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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 15, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm james reynolds. the headlines at 2: tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation's health. the money raised could extend free school meal provision and support better diets among the poorest. you're not going to break this link, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. but the prime minister responded coolly this morning to the idea of a salt and sugar tax. lam not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard—working people. at least 30 people have died and dozens are missing after unprecedented flooding in western germany after the resignation of matt hancock — electronic devices have been seized following searches of two homes in connection
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with the leaked cctv footage. borisjohnson says his plans for ending inequalities in the uk won't make richer areas poorer. give musicians a fair share of the hundreds of millions of pounds record labels earn from streaming, say a group of mps. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. sugar and salt should be taxed and fruit and vegetables prescribed by the nhs in order to improve our diets, an independent review has said. the report, led by the businessman henry dimbleby, says the taxes raised could also be used to extend free school meals to more children.
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mr dimbleby said that poor eating habits cause "horrific health harms". but the food industry says new taxes could increase the price of food and when asked about the review, borisjohnson said that he is not in favour of raising taxes on food. here's our correspondent ellie price. maureen has got a number of physical and mental health issues. she knows she needs to eat more fresh food but it's something she can't afford without the help of a charity. if we had an ideal amount of fruit and veg in our diet, it would be easier to create stuff, i suppose, that was easy to eat. you need variety and it's the variety that costs. i could pay for it but it means something else has to go and it means we go in the red instead of staying in the black, and i can't cope with the worry of being in the red. today's reports says a poor diet contributes to 64,000 deaths every year in england alone and costs the economy an estimated £74 billion.
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there is an environmental impact too — globalfood production is the second biggest contributor to climate change. the report recommends a tax on sugary and salty foods. if producers don't change their recipes to use less, it could mean a price increase of 15 to 25% for desserts, biscuits and sweets. there have been 14 previous obesity plans in this country and almost all of them have been voluntary measures and you are not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies unless you tackle it directly and that is what we are recommending with the sugar and salt reformulation tax. it's not a tax to increase price, it's a tax to make companies reformulate, as they did with the sugary drinks tax, they take the bad stuff out. but this morning, the prime minister appeared to oppose the idea. there are doubtless . some good ideas in it. we believe in tackling obesity, -
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trying to help people to lose weight with promoting exercise and tackling junk food advertising and so on. - lam not, i must say, _ attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard—working people. many in the food industry agree. there have already been some quite big changes and that goes across from curry sauces through to breakfast cereals, so we are already seeing those changes, but the changes do take time and they are expensive to make, because you want to make it right so that people still buy the product and they still taste great. i think we already have those programmes and i don't think that taxing companies will help them move them along. the report also recommends greater use of projects like this one. cathy runs the charity care merseyside, involved in what's called social prescribing. patients are referred by their local gp and then offered things like exercise support,
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cooking advice and even fresh food. from the point of referral, we assess a person's needs, we assess what it is they need support with and we offer them a various range of levels of support. what our aim to do is to reduce gp consultations, to reduce hospitalisations and to try and tackle, in a holistic way, how to help people improve their health and wellbeing. the national food strategy estimates its recommendations would cost around £11; billion a year and bring in up to £31; billion a year in tax revenue. for the report's author, the cost of doing nothing would be terrible damage the environment and to our bodies. ellie price, bbc news. i'm joined now by dr hilda mulrooney, who is associate professor in nutrition at kingston university and part of the obesity group at the british dietetic association. thank you forjoining us. if all of
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these recommendations are taken up, can we expect to be as fit and as slim as mickjagger? i can we expect to be as fit and as slim as mick jagger?_ can we expect to be as fit and as slim as mick jagger? slim as mickjagger? i don't think we could say _ slim as mickjagger? i don't think we could say that, _ slim as mickjagger? i don't think we could say that, but _ slim as mickjagger? i don't think we could say that, but we - slim as mickjagger? i don't think we could say that, but we would l slim as mickjagger? i don't think. we could say that, but we would be definitely in a better position than we are at the moment. the cost of doing nothing isjust too high and the cost of doing nothing is our children's health and our children's well being. so the costs to the nhs and the wider social cost of diseases like obesity have been clearly laid out and we have known about them for many years. i listened to the piece that you did about people's responses to the tax and i would say this is not a tax on individuals, it is a tax on the companies, the retailers and the manufacturers and restaurants and businesses that are buying the salt and sugar to put into foods. if they choose to do that they would pay tax, if they reform late their foods, they wouldn't pay the tax.
