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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 15, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. parts of germany and belgium suffer their worst floods in living memory. people in parts of belgium and western germany are being rescued from their rooftops. others have been swept away. more than a0 people are dead. agree for the people who lost their lives. we do not know the number, but it will be many. some of the basements of their houses, some were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety.- working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. people had to be rescued _ bring others to safety. people had to be rescued and _ bring others to safety. people had to be rescued and many _ bring others to safety. people had to be rescued and many are - bring others to safety. people had i to be rescued and many are affected. unfortunately, the forecast is for more rain, we will have the latest
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on the story. south africa in south africa — 117 people are now known to have died in the violence. president ramaphosa deploys 25,000 troops in a bid to stop the arson and looting of the past week. the dutch reporter, peter r de vrees, known for investigating organised crime, dies in hospital — nine days after being shot in amsterdam. we start with catastrophic floods in europe. the western germany states of rhineland—palatinate and north rhine—westphalia have experienced their deadliest floods in living memory. these are the images from the area. at least 42 people are dead, many more missing. heavy flooding has turned streets into raging torrents and caused rivers to burst their banks, sweeping away cars and causing buildings to collapse. residents are posting images like these on social media let's hearfrom one resident.
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oui’ our community centre was just crushed and it stuck to the bridge over there. at a a0 tonne truck must be stuck there as well. a house just standing over there tilted over entirely. you can imagine the sort of thing happening in asia, but not here. this is the village of schuld. at least four people died here as they awaited rescue from roofs of houses that were swept away. houses in the district are at risk of collapse and a state of emergency has been declared. rescue efforts are ongoing. police helicopters and soldiers have been deployed to help stranded residents. two firefighters died in north rhine—westphalia, one of them drowned. dussledorf is the capital city of north rhine—westphalia, malika
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facarro is a journalist there. 0urcar 0ur car cannot pass, we've just been devastated. we've never seen anything like that and fears are looming of the second wave of floods and i don't know if you can see it but you can see more heavy rain coming and people are really fearful. more rainfall is forecast all across the area — we'll be speaking to our weather centre about that later. let's get reaction from leaders now. malu dreyer, chief of the rhineland—palatinate state, described the flooding as a "catastrophe". she said: "there are dead, missing and many people still in danger. all of our emergency services are in action and risking their own lives." chancellor angela merkel, who is in the us meeting with presidentjoe biden, said she was "shocked by the disaster". here she is speaking earlier from washington. these are peaceful towns were now
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living through a catastrophe and one can say a tragedy. there's no word to describe such strong rain and floods other than as a catastrophe. i'm shocked by the reports of the places that now stand completely under water and the people who are in extreme danger in standing on the roofs awaiting rescue and have been rescued. i grieve for the people who've lost their lives. we don't know the number but it will be many, some in the basements of their houses and some were working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety and a give their families my deepest condolences. this is a map of the rainfall. as you can see — germany isn't the only country affected. belgium, the netherlands and france are all experiencing flooding — the area of belgium that borders western germany is especially bad. we'll go live to belgium soon. first, this report from jenny hill in shuldt there was no warning. homes destroyed, lives lost in a matter of
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minutes. the water ripped up the roads, tossed car is a toys. at the very last minute she says a fireman got us out. a family is safe but some were injured and in hospital. they point out what was her neighbours house and says she does not know what happened to them. as to her own property, half the house is gone. they are still in shock. they have just finished refurbishing their pope and there was supposed to open on saturday, better news for the neighbours dog who was managed to be pulled to safetyjust—in—time. it's hard to imagine thatjust yesterday, this was a quiet village street. what's worrying people know is that
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there's more rain forecast this evening and what will happen when the water levels rise again? for now, homeless and fearful, they mourn their dead and wait anxiously for night to come. next we are going to neighbouring belgium. the region of wallonia is badly effected — especially the province of liege. just have a look at this. this is the town of purgatoire, it's completely flooded. so is the nearby town of spa. at least 6 people have died and several more are missing from the area. these images show people in the town of pepinster being rescued by boats after seeking refuge on rooftops. in nearby liege, the mayor is asking people to evacuate parts of the city. and for those who can t leave, to move to the upper floors of their buildings. this is why. the meuse river which flows through liege is expected to rise considerably.
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as you can see it's already on the verge of overflowing. when it does, liege will flood. there are concerns a dam bridge in the area could collapse too. nick beake is in brussels. we have seen this record rainfall because a number of major rivers across europe still burst their banks. we talk about them specifically, we have seen some video where the police car crawling through the very wet streets they're giving us emergency measures saying they should leave their homes as they should leave their homes as they can and if they cannot, if they've got an upper floor, if they have a second or third floor, they should go to higher ground and the river is potentially set to raise 1.5 metres in the coming hours. and so, with that is that a nearby dam could collapse and that's the
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third—biggest urban area and people are being asked to leave we can hear the sirens in the background here in brussels and the capital. if you look at the geography, this is focused on the area over the three countries meet and so the most western part of germany, the most southern tip of the netherlands and the east of belgium yes, they may be separated by borders be of emergency services that have swung into action and are facing some very difficult operations and in one particular place, we saw a woman film from her window in amazement as cars simply just were taken down what would've been the high street. this very thick brown water, a torrent carrying vehicles away and we know that particular place, people have died and care homes have been evacuated and it is a real concern for lots of different people and
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emergency services are doing all they can and really difficult circumstances and as we've been hearing, the rain is set to continue. this is how the weather's looking over the next 5 days. as you can see there won't be much respite — more rainfall is forecast. let's talk to our weather centre. let me show you the radar picture. you can see how the rain developed and became heavier and stationary across western parts of germany and across western parts of germany and across the netherlands, belgium and the parts of france as well. the wettest weather was in germany and following a 2a hours, those on three times thejuly following a 2a hours, those on three times the july average following a 2a hours, those on three times thejuly average rainfall, which is why we have seen these devastating scenes of flooding. and even though the rain hasn't been as intense, we still seeing river levels rising in the low pressure and with a friend that is brought the downpours is weakening and that is why we have seen the rain easing off in some areas during the day but
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there's still some thundering downpours during friday and that will be having its way eastwards across germany with the heaviest falls onto the alps and as we moved to the start of the weekend, the rain continuing to move further east, some downpours likely in poland through the czech republic and the bulk in some parts of italy. slowly to become dry in germany, it is going to become drier, sunnier and warmer in belgium, the netherlands and france. so are these extreme floods linked to climate change. the person who may succeed anglela merkel next year, says there's no doubt they are. let's hearfrom dr hans—martin fou—sel from the european environment agency we will be confronted with such events again and again and that means we need more speed and climate protection measures. worldwide. this
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is always a combination of long—term climate change and so, you cannot attribute a single thing exclusively, but there are many indications that climate change played a role in this. warmer air can hold more water and moisture, extreme precipitation can significantly increase the price and recent decades. —— across. and they're actually high—resolution precipitation data growing which is quite unique and the resolution showing that it is extreme precipitation and events have indeed increased considerably over the last a0 years. in climate models also said this would increase in the future. let's turn now to the unrest in south africa.
