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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 16, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines. the worst floods in living memory sweep across germany and belgium killing at least 70 people. dozens more are missing with further heavy rain expected today. �*grab a jab' vaccine sites open across england in a final push to get all adults vaccinated before monday's easing of restrictions. good monday's easing of restrictions. morning. is busins the good morning. is business ready for the big reopening? there is a rise in cases in confusion over mask wearing and more being told to self—isolate. ifind out if wearing and more being told to
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self—isolate. i find out if firms are ready to shake off restrictions. in the garden of england, the rose is in bloom. justin rose, one of three english players, within touching distance of the lead at the open, alongside danny willet and tommy fleetwood as they head into the second day at royal st george's. good morning. i'm on brighton beach. a gorgeous start to the day ahead of what is set to be a hot and sunny few days ahead. the forecast coming up few days ahead. the forecast coming up shortly. it's friday, the 16thjuly. our top story. at least 60 people have died and thousands of others have been forced from their homes by the worst flooding in living memory in west germany. belgium and the netherlands has also experienced unusually heavy rainfall which caused rivers burst their banks, flooding nearby
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communities and causing several houses to collapse. the german chancellor angela merkel described it as a "catastrophe" and said the full extent of the disaster would not be known for a few days. courtney bembridge reports. the full extent of the damage is only now becoming clear. houses have been ripped apart and roads have all but disappeared. in western germany, three months of rain fell in just 2a hours. the water was so powerful, it crashed a caravan in seconds. it crushed a caravan in seconds. residents here say the floods came without warning. translation: everything was under water within 15 minutes. _ ourflat, our office, our neighbours�* houses. everywhere was underwater. this motorway in north rhine westphalia was blocked for kilometres as residents tried to get out. but it was too late for others. translation: i grieve for the people who lost their lives. we don't know the number but it will be many. some in the basements of their houses, and some
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who were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. across the border in the east of belgium, cars were picked up and carried by the force of the water. this bridge was submerged and covered in debris. in nearby li ge, the river is close to bursting its banks and residents were told to leave. translation: i've never seen anything like this, is incredible. frankly i never thought i'd see that in belgium. parts of the netherlands are also underwater and soldiers are hand underwater and soldiers are on hand in case water levels rise further. translation: we have all seen the images of streets turned into swirling rivers, neighbourhoods and villages completely flooded. people who are afraid. people who are worried about their business, their homes. scientists have long warned that climate change will make extreme weather events like this more common. and german leaders have alsojoined a link between the two. translation:
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this is a natural disaster. but the fact it has taken place in this way is certainly connected to the fact that climate change is progressing at a speed we have observed for while. that must be another incentive and also an obligation for those who have become victims here, for us to do everything we can to stop man—made climate change and prevent such disasters at this scale. heavy downpours have continued overnight, making the work of rescue teams even more challenging. dozens of people are still missing in germany and the clean—up will take some time. some sporting event venues and shops in england will be transformed into pop—up coronavirus vaccination clinics this weekend in a major push to offerjabs to all remaining adults. nhs england is urging anyone who has not yet had their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine to have one before restrictions are eased on monday. tim muffett reports. it's just over seven months
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since the world's first covid jab outside of the medical trial. more than 81 million uk injections later, uk injections later — that is first and second doses — and the biggest vaccination in history means that, on monday, many covid restrictions will end. so this weekend, nhs england is urging adults who haven't had a jab to get one. from the trinity shopping centre in leeds, to primark in bristol, from sefton park in liverpool, to greenwich park in london. pop—up sites will offer first and second doses of covid vaccine to try to maximise protection before restrictions are lifted on monday. young adults are the most recent group to be invited to get their vaccinations, so there has been less time to getjabs in their arms. but research by the office for national statistics also found that young adults were the most
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likely age group to be vaccine hesitant. it is hoped grab—a—jab weekend will persuade more young adults to do what many have done already. for me, there was never any doubt in my mind that i would get the vaccine. i truly believe that it is the only way out of this pandemic. it means that i'm going to get my life back, we are going to get our lives back. i it's something that we shouldn't. take for granted and something we should feel so privileged to have. it is not only going i to protect yourself, but it's going to protect people around us. - and, ultimately, we all want thisj crazy virus mess just to end and, to end and, hopefully, _ one day, normality can come back. the oval cricket ground in london and the british open golf championships in sandwich in kent will also host pop—up vaccination centres. a final drive to increase protection from covid. tim muffett, bbc news. younger adults admitted
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to hospital with coronavirus are almost as likely to suffer from complications as those over the age of 50. a study in the lancet found that four in ten of those aged between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while they received treatment. our health correspondent alan reed reports. i'm in icu. my lung's collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on, paul was 31 years old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things, you don't know how to really deal with it but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how. before the pandemic, paul
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was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could and i was rushed straight to intensive care. put on every machine possible to help my breathing. they acted amazingly. the nhs are phenomenal. paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury, followed by lung and heart damage.
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while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger. this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are one in three of even the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications. some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. so this virus is particularly nasty. vaccination is the best way to protect people. covid is notjust a disease of the frail and elderly. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage, but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid has lasted over a year.
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a reminder that 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting to learn about this virus and its long—term impact on our health. politicians from the five main parties in northern ireland will set out their opposition to the government's plan to end all prosecutions for crimes committed during the troubles, when they meet with secretary of state brandon lewis later today. ministers in westminster insist the proposal will allow reconciliation, but victims�* groups and stormont�*s political leaders say the measure amounts to an amnesty. if you are not in a position to get to the beach today, we can transport you there. sarah is in brighton. lucky you. i am very lucky. good morning, a gorgeous start in
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brighton on the beach. it is dry, a little bit fresh first thing. but we have light winds. and flat seas. the first swimmers have been dipping their toes into the water. we expect more settled weather through the weekend. the forecast across the country today, high—pressure has been building and that is bringing a largely dry, settled and a very warm theme to the weather. temperatures really shooting up over the next couple of days. cloud in the north—west of scotland that could bring drizzle. in the sunshine, it will feel pretty warm. temperatures between 21 in glasgow, 27 in cardiff today. some strong uv levels today and late sunshine
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lasting through the evening hours. tonight, things remain dry. more cloud in northern ireland and western scotland. and some misty patches in england and wales. tomorrow, more of the same. a lot of sunshine for most areas. more cloud in the north—west of scotland. a few spots of rain there. elsewhere dry, and temperatures up on today. between 25 in aberdeen, possibly 29 in london. cooler where you have cloud and drizzle in north—west scotland. if you are heading out, remember uv levels are strong at this time of year. we also have high levels of pollen around. from monday, if you visit shops in england, it will no longer be mandatory to wear a mask or socially distance.
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ben�*s on the high street in ealing for us this morning that looks lovely, as well. we see the tables out there. things are going to change on monday. people still free to make their choices. but the rules will be different. they will. businesses trying to work out what it means. so many implications of the final shaking off of restrictions that happens on monday. i will talk to some in a second. we have come here because this is an award—winning high street. it has a butcher, baker, greengrocer, florist, chemist, estate agent, dry cleaners. all of that here. we can have a sense of what it means for individual businesses. the challenge for businesses. the challenge for businesses and how they cope with the easing of restrictions. mask
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wearing, the government saying it expects and advises firms to encourage mask wearing but it will not make it a legal requirement. it puts the onus of responsibility on individual businesses. alongside test and trace app that has been pinging record numbers of people. 500,000 people were told to self—isolate in england and wales last week, that has implications for staffing with businesses saying they cannot get staff because they are isolating. and because hospitality firms have told they should keep displaying bar codes, that could get worse when we get back out and restrictions are lifted. i can introduce you tojohn, head of the local trade association. as well as being in that position, you are running your own business here. our business is ready that you are speaking to? $5 business is ready that you are
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speaking to?— business is ready that you are s-ueakin to? a . , , speaking to? as ready as we can be. it is difficult. — speaking to? as ready as we can be. it is difficult. there _ speaking to? as ready as we can be. it is difficult. there so _ speaking to? as ready as we can be. it is difficult. there so many - it is difficult. there so many businesses here and so many different references. i do not think the government have been clear. there should be better guidance. we are placing reliance on the general public to try to behave themselves, for better words. we will follow the high street safely fund and welcome back fund. keep social distancing stickers down. at least those people visiting us and traders here can in all fairness feel safe and they know. i encourage people to try to wear masks and adhere to the traders, particularly on our high street and across the country. speaking of the traders, after a tough 18 months, how are they faring? you have won awards for how
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many businesses you have on the high street but it has been a tough year. it has been a tough year for many of them. i go back to the very beginning of the first lockdown. i have dry cleaners on this lane who have dry cleaners on this lane who have learnt very little money. when was the last time we all went to work in pursuit? apart from me, dressed in one today. we did not do christmas parties. whilst they got an initial grant, it is important that the government listen now and look carefully at what additional grants they can give high streets. john, thanks. iwant grants they can give high streets. john, thanks. i want to introduce you to shopkeepers here. good morning, you run a florist. a one—man band, one—woman band i should say. how are you concerned about? $5 should say. how are you concerned about? �* . . should say. how are you concerned about? �* , . ., ., .,
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about? as much as i would love it to net back about? as much as i would love it to get back to — about? as much as i would love it to get back to normal, _ about? as much as i would love it to get back to normal, i _ about? as much as i would love it to get back to normal, i am _ about? as much as i would love it to get back to normal, i am worried - get back to normal, i am worried about the isolation issue because being by myself, if i am paying to, the shop closes so that is a big concern. in that respect i will maintain social distancing in the shop. i am a small shop so one or two customers at a time. hat shop. i am a small shop so one or two customers at a time.- two customers at a time. not too many straightaway. _ two customers at a time. not too many straightaway. and - two customers at a time. not too many straightaway. and mask- two customers at a time. not too - many straightaway. and mask wearing, a lot of confusion. what many straightaway. and mask wearing, a lot of confusion.— a lot of confusion. what is your position? _ a lot of confusion. what is your position? i _ a lot of confusion. what is your position? i do _ a lot of confusion. what is your position? i do not— a lot of confusion. what is your position? i do not like - a lot of confusion. what is your position? i do not like wearing| a lot of confusion. what is yourl position? i do not like wearing a mask but i will continue to wear it and gauge it with the customers. if i see them in a mask i will put my mask on and we will work that way. i still have a screen, i work behind there. i will play it by ear, but essentially it is about staying safe and taking things slowly as we reopen. and taking things slowly as we reoen. . . and taking things slowly as we i’eo en, ., ", ., ., ., and taking things slowly as we i’eo nen. ., ", ., ., ., ., reopen. thanks. i want to go to the cafe and introduce _ reopen. thanks. i want to go to the cafe and introduce you _ reopen. thanks. i want to go to the cafe and introduce you to _ reopen. thanks. i want to go to the cafe and introduce you to rachel. i cafe and introduce you to rachel. you are getting ready to open. most of your tables outside. even though
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monday comes and restrictions are eased, you will have most of your customers out here?— eased, you will have most of your customers out here? yes, most of the customers out here? yes, most of the customers prefer— customers out here? yes, most of the customers prefer to _ customers out here? yes, most of the customers prefer to be _ customers out here? yes, most of the customers prefer to be outside. - customers out here? yes, most of the customers prefer to be outside. i - customers prefer to be outside. i think it is better to be safe in the community to keep it outside, weather permitting, as long as possible and then we will be inside when we have to be. the community prefers to be outside. find when we have to be. the community prefers to be outside.— prefers to be outside. and a quick word on masks. _ prefers to be outside. and a quick word on masks. wearing - prefers to be outside. and a quick word on masks. wearing a - prefers to be outside. and a quick word on masks. wearing a mask, | word on masks. wearing a mask, kee-iin word on masks. wearing a mask, keeping op _ word on masks. wearing a mask, keeping up screens. _ word on masks. wearing a mask, keeping up screens. staff- word on masks. wearing a mask, keeping up screens. staff when i word on masks. wearing a mask, i keeping up screens. staff when they come back will probably wear mask. we will mask up probably till christmas.— we will mask up probably till christmas. ,., ., w ~ ., , christmas. good luck. a little taste of what businesses _ christmas. good luck. a little taste of what businesses here _ christmas. good luck. a little taste of what businesses here are - of what businesses here are contending with. we will take you around the high street over the course of the morning and meet different traders and businesses. looking at monday�*s easing of restrictions, some optimism about getting back to normal but
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trepidation about some things that will change. in some people�*s view, not for the better. shop and restaurant owners want to know they are intending to keep people safe and that message has to get through. when restrictions ease, it is staying involved with that and keeping a balance. let�*s take a look at some of today�*s front pages. the guardian leads on the catastrophic flooding in parts of continental europe. its main picture shows people in liege, in belgium, wading through chest—deep water. the mirror says britain is "grinding to a halt" because of the so—called pingdemic, with more than half a million of us told to self—isolate in the last week. and the telegraph also looks at that issue. it reports that neighbours are being pinged by the nhs app because the bluetooth signal passes through walls, which means some people are having to self—isolate despite never being in the same room
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or even the same home as a positive case. and one of the most viewed stories on the bbc news website features a car chase in hertfordshire. passengers waiting to board a train in cheshunt saw this four—by—four being driven down the tracks in a very dangerous effort to escape police. it was eventually abandoned on the track, causing disruption. it beggars belief. you imagine famous people know famous people. and they are not starstruck. david beckham. probably one of the most famous people in the world, is that fair to say? he bumped into michael cain outside a london restaurant, as you do. he was about to leave on his
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motorbike. he spotted michael cain. look at the big grin on his face when he sees him. he is so chuffed. maybe they are friends but the picture makes him look like a fan. also this story, that seaside posties are wearing hard hats or using umbrellas when out on their round because seagulls keep attacking them. such a menace. a post—in thorpe bay said it has been terrible, the other postmen have been wearing hard helmets like builders and one puts an umbrella up. in seaside towns? we will warn sarah. you might want to keep your eyes out for this little fellow. roboshark has been developed in china. it operates almost silently and can move at high
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speed and carry out reconnaissance without being detected. some people of a certain age might remember stingray. in that, one of their underwater ships was shaped very like this. by way of camouflage. look at this now. the scientists who developed it say... it is effectively life—size. they say replacing the traditional propeller, it was not easy to distinguish, this is not easy to distinguish from a shark when seen from distance. from a long way away it looks like a shark, they say. apparently, there have been a number of these ideas for underwater robots. there was one called the ghost to swimmer in 2013. the idea that fish like submarines
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could go undetected around the world. that is the latest one. you will not see it. you are not supposed to say. you should not really look out for it. the olympic opening ceremony is little more than a week away and in a small town in the mountains of northern japan there is genuine enthusiasm for the games. one community is getting ready to welcome and host the bulgarian rhythmic gymnastics team. our tokyo correspondent rupert winfield—hayes can explain what it means for the town to give its support to a group of teenagers from eastern europe. not many japanese kids are lucky enough to have a former international gymnast as their teacher. and notjust any gymnast. antoinette vitale was once a world—class rhythmic gymnast competing for bulgaria. but, for the last two years, she has been teaching here in the mountains of north japan. for me, it is really like dreams come true to experience —
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to come here in the place that i already love. and to work with terrific gymnasts. that was my childhood — i grew with gymnastics. this is my passion. five years ago, moriyama invited the bulgarian women�*s gymnastic team to make this place their olympic hometown. but that was before covid. the hotel manager shows me the route the bulgarian team will now have to take to get back to their rooms. ok, so there is a screen here. can�*t go any further. at every stage, the team members will have to be kept separate from other guests. news that two ugandan athletes tested positive for covid after arriving injapan has added to his worries. translation: when i heard about the ugandan team, i i was a bit concerned.
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if we have an athlete infected after they arrive, the infection could spread around the team. that is what i�*m most worried about. moriyama is really an exemplar of what the whole olympic spirit is supposed to be about. but, because of covid, the tremendous enthusiasm here is tempered with anxiety. that is because places like this in ruraljapan, have lots and lots of old people, and so far almost no covid infections. that is not going to stop this woman. she is the founder of murayama�*s bulgarian gymnastic support club. she said she thinks of the team as her adopted granddaughters. and she can�*t wait to see them compete. translation: i know there is a lot of criticism because of covid. - i really wanted to be in tokyo to see them perform. their families and friends
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can�*t come, so that�*s why i wanted to be there — to make sure the girls know we are all behind them. the majority of japanese may still be very sceptical about the games taking place. but here in murayama, there is real excitement as they await the arrival of their bulgaria granddaughters. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, northern japan. it isa it is a week on monday. it gets under way. as we see more enthusiasm, it is infectious. it is like the euro is builds. and necessarily it has been downbeat. athletes have not been there. and the coverage will be different but enthusiastic nevertheless. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i�*m tarah welsh.