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the benefits of reformulation are that the consumer does not have to change what they're eating. we know making individual changes to our diet are difficult, in part because we are surrounded by very tasty foods at low prices. they're marketed in way that makes them attractive, particularly to children. we have seen from the voluntary programmes that have been run that they're very limited and we had a 3% reduction in sugar in foods as part of the voluntary sugar reformation programme, but more than a ten fold reduction in sugar content of drinks, as a result of the sugary drink tax. so there is no question that taxes have a greater impact than voluntary reformulation programmes. for many businesses, they said themselves that a tax means that it is a level playing field. ,., means that it is a level playing field. i. means that it is a level playing field. , . ., ., field. do you expect we will all one da no to field. do you expect we will all one day go to the _ field. do you expect we will all one day go to the gp — field. do you expect we will all one day go to the gp if _ field. do you expect we will all one day go to the gp if we're _ field. do you expect we will all one day go to the gp if we're out - field. do you expect we will all one day go to the gp if we're out of - day go to the gp if we're out of shape and cam out with a
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prescription forless lettuce and apples? prescription forless lettuce and a- les? ., prescription forless lettuce and aules? ., ., prescription forless lettuce and aules? ., . , prescription forless lettuce and aules? ., ., ., apples? no, many of us are in a osition apples? no, many of us are in a position to _ apples? no, many of us are in a position to buy _ apples? no, many of us are in a position to buy those _ apples? no, many of us are in a position to buy those foods - apples? no, many of us are in a - position to buy those foods already. it is about trying to take the inequality out of the system and ensure the people who are least well off are not disadvantaged further. we heard the piece earlier on and we have heard pieces today from low income individuals saying they can't afford to buy fresh fruit and vegetables and it is not a question of knowing what is the right thing to do it is being able to put it into practice. it is far beyond obesity, it is the role of foods across many diseases and health and as well as the environmental impact of diet and how food is produced and i think we need to be mindful of the fact that we are in a position where we are negotiating food deals and the report was very clear in
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outlining the potential impacts and risks faced by poorly thought through trade deals. the government hasn't committed to allowing sufficient time for parliament to scrutinise any potential trade deals they negotiate and we don't have a commitment for wider public health scrutiny of any food trade deals. so food safety is assured, but the wider public health impact is not. so the impact of food trade deals on things like diseases such as obesity, that needs to be in place. how do you deal with the fact the sugary processed, salty food are easier to get. in you're in a train station you can get a pact of crisps in a short time. fix, station you can get a pact of crisps in a short time.— in a short time. a lot of that is roduct in a short time. a lot of that is product placement _ in a short time. a lot of that is product placement and - in a short time. a lot of that is product placement and we - in a short time. a lot of that isj product placement and we had
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in a short time. a lot of that is l product placement and we had a review and the outcome was clear, there was agreement there should be further restrictions on promotions and placements of those foods. the government said we agree, but they have done nothing to implement it. what we need is not words, but actions, the best report in the world will not make difference, its will gather dust on a shelf unless action is taken. we need firm commitment and it needs to be cross party. if there is a change of government in the future, we need to make sure this work doesn't fall by the way side. we wouldn't have an nhs if a commitment had not been made in the 40s. we need commitment and measururable actions. it shouldn't be the case that costs of any tax on sugar and salt are passed on to the consumer, then manufacturers don't have to reform late. the problem with the voluntary
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reformulation programme is there was no stick whatsoever so, companies chose not to take action didn't have to. . ~' , ., computers and electronic devices have been seized from two residential properties in the south of england as part of an investigation into the leaking of cctv images of the former health secretary matt hancock. the images which showed mr hancock embracing his former aide gina coladangelo were published in the sun newspaper last month and led to his resignation as health secretary. the information commissioner's office confirmed it is investigating an �*alleged data breach�*. at least 30 people are reported to have been killed and 70 are missing after heavy rain and flooding caused widespread damage in western germany. at least four people died when their houses were swept away in the village of schuld. the region has seen record—high rainfall over the past 2a hours. damien mcguinness reports. these are the worst floods to hit this part of western
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germany in living memory. translation: our community centre wasjust crushed and is stuck to the bridge over there and a a0 tonne truck must be stuck there as well. a housejust standing over there tilted over entirely. you can imagine this sort of thing happening in asia, but not here. at least a dozen people are thought to have died and more than 70 are still missing. buildings collapsed, whole villages almost destroyed and cars swept away, as streets were turned into raging rivers. dozens of people were trapped on the roofs of their houses, waiting for rescue and almost 150,000 homes lost electricity. the whole country is affected. parts of rhine have now been closed to shipping and across large parts of germany, traffic and rail transport is heavily disrupted.