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10,000 troops are on the streets to contain 7 days of unrest sparked by the jailing of former presidentjacob zuma. 117 people are now known to have died. unrest has been centred in two provinces, jacob zuma's home province — kwazulu—natal and gauteng. there's been destruction to businesses — on a massive scale. this in johannesburg. we're told the situation there is now relatively calm, and that's made way for a clean up. the government has increased the military presence. 25,000 troops are being deployed, in the biggest military deployment since the end of the racist system known as apartheid. that's johannesburg. the government says the situation in kwazulu—natal remains tense. the bbc�*s vumani mkhize is in durban. thankfully, we have not had as many attacks as we did in the previous four days or so, at the moment we
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have about 25,000 troops that is said to be deployed in the country in the next three months and that is encouraging because the police have been heavily outnumbered and they have been really struggling to contain the situation because people have been looting with reckless abandon and have been doing it in full view of television campaigns and in full view of police as well and in full view of police as well and have been unable to essentially remove them. we hope that the military, the extended military presence in the country is going to bring law and order share because the economy of the country has been severely hampered and the safety and security of citizens not only in the suburbs where i am, but also in the townships where many people are struggling from poverty and inequality in crime essentially are also being affected. so, the presence of the military really is hoped that it is going to alleviate the problems that many people are
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experiencing. we're going to look at how the violence has impacted business — and health. lets first assess the damage. more than 200 malls have been looted or destroyed and over 600 stores burnt or damaged more than 200 liquor shops have been looted in kwa—zulu natal and gauteng. lucky lekgwathi owns a restaurant owner in klipton, soweto. they are upset knowing that i took my last money to open to open a small business and at the end, you know, it's been looted by the people. i know most of them and they know me in the use to support me and so, yeah, that is very sad. this adds to an already dire economic situation — made worse by the pandemic.
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last year, the economy contracted 7% in 2020. and inflation has pushed up food and fuel prices. fuel is now 37% more than it was a year ago. 2 million more people are living in poverty and unemployment is growing. 32% don't have a job. and that's even higher among young people. according to the world bank — 63% are unemployed. all this is adding to frustrations. here's one expert's take. when you have millions of young people with lots of energies and no sense of value and any reason for being hopeful about their futures, roaming around, they're going to be available to be used as political ponds of factions of the agency and independent of that, they have good reasons to not be scared of being arrested for looting because after all, the status quo already condemns
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them to the margins of society. next, lets look at healthcare. we're told medicines have been looted from pharmacies ambulances haven't been unable to reach critical care patients due to being attacked and hospitals and care units have been looted. all the equipment has been taken and medications, like everything. everything has been taken and it is sitting somewhere probably being sold or something and we have to think of how to rebuild our clinics. all this as south africa deals with a third coronavirus wave. this graph shows the increase in cases across south africa since the wave began in april. on wednesday over 17000 cases were registered. and in some areas the violence has paused the vaccine rollout. and it's already been slow.
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just over 6 % of the population in south africa has had at least one vaccine dr fiona braka is from the world health organisation regional officer in africa — she's in brazzaville. thank you for being with us on outside source, how would you describe and categorise the state of the pandemic in south africa? patrice the pandemic in south africa? africa is exneriencing _ the pandemic in south africa? africa is experiencing a _ the pandemic in south africa? africa is experiencing a third _ the pandemic in south africa? africa is experiencing a third wave, - the pandemic in south africa? sit ca is experiencing a third wave, or wave that is much higher in terms of the number of cases compared to previous waves. we hit 6 million cases this week earned south africa accounts for a6% of the cases that have been recorded in the past week and so, we are concerned seeing the evolving situation in south africa because it does have an impact on the already existing measures to cut
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the already existing measures to cut the pandemic and where we see crowds and increased contact among people, these are conditions that are facilitating the spread of the virus. we also have observed these decrees number of people reaching vaccination sites and over the last few days, with the unrest and with the 1.3 million people who have so fervently vaccinated in south africa for from where we would like to be, this is a concern. and the other impact is on the countries around south africa that access their medical supplies from south africa, we see countries like namibia and others that will also start to see the impact of the unrest in south africa. fin the impact of the unrest in south africa. , , ., ., u africa. on the issue of the vaccine roll-out buttock _ africa. on the issue of the vaccine roll-out buttock across _ africa. on the issue of the vaccine l
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roll-out buttock across sub-saharan roll—out buttock across sub—saharan africa, is it access to vaccines or having the capacity to administer the vaccines? we having the capacity to administer the vaccines?— the vaccines? we do have a challenge. _ the vaccines? we do have a challenge, we _ the vaccines? we do have a challenge, we have - the vaccines? we do have a challenge, we have a - the vaccines? we do have a - challenge, we have a challenge with supplies that are needed out of the 3.1 billion doses that have been administered around the world only 2% have been done in africa and so a gross supply issue and how we tried to increase and ensure equitable availability of vaccines is one of the main factors. also to deliver vaccines, they must have systems in place, they must have demand for the vaccines and still working on tailored approaches to increase demand and community level is an aspect of ensuring that vaccines reached the places that need to receive them. we reached the places that need to receive them.— reached the places that need to receive them. we don't often talk about the pandemic _ receive them. we don't often talk about the pandemic in _ receive them. we don't often talk about the pandemic in congo - receive them. we don't often talk l about the pandemic in congo where you are, just update us on the
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situation there.— you are, just update us on the situation there. several countries are seeing _ situation there. several countries are seeing a _ situation there. several countries are seeing a resurgence - situation there. several countries are seeing a resurgence in - situation there. several countries l are seeing a resurgence in covid-19 are seeing a resurgence in covid—19 cases and several of her situation closely to. we have currently 16 countries in resurgence, including drc and we are pushing in terms of assuring public health and social issues are implemented in conference of packaging as to include the scale up of packaging as to include the scale up of vaccines and so, that's the situation in the country that we must comprehensive package of interventions because all countries are at risk of such, especially given the variance of concern, the delta variant which is rapidly spreading across several countries and we all need to be on high alert.