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disabled and low income drivers will be able to access funding to help towards changing cars ahead of the expansion of the ultra low emmision zone. the ulez will expand to the north and south circulars in october. those eligable can apply for £2000 under the scrappage scheme. the mayor has announced more funding for londoners to switch to cleaner vehicles ahead of the new larger low pollution ultra low emission zone. a boxing club in south london says it has been forced to train in a car park after being left homeless during the pandemic. peckham abc has had to stop running sessions for younger children. it says suitable venues are unaffordable, and its now crowdfunding to try and raise enough money for a new site. it makes me proud, in a way, that the kids turn up week in,
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week out and that they are happy. they don�*t need materialistic things. that�*s the biggest problem in sport, especially boxing, have had to fold under that pressure of where�*s the money coming from? as part of a drive to get more people vaccinated, over the weekend, there will be pop up sites in some unusual places. starting from this evening, jabs are available in the tate modern and at the oval. if you�*ve seen the netflix series the queen�*s gambit, you�*ll probably know why it has made the game of chess all the more popular. well, this weekend there�*s a series of events happening in london, called chess fest.
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the three—day festival will involve over 300 school children. it all ends in a day of chess activities open to the public at trafalgar square on sunday. let�*s take a look at the travel situation now. there�*s a good service on the tubes this morning. we are having some technical problems this morning. it will be mostly sunny and warm today and tomorrow. this morning will be cloudy at first but they�*ll be plenty of sunshine this afternoon. there is likely to be a hot weekend, we are expecting temperatures of 26 commit may be up to 30 on sunday.
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now though it�*s back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up on breakfast this morning... we�*re at the farne islands nature reserve, which is home to puffins and arctic terns, to find out how a lack of visitors has affected their behaviour. amy winehouse�*s mum janis tells us about a new bbc documentary to mark the 10th anniversary of the singer�*s death. an unseasonably cold and wet spring has been bad news for butterflies. naturalist chris packham joins us to explain how we can help by taking part in this year�*s big butterfly count. more than a8,000 new covid
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cases have been confirmed in the uk in the latest 21i hours — the highest number of infections since january. it comes as more than half a million people in england and wales have been asked to self—isolate by the nhs test and trace app, causing significant disruption to workplaces. dr mohit mandiratta is our gp this morning and joins us now. good morning. how you doing? good morning. i am very well, thank you. we have lots to talk about. the festival, if we talk about the number of people who have been pinged and how people are feeling about having test and trace app or the nhs app and the disruption, what are you hearing? the the nhs app and the disruption, what are you hearing?— are you hearing? the fact that so many people _ are you hearing? the fact that so many people are _ are you hearing? the fact that so many people are being _ are you hearing? the fact that so many people are being pinged i are you hearing? the fact that so j many people are being pinged all elected does not surprise me. cases
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are rising, there are 50,000 cases a day. we have the more transmissible covid variant. the reason is to stop the spread of coronavirus. it is important, as much as i completely acknowledge the frustration and tension many people feel. we have heard about large businesses struggling with staff stop we want to maintain resilience to keep open and support people in the community. i understand the frustrations, we hear that. the number of people downloading the app seems to be increasing. it is important people follow the isolation guidelines. from august the 16th, it has been said those double vaccinations may
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not have to isolate unless they are showing symptoms. there is talk of reducing the sensitivity of the app. i would still want everybody to follow the guidance to protect everyone. follow the guidance to protect everyone-— follow the guidance to protect eve one. ., ., , ., everyone. what are people saying to ou? what everyone. what are people saying to you? what is — everyone. what are people saying to you? what is the _ everyone. what are people saying to you? what is the feeling _ everyone. what are people saying to you? what is the feeling you - everyone. what are people saying to you? what is the feeling you are i you? what is the feeling you are getting? case numbers are rising. 5.3 million cases of coronavirus in the uk commit nearly 5.3 million, yet restrictions are easing. we have burn—out on ealing high street. —— ben out stop what are attitudes towards the virus?— ben out stop what are attitudes towards the virus? mixed. everyone is anxious towards the virus? mixed. everyone is anxious in — towards the virus? mixed. everyone is anxious in terms _ towards the virus? mixed. everyone is anxious in terms of— towards the virus? mixed. everyone is anxious in terms of restrictions i is anxious in terms of restrictions easing. people are excited. we have been allowed to do more and more in a stepwise approach which is the right thing to do. my message would be about showing caution because we
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are not out of the pandemic yet stop lots of people are vaccinated. there are a fair amount of people who have not had both doses. we are urging people to have a first dose if they had not had it. we hear about long covid even affecting younger populations. mixed emotions. happy we can get back to doing more of the rings we love. keep following the guidance because the virus is still there. —— attracted the things we love. there. -- attracted the things we love. ~ ., ., ., love. we have had a report in the lancet. love. we have had a report in the lancet- if— love. we have had a report in the lancet. if people _ love. we have had a report in the lancet. if people get _ love. we have had a report in the lancet. if people get ill— love. we have had a report in the lancet. if people get ill and i love. we have had a report in the lancet. if people get ill and go i love. we have had a report in the lancet. if people get ill and go to hospital, they can suffer as much damage as older people if they are younger. the data published now is coming 16, 17 months after we first started to tackle coronavirus. the shift in terms of who has been vaccinated in terms of the most
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vulnerable, what about that has changed? it vulnerable, what about that has chanced? . vulnerable, what about that has chanced? , ., , ., , vulnerable, what about that has chanced? , ., , ., ., changed? it is not 'ust a disease of older people — changed? it is not 'ust a disease of older people and i changed? it is notjust a disease of older people and more _ changed? it is notjust a disease of older people and more frail - changed? it is notjust a disease of| older people and more frail people. they are more at risk from covid that people of all ages can be significantly impacted by it. i have seen people being significantly debilitated. we are hearing four in ten younger people, people below 50 can have significant complications with heart problems, lung problems stop we are still learning about the virus. with the note of caution in people being careful, as you mentioned, we are now significantly vaccinating in these publications do seem to affect people who are more severely affected. —— these complications. what is surprising from the study is young people
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needed support with independent activities when they came out of hospital. activities when they came out of hos - ital. ., activities when they came out of hosital. ., ., _ , ., activities when they came out of hosital. ., , ., ., hospital. how easy is it to treat loni hospital. how easy is it to treat long covid? _ hospital. how easy is it to treat long covid? the _ hospital. how easy is it to treat long covid? the symptoms i hospital. how easy is it to treat long covid? the symptoms are| hospital. how easy is it to treat i long covid? the symptoms are new hospital. how easy is it to treat - long covid? the symptoms are new all the time. how do you know you have long covid? it is the time. how do you know you have long covid?— long covid? it is a really wide mix of symptoms- _ long covid? it is a really wide mix of symptoms. headaches, - long covid? it is a really wide mix i of symptoms. headaches, shortness of breath, headaches, problems, muscle fatigue, memory and concentration problems among other rings. we investigate people to try to find the cause. there is a lot of investigation going into long covid clinics with specialist, physios, rehabilitation teams to try to support people getting back to normal. there is a cure for covid. we are encouraging people to be as
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careful as possible.— mike is ready with the sport. i like the image you have behind you. i was thinking of an album cover, a tour poster. we have to remember, an english man has not won the open since 1992 and nick faldo. after a two year wait, it was an entertaining first day at the open, for the 32,000 fans that came out to show their support at royal st george�*s. and while former champion, louis oosthuizen leads, it was a good start, for five english players, who are part of a group sitting within touching distance of the lead as andy swiss reports. morning, everybody. have your qr code on your ticket? what�*s a little bit of queueing when you have waited two years? after being postponed by the pandemic, finally, the fans flocked to sandwich.
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the crowd limited to 32,000 but, under blue skies, the excitement was boundless. yeah, i think we�*ve all missed being back at golf. so really enjoyed being back on the course. lovely day for it. really looking forward to the day. it�*s great. very special. the weather is out and the sun is shining for us, so it's wonderful. good conditions for watching, then. and not bad for playing, either, as a couple of former champions proved. south africa�*s louis oosthuizen leading the way on 6—under par, closely pursued by america�*sjordan spieth as he rolled his way into contention. and a cluster of english players, including danny willett, are right there in the chasing pack. well, this course, with its thick rough and its humps and bumps is always the sternest of tests. and whilst some players rose to the challenge, others found things a little trickier. as ever, rory mcilroy was one of the biggest draws. but, after a fine start, his
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round veered into the vegetation. keep an eye on this one. he�*s six shots off the pace, while big—hitting bryson dechambeau is seven back, after he also took the scenic route. it was hard work — not so much a golf club as a garden strimmer. instead, this was the way to do it. will zalatoris with a contender for shot of the day. if only it was always that simple. andy swiss, bbc news, sandwich. what a relief for the riders in the tour de france, as there are no more mountains. not even hills, i think. it must feel like down hill all the way now, with three stages to go. barring any mishaps, defending champion tadej pogacar should win it again now, following his success on the final mountain stage. his lead is nearly six minutes, with a nice flat stage and a time trial, into paris to go. and great news for, mark cavendish, who successfully made it through the mountains,
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finishing inside the cut—off time — so he�*ll be able to challenge for a record—breaking 35th stage win later today. lewis hamilton says winning an eighth formula 1 world drivers�* title this year will be a tall order now. the mercedes driver is 32 points behind max verstappen of red bull before this weekend�*s british grand prix. there�*s qualifying today, before the new sprint race to decide the grid tomorrow, and hamilton is hoping the home crowd of more than 140,000 will make a difference for him. the roar of the crowd here is unlike anywhere else. considering we�*ve had a drought in terms of fans not being at the races in the past year, the energy has definitely been very much missed. and, yeah. you arrive with this kind of excitement but also this kind of nervousness also because you want to deliver for everyone and you want everyone to have the best weekend. some sad news from the world of darts. former world champion andy fordham has died at the age of 59. he was known as �*the viking,�* and beat mervyn king in 2004 to win
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the bdo world championship — also becoming one of the sport�*s most popular players and a celebrity away from darts. his great mate and rival, bobby george was among those paying tribute, saying, "he was a gentle giant and loved by all. our condolences go out to his wifejenny family and friends. rip andy fordham the viking." we are just one week away from the start of the tokyo olympic games, and one of the sports making its debut this time is climbing. one of the favourites for a medal will be shauna coxsey, great britain s most successful will be shauna coxsey, she s won world cups and british titles, but now has this one chance at an olympic medal, before she moves away from indoor climbing. ive been to train with her in sheffield. it�*s the moment she�*s been reaching for since she first climbed a wall aged four. shauna coxsey, multiple world cup medal winner,
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the uk�*s most successful competition climber. now hoping to grasp olympic glory as the sport she loves gets its chance to engage a whole new global audience. climbing is something that�*s really natural to us. as kids, we want to climb things. we climb trees, we climb all over the house when we�*re not supposed to. it�*s something that;s within us, it�*s part of who we are as human beings. that doesn�*t go away when we get older. climbing is a sport for everybody. i didn�*t ever expect to see it become part of the olympics during my professional career. i think this is such a monumental time for my sport, it�*s so important and it a privilege to be part of that. the olympic competition involves three different disciplines. speed climbing, it�*s the fastest to the top, lead climbing with ropes in the endurance event to see you can go highest and bouldering, no ropes at all in coxsey�*s strongest event. to boost shauna�*s bid for olympic glory, she�*s been training on this purpose—built climbing wall in sheffield, which is an exact
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replica of the one she will be tackling in the bouldering event at tokyo. the shape wall is what�*s going to be out in tokyo. but the holds, the things that we screw onto the wall, these will all be different. so the climbs themselves will be entirely new to any athlete. you�*ll be pushed to find an athlete more dedicated. even when shauna gets home, there�*s no time to rest because she�*s got a bouldering wall now in her basement. we actually bought this house because of the basement conversion, so we could make it into a training space. she can also hang out here by herfingertips, helping the work of her finger strengthening coach. there are other advantages to training at home. shauna and her new husband, ned, even trained here on the morning of their wedding a few weeks ago. we had a really beautiful day, a really small ceremony with some family and, yeah, it was very chill. he wore jeans and t—shirt
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to the wedding and we trained in the morning, so it was very relaxed. and they will be training together much more after shauna�*s one and only attempt at the olympics, as she retires from indoor competition climbing after tokyo tojoin her husband in outdoor rock climbing. my other half, he trains... my husband i should say probably, i�*m still not used to it! he�*s an outdoor climber, so he�*s very excited that he�*ll get me back and we�*ll get to go climbing together again because for the best part of a decade i�*ve focussed solely on competition and we get to go climbing together again, hopefully we still like climbing together. what a legacy shauna coxsey will leave, hoping to inspire1 million people on to indoor walls a week before the pandemic came. as they open up again, new centres are being built like this one in sheffield where beginners can get a taste of that tokyo wall. for me, bouldering is just so free. you don�*t need anything. you can hire shoes, you can hire chalk. it�*sjust an expression of movement on the wall,
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it�*s problem—solving. beginners and the elite can be in the same space, on different climbs but on the same wall, that�*s pretty magical. you don�*t get that in many sports. first of all, a common misconception about climbing is it�*s all in your upper body. what�*s stronger — your arms or your legs? definitely my legs. exactly. and then... if you think about using your legs and we want our hand to get there, we want to hold on. use our legs and hold on. two hands on that top one. good work! no ropes, no wires. easy. that�*s just climbing. that�*s the great thing about bouldering, actually, is that freedom. you canjump down whenever you�*re ready. there�*s a lot of overhangs, aren�*t there? that makes it a little bit more exciting, and a bit trickier. two more and you�*re there. yes. i�*ve touched it. to really prove to me it is about the leg more than arm power, shauna tried to teach me a walljump. you touched it. two hands touched it. jump. yes!
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you can tell how inspiring others gives shauna a spring in her step... so close! two hands touched it. ..as she nowjumps on to that olympic stage. that would be one of the best bits in bouldering, when they had to make the leap. what you did not see where the leap. what you did not see where the pain on the feet. you have squeeze into tight climbing shoes. i am normally a seven and had to put on a size nine. top climbers put on shoes that are smaller, imagine squeezing into two sizes smaller. one of the lovely things is her enthusiasm for you giving it a try, absolutely going for it. she has
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inspired so many youngsters and other people to give climbing again. there are so many centres opening up banks to her inspiration. —— thanks to her inspiration. sarah is at brighton beach with the weather for us this morning. we were looking at the story earlier about dangerous gulls, people worrying about them diving on to them. they had been quite civilised this morning in brighton. it is a glorious start to the day. i of a warm, summery weekend that is forecast lots of visitors will be flocking to the beach. a problem is the amount of litter left behind when everyone goes back home. we have an army of litter pickers.
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coral evans, you started up this group, you and your team of volunteers. what made you want to come here and pick up the letter? we came come here and pick up the letter? - came today because it was warm and sunny yesterday. after that we are left with a bit of tsunami of plastic waste and litter. do you think things — plastic waste and litter. do you think things have _ plastic waste and litter. do you think things have got _ plastic waste and litter. do you think things have got worse i plastic waste and litter. do you l think things have got worse since the pandemic?— think things have got worse since the pandemic? think things have got worse since the andemic? ~ , ,., , ., the pandemic? absolutely. there are not many nightclubs _ the pandemic? absolutely. there are not many nightclubs to _ the pandemic? absolutely. there are not many nightclubs to go _ the pandemic? absolutely. there are not many nightclubs to go to - the pandemic? absolutely. there are not many nightclubs to go to pubs i not many nightclubs to go to pubs and bars. people are coming to the coastline to relax and enjoy themselves. many people are not responsible with their rubbish and this needs to change. what type of rubbish do you find? mostly single—use packaging which has a huge impact on the environment and beach users and a huge impact on marine wildlife.— beach users and a huge impact on marine wildlife. ~ ., ., marine wildlife. what message do you want to net
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marine wildlife. what message do you want to get across? _ marine wildlife. what message do you want to get across? welcome - marine wildlife. what message do you want to get across? welcome to i want to get across? welcome to bri . hton, want to get across? welcome to brighton, enjoyed _ want to get across? welcome to brighton, enjoyed the _ want to get across? welcome to brighton, enjoyed the beach. it| want to get across? welcome to | brighton, enjoyed the beach. it is beautiful but please take your rubbish off the beach.- beautiful but please take your rubbish off the beach. thank you for comini rubbish off the beach. thank you for coming down _ rubbish off the beach. thank you for coming down bright _ rubbish off the beach. thank you for coming down bright and _ rubbish off the beach. thank you for coming down bright and early. i i rubbish off the beach. thank you for coming down bright and early. i will| coming down bright and early. i will let you get on with filling up these bags. thank you. a warm weekend certainly in the forecast here in brighton. what about the rest of the uk? we are expecting hot sunshine this weekend. that is down to the fact that high pressure is building in, it has been building for a couple of days bringing warm and dry weather. they are not going to be seen wall—to—wall sunshine. there is a weather front to the west of the uk bringing cloud and spots of rain in the north—west of scotland. also early cloud in east anglia. long spells of strong sunshine and temperatures will respond nicely.