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over the past 2a hours, this densely—populated region saw record levels of rainfall. the heavy rain comes after an unusually stormy summer, causing rivers to burst their banks. the impact is being felt elsewhere in europe too. across the border in belgium, buildings were also destroyed as a river burst its banks. at least two people there have died. in western germany, the rain has eased off for now and local people are having to deal with the aftermath, but with so many missing it's also still an emergency situation. with more rain expected in southern germany later today and rivers also at dangerously high levels, other regions are preparing for the worst. after a summer of unusually heavy rains and unpredictable weather, many in germany are already linking these floods to climate change. the prime minister has insisted that his "levelling up" plan is a "win win" for the whole
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of the uk and won't make "rich" areas poorer in order to benefit the most deprived. in a wideranging speech in coventry, borisjohnson said the project, which includes new transport infrastructure and the promise of £50 million of investment in football pitches, was a "huge undertaking" — as iain watson reports. just after the lastless boris johnson invaded what was once enemy territory, this part of north—east england was represented by a labour prime minister. i england was represented by a labour prime minister.— prime minister. i know people may have been breaking _ prime minister. i know people may have been breaking the _ prime minister. i know people may have been breaking the voting - prime minister. i know people may i have been breaking the voting habits of generations to vote for us. the conservatives _ of generations to vote for us. the conservatives didn't just take tony conservatives didn'tjust take tony blair's old constituency of sedgefield, but a lot of seats in the north and midlands and promised that the government would level up the places that felt they were missing out on economic success. but polling suggests that people are not clear about what levelling up actually means. so today the prime
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minister sent himself to coventry to try to define it. minister sent himself to coventry to try to define it— try to define it. everybody knows that talent _ try to define it. everybody knows that talent and _ try to define it. everybody knows that talent and energy _ try to define it. everybody knows that talent and energy and - that talent and energy and enthusiasm and flare are evenly spread across the uk. evenly spread. it is opportunity that is not. the loss of a seat _ it is opportunity that is not. the loss of a seat in _ it is opportunity that is not. the loss of a seat in the south has made some of borisjohnson's mps nervous. they fear that a focus on northern england might mean traditional tory voters feel they're missing out and the prime minister said levelling up can be all things to all people. we don't can be all things to all people. - don't think that you can make the poor parts of country richer by making the rich parts poorer. levels up making the rich parts poorer. levels up is not a jam—spreading operation. it is not robbing peter to pay paul, it is win—win for the whole united kingdom. to it is win-win for the whole united kinudom. ., i. , it is win-win for the whole united kinadom. ., i. , .,, kingdom. to everyone size he was facina the kingdom. to everyone size he was facing the future, _ kingdom. to everyone size he was facing the future, boris _ kingdom. to everyone size he was facing the future, boris johnson i kingdom. to everyone size he was i facing the future, boris johnson was facing the future, borisjohnson was speaking at a project developing
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batteries for electric cars and invited local authority leaders to help drive the agenda. labour accused him of making empty promises. he accused him of making empty promises-_ accused him of making empty aromises. ., , , ., promises. he said “am spreading, it is alwa s promises. he said “am spreading, it is alwaysjam — promises. he said jam spreading, it is always jam tomorrow _ promises. he said jam spreading, it is always jam tomorrow in - promises. he said jam spreading, it is always jam tomorrow in areas - promises. he said jam spreading, it is always jam tomorrow in areas in l is always jam tomorrow in areas in my background, we have had severe cuts we _ my background, we have had severe cuts we have seen free school meals taken _ cuts we have seen free school meals taken and _ cuts we have seen free school meals taken and even their own advisor, it is only— taken and even their own advisor, it is only10%— taken and even their own advisor, it is only 10% of what theed advisor said _ is only 1096 of what theed advisor said. ., , ., ., said. there are potential huge aolitical said. there are potential huge political rewards _ said. there are potential huge political rewards for _ said. there are potential huge political rewards for boris - said. there are potential huge - political rewards for boris johnson if he can spread wealth more evenly, but turning around years of disadvantage is a long—term project and it may be difficult to judge success by the time of the next election. the prime minister said we would have to wait until the autumn for more detail of the plans and these could determine the territory on which the next election is fought.