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but prime minister borisjohnson said he is �*not in favour�* of raising food taxes. he also recommended doctor should prescribe fruit and vegetables to improve our diet. ellie price reports. a number of physical and mental health issues, she knows she needs to eat more fresh food but it is something she cannot afford without the help of the charity. you something she cannot afford without the help of the charity.— the help of the charity. you need varie is the help of the charity. you need variety is the _ the help of the charity. you need variety is the variety _ the help of the charity. you need variety is the variety that - the help of the charity. you need variety is the variety that costs. | the help of the charity. you need variety is the variety that costs. i could pay for it but it mean something else has to go. today's re ort something else has to go. today's report says _ something else has to go. today's report says 64,000 _ something else has to go. today's report says 64,000 deaths - something else has to go. today's report says 64,000 deaths are . report says 6a,000 deaths are attributed to poor diet alone because it cost the economy £7a billion. an environmental impact, it is the second biggest contributor to climate change. if they do not
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change their recipes, it could mean a price increase for desserts, biscuits and sweets.— a price increase for desserts, biscuits and sweets. you're not auoin to biscuits and sweets. you're not going to break _ biscuits and sweets. you're not going to break this _ biscuits and sweets. you're not going to break this junk - biscuits and sweets. you're not going to break thisjunk food i biscuits and sweets. you're not i going to break thisjunk food cycle going to break this junk food cycle between _ going to break this junk food cycle between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies unless_ commercial incentive of companies unless you — commercial incentive of companies unless you tackle it directly and that is — unless you tackle it directly and that is what we are recommending for the sugar— that is what we are recommending for the sugar and salt information, it is a tax _ the sugar and salt information, it is a tax to— the sugar and salt information, it is a tax to make the companies reformulate as they did with the sugar— reformulate as they did with the sugar drinks, they take the bad stuff— sugar drinks, they take the bad stuff out — sugar drinks, they take the bad stuff out. ~ , stuff out. the prime minister it seemed to _ stuff out. the prime minister it seemed to oppose _ stuff out. the prime minister it seemed to oppose the - stuff out. the prime minister it seemed to oppose the idea. i l stuff out. the prime minister it l seemed to oppose the idea. i am stuff out. the prime minister it - seemed to oppose the idea. i am not attracted to — seemed to oppose the idea. i am not attracted to the _ seemed to oppose the idea. i am not attracted to the idea _ seemed to oppose the idea. i am not attracted to the idea of _ seemed to oppose the idea. i am not attracted to the idea of extra - seemed to oppose the idea. i am not attracted to the idea of extra taxes . attracted to the idea of extra taxes on the _ attracted to the idea of extra taxes on the hard—working _ attracted to the idea of extra taxes on the hard—working people. - attracted to the idea of extra taxes on the hard—working people. man'gj attracted to the idea of extra taxes on the hard-working people. many in the food industry _ on the hard-working people. many in the food industry agree. _ on the hard-working people. many in the food industry agree. the - on the hard-working people. many in the food industry agree. the sorry i the food industry agree. the sorry been big changes _ the food industry agree. the sorry been big changes and _ the food industry agree. the sorry been big changes and sauces, i the food industry agree. the sorry i been big changes and sauces, routine breakfast cereals, we are releasing those changes, those changes do take time at they're expensive to make
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because you want to make it right so people still buy the product and still tastes great. the people still buy the product and still tastes great.— still tastes great. the national food strategy _ still tastes great. the national food strategy says _ still tastes great. the national food strategy says that - still tastes great. the national food strategy says that the i food strategy says that the estimation could cost millions of pounds a year and bring it up to £3.a billion a year in tax revenue. but the reports author, the cost of doing nothing would be a terrible damage to the environment and to our bodies. to washington now, where germany's chancellor angela merkel is meeting presidentjoe biden. it's expected to be her last visit to the white house before she steps down in three months�* time. let's go now to washington where the two leaders are holding a press conference following their meeting.— likely the merkel�*s final appearance at the white house before she steps 0ur correspondent anthony zurcher is at the white house. think the first thing they're going to be facing isjust think the first thing they're going to be facing is just trying to
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rebuild us german relations after a tumultuous four years with donald trump in the white house. and also were going to talk a bit about the us military pull—out from afghanistan, germany was wrangler the bit that they weren't forewarned about the pull—out, they were not consulted enough about it and i think the nordstrom pipeline is going from russia to germany and thatis going from russia to germany and that is on the verge of being finished and if the us is spoken out against in the past but has not put any sanctions and play on that and thatis any sanctions and play on that and that is going to come up as well and as you mention, because of the flood, there would be suppressed of the talk about the environment, about climate change, that is a key global issue and germany, merkel and thejoe biden administration care deeply about this but once again, first and foremost, i think the rebuilding relationships and emphasising that the united states sees germany as a key player and whatjoe biden has described as an
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epic struggle between democracies and authoritarian governments around the world, that is going to become a topic of discussion even if germany doesn't always see things the same way as the joe doesn't always see things the same way as thejoe biden administration does. way as the joe biden administration does. ., . , way as the joe biden administration does. ., ., , ., , way as the joe biden administration does. ., . , ., , ., does. normally when the leaders of the end of their _ does. normally when the leaders of the end of their term, _ does. normally when the leaders of the end of their term, but _ does. normally when the leaders of the end of their term, but they i does. normally when the leaders of the end of their term, but they are l the end of their term, but they are not seen as valuable to other world leaders because they know the going to be leaving but angela merkel such a huge politicalfigure in the world and joe biden ceaser presence is very important. i and joe biden ceaser presence is very important-— very important. i think so and i think she _ very important. i think so and i think she has _ very important. i think so and i think she has cast _ very important. i think so and i think she has cast such - very important. i think so and i think she has cast such a i very important. i think so and i l think she has cast such a shadow over european relationships of the us over the past 16 years and to have in the united states, have them talking about the importance of continued relations between the us and germany and the importance of having the united friends against authoritarian governments and that is in the joe authoritarian governments and that is in thejoe biden can take and build on as he trusted to his foreign policy going forward. goad