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temperatures around 21 in glasgow, up temperatures around 21 in glasgow, up to around 27 in cardiff later. light winds were strong sunshine with cloud bubbling up. a touch coolerjust with cloud bubbling up. a touch cooler just around the with cloud bubbling up. a touch coolerjust around the coast. we are going to be seen temperatures into the mid to high 20s for many of us. just a bit fuller when there is a weather front in the north—west of scotland. —— a cooler. overnight things are staying dry but largely clear conditions. more cloud tonight. for england and wales, a few misty and murky patches with temperatures about 12 to 16 degrees tomorrow morning. dry almost across the board but more cloud in the west of scotland bringing a bit of drizzle. underthe of scotland bringing a bit of drizzle. under the cloud, 21 degrees in the west and aberdeenshire 25, 26
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stop further south across england and wales but we could see temperatures to 29, 30 degrees. long spells of strong sunshine and high levels of pollen. sunday a similar sort of day. it will feel hot. probably the peak of the heat on sunday with temperatures up to 30. not everyone a fan of the heat. it will be cooler in the north of the uk with cloud around. we are expecting a weekend of dry, warm unsettled weather across much of the uk. forsome unsettled weather across much of the uk. for some others, unsettled weather across much of the uk. forsome others, particularly unsettled weather across much of the uk. for some others, particularly in the south, it has been a long time coming. you have spoiled us with that beautiful scene behind you. we will continue that with a view coming up now.
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the fame islands, off the coast of northumberland, are an important breeding ground for a number of rare seabirds including the arctic tern and the puffin. for much of the last 18 months, there haven�*t been any visitors or staff and while the humans have been away, the birds have started to behave a little differently. our north of england correspondent fiona trott is there for us this morning and can explain. good morning to you. what a beautiful place that is!- beautiful place that is! good mornini beautiful place that is! good morning to _ beautiful place that is! good morning to you. _ beautiful place that is! good morning to you. we - beautiful place that is! good morning to you. we are i beautiful place that is! good j morning to you. we are very beautiful place that is! good i morning to you. we are very lucky. welcome to the beautiful inner farne where the gulls and kittiwakes have got used to the fact. they had been coming in and to nest this year. during the pandemic no visitors or wardens who normally live here have
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been able to come onto the island. they have had to stay away because if they fell ill, there is no running water and no guarantee a boat could come and pick them up. their work has been really cut out for the wardens. only half of them have been able to come here. when they returned onto the island in may to start streaming this undergrowth for the nesting season, they noticed quite a few changes and members of the public have probably noticed the changes as well. finally setting foot on inner farne. after 18 months, visitors are coming back and they�*re delighted. there are so many birds. i know it sounds ridiculous, it�*s full of birds. it�*s just wonderful — seeing mother nature like this. it�*s like puffin city — it�*s really brilliant. it'sjust wonderful. you just want to keep coming back to this place. such a variety of birds to see, fantastic. we picked a brilliant day, haven't we?
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i've got a soft spot for the puffins. i it's jasper's first proper holiday. he's going to probably make the same bird noise the whole way round. - but they will notice a change. there have been fewer wardens and fewer visitors to scare the gulls away — that�*s bad news for the arctic terns who nest here. normally there would be about 200 or so arctic terns in this area in the courtyard — making an absolute racket. probably dive—bombing our heads. we wouldn�*t be able to hear each other in a conversation like this. what we found after we prepared all the areas for them nesting is that they came back late and also that they came back in not very strong numbers. because only ten of them laid eggs, we think that there wasn�*t a strong enough number of them and that�*s why they didn�*t survive. it worries you. yes, it does. it�*s quite heartbreaking. so where are the arctic terns? we had to set sail to find them. it looks and feels
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very different here, harry, on staple island. yes, staple is such a different island to inner farne. i can already hear the terns. i can hear that... click, click, click. they do, don�*t they? clicking. so where are they? over there. you can see they�*vrjust flown out. oh, good grief! how many? there�*s a couple of hundred there. there�*s 200 there. and you see they�*ll come back and they�*ll nest in that long grass. they�*ve just flown out and they�*re chasing away this gull. it�*s important for them to do that in a group. the gulls are after the chicks are the eggs, are they? yeah, they�*ll be after the chicks or the eggs. after they�*ve chased away the gull, they�*ll sit back down on the chicks and eggs. back on inner farne, the puffin count is under way. the pandemic has affected that, too. with fewer wardens for fewer days, it�*s been limited. so far there are signs that the breeding season has been good. the wardens live and breathe this beautiful island. as more visitors return, they�*ll be watching the effects very closely.
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well, at the moment, the visitors that are coming here, numbers are quite low, deliberately. the national trust wants to make sure people can stay socially distant but it is also for the benefit of the birds, who are not used to having us around. the visitors who have attended over the past few days have actually enjoyed having that space, feeling they have inner farne to themselves and saying, maybe in should stay that way? does it matter that the arctic turns i not hear any more? would that mean that is less income for things like the national trust which has to conserve these places. it is a balancing act as restrictions are eased.- restrictions are eased. walter fascinating — restrictions are eased. walter fascinating place! _
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restrictions are eased. walter fascinating place! -- - restrictions are eased. walter fascinating place! -- what i restrictions are eased. walter fascinating place! -- what a l fascinating place! —— what a fascinating place! —— what a fascinating place! —— what a fascinating place! can we listen into the bird sound for a moment? as if on cue stop don�*t you love it when the animals work with us! loads of brilliant pictures and views to bring it throughout the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i�*m tarah welsh. disabled and low—income drivers will be able to access funding to help towards changing cars ahead of the expansion of the ultra—low emmision zone. the ulez will expand to the north and south circulars in october. those eligable can apply for £2000 under the scrappage scheme. a boxing club in south london says it has been forced to train in a car park after being left homeless during the
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pandemic. peckham abc has had to stop running sessions for younger children. its now crowdfunding to try and raise enough money for a new site. it makes me proud, in a way, that the kids turn up week in, week out and that they are happy. they don�*t need materialistic things. that�*s the biggest problem in sport, especially boxing, a lot of clubs have had to fold under that pressure of where�*s the money coming from? as part of a drive to get more people vaccinated, over the weekend, they�*ll be popup sites in some unusal places. starting from this evening, jabs are available at the tate modern and at the oval. if you�*ve seen the netflix series the queen�*s gambit, you�*ll probably know why it has made the game of chess all the more popular. this weekend, there�*s a series of events happening in london called chess fest. the three—day festival will involve over 300 schoolchildren. let�*s take a look at
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the travel situation now. there�*s a good service on all tube lines this morning. let�*s take a look at the weather now. you can see it�*s a gorgeous morning here in the capital. it will be mostly sunny and warm today and tomorrow. but there�*s some much warmer weather ahead. here�*s elizabeth to tell us more from our social media sites. hello, you have probably heard things are set to warm up this weekend with climbing temperatures, and sunshine to come and many across the capital pretty happy to hear summer is returning.
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enjoy it while it lasts. i�*m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. goood morning welcome
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to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. the worst floods in living memory sweep across germany and belgium killing at least 92 people. dozens more are missing with further heavy rain expected today. "we�*re not out of the woods yet." england�*s chief medical officer urges caution as restrictions ease but cases continue to rise. this has a long way to run in the uk and even further to run globally. we should not believe this is somehow just about to finish. the second day is under way at the open and in the garden of england, five english players are in the chasing pack, just three strokes off the lead, including the man who was runner up, two years ago, tommy fleetwood. amy winehouse�*s mum janis tells us about a new bbc documentary to mark the 10th anniversary of the singer�*s death. iam in i am in brighton and i iam in brighton and i have i am in brighton and i have been lucky enough to come up to this
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tower with a stunning view of the city. a really warm and sunny weekend for many. the forecast in about ten minutes. it�*s friday the 16th july. our top story. at least 92 people have died and thousands of others have been forced from their homes by the worst flooding in living memory in germany and belgium. the netherlands has also experienced unusually heavy rainfall which caused rivers to burst their banks, flooding nearby communities and causing several houses to collapse. the german chancellor angela merkel described it as a "catastrophe" and said the full extent of the disaster would not be known for a few days. courtney bembridge reports. the full extent of the damage is only now becoming clear. houses have been ripped apart and roads have all but disappeared. in western germany, three months of rain fell in just 21i hours. the water was so powerful, it crushed a caravan in seconds.
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residents here say the floods came without warning. translation: everything was under water within 15 minutes. _ ourflat, our office, our neighbours�* houses. everywhere was underwater. this motorway in north rhine—westphalia was blocked for kilometres as residents tried to get out. but it was too late for others. translation: i grieve for the people who have lost their lives. _ we don�*t know the number, but it will be many. some in the basements of their houses, and some who were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. across the border in the east of belgium, cars were picked up and carried by the force of the water. this bridge was submerged and covered in debris. in nearby liege, the river is close to bursting its banks and residents were told to leave.
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translation: i've never seen i anything like this, it's incredible. frankly, i never thought i�*d see that in belgium. parts of the netherlands are also underwater and soldiers are on hand in case water levels rise further. translation: we have all seen the images of streets turned i into swirling rivers, neighbourhoods and villages completely flooded. people who are afraid. people who are worried about their business, their homes. scientists have long warned that climate change will make extreme weather events like this more common. and german leaders have also drawn a link between the two. translation: this is a natural disaster. i but the fact it has taken place in this way is certainly connected to the fact climate change is progressing at a speed we have observed for while. that must be another incentive and also an obligation for those who have become victims here, for us to do everything we can to stop man—made climate change and prevent such disasters at this scale.
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heavy downpours have continued overnight, making the work of rescue teams even more challenging. dozens of people are still missing in germany and the clean—up will take some time. our europe correspondent anna holliganjoins us now from valkenburg in the netherlands. it is not a good morning for so many people. i think you are in a back garden, with more devastation and more rain to come. this garden, with more devastation and more rain to come.— garden, with more devastation and more rain to come. this is bridget's carden. more rain to come. this is bridget's garden- this — more rain to come. this is bridget's garden- this is _ more rain to come. this is bridget's garden. this is just _ more rain to come. this is bridget's garden. this isjust one _ more rain to come. this is bridget's garden. this isjust one garden. i i garden. this isjust one garden. i want to tell you how deep the water is here, you can see. i am right at the edge. it is flooded all the way down. i will take you round because
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they have been pumping water all night. the fire brigade have been working. the army have been here. trying to get rid of the floodwaters. this is bridget, it is her house that has been entirely flooded downstairs. devastating. i understand. we have been speaking to bridget. she is clearly finding it extremely difficult. if i take you around here, you can see all of these homes behind me have been evacuated. you can see that people have been building sand banks themselves. makeshift banks to try to protect their homes. bridget�*s basement is entirely flooded. she told me she is the lucky one and it has been a miracle for them because down here, all of these homes have
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been evacuated. and you can see they are trying to clear the water. just behind here, a bridge collapsed. a carfell into the behind here, a bridge collapsed. a car fell into the water. if i take you round here, just the other side, the army have been on hand. they have built a new bridge to try to rescue some of the residents who have become marooned on an island. look at these paving stones. the people who live on this street have been taken to a hotel. hundreds of residents have been evacuated from care homes. some had to be taken out of here on tractors. 10,000 people in maastricht have been evacuated. the dutch prime minister will be coming here today. this whole area has been classified as a disaster zone because the damage is so extensive. they do not know how much
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it will cost to repair this. fine extensive. they do not know how much it will cost to repair this.— it will cost to repair this. one of the things. _ it will cost to repair this. one of the things, those _ it will cost to repair this. one of the things, those paving - it will cost to repair this. one of| the things, those paving stones, it will cost to repair this. one of i the things, those paving stones, it shows the power of the water. that is something we do not realise. you are in a town or city and you think the pavements are flooded. but it is powerful and there is a reason people are being moved from their homes to safety. interesting when you saw bridget and walking along the street and sandbags, makeshift, home—made, what support are the authorities giving to residents? we have seen it in the uk with homes devastated and delays to insurance payments orjust support on the day. exactly. they have just grabbed everything, anything they can. these are just shopping bags filled with sand. in terms of support, the dutch king and queen were here yesterday
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offering support. they have put animals on ships to try to get them out. bridget, what kind of support have you actually had?— have you actually had? neighbour su ort. have you actually had? neighbour support- you _ have you actually had? neighbour support. you were _ have you actually had? neighbour support. you were telling - have you actually had? neighbour support. you were telling me i have you actually had? neighbour support. you were telling me you| support. you were telling me you consider yourself _ support. you were telling me you consider yourself lucky. - support. you were telling me you consider yourself lucky. yes, i support. you were telling me you consider yourself lucky. yes, we | consider yourself lucky. yes, we still have our _ consider yourself lucky. yes, we still have our living _ consider yourself lucky. yes, we still have our living room. i consider yourself lucky. yes, we still have our living room. the i still have our living room. the third — still have our living room. the third house from here, living room and everything higher. all gone. i�*m and everything higher. all gone. i'm sor . and everything higher. all gone. sorry. what and everything higher. all gone. l“n sorry. what kind of support have you had from officials and the government? firefighters have worked all night and the military building all night and the military building a bridge. all night and the military building a bride. . all night and the military building a bride. , ., , a bridge. yes, the other side. in the street. _ a bridge. yes, the other side. in the street, there _ a bridge. yes, the other side. in the street, there was _ a bridge. yes, the other side. in the street, there was nothing i a bridge. yes, the other side. in i the street, there was nothing they could _ the street, there was nothing they could do — the street, there was nothing they could do it — the street, there was nothing they could do. it wasjust police coming from _ could do. it wasjust police coming from time — could do. it wasjust police coming from time to time to send away tourists — from time to time to send away tourists. , , ., , , ., tourists. disaster tourists. can we have a look _ tourists. disaster tourists. can we have a look inside, _ tourists. disaster tourists. can we have a look inside, would - tourists. disaster tourists. can we have a look inside, would you i
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tourists. disaster tourists. can we i have a look inside, would you mind? i think my husband fell asleep again — i think my husband fell asleep aiain. . ~ i think my husband fell asleep aiain. .«i i think my husband fell asleep aiain. ., again. ok. i will take you back into the garden- _ again. ok. i will take you back into the garden. she _ again. ok. i will take you back into the garden. she was _ again. ok. i will take you back into the garden. she was talking - again. ok. i will take you back into the garden. she was talking about| the garden. she was talking about the garden. she was talking about the power and you said you had been battling all day to keep water out and it was a surge. now, there is only drizzle. but the danger was from the rivers.— from the rivers. yes, 'ust the river. from the rivers. yes, 'ust the we * from the rivers. yes, 'ust the river. we have i from the rivers. yes, 'ust the river. we have been i from the rivers. yes, just the river. we have been trying i from the rivers. yes, just the river. we have been trying 12| from the rivers. yes, just the i river. we have been trying 12 hours to keep _ river. we have been trying 12 hours to keep the — river. we have been trying 12 hours to keep the water out but it did not work _ to keep the water out but it did not work. , �* and work. does bridget feel safe? and when we came _ work. does bridget feel safe? and when we came back, _ work. does bridget feel safe? and when we came back, it _ work. does bridget feel safe? and when we came back, it was - work. does bridget feel safe? and when we came back, it was too i work. does bridget feel safe? and. when we came back, it was too late to do— when we came back, it was too late to do anything. do you feel safe? at this moment, 0k. the last days, it was this moment, 0k. the last days, it wasjust_ this moment, 0k. the last days, it wasjust fear. we did not sleep, looking — wasjust fear. we did not sleep, looking what can we do? can we do anything? — looking what can we do? can we do anything? will it rise for ever. i will anything? will it rise for ever. will let you anything? will it rise for ever. i will let you clear up. inside, i
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anything? will it rise for ever. i will let you clear up. inside, itl anything? will it rise for ever. i | will let you clear up. inside, it is ok, it isjust— will let you clear up. inside, it is ok, it is just the _ will let you clear up. inside, it is ok, it isjust the basement i will let you clear up. inside, it is ok, it is just the basement that| will let you clear up. inside, it is. ok, it isjust the basement that is 0k, it isjust the basement that is flooded _ ok, it isjust the basement that is flooded it— 0k, it isjust the basement that is flooded. it probably smells. | 0k, it isjust the basement that is flooded. it probably smells. i do not smell it— flooded. it probably smells. i do not smell it any _ flooded. it probably smells. i if not smell it any more. we will let you clear up. i am going to leave bridget there and take you to have look. this is one street in one town. but the devastation across western europe has been felt in such a powerful way. at least 60 people killed in germany, 11 in belgium, and the rain has started again. thanks so much. you can see the devastation, physical devastation and what it is doing to people�*s lies. thank you. we will keep you up—to—date with developments and will speak to journalist in dusseldorf. problems in belgium, as well, and we will catch up with those affected in belgium. the chief medical adviser, professor chris whitty, has warned that the uk is "not out
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of the woods yet" when it comes to coronavirus. he urged people to act with caution when restrictions in england come to an end on monday, particularly as hospital admissions are doubling every three weeks. the warning comes as some sporting event venues and shops will be transformed into pop—up coronavirus vaccination clinics this weekend, as tim muffett reports. it�*s just over seven months since the world�*s first covid jab outside of a medical trial. more than 81 million uk injections later — that is first and second doses — and the biggest vaccination programme in history means that, on monday, many covid restrictions will end. we are not by any means out of the woods on this. much better shape due to the vaccine programme. but this has a long way to run in the uk and even further to run globally and you should not believe this is somehow
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just about to finish. that is far from where we are at the moment. so this weekend, nhs england is urging adults who haven�*t had a jab to get one. from the trinity shopping centre in leeds, to primark in bristol, from sefton park in liverpool, to greenwich park in london. pop—up sites will offer first and second doses of covid vaccine to try to maximise protection before restrictions are lifted on monday. young adults were the most recent group to be invited to get their vaccinations, so there has been less time to getjabs in their arms. but research by the office for national statistics also found that young adults were the most likely age group to be vaccine hesitant. it is hoped grab—a—jab weekend will persuade more young adults to do what many have done already. for me, there was never any doubt in my mind that i would get the vaccine.