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the number ofjob vacancies in the uk is now higher than pre—pandemic levels in the three months tojune. data from the office for national statistics shows there were 862,000 jobs on offer between april and june. that's over 77,000 more than the first three months of 2020. the 0ns says the rise is being fuelled by vacancies in hospitality and retail. the figures also show companies are hiring at a quick pace. there were 356,000 more workers on payrolls injune. that's the biggest rise since the start of the pandemic. however the figure is still over 200,000 down on pre—pandemic levels and stands at 28.9 million. the 0ns also said that the unemployment rate was a.8% between march and may. let's talk about those jobs figures — and the prime minister's speech on levelling up — with hannah slaughter who's economist at the resolution foundation. thank you forjoining us. we saw in that report there had been confusion
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about what levelling up means, do we now know what it means? i’m about what levelling up means, do we now know what it means?— now know what it means? i'm not sure. we now know what it means? i'm not sure- we have — now know what it means? i'm not sure. we have had _ now know what it means? i'm not sure. we have had lots _ now know what it means? i'm not sure. we have had lots of- now know what it means? i'm not| sure. we have had lots of regional inequality in this country for decades and it's a really port thing to o' —— important thing to get ahold of. but the pandemic has turned that on its head. we have seen the hardest hit area at the moment compared to prepandemic is actually london. so the number of employee jobs actually london. so the number of employeejobs in london is still about 3% below precrisis levels, for the regions, three in the north of england and northern ireland have morejobs than england and northern ireland have more jobs than they had precrisis. so it is not a simple picture as to what is going on with regional inequality. what is going on with regional inequality-— what is going on with regional ineauali . , ., , inequality. does making regions ficher inequality. does making regions richer ao inequality. does making regions richer go hand _ inequality. does making regions richer go hand in _ inequality. does making regions richer go hand in hand _ inequality. does making regions richer go hand in hand with - inequality. does making regions. richer go hand in hand with giving regions more political power? the prime minister talked about that in his speech. to
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prime minister talked about that in his s-eech. ., , ., , ., prime minister talked about that in his seech. ., , ., , ., , his speech. to be honest, that is not really — his speech. to be honest, that is not really my _ his speech. to be honest, that is not really my area _ his speech. to be honest, that is not really my area of _ his speech. to be honest, that is not really my area of expertise, l his speech. to be honest, that is i not really my area of expertise, but on the jobs not really my area of expertise, but on thejobs side, not really my area of expertise, but on the jobs side, we know it will be a big challenge coming up into the autumn to kind of look at where, at what's happening in the labour market as the furlough scheme is wound down. we still have areas, a lot in london and the south—east, but also in some other areas like the lake district, where we still have you know lots of people who have you know lots of people who have lost their jobs have you know lots of people who have lost theirjobs since the pandemic began, but also lots of people who are still on furlough and we know from official forecasts that it is later this year that unemployment is expected to rise, once the furlough scheme ends and the distribution of what will look like across the country and within different groups of people will be important for what happens after the end of this year in the medium term. tell us more about the furlough scheme, remind us when it is ending and whether it is a cliff edge? 50
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and whether it is a cliff edge? so it is and whether it is a cliff edge? 5r it is actually —— it's already started to phase out in terms of employee contributions starting to rise. employers now have to contribute 10% of furloughed workers' pay, on top of pension payments they were contributing, employers will have to contribute more and more of people's, of furloughed workers' pay and they have got more skin in the game. the idea that is giving them an incentive to get people back to work. the scheme ends in september. by work. the scheme ends in september. by the autumn, we are at least on current plans expecting it to be withdrawn and the hope is that by that point you know all of the restrictions would have been eased and the economy would be fully open.