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foreign policy going forward. good to have your life on the programme and i will see you watching it a couple minutes' time. hello again. a full forecast in a moment but first let's cast an eye on what's been going on in europe and that severe weather. here a picture from wednesday which shows a line of severe thunderstorms just locked in the same area for hour upon hour upon hour. we think the heaviest rain towards the southwest of bonn where 158 mm of rain fell in 2a hours, now it looks to be three times the amount of rain we'd normally see in the whole month ofjuly. it was extreme rain and has resulted in catastrophic floods. the jet stream was largely responsible because we have this cut off flow over germany locked in place, couldn't move
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because of the general jet stream pattern. this low fed on some very humid, hot air that originated from the mediterranean. that's what powers some of those enormous storms in the extreme weather that it resulted. here in the uk, the same jet stream pattern is building this area of high pressure. we've had plenty of sunshine across most of parts of the uk today. the best of it arguably across the north and the west. we have a bit of a bigger southeast england but that will continue to very gradually filter its way further southwards as we go on through the night. at the same time a little bit cloudy for scotland and northern ireland. these are the lowest temperatures, another quite warm night for sleeping, about 15 degrees your overnight lows. tomorrow we got more of this dry and sunny weather on the way the exception northwest scotland a very weak weather it a very weak weather front could bring an odd patch of rain but it won't amount to much. it would just be a fleeting hotspot. 0therwise dry with plenty of sunshine around for the day by day many areas will see those temperatures rise. 2a in aberdeen, 23 for belfast,
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we are up into the mid—20s, 26, cardiff. the weekend sees more of that hot and sunny weather. the exception, the far northwest of scotland where we will probably see a few patches of rain from time to time. hotter further south temperatures climbing again, 27, 28 in london and cardiff. it's sunday that we may well see temperatures peek into the low 30s was a very hot weather across southern areas was up slightly cooler and fresher air filtering through parts of scotland. you might well find temperatures easing back a little bit here. highs of around 20 through the central belt was up as i say, further south we could see highs reaching the 30s.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. parts of europe are suffering their worst floods in living memory. these -ictures worst floods in living memory. these pictures from — worst floods in living memory. these pictures from western _ worst floods in living memory. these pictures from western germany i worst floods in living memory. these pictures from western germany at the homes of collapsed building and cars have been swept away and a number of rivers burst their banks. we know over a0 mac people have lost their lives. i over 40 mac people have lost their lives. ., , ., , ., lives. i grieve for the people of lost their lives. _ lives. i grieve for the people of lost their lives. we _ lives. i grieve for the people of lost their lives. we don't i lives. i grieve for the people of lost their lives. we don't know| lives. i grieve for the people of. lost their lives. we don't know the number but it will be many. some in the basements of the houses and some who are working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. we know another six people have died in belgium where some people had to be rescued from the rooftops, the netherlands and france are also affected but not affected by it. the forecast is for more rain we will
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continue to keep an eye more rain. also in south africa 117 people are now known to have died in the violence there and 10,000 troops around the streets in a bid to stop the arson and looting of the past week. and in our weekly report for the bbc website and for iplayer, we will look at the record—breaking heat waves in america are connected to the broader issues of climate change. lets turn to afghanistan. the german states have experienced the most serious floods in living memory. some images from the area, we know at least a3 people that died in germany. as you can see, the flooding has turned streets into torrance and this is the aftermath of the flooding as well. buildings, cars and many other things swept away by the water. i'm standing on
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the banks of the river as you can see it's very fast flowing, very swollen. what people in this area are telling us that around tea—time yesterday so 2a hours or so it suddenly started to rise. the water just rushed through the little towns and villages that dot the countryside around here. copy two causing devastating effects. i spent some time in a small village were six houses were completely destroyed. swept away, four people died at least two other is still missing. i could tell he wanted a we arrived it looked like something out of a disaster movie. people wandering around dazed and shocked saying we didn't really have any warning. 0ne saying we didn't really have any warning. one minute started to rain a little bit next this deluge came through the town. you could see what was left of peoples homes would, crushed household pieces
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firefighters sifting through it all. the overwhelming sense from people is that it almost came out of nowhere. is this an area that's plunked prone to flooding? people sa from plunked prone to flooding? people say from time _ plunked prone to flooding? people say from time to _ plunked prone to flooding? people say from time to time _ plunked prone to flooding? people say from time to time there i plunked prone to flooding? people say from time to time there are i say from time to time there are little bits of flooding. there is a river here, valleys and tributaries was upfront time to time there will be flooding but no one remembers anything like this, not in this region, not the whole of germany. more than a0 people have now been confirmed dead. there is still more missing. angela merkel is described this as a catastrophe and what you are hearing from a lot of people around here in md german politicians todayisis around here in md german politicians today is is this a result of climate change and will we expect to see more events like this happening? in the immediate term, hundreds and hundreds of people are caught up in this evidently. what support is being provided while they wait for their homes to dry?— their homes to dry? there is sunport- _ their homes to dry? there is support. there _ their homes to dry? there is support. there are - their homes to dry? there is support. there are centres l their homes to dry? there is i support. there are centres that