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i truly believe that it is the only way out of this pandemic. it means that i'm going to get my life back, we are going to get our lives back. i it's something that we shouldn't. take for granted and something we should feel so privileged to have. it is not only going i to protect yourself, but it's going to protect people around us. i and, ultimately, we all want this crazy virus mess just _ to end and, hopefully, _ one day, normality can come back. the oval cricket ground in london and the british open golf championships in sandwich in kent will also host pop—up vaccination centres. a final drive to increase protection from covid. tim muffett, bbc news. a major study of 70,000 covid patients in the uk has found that half those admitted to hospital in the first wave of the pandemic developed at least one serious health complication. four in ten of those aged between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while they received treatment.
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older men were most likely to be affected, but the researchers said they were surprised to see complications were also common in younger adults. northern ireland�*s political leaders will set out their opposition to government proposals to end all prosecutions related to crimes committed during the troubles — they�*ll meet the secretary of state brandon lewis later today. our correspondent dan johnson is at stormont this morning for us. this move has been controversial and many have problems with it. take this move has been controversial and many have problems with it.- many have problems with it. take us throu:h many have problems with it. take us through what — many have problems with it. take us through what will _ many have problems with it. take us through what will be _ many have problems with it. take us through what will be happening i through what will be happening today. the secretary of state is due to have a meeting with representatives of the irish government and all the major political parties in northern ireland and the message he will hear is that there is fierce and united opposition to this plan. essentially the most contentious part of the
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british government�*s proposals is the statute of limitations that would mean an end to the possibility of any prosecution dating back to the trouble is, the years of violence in northern ireland, and it would stop civil cases and inquests. it would mean in essence an end to any criminal process that might bring anybody to justice for crimes, for the attacks committed here in northern ireland and britain, which is why victims�* groups have been across the country giving their strong reaction to this. saying it is not fair and they do not feel it would be an appropriate way to proceed. the government in britain thinks that pursuing prosecutions after so much time is not realistic are not helpful for piece here which is why they want to see a process of truth in information, so families get facts about what happened to loved ones, even if there is no further criminaljustice. brandon lewis faces serious opposition to
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these plans. sarah is in brighton with the weather for us this morning. it is going to be sunny in lots of places. sarah is taking a bird�*s eye view above glorious brighton. you are spoilt and are spoiling us. good morning. good morning. iam pretty lucky. i have been allowed up the british airways i360 viewing tower. you have to have a good head for heights. i am at the highest point, 138 metres. a50 feet. you can see across the south downs with glorious views to the north. and you get fantastic views over the sea. along the sussex coast line. on a clear day you can see as far as the isle of wight. it is located on the derelict site of the west pier that burned down in 2003. it is powered
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by renewable energy. it is a gorgeous day to look at the view today. through the weekend, we expect fine weather here. in the rest of the uk, a similar picture with a warm and sunny weekend to come. that is because high pressure is settling down the weather that has been unsettled for much ofjuly, particularly in the south. high pressure brings warm and dry weather over the next days. a weather front close to the north—west is bringing cloud in north—west scotland and rain there. eastern scotland, northern ireland, england and wales, long spells of sunshine today. fairweather cloud bubbling up later. temperatures between 21 and 27. sunshine will last into the evening. things remain dry tonight. more cloud drifting into scotland and
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northern ireland tonight. and some mist patches in england and wales. but quite mild night to come. tomorrow, similar to today. a lot of sunshine and dry weather. more cloud in north—west scotland bringing drizzle. eastern scotland, northern ireland, england and wales, sunny spells. temperatures up to 29 in the warmest spots on saturday. sunday, the peak of the heat. we could see places reaching 30, even higher, and that will be the first time this year we have hit 30 degrees. a sunny hot weekend ahead. kidney damage, collapsed lungs and heart problems are among the medical conditions commonly seen in adults under 50, who have been treated in hospital for covid—19. a new study published in the lancet found that the risk of further
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complications to young healthy adults, many of whom aren�*t fully vaccinated, is higher than originally thought. we�*re joined now by professor calum semple, who is the joint author of the study, and also by paul godfrey, who spent several days in intensive care with coronavirus. paul, i am glad you are well. thank you forjoining us. professor, always good to talk to you. tell us what is new. my understanding is that now that fewer older vulnerable people are falling more ill, we are seeing it now spreading across all ages of society. this seeing it now spreading across all ages of society-— seeing it now spreading across all ages of society. this study is from the first wave _ ages of society. this study is from the first wave and _ ages of society. this study is from the first wave and we _ ages of society. this study is from the first wave and we have - ages of society. this study is from the first wave and we have the i ages of society. this study is from | the first wave and we have the data and cleaned it up and looked carefully. what we were surprised by is half of those who survived had
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evidence of organ damage during admission to hospital. what was more surprising, unlike the risk of death, which is associated in being frail and elderly with covid, but complications remained high in all age groups of adults. one in three of people aged 20—29 had evidence of one organ damaged. such a scarring to the lungs, kidney injury, liver injury. to the lungs, kidney in'ury, liver in'u . ., , , ., injury. can i condense this down? it is injury. can i condense this down? it is important — injury. can i condense this down? it is important research _ injury. can i condense this down? it is important research and _ injury. can i condense this down? it is important research and it - injury. can i condense this down? it is important research and it is i is important research and it is important that people understand it. if i understand it correctly, and i know you said it was from the first wave, if we transport what you are finding out to where we are today, if we have two people in hospital who have been admitted and are sufficiently ill, of differing ages. one of them over 50 and another in
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their 30s, what are you seeing now about what might happen next? the chances of developing something more serious. if chances of developing something more serious. , ., , ., serious. if they are in hospital now, serious. if they are in hospital now. the _ serious. if they are in hospital now, the most _ serious. if they are in hospital now, the most likely - serious. if they are in hospital now, the most likely reason i serious. if they are in hospital| now, the most likely reason is because they are not vaccinated. this data is relevant to these people. if they are over 50 they have a one in two chance of a complication and under 50, a a0% chance of a complication. these risks are very similar. the risk of damage to liver, kidney, lungs, scarring of the lung, which might mean you require oxygen, damage to a kidney, so your renal function will be poor many months and possibly many years, we do not know yet. these are big problems. kidney damage leads to damage with brittle bones and high blood pressure and increased risk of heart attack and
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worst—case scenario, renal replacement therapy or dialysis. we are seeing in the people who survive covid significant injuries to their bodies and we need to make sure they recover. the other weird thing about this, the risk of these injuries was less defined by the course of your hospital treatment but more defined by how sick you were at the front door when you came to hospital. that is not to say hospitals are useless. we are great at keeping people alive and have new therapies all the time. the strongest prediction of likelihood of complication had been set before you were admitted. that means if we want to change the risk of complications, we have to do something before you get to hospital. the only thing we have his vaccination. the message here is if you are under 50, do not think you are not going to get a severe problem. if you are unlucky and under 50 there is a a0% chance of
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getting a significant tissue injury to lung, liver or kidney so get vaccinated and reduce the risk. paul, i am vaccinated and reduce the risk. paul, iam pleased vaccinated and reduce the risk. paul, i am pleased you are well and out of hospital. what happened, and how long have you had to deal with this? i how long have you had to deal with this? , , ., this? i went in 'ust before the first lockdown i this? i went in just before the first lockdown by _ this? i went in just before the first lockdown by a _ this? i went in just before the first lockdown by a couple i this? i went in just before the first lockdown by a couple of. this? i went in just before the i first lockdown by a couple of days. i first lockdown by a couple of days. i was _ first lockdown by a couple of days. i was at _ first lockdown by a couple of days. i was at home. had what i thought was a _ i was at home. had what i thought was a bad — i was at home. had what i thought was a bad chest infection but it was coronavirus — was a bad chest infection but it was coronavirus. within five days, my lungs _ coronavirus. within five days, my lungs had — coronavirus. within five days, my lungs had collapsed and i had caught pneumonia for the third time, because — pneumonia for the third time, because i_ pneumonia for the third time, because i have had it since i was a child _ because i have had it since i was a child on — because i have had it since i was a child on the _ because i have had it since i was a child. on the fifth day i was rushed to hospitai— child. on the fifth day i was rushed to hospital and they saw the damage. at that _ to hospital and they saw the damage. at that time you had to wait three days for_ at that time you had to wait three days for results from the coronavirus test. they rushed me to intensive _ coronavirus test. they rushed me to intensive care, wasted no time. if it was— intensive care, wasted no time. if it was not— intensive care, wasted no time. if it was not for them i would not be here _ it was not for them i would not be here. , , ,
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here. they definitely save my life. you were in _ here. they definitely save my life. you were in hospital _ here. they definitely save my life. you were in hospital how- here. they definitely save my life. you were in hospital how long? i here. they definitely save my life. i you were in hospital how long? you were in intensive care seven days? for several days and i was meant to id for several days and i was meant to go into_ for several days and i was meant to go into an _ for several days and i was meant to go into an induced coma. and overnight. _ go into an induced coma. and overnight, they are not sure what happened. — overnight, they are not sure what happened, it turned. then i spent another— happened, it turned. then i spent another weekjust trying to get back to somewhat normal. i was not able to somewhat normal. i was not able to take _ to somewhat normal. i was not able to take a _ to somewhat normal. i was not able to take a full deep breath the whole time i_ to take a full deep breath the whole time i was _ to take a full deep breath the whole time i was in intensive care, so it was _ time i was in intensive care, so it was constantly like suffocating, which _ was constantly like suffocating, which was most terrifying. when you came out, which was most terrifying. when you came out. you _ which was most terrifying. when you came out, you were _ which was most terrifying. when you came out, you were confined - which was most terrifying. when you came out, you were confined to - which was most terrifying. when you came out, you were confined to a . came out, you were confined to a wheelchair? i can hear your voice is croaky now. i wonder how you are coping now. i croaky now. i wonder how you are ceping now— coping now. i am still having a lot of problems- _ coping now. i am still having a lot of problems. it _ coping now. i am still having a lot of problems. it has _ coping now. i am still having a lot of problems. it has been - coping now. i am still having a lot of problems. it has been over- coping now. i am still having a lot of problems. it has been over a l coping now. i am still having a lot i of problems. it has been over a year and a _ of problems. it has been over a year and a halt _ of problems. it has been over a year and a half. they estimate around that time — and a half. they estimate around that time. when i got long covid, it was hot _ that time. when i got long covid, it was not even out in the universe yet _ was not even out in the universe yet i_ was not even out in the universe yet. i thought did i
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was not even out in the universe yet. ithought did i have mental issues, — yet. ithought did i have mental issues, ptsd? i kept explaining i cannot— issues, ptsd? i kept explaining i cannot physically walk, my legs shake, — cannot physically walk, my legs shake, i— cannot physically walk, my legs shake, i am out of breath and constantly— shake, i am out of breath and constantly exhausted. four months later, _ constantly exhausted. four months later, that — constantly exhausted. four months later, that is when long covid came out and _ later, that is when long covid came out and when i was diagnosed. it was scary— out and when i was diagnosed. it was scary wheh _ out and when i was diagnosed. it was scary when you know something is wrong _ scary when you know something is wrong with — scary when you know something is wrong with your body but nobody else can seem _ wrong with your body but nobody else can seem to _ wrong with your body but nobody else can seem to see what is going on with it _ can seem to see what is going on with it i— can seem to see what is going on with it i am _ can seem to see what is going on with it. i am still having that issue — with it. i am still having that issue now _ with it. i am still having that issue now. i had a lot of test. last week— issue now. i had a lot of test. last week a _ issue now. i had a lot of test. last week a heart— issue now. i had a lot of test. last week a heart monitor. i am having tests— week a heart monitor. i am having tests on_ week a heart monitor. i am having tests on my— week a heart monitor. i am having tests on my liver. constant tests to nail down _ tests on my liver. constant tests to nail down why i am still suffering. it is endless, if i am honest. professor. _ it is endless, if i am honest. professor, it is sobering hearing that story. it illustrates what you are talking about. and yet you will know this, there will be some people who listen to that story and hear what you told us about research you have done who still have in their mindset, maybe if they are younger,
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but it is not exclusively the preserve of the young, that they think they are not likely to catch covid and if they do, they still think they are not likely to be hospitalised. they might still think, even given what you told us, they might be in the mindset that if they might be in the mindset that if they are in hospital, they are not likely to be seriously ill. do you want to take us through what we know now about each of those steps? the first step is — now about each of those steps? inez first step is right. the now about each of those steps? iu9 first step is right. the chances are, they will be lucky and chances are, they will be lucky and chances are they will not get severe disease. they may be asymptomatic, but they will be spreading the disease. and there is always someone who will be unlucky and it might be your brother, sister, mother, daughter, so that is the first part of the argument we need to collapsed down. the reason we treat public health medicine differently to other types is it affects everyone. after
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that, it is the swiss cheese problem. if the holes line up and you come into hospital, then regardless of your age, you have a one in two chance of having a complication. it will be a one in four chance it is the kidney, one in five it is your lung, and one in six it is your heart and one in ten it is your liver. the data is so strong that we can categorically say if you come into hospital, your risk of being damaged is very high. some of what we call long covid we will is secret —— realises simply the after—effects of covid leaving people damage and disabled. paul may have damage in his brain that is affecting his nerves, which is why he went into a wheelchair. and he is now having the shakes. i hope this
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research persuades people of the value of getting vaccinated. pauli. value of getting vaccinated. paul, we wish you _ value of getting vaccinated. paul, we wish you well. _ value of getting vaccinated. paul, we wish you well. you _ value of getting vaccinated. paul, we wish you well. you have - value of getting vaccinated. paul, we wish you well. you have obviously been through a lot and i hope things get better. been through a lot and i hope things aet better. . ~ been through a lot and i hope things aet better. :, ,, , :, been through a lot and i hope things aet better. . ~' , :, . ~' been through a lot and i hope things aet better. :, ,, i. ., ,, been through a lot and i hope things aet better. :, ,, .«r _ get better. thank you. take care, by b . you will find out what is happening wherever you are, but first a treat. we're at the farne islands nature reserve. good morning, welcome to the home of the cheeky puffins, one of the star attractions here. the national trust is concerned the pandemic may have had an effect on a different species, the arctic tern. join us later to find out more but first the news where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. disabled and low income drivers will be able to access funding to help towards changing cars ahead of the expansion of the ultra low emmision zone. the ulez will expand to the north and south circulars in october. those eligible can apply for £2000 under the scrappage scheme. a boxing club in south london says it has been forced to train in a car park after being left homeless during the pandemic. peckham abc has had to stop running sessions for younger children. it says suitable venues are unaffordable, and its now crowdfunding to try and raise enough money for a new site. it makes me proud, in a way, that the kids turn up week in, week out and that they are happy. they don't need materialistic things. that's the biggest problem in sport, especially boxing, a lot of clubs have had to fold under that pressure of where's the money coming from?
