaccinated? i'm afraid so, and it does put _ is get vaccinated? i'm afraid so, and it does put pressure - is get vaccinated? i'm afraid so, and it does put pressure on - and it does put pressure on vaccinations in younger people and thatis vaccinations in younger people and that is really important to understand this policy position. professor calum semple, thank you very much. a pulitzer—prize—winning photo journalist working for the reuters news agency has been killed in afghanistan. danish siddiqui was killed while covering a clash between security forces and taliban fighters near a border crossing with pakistan.
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siddiqui, an indian national, had been embedded with afghan special forces based in the southern province of kandahar. let's turn our attention to south africa. more than 100 people are now known to have died in a week of violence, following the imprisonment of the former president, jacob zuma. after visiting the worst hit province of kwazulu—natal, the current south african president, cyril ramaphosa, has described the unrest in the country as an assault on democracy. we obviously, as a government, are extremely concerned about what happened here. and we are doing everything to deal with it and it's quite clear that all these incidents of unrest were instigated and we are going after those people, we are going after them, we have identified a good number
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of them and we will not allow anarchy and mayhem to just unfold in our country. our correspondent shingai nyoka is injohannesburg. hello there. it may have started as support, a way of supporting jacob zuma, but things are a little bit more complex than that now, aren't they? more complex than that now, aren't the ? , ., ., ., , , they? they are, and there has been an admission _ they? they are, and there has been an admission by _ they? they are, and there has been an admission by the _ they? they are, and there has been an admission by the government, . they? they are, and there has been | an admission by the government, as well as by traditional leaders who are in kwazulu—natal, the epicentre of this unrest, and they say that this likely has been fuelled by the fact that there is a discontent and there is frustration, especially among the youth, and that this was just the tinderbox for that expression. young people, for example, have higher rates of joblessness. one young person out of every two doesn't have a job and so,
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when these protests started and the roads were blockaded, there was a level of opportunism that went into there. young people that really felt as if they had nothing to lose because they have got nothing to do and they are hopeless about the future. ., ., ,., and they are hopeless about the future. ., ., , .,, future. now, there are some people sa in: that future. now, there are some people saying that this _ future. now, there are some people saying that this is _ future. now, there are some people saying that this is an _ future. now, there are some people saying that this is an attempt - future. now, there are some people saying that this is an attempt to - saying that this is an attempt to destabilise the country. i mean, the pressure really now coming on mr ramaphosa. he pressure really now coming on mr ramaphosa— pressure really now coming on mr ramahosa. . , ., ., ramaphosa. he has said that and the government — ramaphosa. he has said that and the government officials _ ramaphosa. he has said that and the government officials have _ ramaphosa. he has said that and the government officials have said - ramaphosa. he has said that and the government officials have said that l government officials have said that before, but they really hasn't been any attempt to elaborate. he said today that investigations are continuing. he doesn't see the nature of who these instigators or the faces of who these people are, but what we have seen is notjust an attack on businesses and malls, but also state infrastructure, clinics, hospitals, as well as a water treatment plant. what the government is saying is that this just is not
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just an act of vandalism, this is a direct attack on the state, but we haven't seen any arrests and so we just wait to see how they will back up just wait to see how they will back up this is a hijacking of democracy and politically motivated. something of a erfect and politically motivated. something of a perfect storm, _ and politically motivated. something of a perfect storm, isn't _ and politically motivated. something of a perfect storm, isn't it? - and politically motivated. something of a perfect storm, isn't it? i- of a perfect storm, isn't it? i mean, south africa is one of the strongest economies on the continent. so we have got this action taking place and then on top of that the pandemic. find action taking place and then on top of that the pandemic.— of that the pandemic. and that is one of the _ of that the pandemic. and that is one of the reasons _ of that the pandemic. and that is one of the reasons why _ of that the pandemic. and that is one of the reasons why the - one of the reasons why the government believes that there has been such a backlash, is over the last year or so 2 million more south africans have full and poverty and this, as you say, is really the backbone of the region, notjust the region, but africa as a whole. this is the most developed economy in africa. and the impact that these demonstrations have had and the looting is notjust impacting south africans stop we have seen food
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shortages here, food shortages because the refinery has had to been closed down because of fear of sabotage, but also in the region. durban is a major port and it supplies the region, notjust zimbabwe, but beyond, to central africa, with goods and so there are likely to be repercussions felt, not just in south africa, but beyond. 0k. just in south africa, but beyond. ok. shingai nyoka injohannesburg, thank you very much. what weather is in store here in the uk over the weekend? we can hear from tomasz again. if you are a hot weather worshipper, i guess it is good news for you. lots of sunshine on the way this weekend and the temperatures will keep on climbing. today around the mid or high 20s in some spots across the south, even eastern scotland getting 25 degrees. but always a bit more cloud through the day and night in the north—west of the country. the night is going to be quiet across most of the uk. england and wales has a relatively
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balmy night, 15 degrees — quite a mild start to the day — and saturday is looking sunny across the bulk of the country, but again around the western isles and the north coast of northern ireland it could be a bit cloudy at times. here are the temperatures on saturday, hitting the high 20s widely across england. elsewhere across the country it is more like the low 20s and sunday is going to be even warmer, with temperatures quite likely to hit 30 degrees in the south—east.