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people can go to. germany has a very strong tradition of volunteers, a lot of volunteer firefighters were out in this village that i spent most of the day in today. i think the emotional burden of this is incalculable. i met one woman, she fled last night saying a fireman came and got them out right at the last minute, her son had been injured, he is in hospital but okay. she had come back to have a look at her village where she has spent 20 years and shejust her village where she has spent 20 years and she just walks around the corner and saw this unbelievable devastation. all she could do was utter a little noise. we then walked with her to see where her house had stood, half of it or been swept away, or neighbours house was simply gone. she didn't know where her neighbours were. 0ne gone. she didn't know where her neighbours were. one of the big problems with the emergency services had today as there's very little connectivity here. no internet, no phones working, very difficult to communicate. that means a lot of people have it known what's happened to their friends and loved ones. people have it known what's happened to theirfriends and loved ones. i met in elderly man driving his car
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towards the village to their friends and loved ones. i met in elderly man driving his car towards the villages stopped and asked me the way and said he was he said he didn't know where they are the parents were. he suspected they were 0k and just hadn't been able to get in touch but he didn't know. you can imaginejust how devastating and stressful even a situation like that is for people. we reported from germany, from congo from the us from south africa as well. the un is warning of an unfolding �*humanitarian catastrophe�* — as violence between taliban and afghan government forces surges. the taliban and is beginning territory since the us began withdrawing from the territory. militants have taken nearly all of the area except the capital could do city. in the past month 35,000 people have been displaced and they have arrived in the city.
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it�*s humanitarian coordinator has been speaking exclusively to the bbc�*s yogita limaye. decades of suffering that has now become even more brutal. in this city besieged by the taliban tens of thousands of afghans who have fled a surge in violence. running from bullets and bombs. caught between insurgents and government forces. scared, hungry and homeless. in a5 degrees heat. people rushed to us. to tell us their stories. it�*s nearly impossible to count how many they�*ve lost. she said six of her family were killed a few weeks ago.
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including her husband and four sons. we couldn�*t even identify their remains, she told us. the caliban had entered our home and was shooting at government forces. then a government plane dropped a bomb on our house. war is devastating people across the country as the taliban gained more territory every day in foreign forces leave. her husband and three children were killed when and three children were killed when a mortar hit their home. i am numb with grief, every day i cry thinking of them, she told us. i am alone, i have nothing. she is malnourished, she said. her other son barely speaks. he has shrapnel injuries and struggles to walk. they are among hundreds here who have had to run for their lives more than once. we
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went where they fled from, we saw signs of battle and evidence that a part of the city is no longer under the control of the soldiers. this is a position of the afghan government forces and then just across the bridge on the other side there is territory controlled by the taliban where in the city of court does but in the weeks is become the front line. the spaces that people can run two for safety are shrinking every day here. on our way to the centre of the city we saw the aftermath of an explosion. it was a bomb placed on a fuel tanker. no one was hurt in this attack but there is no way for us to tell what is happening just a mile from here. many of the wounded aren�*t able to get medical help yet all the critical care beds at the main hospital are full. more than
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half of afghanistan people need immediate aid to just survive. many here feel abandoned by their government and departing foreign troops. they are leaving so irresponsibly and all of a sudden. no one is hearing our voices. 0utside no one is hearing our voices. outside the camp another family arrived, there was for them. even the fragile safety of a basic tenant is hard to find. next we turn to the netherlands because the dutch crime reporter has died after being shot in amsterdam last week. he was known for his connections to drug lords, he won an emmy award and he was proclaimed for reporting on the dutch underworld. last tuesday he was shot five times after leaving a tv studio, was taken
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to a hospital in amsterdam where he was heavily guarded while he fought for his life. his family have released a statement today saying... this was one of the most acclaimed journalist here in thet netherlands. he specialised in helping with cold cases so solving child murders, disappearances. he became the victim of what he had spent his life reporting on but he absolutely said he would rather stand and fight then be hiding in a corner. in a few minutes to an outside source regular update you on britney spears situation. continuing her battle to enter conservatorship. she told her because she wants to sue her father for abusing her position eight —— his position. the number of people
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being told to self—isolate by the test and trace app has risen sharply causing significant disruption to some workplaces. alerts were sent to more than a half a million people last week is more from the bbc�*s health editor hugh pam. more people are being paying by the nhs app if they�*ve come into contact with some of his tested positive. that is now affecting the wider economy. the car maker nissan saying that production at its plant is been affected with reports that more than 10% of the workforce are self isolating. and it�*s affecting the nhs. this gp practice might have to close with staff members are unable to work because of isolation requirements. those rules will change in mid august for anyone double jab to. the august for anyone double 'ab to. the doctor august for anyone double jab to. tue: doctor say august for anyone double jab to. tte: doctor say that august for anyone double jab to. t'te: doctor say that should august for anyone double jab to. tte: doctor say that should happen now. it seems ridiculous to us that we have staff who are double vaccinated, i had my first waxing before christmas, we been vaccinated
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for months. and yet they are not able to come to work. in the first week ofjuly more than 525,000 alerts were sent to users of the app in england telling them to self—isolate. at a6% on a previous week. that reflects the recent increase in cases in the same weekjust recent increase in cases in the same week just over recent increase in cases in the same weekjust over 190 tested positive at least once, up a3% and the highest since january. this at least once, up 4396 and the highest since january. as infection s - read the highest since january. as infection spread the test _ highest since january. as infection spread the test entry _ highest since january. as infection spread the test entry system i highest since january. as infection spread the test entry system has. spread the test entry system has come under pressure, there are been anecdotal reports of delays getting bookings. performance figures are falling with him than a third in england not getting results back within 2a hours of visiting a community testing site. across the uk there is a push to get more people vaccinated including here in birmingham, scottish officials have advised the foreign travel will be difficult without being jabbed. all this as ministers in northern islands a cast lead in that case increases work concerning.