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as part of a drive to get more people vaccinated, over the weekend they'll be pop up sites in some unusal places. starting from this evening, jabs are available in the tate modern and at the oval. if you've seen the netflix series the queen's gambit you'll probably know why it has made the game of chess all the more popular. well, this weekend, there's a series of events happening in london, called chess fest. the three—day festival will involve over 300 school children. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all tube lines this morning. let's take a look at the weather now. you can see it's a gorgeous morning here in the capital. it will be mostly sunny and warm today and tomorrow. but there's some much warmer weather ahead and here's elizabeth to tell us more from our social media sites. hello. you have probably heard things are set to warm up this weekend.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. let's bring you up—to—date with the flooding stories in parts of europe. extreme flash flooding in germany, belgium and the netherlands came with almost no warning, as homes were destroyed and lives lost in a matter of minutes. many were rescued from rooftops, and others were dragged to safety from the flood water, which became a deadly torrent destroying houses and engulfing neighbourhoods. trying to give you a picture of different places that have been affected. we're joined now from dusseldorf byjournalist
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maleeka fashroo and also from the belgian city of liege by dr philippe devos, who had to rescue his parents from the flooding. very good morning to both of you. if i could start with you, i am looking at the scene behind you. i wonder if you could describe where you are and what you have seen.— what you have seen. hello thank you for havin: what you have seen. hello thank you for having me- _ what you have seen. hello thank you for having me- i— what you have seen. hello thank you for having me. i am _ what you have seen. hello thank you for having me. i am in _ what you have seen. hello thank you for having me. i am in the _ for having me. i am in the sawed—off. i am for having me. i am in the sawed—off. iam in for having me. i am in the sawed—off. i am in one of the most effective places with lads. the river is unusually and dangerously high. 0n the other side of the river houses were evacuated in the night because the river was dropping over. it seems to have cleared up today. yesterday, the night before we had traumatic scenes. in the background, some trees have fallen into the river and some parts of the houses have dropped into the river. yes. as
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ou are have dropped into the river. yes. as you are talking. _ have dropped into the river. yes. as you are talking, we _ have dropped into the river. yes. as you are talking, we are _ have dropped into the river. yes. as you are talking, we are showing - you are talking, we are showing pictures to our viewers of the extent of the damage. there are wrecked cars, there are houses that are completely ruined. there is mud everywhere. this must have been terrifying for people living in their homes and having to get out in a hurry. their homes and having to get out in a hur . . their homes and having to get out in a hur . , ., , :, their homes and having to get out in ahur. , :,. a hurry. yes. i was not as affected as other regions. _ a hurry. yes. i was not as affected as other regions. there _ a hurry. yes. i was not as affected as other regions. there are - a hurry. yes. i was not as affected as other regions. there are 1300 i as other regions. there are 1300 people missing. the people are still hoping... the internet has been down and the mobile system is down. the police are hoping they are alive. not only material damage that has happened, it is the human cost of the flats. :, :, �* :, ., the flats. now to belgium. you had to rescue your _ the flats. now to belgium. you had to rescue your parents _ the flats. now to belgium. you had to rescue your parents from - the flats. now to belgium. you had to rescue your parents from the - to rescue your parents from the flooding. you have seen it first—hand. in all the residents
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have been asked to leave. —— liege. people were asked to leave their houses — people were asked to leave their houses. normally the bottom of the garden _ houses. normally the bottom of the garden overlooks a river. this is one metre — garden overlooks a river. this is one metre 50 higher than the bottom of the _ one metre 50 higher than the bottom of the garden. before the night in the evening, the water was at the end of— the evening, the water was at the end of the — the evening, the water was at the end of the garden. 0ne metre 50 of difference _ end of the garden. 0ne metre 50 of difference in order to move. the water— difference in order to move. the water was — difference in order to move. the water was getting so quickly high during _ water was getting so quickly high during the night the police decided to evacuate all the streets at two o'clock— to evacuate all the streets at two o'clock in — to evacuate all the streets at two o'clock in the morning. they were put onto— o'clock in the morning. they were put onto a — o'clock in the morning. they were put onto a bus. the bus took them to a school— put onto a bus. the bus took them to a school near— put onto a bus. the bus took them to a school near the city. they were there _ a school near the city. they were there and — a school near the city. they were there and they were waiting for help _ there and they were waiting for help. they did not have anything to drink— help. they did not have anything to
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drink or— help. they did not have anything to drink or eat. — help. they did not have anything to drink or eat, no blankets and so on. i drink or eat, no blankets and so on. i decided _ drink or eat, no blankets and so on. i decided to— drink or eat, no blankets and so on. i decided to go and take them. it was difficult to take them back. all the values — was difficult to take them back. all the values around were also flooded. it is the values around were also flooded. it is a _ the values around were also flooded. it is a trip _ the values around were also flooded. it is a trip that usually takes 15 minutes— it is a trip that usually takes 15 minutes and i have made more than three _ minutes and i have made more than three hour— minutes and i have made more than three hour trip in order to get there — three hour trip in order to get there because it was almost impossible to find a route that is not flooded. we impossible to find a route that is rrot flooded-— not flooded. we have seen the ictures not flooded. we have seen the pictures in _ not flooded. we have seen the pictures in liege _ not flooded. we have seen the pictures in liege of _ not flooded. we have seen the pictures in liege of the - not flooded. we have seen the i pictures in liege of the damage. i had two questions... how are your parents? they must be very distressed. you are a doctor stop how is that affecting you in terms of work? there are people ready needing treatment because we are in a pandemic. needing treatment because we are in a pandemic-— a pandemic. they are very exhausted and stressed — a pandemic. they are very exhausted and stressed because _ a pandemic. they are very exhausted and stressed because they _ a pandemic. they are very exhausted and stressed because they are - and stressed because they are thinking — and stressed because they are thinking about the house. the last
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time we _ thinking about the house. the last time we saw the house, the water was getting _ time we saw the house, the water was getting to _ time we saw the house, the water was getting to the ceiling of the ground floor _ getting to the ceiling of the ground floor the — getting to the ceiling of the ground floor. the car in front of the house was not _ floor. the car in front of the house was not visible any more, it was under— was not visible any more, it was under the — was not visible any more, it was under the water. we hope that the water— under the water. we hope that the water witt— under the water. we hope that the water will get low today and that we may be _ water will get low today and that we may be will be authorised to get back there and to see the damage. they are _ back there and to see the damage. they are very stressed about that. as dr. _ they are very stressed about that. as dr. the — they are very stressed about that. as dr, the main problem we have is that a _ as dr, the main problem we have is that a hospital near liege has been also flooded. the ambulance had to take the _ also flooded. the ambulance had to take the patient from the hospital and put _ take the patient from the hospital and put them in other hospitals. we have stopped doing surgery and so on in my— have stopped doing surgery and so on in my hospital in order to leave room _ in my hospital in order to leave room to— in my hospital in order to leave room to meet these patients. we have other patients because there are
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still some — other patients because there are still some areas in liege web people are stilt— still some areas in liege web people are still trapped in their houses on the first— are still trapped in their houses on the first of— are still trapped in their houses on the first of the second floor and nobody — the first of the second floor and nobody can help them right now stop when the _ nobody can help them right now stop when the water will leave this area, i am when the water will leave this area, i am sure _ when the water will leave this area, i am sure we — when the water will leave this area, i am sure we can give them medical help _ i am sure we can give them medical help the _ i am sure we can give them medical help. the water is really cold. i know _ help. the water is really cold. i know some _ help. the water is really cold. i know some people have hypothermia. we are _ know some people have hypothermia. we are ready to help them. back know some people have hypothermia. we are ready to help them.— we are ready to help them. back to dusseldorf in _ we are ready to help them. back to dusseldorf in germany. _ we are ready to help them. back to dusseldorf in germany. he - we are ready to help them. back to i dusseldorf in germany. he mentioned the number of people still missing. there may be any number of reasons for that. that is distressing. it is a major operation for people to get backin a major operation for people to get back in touch with loved ones. in terms of the rising water and what you are expecting to happen next, what can you tell us?— what can you tell us? there are still fears _ what can you tell us? there are still fears of— what can you tell us? there are still fears of another _ what can you tell us? there are still fears of another rainstorm | still fears of another rainstorm because there was a fork assembly
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are expecting more rainstorms today during friday evening. people are very fearful. the sky has turned grey. that is quite worrying. there are floodgates around the area. we have now fears the floodgates will break and we will have another wave of floods in the area. the other thing is people are missing loved ones. we are trying to get through to them. the german army has deployed 900 soldiers to help find and rescue the people because firefighters and police officers and abortive rescue forces are too busy, it has been too much. yesterday i was talking to someone on the ground he said he felt neglected by fire fighters and they see their floods and cannot get to his house and it
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has been too much. that and cannot get to his house and it has been too much.— and cannot get to his house and it has been too much. that report from dusseldorf in — has been too much. that report from dusseldorf in germany _ has been too much. that report from dusseldorf in germany and _ has been too much. that report from dusseldorf in germany and liege. . dusseldorf in germany and liege. thank you very much. we should talk about sport. mike will bring it up—to—date shortly. one of britain's most successful athletes, sir mo farah says racist abuse towards black sportsmen and women is "getting worse". in an exclusive interview with the bbc, the four times olympic champion has called on authorities to do more to tackle the problem. sir mo has also revealed that despite failing to qualify for the tokyo olympics, he's not ready to hang up his running shoesjust yet. he's been speaking to victoria derbyshire sir mo farah has won multiple medals in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and now he wants to give his support to england's footballers who were racially abused. it's really important for myself
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to show support throughout the world for black people. do you think the abuse that some black sportsmen and women receive is actually getting worse? it seems like it is getting worse in my honest opinion. back in the days, back in my time, there was never so much social media. what kind of racist messages have you had on social media? i have had some shocking ones, some saying, "you don't belong here." i've had quite a bit. how does that make you feel? to me, this is my home. social media companies need to do a lot more, they have to be held accountable for what people get up to. even myself, i've had some shocking ones where people have received the message, i have gone delete, i have blocked... i've gone, "report..." gone back to report,
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nothing happens. i wonder if something should be triggered. as soon as there is racist abuse, something should be triggered. for sure. with technology now, as soon as you... there are words to be said, they should automatically freeze. how do we make it harder for these people? when you sign up, you put in your passport, your driving licence, your address is automatically there. secondly, i listened to gary neville and saw a lot of stuff and there's people have jobs and families to feed. they might be quite high up in theirjobs. the companies should be aware of what they have been up. shaming then in ways we can. i know there's more to be done. i think social media companies need to do more. are they actually your spikes? actually my spikes.
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farah, now 38, wanted tokyo to be his last olympics but he didn't make the qualifying time for the 10,000 metres. he exclusively revealed he is battling an injury. i have a stress fracture on my foot — left foot. i have been struggling quite a while. finally got diagnosed with a stress fracture. it is disappointing. you have had a few weeks to reflect on the fact you didn't qualify for tokyo, how are you feeling about it? i am gutted. this is athletics, this happens. what goes up must come down at some point. what is the race you are imagining will be the end of your career? i think it would be like a marathon, a half marathon. i would love to be able to show one more track event. so another 10,000 metres? somewhere. the world championships? i don't know, victoria. in 2017, at the world championships you ran the 10,000 metres in 26 minutes 49 seconds. the other week in manchester,
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you did it in 27 minutes 47 seconds, that is a minute slower. yeah. in order for me to compete with the best, i have to be running that time or even faster. can you do that? in the championship, it's tactical. i have always come through in terms of being a tactician to win as many medals as i have done throughout my career. these are my london... the four—time olympic champion says he still has the desire to run and insists this isn't the end of his career. what comes up must come down at some point. i know my career will at some point because that's just life but at the same time i don't want to end it like this, i want to continue to keep pushing, so when i want to finish, then finish. right now at the minute, it's like, nah! how do you want it to end then? i want to celebrate with my fans. i want to show people who have supported me throughout my career
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as a young child. get everyone out and show the appreciation and what i can do. never underestimate the gratitude athletes have for their fans, never underestimate the gratitude athletes have for theirfans, any sports people. he is not going to compete at the olympics but he is still adored by so many. can ijust say? that is a spectacular metal cabinet behind him. what to expect?! he would definitely have a cabinet made. people in their living rooms, theyjust have the one under 11 football trophy. they keep it dear for ever. that was my moment it will pounce. —— it all counts.
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sarah is in brighton with the weather for us this morning. it is gorgeous. i am at the viewing tower here in brighton which will this summer be celebrating its anniversary. it was built in 2016 the site of the derelict west beer which burned down in 2003. we have a height of which burned down in 2003. we have a height 0f1150 feet which burned down in 2003. we have a height of a50 feet above brighton. there was an interesting construction process involved. unlike a typical building where they would start the ground and build upwards, this tower started at the top and work downwards. no cranes involved. it was much safer for the construction workers who could remain on the ground all the time. stunning views right across the south down. if you look out to sea,
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i am told you can spot dolphins. a fine and beautiful start to the day in brighton. what about the forecast for the rest of the country throughout the course of the weekend? you have probably already heard we had dry and summery weather on the cards. today is looking dry. very warm weather on the cards in most places. the high pressure has been building in the azores. more clout in western scotland. a spot of drizzle during the day. across england and wales we will see more sunshine. cloud clearing away from east anglia and the south is quite quickly. cloud bubbling up into the afternoon. long spells of sunshine with light winds and temperatures are on the up. somewhere between 21 degrees in glasgow to 27 degrees in
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cardiff later this afternoon. the sunshine will last into the evening as well. this evening and overnight things are looking largely dry and clear with light winds. some misty patches forming and overnight temperatures on the mild side, around 15 degrees on saturday morning. temperatures similar to today but hotter. long spells of blue sky and sunshine stop a touch cooler if you are under the cloud. in eastern scotland is another very warm day. across england and wales to pitches could reach up to 29 degrees in the warmest spots. very strong sunshine. too bad that in mind if you have actual plans. sunday is a similar day. another try and fine day and it will feel hot. it will bring the peak of the heat. temperatures could be up to 30,
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perhaps higher. it will be the first time this year we have reached their teeth. if we do see it. in scotland and northern ireland more cloud. we have a hot and sunny weekend ahead. if you have got plans to head to the coast, do remember to take your litter home after you leave. we saw you on the beach earlier with the letter pickers. next week it will be ten years since singer amy winehouse was found dead in herflat in north london, she was just 27 and struggled with alcohol and drug addictions. now in a new bbc documentary, "reclaiming amy", her parents, janis and mitch, want to tell a different side of her story. they spoke to our music reporter, mark savage at the jazz cafe in camden, where amy often performed. what am i scared of? myself.
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it is ten years since amy winehouse died of alcohol poisoning at the age of 27. i will always remember our last words. i said, i love you, amy. she said, "i love you, mummy." i can always remember the love she had for me, always there. since then, amy's story has been told countless times but now her parents janis and mitch want to tell their side. people's idea about amy, the very black—and—white image of amy that she was struggling with addiction to alcohol and drugs. they thought she was a certain way, she wasn't. i knew amy. in a bbc documentary, the couple and amy's friends look back on the ups and downs of her life. she wanted to be famous, she wanted to be successful.
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when she got it, it was like, oh, god and it all kicked off, it all kicked off. at one point you say mistakes were made when amy was ill. what were the mistakes? the mistakes were... we didn't know... we didn't know what to do. no—one knew what to do because obviously the responsibility of the addiction lies with the person who is struggling with the addiction. as a family we could stand on our heads. how many times we had family interventions i lost count. how many times i took her into rehab and she would walk out the next day... i don't think there is no right or wrong way to deal with it. i am quite an insecure person. the more insecure i felt, the more i would drink. i mitch, you were accused of putting amy on the stage when she was ill against her will. how do you respond to those criticisms? it's lies.
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not true. you only have to know amy to understand even when she was ill she would only do what she wanted to do. i had criticism about me putting her on stage in serbia. i wasn't in serbia. had i have been in serbia, she would not have been on the stage. there were a number of situations where i was there where she did not go on the stage previously to that. ican't... people can say what they want, they can do what they want, i don't care. one of the more unexpected revelations in the film comes from amy's friend catriona, who says the star struggled with her sexuality. our relationship was so unique, undefined. we just loved each other very much. what i took from it, knowing her, was that she was confused about what it made her. catriona and amy, they were sisters — they were more than best friends. i have no objections.
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ijust wanted amy to be happy. # stop being a bore...# amy was often at her happiest when she was performing and her music continues to influence artists today. # i have been feeling lonely lately... i feel like i always kind of keep her in my heart. she has become such an integral part of my identity that i... you know, i always think, "what would amy do? will she go further than this?" if i hadn't gone far enough, i will go further because of her. # i ain't got the time, _ and my daddy thinks i'm fine...#. it will be amy's talent that her friends and family remember next week on the anniversary of her death.
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on the 23rd, we will get together at the cemetery. the first ten minutes will be sobbing and then after that will be in fits of laughter with a new amy anecdote. although it's not a joyful thing that you would go and celebrate it, but we do — we actually go and remember her. myjoke is, now i know where she is. that is a blackjoke. yes. but true. amy's family celebrate her humour and kindness, herfans will hold on to her music. mark savage, bbc news. if you have not listened to amy winehouse's music of late, it was all around you remember how brilliant it was, what an impact she made. the documentary "reclaiming amy" will be shown on bbc two at 9pm on fridayjuly 23rd.