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hello, this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. the headlines: at least 100 people are dead and many more are missing after some of the worst floods to hit germany in decades. covid infections continue
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to increase in england and scotland. the ons the number of people testing positive for covid increased across all english regions, an increasing number of businesses are warning it is becoming impossible to operate properly because of the impact of staff being told to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland set out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles. the south african president, cyril ramaphosa, says the violence that's swept the country has clearly been planned.
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the estimate of the number testing positive for covid in england is equivalent to around 195 people. that is the highest it has been for months. i'mjoined by that is the highest it has been for months. i'm joined by philippa roxbury, it will break down those figures for us. just take us through the top line. figures for us. just take us through the top line-— the top line. these are estimates based on a _ the top line. these are estimates based on a survey _ the top line. these are estimates based on a survey of— the top line. these are estimates based on a survey of people - the top line. these are estimates based on a survey of people with| based on a survey of people with symptoms and without symptoms and households right across the uk. they found that an estimate of 1% of people are not infected with the virus. in england, the rise was particularly stark, so around 195 people are now estimated to be infected. that has risen from the previous week from one in 60. the virus is also rising in scotland. leicestershire in wales and northern ireland up the trend. levels there are slightly lower. of course, there are slightly lower. of course, there are different restrictions across the uk at the moment, so a different picture depending on where you live.
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infections are rising at quite a high level. in england, to cutback to where they were in february. 230 people have not been vaccinated against the virus, the challenge now is to see just how effective those vaccines are preventing these infections, translating into hospital admissions. infections, translating into hospitaladmissions. do infections, translating into hospital admissions. do we have details on the _ hospital admissions. do we have details on the latest _ hospital admissions. do we have details on the latest case - hospital admissions. do we havej details on the latest case figures for the uk? do you have a breakdown of those, and hospitalisations? case fiuures of those, and hospitalisations? case figures from — of those, and hospitalisations? case figures from what _ of those, and hospitalisations? case figures from what i _ of those, and hospitalisations? (.a, figures from what i recall rr branch, well, nearly up to 50,000 a day. those are efficient government case figures of people who have symptoms and then go and get a test. these figures show a slightly earlier picture because they are testing people without symptoms, so it gives a better idea ofjust the level of infections around. people who have tested _
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level of infections around. people who have tested positive - level of infections around. people who have tested positive is - level of infections around. people i who have tested positive is 48,000. who have tested positive is 118,000. deaths within 28 days is 63. patients admitted 582. we will have an update on those later in the day. this could potentially have an impact on what happens on monday or not? what is the government and sank in terms of the trend of the figures? in terms of the trend of the fi . ures? ., ., , figures? the government are very sad, figures? the government are very sad. saying _ figures? the government are very sad. saying they _ figures? the government are very sad, saying they are _ figures? the government are very sad, saying they are due - figures? the government are very sad, saying they are due to i figures? the government are very sad, saying they are due to openl figures? the government are very l sad, saying they are due to open up in england, lift remaining restrictions in england on monday. in other parts of the uk, different strategies there are different policies. it is unlikely that will change now. some advice still remains, we are being advised to wear masks in some situations and there have been warnings from many health experts in recent days that we should still be extremely cautious based on the fact that this is a third wave of infections, despite the protections that vaccinations provide, this is still a third way. —— third wave.