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this is 0utside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is... more than a0 people have died in germany and belgium where angela merkel has described catastrophic flooding. a couple of developments in britney spears�* latest battle to end her controversial consevatorship. the pop star has told a court that she wants to press charges against herfather ? jamie spears ? over his alleged conservatorship abuse telling the court. .. i m angry and i will go there. she made that statement after a judge ruled that she could choose her own lawyer after being represented by samuel ingham, a court—appointed lawyer, for the last 13 years. this man — mathew rosengart ? is replacing samuel ingham.
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he�*s a former federal prosecutor and hollywood lawyer who s previously represented steven spielberg and sean penn. it�*s clear he�*s going to be taking her case in a very different direction to where it�*s been over the last decade — here�*s our north america correspondent david willis. that lawyer, mathew rosengart, said that he plans to file immediately a motion seeking to have britney spears�* father jamie stripped of his control over her life. following that testimony her former lawyer resigned he became controversial after came clear he never petitioned to end her father�*s conservatorship. it also been earning for hundreds $25 an hour for taking on her case. it s a huge win for ms spears ? who posted this video on twitter and instagram, of her celebrating by riding a horse and doing ca rtwheels. fans celebrating as well this is her fans outside of the court in los
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angeles. t fans outside of the court in los anaeles. ., , fans outside of the court in los anaeles. .,, , , angeles. i was bursting with emotion- — angeles. i was bursting with emotion. it's _ angeles. i was bursting with emotion. it's a _ angeles. i was bursting with emotion. it's a really - angeles. i was bursting with emotion. it's a really big i angeles. i was bursting with | emotion. it's a really big win angeles. i was bursting with i emotion. it's a really big win for emotion. it�*s a really big win for her. emotion. it's a really big win for her, . emotion. it's a really big win for her. . . her. so much 'oy, so much relief. happiness — her. so much joy, so much relief. happiness and — her. so much joy, so much relief. happiness and excited _ her. so much joy, so much relief. happiness and excited for- her. so much joy, so much relief. happiness and excited for her- her. so much joy, so much relief. | happiness and excited for her that she's— happiness and excited for her that she's going to live the life that she wants to live. every week on outside source we produce for iplayer two. this week we turn to the extreme heat in north america and what it means for our planet as a whole. this is a story of two heat waves. they have set record temperatures, started wildfires in killed people. and connecting to what they do to our planet and how we are tackling climate change. because the science is absolutely clear, this is all part of the same story. we are seeinr part of the same story. we are seeing the _ part of the same story. we are seeing the effects _ part of the same story. we are seeing the effects of— part of the same story. we are seeing the effects of climate . part of the same story. we are i seeing the effects of climate change in california and other parts of the country and the world as well but it�*s already happening. we can�*t keep waiting to act. it's already happening. we can't keep waiting to act.— it's already happening. we can't keep waiting to act. let's take the sta . e keep waiting to act. let's take the
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stare b keep waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage — keep waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage by _ keep waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage by looking - keep waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage by looking at i keep waiting to act. let's take the stage by stage by looking at how. stage by stage by looking at how these heat waves fit into a far bigger picture, and we will start up close. 0n the western side of north america. the first heat wave began in late june, america. the first heat wave began in latejune, this is portland in the us, this is british columbia in canada. in temperature records were being smashed in canada�*s previous record was a0 for degree celsius now it is a9.6 c. that is now canada�*s higher average temperature. move of the border to seattle in the us, it went from this to theirs. and further south in portland the old record was beaten by another big margin. and none of this is normal. this is one canadian climatologist puts it. this is one canadian climatologist uts it. , ., this is one canadian climatologist uts it. , . , ., , ., puts it. these are temperatures that are for or 5 — puts it. these are temperatures that are for or 5 degrees _ puts it. these are temperatures that are for or 5 degrees warmer... i puts it. these are temperatures that are for or 5 degrees warmer... here | are for or 5 degrees warmer... here is whether—
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are for or 5 degrees warmer... here is whether historian _ are for or 5 degrees warmer... here is whether historian christopher byrd. he says... nature is telling us this is normal to. on the pacific coast it�*s estimated that over a billion marine creatures have been killed. this man runs a noise or business in canada.— killed. this man runs a noise or business in canada. basically cook the oysters. _ business in canada. basically cook the oysters, clams, _ business in canada. basically cook the oysters, clams, mussels, i business in canada. basically cook| the oysters, clams, mussels, most business in canada. basically cook- the oysters, clams, mussels, most of the oysters, clams, mussels, most of the muscles around here are all gone. my clams, we see the sand dollars and stuff, they are all dead. �* ., ., ., ., ., , dollars and stuff, they are all dead. �* ., ., ., ., , dead. and now one heat wave has been followed by another. _ dead. and now one heat wave has been followed by another. this _ dead. and now one heat wave has been followed by another. this image - dead. and now one heat wave has been followed by another. this image from i followed by another. this image from bbc weather shows the 10th ofjuly in the us. the red means harder than average. and this is death valley in california, its reach 5a—point for degree celsius was up and confirmed that will equal the highest temperature ever reliably recorded anywhere. if that�*s the heat, one of its consequences is wildfires. a lot of them. back to canada it was
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nearly wiped out by a fire. this is california, across western canada and the us there�*s been well over 1000 wildfires since april. many in the last two months. and the link to the last two months. and the link to the heat is explicit. tt�*s the last two months. and the link to the heat is explicit.— the heat is explicit. it's actually all related _ the heat is explicit. it's actually all related to _ the heat is explicit. it's actually all related to extreme - the heat is explicit. it's actually all related to extreme heat. i the heat is explicit. it's actually i all related to extreme heat. with extreme heat that kind of triggers a drought which also experiencing california extreme drought. with that extreme drought the wildfires are also more severe. tt that extreme drought the wildfires are also more severe.— are also more severe. if that's the fires caused _ are also more severe. if that's the fires caused by — are also more severe. if that's the fires caused by the _ are also more severe. if that's the fires caused by the heat _ are also more severe. if that's the fires caused by the heat next i are also more severe. if that's the fires caused by the heat next we l fires caused by the heat next we have to step back again and look at why these two heat waves have happened. the immediate cause is what�*s called a heat dome. there happened. the immediate cause is what's called a heat dome. there is a vast dome — what's called a heat dome. there is a vast dome of— what's called a heat dome. there is a vast dome of high _ what's called a heat dome. there is a vast dome of high pressure i what's called a heat dome. there is| a vast dome of high pressure across western canada. it�*s like a lid and trapping warm airand western canada. it�*s like a lid and trapping warm air and pushing it down where it gets even harder. the heat is held in place by the path of the jet stream so temperatures have kept climbing. fight!