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last year more than 1.4 million butterflies were recorded in the uk, but an unseasonably cold and wet spring has seen many species in decline. from today we're being urged to count as many butterflies as possible to see what can be done to protect them. one of those joining the "big butterfly count" is the wildlife presenter chris packham, who is at a nature reserve in winchester. i must say, morning to you. it looks absolutely serene. itjust looks absolutely serene. it just looks wonderful. absolutely serene. itjust looks wonderful. we have seen you on the screen and it looks so peaceful. it is absolutely paradise here this morning. there is the buzz of the m3 in the distance but also the song of the skylark. i am surrounded by these wild flowers the skylark. i am surrounded by these wildflowers provide nectar for a great range of butterflies and other pollinating insects. i want to
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show you something pretty special. how about that? this is an elephant hawk moth, very beautiful pink and green with the white and ten i. they are on the wing at this time of year. —— antennae. it is about the big butterfly count today. we are launching it. last year we spotted 1.5 million butterflies with lowest total of the insects surveying people have ever spotted. we are hoping to up the anti—this year. all we need is 15 minutes your time. go to the website and download this sheet. there are 20 altogether 17 butterflies, three of those day flying moths. if you are having problems identifying them, there is information on the website. or you
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can download the app. stand in one place anywhere where you think you might see if you butterflies and stand there for 15 minutes and ticked off the number of species you see and upload the data. armed but we hope to get a better snapshot as to what is happening with the population and distribution of these insects at this point in the year. can i ask, with your expert eye, cast your eye around your immediate environment? can you see any butterflies?— environment? can you see any butterflies? . , , butterflies? what can you see? it is uuite earl butterflies? what can you see? it is quite early here _ butterflies? what can you see? it is quite early here in _ butterflies? what can you see? it is quite early here in butterfly - butterflies? what can you see? it is quite early here in butterfly terms, | quite early here in butterfly terms, not for you. give it another half—an—hour of the warming and we will see plenty of meadow brown butterflies. they are these insects. we see the men lots of gardens. the ones we have chosen our butterflies that occur in a range of different
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habitats. this is the marbled white butterfly, striking pride in set of grasslands. occasionally splitting into suburbia. we are asking people to look out for familiar favourites like the peacock and red admiral and the tortoiseshell. the april we had was also very cold. then we had a very wet may. this was when many butterfly species were getting started. they had a very poor start. we are going into the big butterfly count with trepidation. we would like to see more butterflies but we would like to see what you see. unless we know how well they are doing butterfly conservation cannot begin to implement the essential conservation for the insects. the larvae are feeding all the birds who have young around here as well. irate
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have young around here as well. two cuestions. have young around here as well. two questions. what is your favourite on the sheet, butterfly? why hasn't the elephant moth blown away from you? it is a nocturnal insect. it is doing its best to hide. i'm going to put it in a bush and it'll be much happier and take to the wing again tonight. this is one of my favourite, brimstone. when it emerges on hedge reds, it always lifts my heart. —— hedgerows. enjor;r lifts my heart. -- hedgerows. en'oy the tranquillity fl lifts my heart. -- hedgerows. en'oy the tranquillity and d lifts my heart. -- hedgerows. en'oy the tranquillity and take i lifts my heart. —— hedgerows. enjoy the tranquillity and take care. get involved if you can. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. the worst floods in living memory sweep across germany and belgium killing at least 92 people. hundreds more are missing with further heavy rain expected today. "we're not out of the woods yet." england's chief medical officer urges caution as restrictions ease but cases continue to rise. this has a long way to run in the uk and even further to run globally. we should not believe this is somehow just about to finish. for business, there is concern about the rising cases and the confusion over masks and how many are told to
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self—isolate. i5 over masks and how many are told to self-isolate— self-isolate. is business really read to self-isolate. is business really ready to shake _ self-isolate. is business really ready to shake off _ self-isolate. is business really ready to shake off restrictions| self-isolate. is business really i ready to shake off restrictions on monday? they're back in the swing of things at the open. the big challenge for all the players on this second day. is making the cut. it's been a good start for former champion padraig harrington. we will be live at royal st george's at 8:30 good morning. i'm in brighton at the ba i360 viewing tower. blue sky and sunshine over the views of the palace. how is it looking at the weekend? hot weather on the cards. all the details in about ten minutes. it's friday the 16th july. our top story. at least 92 people have died and thousands of others have been forced from their homes by the worst flooding in living memory in germany and belgium. the netherlands has also experienced unusually heavy rainfall, which caused rivers to burst their banks, flooding nearby communities and causing several houses to collapse. the german chancellor angela merkel described it as a catastrophe and said the full
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extent of the disaster would not be known for a few days. courtney bembridge reports. the full extent of the damage is only now becoming clear. houses have been ripped apart and roads have all but disappeared. in western germany, three months of rain fell in just 2a hours. the water was so powerful, it crushed a caravan in seconds. residents here say the floods came without warning. translation: everything was under water within 15 minutes. _ ourflat, our office, our neighbours' houses. everywhere was underwater. this motorway in north rhine—westphalia was blocked for kilometres as residents tried to get out. but it was too late for others. translation: i grieve for the people who have lost their lives. _ we don't know the number, but it will be many. some in the basements
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of their houses, and some who were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. across the border in the east of belgium, cars were picked up and carried by the force of the water. this bridge was submerged and covered in debris. in nearby liege, the river is close to bursting its banks and residents were told to leave. translation: i've never seen i anything like this, it's incredible. frankly, i never thought i'd see that in belgium. parts of the netherlands are also underwater and soldiers are on hand in case water levels rise further. translation: we have all seen the images of streets turned - into swirling rivers, neighbourhoods and villages completely flooded. people who are afraid. people who are worried about their business, their homes. scientists have long warned that climate change will make extreme weather events like this more common. and german leaders have also drawn
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a link between the two. translation: this is a natural disaster. - but the fact it has taken place in this way is certainly connected to the fact climate change is progressing at a speed we have observed for while. that must be another incentive and also an obligation for those who have become victims here, for us to do everything we can to stop man—made climate change and prevent such disasters at this scale. heavy downpours have continued overnight, making the work of rescue teams even more challenging. dozens of people are still missing in germany and the clean—up will take some time. our europe correspondent anna holliganjoins us now in the netherlands. the real tragedy here is the loss of lives and those missing and there are a lot of those in germany and where you are. you are getting a
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first—hand sense of the damage to infrastructure. we see some of it behind you. infrastructure. we see some of it behind you-— behind you. hour by hour, the magnitude — behind you. hour by hour, the magnitude of _ behind you. hour by hour, the magnitude of this _ behind you. hour by hour, the magnitude of this disaster - behind you. hour by hour, the magnitude of this disaster is i magnitude of this disaster is becoming clearer. this is one street in one neighbourhood in one town. that this devastation is right across the region. behind me they are using a digger to try to access are using a digger to try to access a gas pipe because there is a leak. they are trying to place a balloon on there to contain. they are trying to pump out water. all of these homes have been evacuated. 10,000 people in maastricht had to leave their homes. i want to show you here. this bridge collapsed. you can see. a car has fallen into the water and there are recycling bills close
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by. —— bins. this is now officially a disaster zone. the military have been called in. they are building a bridge on the other side of these homes. so that supplies can be brought in and people can be evacuated. we saw two care homes evacuated. we saw two care homes evacuated already. some residents put onto tractors to take them out safely. people are advised not to come here. you can see, there is so much instability. they are trying to repair the damage right now but it is still not clear how much worse this will get. the realfear is still not clear how much worse this will get. the real fear now, you can see, it has stopped raining. the real fear is the water flooding down and then pushing the water level is here higher and higher. you can see the impact of that right
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now. i can see the impact of that right now. :, : can see the impact of that right now. :, . , :, .., can see the impact of that right now. :, . , :, .. :, now. i did notice before we came to ou, ou now. i did notice before we came to you. you were _ now. i did notice before we came to you, you were talking _ now. i did notice before we came to you, you were talking to _ now. i did notice before we came to you, you were talking to i _ now. i did notice before we came to you, you were talking to i think - now. i did notice before we came to you, you were talking to i think a i you, you were talking to i think a fire chief with you. clearly, they are concerned for obvious reasons we can see behind you, that things are secure enough for people to be there. .. , secure enough for people to be there. , : secure enough for people to be there. , ~ ., , secure enough for people to be there. , ~ :, , :, , there. exactly. all of these homes here... there. exactly. all of these homes here- -- he — there. exactly. all of these homes here... he was _ there. exactly. all of these homes here... he was explaining - there. exactly. all of these homes here... he was explaining what i there. exactly. all of these homes i here... he was explaining what they are trying to do. why they have to make sure the gas does not leak. i mean we have been inside one person's home and in their basement, the fridge is floating. flip—flops everywhere. the garden furniture out the back. many cars on this street alone are up to the door. the prime
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minister is expected here later today to assess the scale of the devastation. but there is a fear the worst is not quite over yet.- worst is not quite over yet. thank ou ve worst is not quite over yet. thank you very much- — worst is not quite over yet. thank you very much. we _ worst is not quite over yet. thank you very much. we will— worst is not quite over yet. thank you very much. we will be - worst is not quite over yet. thank you very much. we will be back i worst is not quite over yet. thank. you very much. we will be back with you very much. we will be back with you later. the chief medical adviser, professor chris whitty, has warned that the uk is "not out of the woods yet" when it comes to coronavirus. he urged people to act with caution when restrictions in england come to an end on monday, particularly as hospital admissions are doubling every three weeks. the warning comes as some sporting event venues and shops will be transformed into pop—up coronavirus vaccination clinics this weekend, as tim muffett reports. it's just over seven months since the world's first covid jab outside of a medical trial. more than 81 million uk injections later — that is first and second doses — and the biggest vaccination programme in history means that, on monday, many covid restrictions will end.
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we are not by any means out of the woods yet on this. we are in much better shape due to the vaccine programme and drugs and a variety of other things, but this has a long way to run in the uk and it's got even further to run globally. we really shouldn't believe this is somehow just about to finish. that is far from where we are at the moment. so this weekend, nhs england is urging adults who haven't had a jab to get one. from the trinity shopping centre in leeds, to primark in bristol, from sefton park in liverpool, to greenwich park in london. pop—up sites will offer first and second doses of covid vaccine to try to maximise protection before restrictions are lifted on monday. young adults were the most recent group to be invited to get their vaccinations, so there has been less time to getjabs in their arms. but research by the office for national statistics also found
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that young adults were the most likely age group to be vaccine hesitant. it is hoped grab—a—jab weekend will persuade more young adults to do what many have done already. for me, there was never any doubt in my mind that i would get the vaccine. i truly believe that it is the only way out of this pandemic. it means that i'm going to get my life back, we are going to get our lives back. i it's something that we shouldn't. take for granted and something we should feel so privileged to have. it is not only going i to protect yourself, but it's going to protect people around us. - and, ultimately, we all want this crazy virus mess just _ to end and, hopefully, _ one day, normality can come back. the oval cricket ground in london and the british open golf championships in sandwich in kent will also host pop—up vaccination centres. a final drive to increase protection from covid. tim muffett, bbc news.
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younger adults admitted to hospital with coronavirus are almost as likely to suffer from complications as those over the age of 50. a study in the lancet found that four in 10 of those aged between 19 and 49 developed problems with their kidneys, lungs or other organs while they received treatment. our health correspondent alan reed reports. i'm in icu. my lungs collapsed. and i'vejust found out i have pneumonia. looking back 18 months on. paul was 31 years old last march when he was taken to hospital with what later turned out to be covid. it was the worst experience of my life, obviously. it was horrific. it's one of those things, you don't know how to really deal with it but you mentallyjust do. you don't know how. before the pandemic, paul
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was diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a serious lung condition. in hospital, he was told covid had caused pneumonia. i couldn't believe how this virus had ruined my body so quickly. and the fight that i would have to fight. i could see on their face they were quite shocked, but they did everything they could and i was rushed straight to intensive care. put on every machine possible to help my breathing. they acted amazingly. the nhs are phenomenal. paul was treated here in colchester last year. he is certain the staff at this hospital saved his life. what we didn't know at the time, though, was just how much damage a severe covid infection could do to the body. now a new study has looked back at the first wave of the pandemic to see how those who needed hospital treatment were affected. an analysis of 70,000 covid patients found that half suffered some form of medical complication in hospital. the most common was a kidney injury, followed by lung and heart damage.
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while those aged 50 and over were most likely to have a problem, researchers said they were surprised to find high levels of medical complications in patients like paul — in their 30s and even younger. this study, again, reinforces covid is not the flu. we are seeing one in three of even the youngest of our adults who are coming into hospital suffering significant complications. some of which will require further monitoring and potentially further treatment in the future. so this virus is particularly nasty. vaccination is the best way to protect people. covid is notjust a disease of the frail and elderly. doctors are not yet certain how covid can cause organ damage, but it's likely that, in some cases, the body's own immune system can get carried away and attack healthy tissue. it is thought vaccines can help by reducing the severity of the disease. for people like paul, the damage caused by covid has lasted over a year.
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a reminder that 18 months into this pandemic, we are onlyjust starting to learn about this virus and its long—term our health correspondent reporting. northern ireland's political leaders will set out their opposition to government proposals to end all prosecutions related to crimes committed during the troubles — they'll meet the secretary of state brandon lewis later today. our correspondent danjohnson is at stormont this morning for us, it looks beautiful there with the sun shining, but there is far from good will, i think, or agreement in reaction to these plans. absolutely. that meeting _ reaction to these plans. absolutely. that meeting has _ reaction to these plans. absolutely. that meeting hasjust _ reaction to these plans. absolutely. that meeting hasjust begun - reaction to these plans. absolutely. that meeting hasjust begun and i reaction to these plans. absolutely. | that meeting hasjust begun and the that meeting has just begun and the secretary of state will be hearing the fierce, the unified opposition to the plan he outlined this week.
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there are so many victims and survivors of attacks across northern ireland who want to know who carried out those attacks, who planned those bombings, who commissioned those shootings. did members of the security services break the law in some of their actions in years gone by? those are the sort of question still hanging over people here, left over from the troubles. there are strong calls forjustice. the british government position is it is beyond the point of prosecution is being realistic, which is why the secretary of state set out the plan for a statute of limitations to end criminal investigations, inquests and civil cases. in place, put in an information process that would hopefully give families and survivors facts, answers, the truth, if not criminaljustice. brandon lewis the secretary of state will get an idea today of the opposition
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to that plan from political parties in northern ireland and also from the irish government.— you have probably noticed almost anywhere we have looked, the camera show the weather is absolutely stunning. sarah is in brighton with the weather for us this morning. look at that. good morning. a beautiful day to be on the coast in brighton. i am up the ba i360 viewing tower. the views are glorious, across brighton and hove, the south downs, out to sea, the isle of wight, as well. this tower will celebrate its fifth anniversary this summer and is powered by renewable energy. as the pod comes downwards, it collect some of the energy it makes and is then used to propel it back up. that means at least every third flight is totally
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self powered. it is on the site of the derelict west pier that burnt down in 2003. it brings spectacular views across the skyline and south downs. what about the weekend whether? we expect more of the same. blue sky overhead today, sunshine. not everyone will see quite this much sunshine. more cloud in north—west scotland. generally, high—pressure holding onto the weather over the next days. it will be largely dry and feel very warm if not hot. high—pressure building. a week where the front pushing into the far north—west bringing cloud across the western half of scotland with drizzle around also. away from there, blue sky and sunshine. light winds. a warmer day in east england because we have lost the cloud and
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breeze from the sea. afternoon temperatures widely in the mid 20s. perhaps 27 in cardiff. tonight, more cloud across parts of scotland and northern ireland. misty patches in england and wales but a mild night with temperatures 12—16 first thing tomorrow. tomorrow brings more of the same. a lot of dry weather. more cloud in western scotland with spots of rain. away from there, warm if not hot by the afternoon. temperatures could reach 29 on saturday. very strong uv levels. we are not quite used to it, particularly in the south where it has been unsettled. by sunday, we could see temperatures hitting 30, something we have not seen in the uk something we have not seen in the uk so far this year. enjoy it. i know the hot weather is not everybody�*s cup of tea.
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very true, it is not to everyone's taste. it's one notification you don't want to receive on your phone — the nhs covid app telling you to self—isolate for ten days after coming into contact with someone who has tested positive. as the number of people getting pinged continues to rise, business leaders are now warning some shops and factories may have to temporarily close because so many employees are isolating. more than half a million people in england and wales were told to self—isolate by the app last week. that's an increase of 46%, compared to the previous week. anyone who receives an alert is advised — but not legally obliged — to self—isolate for ten days. but from the 16th august, people in england who have received both doses of a coronavirus vaccine will no longer need to self—isolate if they receive an alert. richard galpin has
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been looking at how businesses have been affected. rolls—royce, one of many companies, big and small, now fearful big and small now fearful production could be affected by large numbers of staff being told by the nhs covid app to self—isolate for ten days. the company says it may have to halve production at its goodwood factory. nissan another company facing staff shortages after up to 900 workers at its sunderland car plant were sent home — 10% of the workforce. here in sheffield, this numberplate manufacturing company faces a similar problem of staff shortages. eight members of the team here currently self—isolating. that's a problem for our business, because we're going to be letting down customers in a very competitive market. it adds cost to a business that's already had significant costs incurred last year through everything that we've had to endure. rob, a member of the team, is now back at work after having
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to self—isolate along with his family. from monday, there are going to be a lot more cases and the amount of self—isolation will go up because of the amount of contact that people will have and without wearing these things, without wearing masks. and the amount of cases will go up and we will be back to square one, i think. come and take a seat. at this gp practice in leeds, they fear the worst. they may have to close down now, because members of staff are self—isolating. it seems ridiculous to us that we have staff who are double—vaccinated. you know, i had my first vaccine before christmas. we've been vaccinated for months and yet they're not able to come to work. a government spokesman said it was sticking with the date of august the 16th for the lifting of self—isolation rules. and with covid cases increasing, it was vital to make sure systems for self—isolation were proportionate. richard galpin, bbc news.