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why is rape so infrequently prosecuted? an enquiry by hm inspectorate of constabulary and the fire and rescue service has tried to answer that question. the inspectorates spoke directly to women who had been raped and have today published a separate report providing their experiences of the police and prosecutor response, and the wider criminal justice system. this is what one of them told the inspectorate— her words are spoken for her. i felt more like they were investigating me. ijust thought, "why am i the one that's being judged?" after a while i kind of lost faith. they even described him, the suspect, as "an upstanding member of society." harriet wistrich is the founder and director of the centre for women'sjustice. harriet�*s, thank you forjoining us. this is the second report that has come out. we had the first last
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month. your response to those findings? month. your response to those findin . s? month. your response to those findinus? ,, . ., ., , findings? the inspectorate report is a very thorough _ findings? the inspectorate report is a very thorough report _ findings? the inspectorate report is a very thorough report that - findings? the inspectorate report is a very thorough report that looks i a very thorough report that looks about policing and crown prosecution service. it looks at the first stage of the rape process. they are bringing out a second report later looking at after charge. essentially, we have these shocking figures of below 3% of cases reported resulting in charge, which isjust reported resulting in charge, which is just entirely unacceptable. from the work we do, we work with the front line services and with survivors themselves, many of whom get decisions not to prosecute in circumstances where it is very hard to believe. we also see very, very long delays. many of the findings of this report reflect a work that we have seen directly on the front line and also in a report that we'd
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cooperate with other women's organisations which looked at the decriminalisation of rape. it reflects our view that there has to be a really fundamental change. some headlines really in terms of this report, it is yet another report, we had the government and to end rape reporting last month. words and words and words repeated reports aren't good enough. we need to really see action and proper resourcing and we need to see major changes in order to ensure that this most serious of crimes is properly investigated and properly prosecuted and done so in a prompt way, not with the delays of at least a year and a half, if not longer, which we see so frequently, which is just a nightmare for those that have been attacked. 50.
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nightmare for those that have been attacked. , , ., nightmare for those that have been attacked. , ., ., attacked. so, basically, one of the key findings _ attacked. so, basically, one of the key findings of _ attacked. so, basically, one of the key findings of the _ attacked. so, basically, one of the key findings of the report - attacked. so, basically, one of the key findings of the report is i attacked. so, basically, one of the key findings of the report is that l key findings of the report is that there is a pain culture that exist between the cps and the police and that they're reducing different datasets, as well. that is incredulous, for such a sensitive crown. in terms of your experience dealing with rape, with victims who eventually dropouts, what practical changes need to be taken? this is just words, how do you make it happen? just words, how do you make it ha . en? just words, how do you make it ha en? ., ., ., , happen? some of the recommendations ofthe happen? some of the recommendations of the re ort happen? some of the recommendations of the report we — happen? some of the recommendations of the report we would _ happen? some of the recommendations of the report we would fully _ of the report we would fully endorse, better resourcing from wraparound services for rape victims so that they are actually supported throughout the process so that they don't drop out of the process. we need to change the whole culture, the risk averse culture, that is developed between the police and the cps, so that they look at building
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cases and looking at investigating the suspect, not the victim. many victims drop out of the process because they feel that they are not being sufficiently believed, or they feel they are being investigated themselves. because of the difficulties that rape prosecutions involve because of a counter wider context —— wider context of victim blaming, there has to be major efforts to tackle that culture and not accepted as inevitable that you'll able to convict somebody because the women weren't believed. we have to find a way to do that. the other helpful thing in terms of a proper consistent data recording is to understand what are the different types of problems that arise for particular victims. the report very helpfully identifies
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that victims with complex needs in particular, with mental health problems and other issues, are too often, their cases are dropped early on because the police know they are going to be difficult cases to prosecute. going to be difficult cases to prosecute-— going to be difficult cases to prosecute. going to be difficult cases to rosecute. , w , , ., ,, prosecute. very quickly, why do you think that rape _ prosecute. very quickly, why do you think that rape crimes _ prosecute. very quickly, why do you think that rape crimes are _ prosecute. very quickly, why do you think that rape crimes are treated i think that rape crimes are treated differently to other crimes? is it because it is predominantly women involved, or is it because a sexual crime, is it that aspect of sex? i crime, is it that aspect of sex? i think there are a number of different reasons. unfortunately, we live in a sexist or misogynistic culture and women are blamed and i think that priorities are put into... they are not rights. i think also because most rapes, the defendant will say we use the defence of consent. because most
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rapes take place in private it is... a year left in a situation where one person's word against another is tested. that is why the counterculture of victim blaming and also the need to really look for evidence and other material that can help bolster a case is so important. we have to leave it there, but thank you very much. thank you. thank you. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland are setting out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles in a meeting with the secretary of state, brandon lewis. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent in northern ireland, danjohnson, who outlined the objections to the proposals. the instant reaction we are getting out of that meeting was that there was a frank exchange of views, that there had been a lot of straight talking and that some of the political leaders remain sceptical about