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the jet stream so temperatures have kept climbing-— kept climbing. and that's the double dan . er. kept climbing. and that's the double danger- high — kept climbing. and that's the double danger. high pressure _ kept climbing. and that's the double danger. high pressure that - kept climbing. and that's the double danger. high pressure that can i kept climbing. and that's the double | danger. high pressure that can move on. �* . , . . , danger. high pressure that can move on. , ., danger. high pressure that can move on. ,y ., ., danger. high pressure that can move on. basically no weather systems can move in so we _ on. basically no weather systems can move in so we don't _ on. basically no weather systems can move in so we don't get _ on. basically no weather systems can move in so we don't get any - on. basically no weather systems can move in so we don't get any relief- move in so we don't get any relief with thunderstorms or showers and all we _ with thunderstorms or showers and all we get _ with thunderstorms or showers and all we get isjust pure blue skies and sunshine.— and sunshine. this is very dangerous. _ and sunshine. this is very dangerous. so _ and sunshine. this is very dangerous. so the - and sunshine. this is very dangerous. so the fire i and sunshine. this is very| dangerous. so the fire has and sunshine. this is very _ dangerous. so the fire has happened because the temperatures happen because the temperatures happen because the temperatures happen because the heat don�*t happen. let�*s take another step back. how do heat domes connect with climate change? on that the director of the earth system science center. tt on that the director of the earth system science center.- on that the director of the earth system science center. if we weren't warmin: system science center. if we weren't warming up — system science center. if we weren't warming up the _ system science center. if we weren't warming up the planet _ system science center. if we weren't warming up the planet through i system science center. if we weren't i warming up the planet through carbon pollution we wouldn't expect to see this more often than once in 100,000 years was what climate change is done is made this a much more probable event for that as you may have noticed, scientists use to be more reticent about making it explicitly between a single weather event and climate change. 1405? explicitly between a single weather event and climate change. now can increase computer _ event and climate change. now can increase computer power _ event and climate change. now can increase computer power means i increase computer power means increase computer power means increase accuracy of climate modeling. listen to this professor on the current heat waves was that we've analysed the climate that you
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would expect without emissions of greenhouse gases and you just don't see these extra ordinary temperatures that were sitting at the moment. 50 this climate modelling is pretty biting clarity. look at this. she is look at these heat waves and concluded... we have the link from the fires of the temperatures to the heat down to climate change. the final part of the equation is ours. humanity and how we are the cause of this. humanity is waging war on nature. this is suicidal. nature always strikes back. and it is already doing so with growing force and fury. fin doing so with growing force and fu . . , doing so with growing force and fu . ., , ., , fury. on that he is right. nature is -arovidin fury. on that he is right. nature is providing any _ fury. on that he is right. nature is providing any number _ fury. on that he is right. nature is providing any number of _ fury. on that he is right. nature is| providing any number of warnings. just look at the last few weeks.
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europe has recorded it second hottestjune, moscow equalled its highestjune temperature for the shift in mexico, it's recorded to its highest ever temperature in june. that was in mexicali. 0r its highest ever temperature in june. that was in mexicali. or you can look at new zealand, it's winter there, it too has recorded its hottestjune. the list goes on. while i'm going through all of this perhaps you're thinking, well, we noticed was that we know climate change is an issue, we know we need to act, we are acting. but there are two important things to note here, the first is that these heat waves it in north america has scientists worried. bear in mind most climate modelling anticipates a gradual warming. but as we've seen there is nothing gradual about this. as the climate colleges budget... in other words, what is starting to
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happen with climate change may be worse and has been projected. if that's the first point, the second is this that deciding to act isn't the same as taking the right action. let me show you what i mean. this year has been full of bold commitments.— year has been full of bold commitments. , , , ., commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive _ commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, - commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, this - commitments. scientists tell us that this is the decisive decade, this is i this is the decisive decade, this is the decade that we must make decisions that will avoid the worst consequences of the climate crisis. if that's the us then there is china, its promise to be carbon neutral by 2060. find china, its promise to be carbon neutral by 2060.— china, its promise to be carbon neutral by 2060. and this is boris johnson. neutral by 2060. and this is boris johnson- we _ neutral by 2060. and this is boris johnson. we are _ neutral by 2060. and this is boris johnson. we are halfway - neutral by 2060. and this is boris johnson. we are halfway to - neutral by 2060. and this is boris johnson. we are halfway to net i neutral by 2060. and this is boris i johnson. we are halfway to net zero, we have _ johnson. we are halfway to net zero, we have carbon emissions lower than at any— we have carbon emissions lower than at any point — we have carbon emissions lower than at any point since the 19th century. we are _ at any point since the 19th century. we are ending support for fossil fuels _ we are ending support for fossil fuels overseas and doubling our international climate finance. the lan . ua . e international climate finance. the language is _ international climate finance. the: language is urgent, more international climate finance. tt9: language is urgent, more urgent than ever. the policies you go further than before. but there are concerns all of this might not be unknown.