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the changes are coming. ben's on the high street in ealing to find out how quickly retaillers will adopt the changes. i think the thought is they are still mindful some customers are still mindful some customers are still feeling cautious, regardless of knowing life is taking baby steps back to normal. yes, that is so true. they are keen to get back to normality but at the same time have to make sure customers coming in the shops every day feel comfortable. there are a lot of things to contend with right now. first is the issue of mask wearing. there is confusion about where you will have to wear it and where you will have to wear it and where you will not, and the government advice is advice to wear a mask, if you go into an enclosed public space, but a lot of retailers i spoke to said they will have staff
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continuing to wear masks and customers if they want to. you have heard about the problem of the pinging on the nhs app, the soaring number of people told to self—isolate. half a billion in england and wales last week. that has implications for staff, whether shops and offices have enough staff, whether they are self—isolating at home. they think that problem could get worse because for hospitality venues in particular, they have been told to keep up bar codes, asking people to check in. that could mean even more people are forced to self—isolate as we get back to normality and more get out there. let's talk about some of those implications and what it means for retailers. i will introduce you to some of the shopkeepers. natalie runs two beauty salons. talk to me about monday, you have made changes to the business already, but what will it mean for you? hagar
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to the business already, but what will it mean for you?— will it mean for you? now we will remain as — will it mean for you? now we will remain as we _ will it mean for you? now we will remain as we were, _ will it mean for you? now we will remain as we were, keeping - will it mean for you? now we will. remain as we were, keeping chairs spaced out, asking staff to keep masks on, and encouraging clients to keep masks on while moving around in the business. the keep masks on while moving around in the business-— the business. the past year has been difficult for so _ the business. the past year has been difficult for so many _ the business. the past year has been difficult for so many firms. _ the business. the past year has been difficult for so many firms. as - the business. the past year has been difficult for so many firms. as we - difficult for so many firms. as we emerge into something more normal, it brings its own challenges. staffing has been difficult. lots of hairdressers have gone mobile over the pandemic which has its own challenges. we are linked to hospitality. people are not going out, not having a blow—dry, out of the habit of hairdressing. even the wedding industry, the beauty side, which means the business has reduced naturally in that respect. hope naturally in that respect. how optimistic _ naturally in that respect. how optimistic are _ naturally in that respect. how optimistic are you _ naturally in that respect. how optimistic are you monday marks a return back to normal? i optimistic are you monday marks a return back to normal?— return back to normal? i think it will be very _ return back to normal? i think it will be very much _ return back to normal? i think it will be very much as _ return back to normal? i think it will be very much as it - return back to normal? i think it will be very much as it was - return back to normal? i think it will be very much as it was over| return back to normal? i think it- will be very much as it was over the past weeks. we have a fair few months before we see a return to normality, i think.
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months before we see a return to normality, ithink. brute months before we see a return to normality, ithink.— months before we see a return to normality, ithink. normality, i think. we will go on a walk. if normality, i think. we will go on a walk- if you _ normality, i think. we will go on a walk. if you were _ normality, i think. we will go on a walk. if you were with _ normality, i think. we will go on a walk. if you were with me - normality, i think. we will go on a walk. if you were with me earlier, | walk. if you were with me earlier, there are all sorts of businesses here, an award—winning high street with a butcher, baker, hairdresser, chemist, book shop, fishmonger, cafe. all sorts of stuff along here. so many of them trying to survive the past year because it has been tough. they are not big chain retailers that have deep pockets to ride out the storm. they are small independent businesses. the past months have meant for them hanging on in there, claiming grants they can from the government, but ensuring they are here to survive the other side. tony runs the dry cleaner. good morning. foryou, the past year has been really tough. we were hearing from natalie, people are not going out, not going to the office, which is a big part of your business. :, :
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office, which is a big part of your business. :, . _, :, , business. you close the economy down, business. you close the economy down. you _ business. you close the economy down, you close _ business. you close the economy down, you close the _ business. you close the economy down, you close the shops - business. you close the economyj down, you close the shops down. business. you close the economy - down, you close the shops down. with no offices, we have no shirts, suits, people are not going to clubs and pubs. the economy dries up completely. brute and pubs. the economy dries up completely-— and pubs. the economy dries up com-letel . ~ . , completely. we are struggling. on monda , completely. we are struggling. on monday. when _ completely. we are struggling. on monday, when we _ completely. we are struggling. on monday, when we are _ completely. we are struggling. on monday, when we are told - completely. we are struggling. on monday, when we are told thingsl monday, when we are told things start to get more normal, how hopeful are you that marks a return to business as usual? brute hopeful are you that marks a return to business as usual?— to business as usual? we will wait and see. to business as usual? we will wait and see- we _ to business as usual? we will wait and see. we have _ to business as usual? we will wait and see. we have had _ to business as usual? we will wait and see. we have had a _ to business as usual? we will wait and see. we have had a lot - to business as usual? we will wait and see. we have had a lot of - to business as usual? we will wait| and see. we have had a lot of false dawns. masks, it is down to everybody individually. we will wear them in the shop and if somebody is wearing a mask, both people are protected. to wearing a mask, both people are trotected. :, , ., , , :, protected. to give us a sense of the im act on protected. to give us a sense of the impact on business, _ protected. to give us a sense of the impact on business, the _ protected. to give us a sense of the impact on business, the number - protected. to give us a sense of the impact on business, the number of| impact on business, the number of shirts you would deal with in a day is how many? brute shirts you would deal with in a day is how many?— shirts you would deal with in a day ishowman ?~ , :, :, , is how many? we were up to, not my sho- is how many? we were up to, not my shop here. — is how many? we were up to, not my shop here. but _ is how many? we were up to, not my shop here. but my — is how many? we were up to, not my shop here, but my friend's _ is how many? we were up to, not my shop here, but my friend's brother'sl shop here, but my friend's brother's shop, he was doing a thousand a week and then down to 80. our turnover went down by 90% after the first lockdown. went down by 9096 after the first lockdown. :, , :, , ,., . ,, lockdown. you need people back in the office? — lockdown. you need people back in the office? let's _ lockdown. you need people back in the office? let's get _ lockdown. you need people back in
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the office? let's get back - lockdown. you need people back in the office? let's get back to - the office? let's get back to normality. _ the office? let's get back to normality, that _ the office? let's get back to normality, that is _ the office? let's get back to normality, that is what - the office? let's get back to normality, that is what we i the office? let's get back to - normality, that is what we need. good luck. need luck. nice to see you. so many different businesses facing in some respects the same challenges, same things they have faced the past 18 months. obeying the rules, ensuring customers are comfortable, but now that move towards more normality, great news as far as getting people back through the doors but they want to make sure customers feel safe doing so. this could be the hardest bit. putting restrictions in place is may be the easiest bit but lifting them and ensuring people are happy as we emerge into something more normal from monday could be a different challenge. i was speaking to the florist. she runs the shop on her own and she is worried if she is told to self—isolate, she will have told to self—isolate, she will have to shut the entire business. so many businesses facing these challenges but monday marks a return to something more normal but not
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without challenges. thanks. a really thoughtful move around the high street getting these views. quite a bit of nodding going on on the sofa. we're joined now by anna blackburn, the managing director of the jeweller beaverbrooks. you have shops in shopping centres and on high streets. 72 stores. paint a picture on monday. what will change if someone is outside one of your stores and wants to come in? very little will change as of monday. from the beginning, our priority has been around keeping our people safe and customers save. we introduce barriers at the entrance to control the flow of customers in. we have sanitiser at the entrance, teams will continue to wear face coverings. we have perspex screens. being a jeweller, we have customers who want to try on jewellery and have advice, so we have screens on the tables and so there is a barrier between the customer. fin
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the tables and so there is a barrier between the customer. on monday, a customer turns _ between the customer. on monday, a customer turns up, _ between the customer. on monday, a customer turns up, who _ between the customer. on monday, a customer turns up, who may - between the customer. on monday, a customer turns up, who may have - between the customer. on monday, a customer turns up, who may have got in touch in advance, and you know they want to spend some money. they get to the store and say, i do not have to wear a mask and i am trying on jewellery. have to wear a mask and i am trying on jewellery-— have to wear a mask and i am trying on 'ewelle . ~ . ., , , , on jewellery. what happens next? our reference on jewellery. what happens next? our preference will — on jewellery. what happens next? our preference will be _ on jewellery. what happens next? our preference will be for _ on jewellery. what happens next? our preference will be for customers - on jewellery. what happens next? our preference will be for customers to - preference will be for customers to wear masks and from feedback, it is that customers want these measures to be in place. i think in that situation, we will have notices up asking customers to wear masks and have masks available should they want them. because we have the perspex screens and teams will be wearing masks, the double layer of protection will still be there. we are not going to enforce it, we do not want to get into that situation with customers, but we will request customers wear them. haste with customers, but we will request customers wear them.— with customers, but we will request customers wear them. have you had situations and _ customers wear them. have you had situations and had _ customers wear them. have you had situations and had to _ customers wear them. have you had situations and had to train _ customers wear them. have you had situations and had to train staff- situations and had to train staff when they have had to enforce mask wearing? brute when they have had to enforce mask wearint ? ~ ., :, , .,
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wearing? we have not seen a reticence- — wearing? we have not seen a reticence. customers - wearing? we have not seen a reticence. customers are - wearing? we have not seen a l reticence. customers are happy wearing? we have not seen a - reticence. customers are happy to wear the masks, i think. we have signs in the stores. on the whole, people are open to it.— people are open to it. would the sitns sa people are open to it. would the signs say we _ people are open to it. would the signs say we would _ people are open to it. would the signs say we would prefer - people are open to it. would the signs say we would prefer you i people are open to it. would the signs say we would prefer you to wear a mask? brute signs say we would prefer you to wear a mask?— signs say we would prefer you to wear a mask? ~ ,:, , , i. wear a mask? we politely request you wear a mask? we politely request you wear a mask? we politely request you wear a mask- — wear a mask? we politely request you wear a mask. there _ wear a mask? we politely request you wear a mask. there will— wear a mask? we politely request you wear a mask. there will be _ wear a mask? we politely request you wear a mask. there will be masks - wear a mask. there will be masks available but there have been customers who have been exempt. it is an awkward point but in a few weeks, if you come into contact with someone and you are double—jabbed, you did not have to wear a mask. there might be somebody who walks into a store, coughing and sneezing, what you do? the into a store, coughing and sneezing, what you do?— what you do? the fact we have pers-ex what you do? the fact we have perspex screens _ what you do? the fact we have perspex screens and _ what you do? the fact we have perspex screens and teams - what you do? the fact we have| perspex screens and teams will continue, and who knows where we will be in a few weeks, because it is evolving rapidly. we are not in any hurry to reduce safety measures and if someone is coughing and sneezing, the likelihood of that
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happening, again is probably minor. the majority, from feedback we get, is that they want to be protected. we saw an increase in footfall of 20% in june we saw an increase in footfall of 20% injune because of the confidence consumers have with those measures in place. we get feedback continually, to be able to come in and experience with the perspex screen and one—on—one service, they are confident. screen and one-on-one service, they are confident-— are confident. have you been affected much _ are confident. have you been affected much by _ are confident. have you been affected much by pinging? i are confident. have you been - affected much by pinging? everyone is. there is an interim period, may be the next month when it is expected that will be a real issue. it will be an issue and keeping those safety measures, distancing, perspex screen, masks, will help us. it will not help a staff member getting pinged. brute it will not help a staff member getting pinged-— it will not help a staff member getting pinged. it will not help a staff member ttettin -tined.. . , ., getting pinged. we have spoken to teams about _ getting pinged. we have spoken to teams about being _ getting pinged. we have spoken to teams about being sensible, - getting pinged. we have spoken to l teams about being sensible, keeping distance, being careful where they are. how many of them are out
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together. are. how many of them are out totether. . . are. how many of them are out together-— are. how many of them are out totether. , , , :, , together. this is in the store. they could be pinged — together. this is in the store. they could be pinged in _ together. this is in the store. they could be pinged in the _ together. this is in the store. they could be pinged in the store. - together. this is in the store. they could be pinged in the store. it- could be pinged in the store. it does not take ten minutes buying jewellery, it can take half an hour. our store teams would not have their phones in—store so they would not be pinged in that visit. obviously, there is a concern from many businesses and, so far, we have had absences because of pinging but it is not significant. brute absences because of pinging but it is not significant.— is not significant. we are hopeful that will continue. _ is not significant. we are hopeful that will continue. keep - is not significant. we are hopeful that will continue. keep in - is not significant. we are hopeful that will continue. keep in touch | that will continue. keep in touch and good luck. a major change for many high street stores. time now to get the news where you are. in tarah welsh. disabled and low income drivers will be able to access funding to help towards changing cars ahead of the expansion of the ultra low emmision zone. the ulez will expand to the north and south circulars in october. those eligable can apply for £2,000
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under the scrappage scheme. a boxing club in south london says it has been forced to train in a car park after being left homeless during the pandemic. peckham abc has had to stop running sessions for younger children. it's now crowdfunding to try and raise enough money for a new site. it makes me proud, in a way, that the kids turn up week in, week out and that they are happy. they don't need materialistic things. that's the biggest problem in sport, especially boxing, a lot of clubs have had to fold under that pressure of where's the money coming from? as part of a drive to get more people vaccinated, over the weekend there will be pop up sites in some unusal places. starting from this evening, jabs are available in the tate modern and at the oval.
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chess seems to be growing in popularity. and this weekend there's a series of events happening called chess fest. the three—day festival will involve over 300 school children. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on all tube lines this morning. minor delays on the piccadilly line. let's take a look at the weather now. you can see it's a gorgeous morning here in the capital. it will be mostly sunny and warm today and tomorrow. but there's some much warmer weather ahead and here's elizabeth to tell us more.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. and over on the radio riz lateef is standing in for vanessa feltz, she is speaking about the easing of restrictions, hammersmith bridge reopening and plenty more. bye for now.
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hello. this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's on today's programme with gethin and sabrina. coming up on morning live... with energy bills expected to rise by 10%, ourfinance expert alice tapper will be showing you more ways to save money this summer by making a simple switch at the weekend. plus, it's been an agonising wait for the 40,000 amateur choirs in england who've been silenced by covid restrictions. but from monday, they are back! and as a choir singer himself, dr ranj has been looking at the science behind spreading covid as you sing, and finding out why belting out a harmony is actually pretty harmless. as long as you keep the noise down! someone who has been making lots of noise online is this nhs surgeon turned social media star.