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the consultation process, when they believe the government will press ahead with its plan to end prosecutions relating to the troubles. the sinn fein leader mary lou mcdonald said that this meeting showed the government was acting with total bad faith and trying to facilitate a process to give cover to the british government. we understand the assembly here will be recalled from recess next week to discuss the british government's plan to enact that statute of limitations, which some have described as an amnesty for murders that were committed during the years of the troubles. it would effectively end all criminal investigations, civil cases and inquests into the deaths that happened during northern ireland's troubles, into attacks too, and that has been met by fierce, fierce opposition by victims, survivors, bereaved families, who don't just want to know what happened, what happened to their loved one and who was responsible, but want to see people held to account with justice. the british government's
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planned proposal is that prosecutions are not realistic after so much time and that it is better to invest time and energy in an information sharing process, where families would at least get some information, some facts, the truth, if not proper criminal prosecutions. back to our top story today andmore than 100 people are now known to have died in flooding that's devastated parts of western germany. dozens of people are still missing after heavy rainfall caused the worst flooding in living memory. 15 people have also died in belgium, where dramatic footage of the floods showed cars being swept away along streets. those living in the belgian city of liege close to the river meuse have been told to evacuate or move to upper floors.
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and here are some more latest picture from belgium's liege province. taken yesterday — these three houses were not only flooded but also engulfed in fire in the town of aux—sous—chevremont. two rivers, the vesdre and the meuse, both burst their banks inundating earlier i spoke to a doctor, who lives in li ge. well, there are still some areas that are underwater. the water is still at the level of the first floor in some areas, while in others the water is leaving now, so... some people arejust able to go back in the house right now,
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while others are not yet safe... and the helicopters are just flying now to take them back to the ground. so it is very different, it depends on where you are in the area of liege. dr philippe devos, can you explain how you as a family experienced flooding? was it quick? we have heard about the speed at which it caught people out in parts of germany. what happened to you? yes, to me, nothing happened because i am living on a hill, but my parents are living... ..over a river, so they had to move, actually. so two days ago in the evening, the water was flooding, but it was not a big concern for them. there was only 1—2 centimetres in the garden and the
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garden is 1.5 metres lower than the house, so they went to sleep and said, "ok, nothing will happen." but at 2am the police asked them to evacuate because the water reached the floor. in less than five hours, the level of the river is higher than 1.5 metres, so they had to move. they went on a hill in a little school and i think four hours later, the water was on the ceiling of the ground floor of their house, so i am very happy that the police asked them to evacuate. otherwise, they would have been on the first floor of the house without any help from anyone. they are more than 80, so it would have been dramatic for them.
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in germany, the interior minister for north rhine—westphalia says he's unable to say how many people have died in the disaster. and we've just had this footage in of a landslide in erftstadt—blessem near cologne. the local council in cologne says that several people were killed and others are missing after houses either collapsed or were swept away by torrents of water. a castle was also demolished by the flooding. it's thought the ground collapsed into a nearby gravel pit. tragically, the death toll here in western germanyjust keeps rising. more than a hundred people are confirmed to have lost their lives
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in these regions. local politicians say it is the worst catastrophe this region has seen for a century and people here say they have seen nothing like it in their lives. the latest tragedy was in an area of cologne. they are superior but slide swept away in a row of houses. rescue services received a panicked phone calls from people trapped in those houses at the time. 50 people were saved by rescuers, but around 15 died as their houses were being swept away by the mudslides. politicians across germany are making the link between the severe weather and the natural catastrophe weather and the natural catastrophe we are seeing here in western germany and climate change. that is putting the issue of global warming back on the national agenda, before a now it is about clearing up the aftermath, looking after the bereaved, but also searching for the
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large number of people missing. ten years ago, amy winehouse was found dead in her flat in north london. a hugely successful performer, she found it hard to shake her demons. now her parents, janis and mitch, are telling her story in a new bbc documentary called �*reclaiming amy'. they spoke to our music reporter mark savage at the jazz cafe in camden, where she performed. what am i scared of? myself. it is ten years since amy winehouse died of alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. i will always remember our last words. i said, "i love you, amy". she said, "i love you, mummy." i can always remember the love she had for me, always there. since then, amy's story has been
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told countless times but now her parents, janis and mitch, want to tell their side. people's idea about amy, the very black—and—white image of amy that she was struggling with addiction to alcohol and drugs. they thought she was a certain way, she wasn't. i knew amy. in a bbc documentary, the couple and amy's friends look back on the ups and downs of her life. she wanted to be famous, she wanted to be successful. when she got it, it was like, oh, god and it all kicked off, it all kicked off. at one point you say mistakes were made when amy was ill. what were the mistakes? the mistakes were... we didn't know... we didn't know what to do. no—one knew what to do because obviously the responsibility of the addiction lies with the person who is struggling with the addiction. as a family we could
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stand on our heads. how many times we had family interventions i lost count. how many times i took her into rehab and she would walk out the next day... i don't think there is no right or wrong way to deal with it. it will be amy's talent that her friends and family remember next week on the anniversary of her death. on the 23rd, we will get together at the cemetery. the first ten minutes will be sobbing and then after that will be in fits of laughter with a new amy anecdote. although it's not a joyful thing that you would go and celebrate it, but we do — we actually go and remember her. myjoke is, now i know where she is. that is a blackjoke. yes. but true. amy's family celebrate her humour and kindness, herfans will hold on to her music. mark savage, bbc news.