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a lot of that does depend on the path of the virus. but that is the hope. path of the virus. but that is the ho -e. , path of the virus. but that is the ho e, , , , . path of the virus. but that is the hoe. , , , . ~ , hope. his speech, the prime minister said to even. — hope. his speech, the prime minister said to even. do _ hope. his speech, the prime minister said to even, do e-mail_ hope. his speech, the prime minister said to even, do e-mail me _ hope. his speech, the prime minister said to even, do e-mail me or- said to even, do e—mail me or someone else he said, your ideas in terms of levelling up. are there any ideas your foundation are hearing that might be e—mailed to the prime minister? so that might be e-mailed to the prime minister? ~' that might be e-mailed to the prime minister? ~ , ,, minister? so i think the big kind of, the big _ minister? so i think the big kind of, the big areas _ minister? so i think the big kind of, the big areas that _ minister? so i think the big kind of, the big areas that we - minister? so i think the big kind of, the big areas that we have i minister? so i think the big kind . of, the big areas that we have been thinking about are particularly aboutjob quality. so at the moment everyone is thinking about the number ofjobs and that will be important making sure the number of jobsis important making sure the number of jobs is there and maintained and help people to get back into work, but another thing to be thinking about isjob quality but another thing to be thinking about is job quality and things like pay and progression and helping people have good jobs locally and kind of making sure that you know work pays and that we are not seeing situations of in work poverty like
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we saw before the pandemic. thank ou. the headlines on bbc news... tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation's health. the raised could extend free school meal provision and support better diets among the poorest. at least thirty people have died — and dozens are missing — after unprecedented flooding in western germany. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then health secretary matt hancock embracing his former aide aide gina coladangelo. the government has defended the decision to put majorca and ibiza on the amber list for travellers from england — just two weeks after they were moved to green. it means that — from monday morning — most holidaymakers returning to the uk from the spanish islands will have to isolate for ten days unless they're fully vaccinated. theo leggett reports.
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it is just over two weeks since the government gave the go—ahead for travel to the sun, sea and sand of the balearic islands, but now a change in the rules means that a summer getaway to ibiza or majorca hasjust become more difficult for some. the government has a traffic light system. countries with low levels of covid infections go on to a greenlist, you can travel there without having to quarantine on your return. four countries will be added to the list on monday, including croatia and hong kong. but the balearics will be removed. a rise in infections means they have been placed on the amber list. as of monday, whether you have to quarantine or not will depend on your vaccination status. and then there is the red list. travellers from these regions have to quarantine in designated hotels. four more countries, including cuba, have justjoined that list. the problem is, the rules are not quite the same for everybody. while most older people are fully vaccinated and could go on holiday to an amber list country
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without having to isolate on their return, many young people have not had their second dose of vaccine yet, which means they would have to go into isolation. i had one vaccine three weeks ago and i know from monday people who are double vaccinated do not need to quarantine when they return from amber list countries. however, i will need to quarantine. 0bviously that is not great for my mental health, but i'm very lucky i can work from home. airlines and travel companies have also expressed frustration at the frequent changes, which they claim are deterring people from making bookings. but some within the industry say the restrictions do have public support. these decisions are chopping and changing. i think from the government's point of view, i think they can be very confident that these are popular measures in the population as a whole, even though it is catastrophic if you are that part of the population that wishes to go to the mediterranean on holiday.