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dr karan rajan has amassed millions of fans with his super speedy health hits and today he tells us the three things we're probably doing wrong every morning! also on the show, diy don, wayne perry, has a job for you. it's one that 36% of us hate to do. he's got some new tips on how to nail the art of picture hanging. and from art to the tiny emojis that 80% of us use every day. ahead of world emoji day, we'll be finding out why they're now so popular they're being used as codes on dating apps, and even by criminal gangs. plus katya will be here to give you the smiley face in today's strictly fitness. sparkles. rolling on the floor. laughing. folded hands. shall we go through them all or keep
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it for later? keep it for your programme, perhaps. we have a bit more to do. goodbye. the open golf championship — and a primark store in bristol — will be just two of the venues offering adults in england the chance to "grab a jab" this weekend without an appointment. nhs england is urging anyone who has not yet had their first dose of a coronavirus vaccine to have one before restrictions are eased on monday. we'rejoined now by dr nikki kanani, director of primary care for nhs england. very good morning to you. thank you for your time. an important weekend coming up. give us a sense of the scale of what you are trying to achieve. . ~ scale of what you are trying to achieve. :, ,, , :, :, scale of what you are trying to achieve. . ~' , :, :, , scale of what you are trying to achieve. :, ,, , :, :, , , achieve. thank you. you helped us with our last _ achieve. thank you. you helped us with our last grab _ achieve. thank you. you helped us with our last grab a _ achieve. thank you. you helped us with our last grab a jab _ achieve. thank you. you helped us with our last grab a jab weekend. i achieve. thank you. you helped us i with our last grab a jab weekend. ap weeks ago we opened up at not only vaccine sites but later different places around the country, shops and
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parks and all sorts, to make sure it has never been easier to get a vaccine. if you have decided to get a vaccine you can come forward. we want to make sure as you go off to primark or the gulf, you can pick up your vaccine. we want to make it easy and convenient for you to get protected. easy and convenient for you to get trotected. :, ., , easy and convenient for you to get trotected. :, ., , ., :, protected. how many vaccinations are ou protected. how many vaccinations are you earpecting — protected. how many vaccinations are you earpecting to _ protected. how many vaccinations are you earpecting to carry _ protected. how many vaccinations are you expecting to carry out? _ protected. how many vaccinations are you expecting to carry out? we - protected. how many vaccinations are you expecting to carry out? we have i you expecting to carry out? we have tot... we you expecting to carry out? we have got- -- we are _ you expecting to carry out? we have got--- we are in _ you expecting to carry out? we have got... we are in a _ you expecting to carry out? we have got... we are in a lucky _ you expecting to carry out? we have got... we are in a lucky position - got... we are in a lucky position are plenty of supply. sites are geared up and hundreds of sites around the country. we are expecting around the country. we are expecting a great weekend. the last time we did this we got over1 million people vaccinated. we had people over 40, the original cohorts who had not decided to come forward. they came forward. a lot of people from are brilliantly ethnically diverse communities as well. a
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really success and we can before and we look forward to see nat again this weekend. i’ii we look forward to see nat again this weekend.— this weekend. i'll be at a point in the vaccination _ this weekend. i'll be at a point in the vaccination process - this weekend. i'll be at a point in the vaccination process where i this weekend. i'll be at a point in i the vaccination process where there is a hard—core of people you are failing to reach? —— army at the point? i failing to reach? -- army at the toint? :, :, ~ failing to reach? -- army at the toint? :, :, ,, ., : point? i do not ink we are bad. we will do everything _ point? i do not ink we are bad. we will do everything we _ point? i do not ink we are bad. we will do everything we can - point? i do not ink we are bad. we will do everything we can to - point? i do not ink we are bad. we. will do everything we can to support communities because it is the best chance of being protected. we will continue to work with community leaders and local authority colleagues to reflect what the local community needs. we will keep doing it in the summer and winter so people decide to say yes to the vaccine they can take up the vaccine. :, :, ~' vaccine they can take up the vaccine. :, :, ,, ., vaccine they can take up the vaccine. :, :, ~' . _, , vaccine. looking at the comments. professor chris _ vaccine. looking at the comments. professor chris whitty _ vaccine. looking at the comments. professor chris whitty is _ vaccine. looking at the comments. professor chris whitty is urging - professor chris whitty is urging caution in a speech he gave yesterday evening. we are at a very
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tricky time, you could call it a cliff edge. the changes coming on monday, restrictions are being lifted. that will be a significant difference. at the same time we know coronavirus infection rates are growing fast. we also know hospital admissions are rising slightly. there is a real risk right now that people are hearing mixed messages, feeling mixed messages that they can get back to normal but things are not normal because of the infection rate. are you worried about where we are in this process? mt; rate. are you worried about where we are in this process?— are in this process? my messages really clear- _ are in this process? my messages really clear. from _ are in this process? my messages really clear. from monday, - are in this process? my messages| really clear. from monday, please continue to follow all the good habits we had picked up over the last 18 months. wearing a mask is a great idea when you are out and about, particularly in enclosed spaces and places. as chris has said before, if people are feeling vulnerable around you. in all health
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care we will still expect people to follow the infection prevention and control guidance and particularly to be wearing masks. out and about make sure you have a mask in your pocket and keep washing your hands because thatis and keep washing your hands because that is really good practice. keep your space around other people because that will help other people to feel comfortable as well. my other message is, the nhs is there for you and has been throughout the pandemic and will continue to be there for you. if you are unwell and need help, keep finding as. that is really important. although the rates are rising and we need to follow the social distancing guidance still because it is really important in terms of keeping us all safe, it is also really important that people seek out help. because of the vaccination programme, although rates are high we are not seeing the same level of illness in hospital and that is really important for people to know. if you have a health
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need, come forward, we are here for you. need, come forward, we are here for ou. , :, , ., , need, come forward, we are here for ou. , ., ,., you. one problem in a way is and i hear very clearly _ you. one problem in a way is and i hear very clearly what _ you. one problem in a way is and i hear very clearly what you - you. one problem in a way is and i hear very clearly what you are - hear very clearly what you are saying about you are advising people to do. as you have been well aware, i appreciate you are not a politician, you do not set policy. what you seem to be saying is clearly at odds with what people are required to do. i clearly at odds with what people are required to do— required to do. i am not a politician _ required to do. i am not a politician and _ required to do. i am not a politician and this - required to do. i am not a politician and this is - required to do. i am not a - politician and this is absolutely a matter for the government. for me as a gp, as a member of the nhs in my national role, i want to keep people safe. it is really important in health care settings particularly people are supported to wear masks and to continue practising really safe measures. in our surgery will continue to ask people to wear masks when they come in, we will continue to wear our personal protective equipment and i expect that to be the same in community pharmacies and
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in hospital settings across the country. in hospital settings across the count . . ., ., country. can i ask about the knock-on — country. can i ask about the knock-on effect _ country. can i ask about the knock-on effect of - country. can i ask about the knock-on effect of the - country. can i ask about the i knock-on effect of the number country. can i ask about the - knock-on effect of the number of knock—on effect of the number of people being pinged? latest figures are over 500,000 people have been pinged. going back to the number of infections, simultaneously the relaxation, it is inevitable until the august the 16th day to commit many more people will be pinged. that is an inevitability and has a knock—on effect for all sorts of areas. the medical profession, the nhs, is not immune from that. how concerned are you alongside the likes of nissan are major employers this could have a real impact on who is able to work? i this could have a real impact on who is able to work?— is able to work? i know the department _ is able to work? i know the department of _ is able to work? i know the department of health - is able to work? i know the department of health and l is able to work? i know the - department of health and social care, which looks after the
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coronavirus and is looking at this in some detail at the moment. currently we have to follow latest gu ida nce currently we have to follow latest guidance which means if you get pinged you have to follow isolation rules. there are particular settings on the app that are different. if you are a health care worker, following the ppe guidance, following the ppe guidance, following days rules when you are specifically in health care settings. but everyone who is listening, the best thing to do is to have your vaccine. you need two cases to be protected. this is that we can to get that really important protection if you have not done so already. == protection if you have not done so alread . . . ~ already. -- this is the weekend. i am aware — already. -- this is the weekend. i am aware of _ already. -- this is the weekend. i am aware of the _ already. -- this is the weekend. i am aware of the difference - already. -- this is the weekend. i i am aware of the difference between politicians making decisions and you as the medical director for primary care at nhs england, there had been thought processes to about the app and how it works in practice and when might be changing somewhat. i
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know it is being looked at. currently we need to follow the guidance. this weekend is that we can to get vaccinated. please come and get it but if you have had one days after your eight weeks, please come and get it because we want to make sure you are as protected as you can be. make sure you are as protected as you can be— make sure you are as protected as you can be. the medical director of trima you can be. the medical director of primary care _ you can be. the medical director of primary care for — you can be. the medical director of primary care for nhs _ you can be. the medical director of primary care for nhs england. - primary care for nhs england. talking about grab a jab trying to get more people to have a first or second vaccine. one of the places that has been transformed is at royal st george's, at the open. that is right. one of the test events. more than 30,000 fans arriving. more than 30,000 golf fans, have been slapping
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on the suncream and are already walking the course, following their favourites, on the the second day of the british open at royal st george's today. former champion louis oosthuizen leads the way after round one, and we all know it changes so much on the second day. and a few big names including rory mcilroy are going to need to improve, if they want to be around for the weekend, which promises to be a hot one. our reporter ben croucher is at the course, in kent, for us this morning. hi there, ben. how is it all going? we haven't seen the big names, the five english players near the top of the leaderboard. what has been happening so far? you leaderboard. what has been happening so far? :, :, , so far? you mentioned it will be hot. we so far? you mentioned it will be hot- we have — so far? you mentioned it will be hot. we have not _ so far? you mentioned it will be hot. we have not got _ so far? you mentioned it will be hot. we have not got that - so far? you mentioned it will be hot. we have not got that yet. i hot. we have not got that yet. window swirling and cloud as a bad as but it is good day for golf stop you mentioned the likes of rory mcilroy going out at ten o'clock and looking to work his way up the leaderboard. we have had padraig amond to, who has already taken to the course this morning. ——
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harrington. he will be struggling to make the cut with a score like that. the american major winner is climbing up the leaderboard at four under par. later this afternoon we have some of those who started well on thursday. bryson de chambeau goes out at 2:30pm. you on thursday. bryson de chambeau goes out at 2:30pm— out at 2:30pm. you mentioned bryson and he is all — out at 2:30pm. you mentioned bryson and he is all over— out at 2:30pm. you mentioned bryson and he is all over the _ out at 2:30pm. you mentioned bryson and he is all over the back _ out at 2:30pm. you mentioned bryson and he is all over the back page - and he is all over the back page headlines. there has been a falling out between him and his club manufacturers. how does the old french proverb go? only a bad workman blames his tools. or did he have good reason? this is slightly strange. he teed off yesterday and it did not go
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straight. that was the story for most of the first round. he is an american golfer who has put on a lot of muscle and tries to hit the ball as hard as he can. he went in after the round and said what went wrong? he said the driver sucks. his manufacture has come out and said, you are behaving like an eight—year—old child. he says, he might get mad at you and then says great you don't really. seems to be something out of nothing. bryson de chambeau may be trying to deflect attention away from his own misgivings. maybe don't hit the ball so hard and concentrate on driving it straight. so hard and concentrate on driving it straitht. ~ ,,:, , it straight. absolutely right, especially — it straight. absolutely right, especially with _ it straight. absolutely right, especially with the - it straight. absolutely right, especially with the wind - it straight. absolutely right, especially with the wind you j especially with the wind you mentioned. that coverage throughout the day. highlights at eight
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o'clock. that would teach me to refer to the weather. i say it is a hot day and the wind is blowing. it is early. sarah is in brighton with the weather for us this morning. when she started she had a jumper on over her dress because it is always a bit chilly, isn't it? we had a bit of a breeze in brighton. it is a glorious day. this is the feeling tower, taking people to a height of 450 feet. a glorious day if you are going at the tower. it is built on the remains of the derelict west pm. still familiar landmark, especially on a beautiful day. it burned down in the huge fire in 2003. a stunning day. if you have
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plans to head to the coast, it is getting cooler. inland, temperatures are set to reach the high 20s over the next days. how things looking? generally dry and very warm. not wall—to—wall sunshine. the weather front is bringing more clout into the far north—west of scotland. away from north and west of scotland, sunny spells for the rest of the uk. any cloud clearing away from the south—east. more cloud bubbling up. temperature wise one of the warmest day so far this year. 21 in glasgow and 27 in cardiff. not as hot as it will get through the course of the weekend. this evening a overnight still dry and settled with light winds and 18 misty patches here and there overnight. temperature is holding at around 12 to 16 degrees.
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pretty similar to today. high pressure still holding on. high pressure still holding on. high pressure with long spells of sunshine. cloud holding on in the north and west of scotland producing a few spots of rain. very hot on the eastern side of scotland. temperatures could reach 29, possibly close to 30. it does look like sunday could bring the peak of the heater during the weekend. it could reach 30 degrees, probably the first time that has happened this year. things are getting drier and hotterfor year. things are getting drier and hotter for the next few days. i am spying some plucky swimmers, and my, in the background? i mightjustjoin them. the water looks absolutely stunning. what a treat we have had this morning. another treat...
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the fame islands, off the coast of northumberland, are an important breeding ground for a number of rare seabirds including the arctic tern and the puffin. for much of the last 18 months, there haven't been any visitors or staff and while the humans have been away, the birds have started to behave a little differently. our north of england correspondent fiona trott is there for us this morning and can explain. good morning. it is beautiful on inner farne this morning. all the passengers, kittiwakes and seagulls have in years to no one being here. the guillemots have come further inland to nest. wardens who live here normally have not been allowed because during the pandemic has not been safe to be here because there
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is no running water, no guarantees of getting a boat if someone becomes appalling. they have had trickyjobs on the hands. —— becomes ill. as they were cutting back on getting ready for the nesting season, they spotted some changes. members of the public will spot the changes as well. finally setting foot on inner farne. after 18 months, visitors are coming back and they're delighted. there are so many birds. i know it sounds ridiculous, it's full of birds. it's just wonderful — seeing mother nature like this. it's like puffin city — it's really brilliant. it'sjust wonderful. you just want to keep coming back to this place. such a variety of birds to see, fantastic. we picked a brilliant day, haven't we? i've got a soft spot for the puffins. - it's jasper's first proper holiday.
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he's going to probably make the same bird noise the whole way round. - but they will notice a change. there have been fewer wardens and fewer visitors to scare the gulls away — that's bad news for the arctic terns who nest here. normally there would be about 200 or so arctic terns in this area in the courtyard — making an absolute racket. probably dive—bombing our heads. we wouldn't be able to hear each other in a conversation like this. what we found after we prepared all the areas for them nesting is that they came back late and also that they came back in not very strong numbers. because only ten of them laid eggs, we think that there wasn't a strong enough number of them and that's why they didn't survive. it worries you. yes, it does. it's quite heartbreaking. so where are the arctic terns? we had to set sail to find them. it looks and feels very different here, harriet, on staple island. yes, staple is such a different island to inner farne. i can already hear the terns. i can hear that...
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click, click, click. they do, don't they? clicking. so where are they? over there. you can see they've just flown out. oh, good grief! how many? there's a couple of hundred there. there's 200 there. and you see they'll come back and they'll nest in that long grass. they've just flown out and they're chasing away this gull. it's important for them to do that in a group. the gulls are after the chicks are the eggs, are they? yeah, they'll be after the chicks or the eggs. after they've chased away the gull, they'll sit back down on the chicks and eggs. back on inner farne, the puffin count is under way. the pandemic has affected that, too. with fewer wardens for fewer days, it's been limited. so far there are signs that the breeding season has been good. the wardens live and breathe this beautiful island. as more visitors return, they'll be watching the effects very closely. let's speak to one of the rangers. i
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going to try to entice the turns back? , , . , ,:, going to try to entice the turns back? , , . ., back? the presence is so important on the island- _ back? the presence is so important on the island. they _ back? the presence is so important on the island. they did _ back? the presence is so important on the island. they did a _ back? the presence is so important on the island. they did a lot - back? the presence is so important on the island. they did a lot of - on the island. they did a lot of hard _ on the island. they did a lot of hard work— on the island. they did a lot of hard work in deterring predators and managing _ hard work in deterring predators and managing habitats. also thinking outside _ managing habitats. also thinking outside the box to entice them by using _ outside the box to entice them by using decoys, essentially dummy terns~ _ using decoys, essentially dummy terns. :, ., :, ,, terns. you live and work here can make you — terns. you live and work here can make you live _ terns. you live and work here can make you live and _ terns. you live and work here can make you live and breathe - terns. you live and work here can make you live and breathe this i make you live and breathe this place. what has it been like for you not being on the island as often as he would like to? it not being on the island as often as he would like to?— he would like to? it has been very challenging _ he would like to? it has been very challenging. last _ he would like to? it has been very challenging. last year _ he would like to? it has been very challenging. last year was - he would like to? it has been very challenging. last year was a - he would like to? it has been very| challenging. last year was a typical year. _ challenging. last year was a typical year. such— challenging. last year was a typical year, such an immersive experience. living _ year, such an immersive experience. living among — year, such an immersive experience. living among the sea bed to get invested — living among the sea bed to get invested in their lives and you care about— invested in their lives and you care about them — invested in their lives and you care about them a great deal. —— see birds. _ about them a great deal. —— see birds. you — about them a great deal. —— see birds, you get invested in their lives — birds, you get invested in their lives. :, :, ., :, ., lives. tom hendrie from the national trust thank you _ lives. tom hendrie from the national trust thank you so _ lives. tom hendrie from the national trust thank you so much _ lives. tom hendrie from the national trust thank you so much for- lives. tom hendrie from the national trust thank you so much forjoining i trust thank you so much forjoining us here this morning on beautiful
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inner farne. it us here this morning on beautiful inner fame-— us here this morning on beautiful inner farne. ., , ., , ,:, , inner farne. it has been absolutely stunnint inner farne. it has been absolutely stunning showing _ inner farne. it has been absolutely stunning showing us _ inner farne. it has been absolutely stunning showing us around - inner farne. it has been absolutely stunning showing us around if - inner farne. it has been absolutely stunning showing us around if you | stunning showing us around if you have not been. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59am.
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hello, welcome to bbc news on friday morning. i'm victoria derbyshire, here are the headlines... at least 80 dead and hundreds unaccounted for in germany after some of the worst flooding in decades — record rainfall causes rivers to burst their banks, devastating some areas more than three months' worth of rain fell in 24 hours over parts of western germany, belgium and the netherlands — some local politicians say climate change is to blame. half of patients admitted to hospital during the first wave of coronavirus developed at least one complication in their kidneys, lungs and heart — according to new research. as cases continue to rise — a warning the uk is "not out of the woods yet" — from the chief medical adviser — and a major push to offer jabs to all remaining adults gathers momentum.

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