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the documentary �*reclaiming amy�* will be shown on bbc two at 9.00pm on friday, 23rd july. a teenager is to become the youngest person to fly to space when he joins jeff p source. all ofjust turned 18, willjoin 82—year—old wally funk, who will become the oldest ever person in space on the rocket called the new shepard. isn't that fantastic? the eiffel tower in paris has reopened. it closed in october of last year due to the covid crisis. this latest closure was the longest since world war ii. visitor numbers will be limited to 10,000 a day to
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meet social distancing requirements. fewer than half of their pre—covid levels. some breaking news concerning extinction rebellion. six of their members on trialfor extinction rebellion. six of their members on trial for blockading the printing press of some of the uk's major newspapers have, we understand, been found guilty. the activists appeared at st albans magistrates' court this morning accused of obstructing the highway outside of the news printing works in september of last year. in a moment, the bbc news at one with jane hill, but first it's time for a look at the weather. sunny skies and temperatures into the high 20s, that's what many of us are in for this weekend. in fact, it could turn a little bit too hot across some south—eastern parts of the country as temperatures hit 30
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on sunday. big high pressure has established itself over us. it is coming in from the azores and it is here to stay for the next few days. there will always be a bit more cloud around northern and western scotland, and also the north of northern ireland. we are closer to weather frontier and the wind is blowing off the ocean. elsewhere, easily made 20s across eastern and south—eastern scotland. high 20s across many parts of england and where is. temperatures are the only high thing, uv levels, as well. perhaps even very high in some southern areas of the uk. it will be a bit fresher for the golf on the coast of kent with the breeze coming off the north sea. temperatures may not even make 20 degrees. the forecast for friday evening and into the early hours of saturday she was quiet weather across england and wales. it will stay dry. a bit more cloud overnight across western scotland and northern ireland. that will drift in length, meaning that
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in the morning of these areas that will be overcast, particularly across northern ireland. there could be some mist and mark around the coast, may be some drizzle in the western isles. elsewhere, sunshine from the word go and we are in for a glorious saturday most of us with the temperature setting high 20s across the country. the high pressure is on us on sunday. around the high pressure we have a wind blowing and there is a weather front just in the north of scotland, so more cloud in spots of rain for parts of the highlands, the north coast of northern ireland, but cited that it coast of northern ireland, but cited thatitis coast of northern ireland, but cited that it is looking stunning once again, every bit as warm if not warmer. temperatures could hit 30 degrees in london. in western scotland, a little bit fresher with temperatures in glasgow around 20 degrees. the temperatures will ease into next week. you can see london hitting 30 degrees on sunday, but by the time we get a monday and tuesday
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we are into the mid 20s.
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more than 100 people are known to have died in the worst flooding to hit northern europe for decades — many more people are injured or missing. more than three months worth of rain fell in 2a hours, over parts of western germany, the netherlands and belgium. many local people say they were caught off guard. nothing you can do. the sound of the water dripping into your house, i never want to hear it again. as germany's president calls for a more determined fight against climate change, we'll have the latest live from germany and the netherlands. also this lunchtime: the test and trace app — more and more companies say business is being disrupted because so many staff are being told to isolate. young people are almost as likely to suffer serious health
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complications from covid as people over 50, according to a new study

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