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listen to the senior climate official on the uk's plan to remove as much carbon as it puts into the atmosphere. as much carbon as it puts into the atmosphere-_ as much carbon as it puts into the atmosphere. something called net zero. atmosphere. something called net zer0- when — atmosphere. something called net zer0- when you — atmosphere. something called net zero. when you look _ atmosphere. something called net zero. when you look at _ atmosphere. something called net zero. when you look at the - atmosphere. something called net| zero. when you look at the policies to deliver i'm afraid we are very off—track, very substantially off track, really only about 20% of the policy commitments of the government has made would take us towards that goal of net zero omissions. there has made would take us towards that goal of net zero omissions.— goal of net zero omissions. there is also this the — goal of net zero omissions. there is also this the lead _ goal of net zero omissions. there is also this the lead author _ goal of net zero omissions. there is also this the lead author on - goal of net zero omissions. there is also this the lead author on the i also this the lead author on the uk's climate change act. she says... she then talks about carbon budgets the idea that the country can reduce a certain amount of carbon and asked what if the safe carbon budget is zero? all of these commitments in question feet into the preparations for the un's latest climate summit. it's happening in glasgow in november, it's another opportunity to set ambitious targets and to look at the funding, the technology and
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the policies needed to deliver them. but while we build up to it that there is a profound tension in plain sight. the tension between the long—term global response and what's happening now. look at this graph. this shows global carbon emissions. they go up and up. the year with the highest emissions in history was 2019. and admissions are having consequences now which brings us right back to the heat waves in north america. and why they matter so much. the individual experiences of the millions of people caught up in this make realty dangers that during that of changing our climate. they make real wild cop 26 is receiving so much attention and they offer another reason whyjust a few months ago david attenborough made this demand of the world leaders. never before us it been so important they should be at debating ground where _ they should be at debating ground where we — they should be at debating ground where we can all talk and come to an agreement— where we can all talk and come to an agreement because unless we all agree _ where we can all talk and come to an agreement because unless we all agree we — agreement because unless we all agree we are lost. sir
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agreement because unless we all agree we are lost.— agree we are lost. sir david attenborough _ agree we are lost. sir david attenborough and - agree we are lost. sir david attenborough and our- agree we are lost. sir davidl attenborough and our report agree we are lost. sir david i attenborough and our report they agree we are lost. sir david - attenborough and our report they are on the heat waves. you can spy more analysis and that video through iplayer, if you're in the ukjust analysis and that video through iplayer, if you're in the uk just go to the news category section or if you want to you can find them on the bbc news website and you can find older additions on bbc sounds. if you want to keep it simple i treat them all out as well. you can find me at bbc ross atkins. to find it is on twitter — i'm @bbcrosatkins. reminder of the flooding is at least 59 people are now to have known died in germany particular two states in the west of germany. this is the most serious flooding in living memory. having floods have done this in rescue operations continue to carry on as do searches for those who have been caught up in this. it's notjust germany affected by belgium as well. several people have
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died there. and france and the netherlands are also affected. that's it for this edition of outside source. thank you for watching. hello again. a full uk forecast in a moment but first let's cast an eye on what's been going on in europe and that severe weather. here a picture from wednesday which shows a line of severe thunderstorms just locked in the same area for hour upon hour upon hour. we think the heaviest rain towards the southwest of bonn where158 mm of rain fell in 2a hours, now it looks to be three times the amount of rain we'd normally see in the whole month ofjuly. it was extreme rain and has resulted in catastrophic floods. the jet stream was largely responsible because we have this cut off flow over germany locked
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in place, couldn't move because of the general jet stream pattern. this low fed on some very humid, hot air that originated from the mediterranean. that's what powers some of those enormous storms in the extreme weather that it resulted. here in the uk, the same jet stream pattern is building this area of high pressure. we've had plenty of sunshine across most of parts of the uk today. the best of it arguably across the north and the west. we have a bit of a thicker cloud southeast england but that will continue to very gradually filter its way further southwards as we go on through the night. at the same time a little bit cloudy for scotland and northern ireland. these are the lowest temperatures, another quite warm night for sleeping, about 15 degrees your overnight lows. tomorrow we got more of this dry and sunny weather on the way the exception northwest scotland a very weak weather front could bring an odd patch of rain but it won't amount to much. it would just be a fleeting hotspot. ——0dd spot otherwise dry with plenty of sunshine around for the day by day many areas will see those temperatures rise. 2a in aberdeen, 23 for belfast, we are up into the mid—205,
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26 birmingham, cardiff. the weekend sees more of that hot and sunny weather. the exception, the far northwest of scotland where we will probably see a few patches of rain from time to time. hotter further south temperatures climbing again, 27, hull, 28 in london and cardiff. it's sunday that we may well see temperatures peek into the low 30s very hot weather across southern areas was up slightly cooler and fresher air filtering through parts of scotland. you might well find temperatures easing back a little bit here. as i say, further south we could see highs reaching the 30s.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... police say at least 58 people have died — and dozens are missing — after flooding in western germany translation: | grieve for the | people who have lost their lives. we don't know the number but it will be many. some in the basements of their houses and some who are working as firefighters trying to bring others to safety. the negativity won't break me — england's bukayo saka speaks out after the racist abuse he received for missing a penalty in the euro 2020 final. he's also criticised social media companies. latest official figures show 48,553 new coronavirus infections in the uk and 63 deaths within 28 days of a positive test. that's the highest number of deaths reported in one day since march. borisjohnson has insisted that his plans for "levelling up"

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