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the government so far has been unrepentant. ministers have already warned that travel this summer will be far from normal and they say holiday—makers should be ready to cancel their plans at any moment. theo leggett, bbc news. some of britain s biggest high mortgages to furloughed workers, and to self—employed people who took out covid grants during the pandemic. that s despite the banking watchdog saying that the payments should not prevent people from being able to access credit. sarah corker reports. swapping the city for the country, lockdown has left people yearning for green spaces and bigger homes. in the past year the uk has had a property boom. but some people who took out covid support during the pandemic like the grant for the self—employed or furlough say they are being locked out of the market. i almost feel like i'm being treated like a bankrupt and being penalised
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for something that wasn't my fault. in lincolnshire lisa says she can't get a mortgage, because she was furloughed and works in hospitality. she is back full—time, but is still being turned town by lenders — down by lenders. being turned town by lenders - down b lenders. ., , being turned town by lenders - down b lenders. . , , ., , by lenders. feel unfairly penalised. furlou a h by lenders. feel unfairly penalised. furlough has _ by lenders. feel unfairly penalised. furlough has been _ by lenders. feel unfairly penalised. furlough has been brilliant, - by lenders. feel unfairly penalised. l furlough has been brilliant, because it protected myjob, but i didn't expect— it protected myjob, but i didn't expect to — it protected myjob, but i didn't expect to come out the other side to have a _ expect to come out the other side to have a deposit and no debt and all the things— have a deposit and no debt and all the things that should make me an ideal first _ the things that should make me an ideal first time buyer only to find banks— ideal first time buyer only to find banks and — ideal first time buyer only to find banks and building societies will not lend — banks and building societies will not lend to me. i feel really let down — not lend to me. i feel really let down. �* �* ., not lend to me. i feel really let down. �* �* . ., ., ., down. the bbc asked all the ma'or banks and building d down. the bbc asked all the ma'or banks and building societies �* down. the bbc asked all the major banks and building societies about| banks and building societies about their policies. most don't accept mortgage applications from people currently on furlough or couldn't include furloughed income when looking at affordability. there are rules for the five million several employed. natwest and the royal bank
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of scotland won't consider people who have taken out the government's self—employment grant. 0thers who have taken out the government's self—employment grant. others are asking for larger deposits. ientirely self-employment grant. others are asking for larger deposits. when the government — asking for larger deposits. when the government announced _ asking for larger deposits. when the government announced the - asking for larger deposits. when the government announced the support| government announced the support package, _ government announced the support package, they— government announced the support package, they did _ government announced the support package, they did say— government announced the support package, they did say it _ government announced the support package, they did say it wouldn't i package, they did say it wouldn't affect— package, they did say it wouldn't affect your— package, they did say it wouldn't affect your credit— package, they did say it wouldn't affect your credit score _ package, they did say it wouldn't affect your credit score or- package, they did say it wouldn't affect your credit score or your . affect your credit score or your chances — affect your credit score or your chances of _ affect your credit score or your chances of getting _ affect your credit score or your chances of getting a _ affect your credit score or yourl chances of getting a mortgage. affect your credit score or your. chances of getting a mortgage. in reality. _ chances of getting a mortgage. in reality, lenders _ chances of getting a mortgage. in reality, lenders and _ chances of getting a mortgage. in reality, lenders and their- reality, lenders and their underwriters _ reality, lenders and their underwriters are - reality, lenders and their underwriters are looking | reality, lenders and their. underwriters are looking at reality, lenders and their- underwriters are looking at it and we have — underwriters are looking at it and we have seen _ underwriters are looking at it and we have seen evidence _ underwriters are looking at it and we have seen evidence that - underwriters are looking at it and we have seen evidence that theyl underwriters are looking at it and i we have seen evidence that they are taking _ we have seen evidence that they are taking this _ we have seen evidence that they are taking this into— we have seen evidence that they are taking this into account _ we have seen evidence that they are taking this into account and - we have seen evidence that they are taking this into account and in - we have seen evidence that they are taking this into account and in some| taking this into account and in some cases— taking this into account and in some cases it _ taking this into account and in some cases it is _ taking this into account and in some cases it is counting _ taking this into account and in some cases it is counting against - taking this into account and in some cases it is counting against people l cases it is counting against people taking _ cases it is counting against people taking a _ cases it is counting against people taking a mortgage _ cases it is counting against people taking a mortgage. uk— cases it is counting against people taking a mortgage.— cases it is counting against people taking a mortgage. uk finance said hel-eders taking a mortgage. uk finance said helpeders must — taking a mortgage. uk finance said helpeders must carry _ taking a mortgage. uk finance said helpeders must carry out _ taking a mortgage. uk finance said helpeders must carry out thorough | helpeders must carry out thorough assessments. there are concerns that people working in hospitality and travel are increasingly being seen as high race bg. —— high risk. lisa says she will to spend a big chunk of her deposit on rents. i
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says she will to spend a big chunk of her deposit on rents.— of her deposit on rents. i feel the opportunity _ of her deposit on rents. i feel the opportunity to — of her deposit on rents. i feel the opportunity to own _ of her deposit on rents. i feel the opportunity to own my _ of her deposit on rents. i feel the opportunity to own my own - of her deposit on rents. i feel the opportunity to own my own home of her deposit on rents. i feel the - opportunity to own my own home has gone and it is devastating. lisa harding ending that report, by sarah corker. four people have been arrested after england footballers were racially abused online following their euro 2020 final defeat. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were targeted after they missed penalties in the euro 2020 final. police say social media companies are working closely with them as they investigate those responsible. well meanwhile the social network instagram has admitted a mistake in its technology meant racist comments and emojis were not removed. it comes after racist abuse was directed at england footballers bukayo saka, marcus rashford and jadon sancho following sunday's euro 2020 final. i can now speak to our technology reporter cristina criddle. what was the mistake? so basically there was a — what was the mistake? so basically there was a problem _ what was the mistake? so basically there was a problem that _ what was the mistake? so basically there was a problem that when - what was the mistake? so basically i there was a problem that when people were reporting racist comments and emojis, things like monkeys that we
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have heard about, when they reported it, where you click on report, you get a notification saying instagram has decided it does not violate guidelines. this happened to me when i reported a few emojis, i went to the head of instagram and asked why this was happening, he said it was a mistake in the technology that the comments were being marked as benign. comments were being marked as benian. �* comments were being marked as benign- yes _ comments were being marked as benign.- yes that - comments were being marked as benign.- yes that is - comments were being marked as benign.- yes that is the l comments were being marked as - benign.- yes that is the word benign. benign? yes that is the word he used. benign. benign? yes that is the word he used- that — benign. benign? yes that is the word he used. that meant _ benign. benign? yes that is the word he used. that meant they _ benign. benign? yes that is the word he used. that meant they were - benign. benign? yes that is the word he used. that meant they were not l he used. that meant they were not subject to a human review and weren't being dealt with in the proper way. weren't being dealt with in the properway. he weren't being dealt with in the proper way. he said it has now been fixed. is proper way. he said it has now been fixed. , , ., ., proper way. he said it has now been fixed. , , . . , proper way. he said it has now been fixed. , , . ., , ., proper way. he said it has now been fixed. , , ., ., , ., ., fixed. is instagram up to the task of findin a fixed. is instagram up to the task of finding and _ fixed. is instagram up to the task of finding and deleting _ fixed. is instagram up to the task of finding and deleting racist - of finding and deleting racist comments?— of finding and deleting racist comments? ~ ., comments? well he said that the aroblem comments? well he said that the problem had _ comments? well he said that the problem had been _ comments? well he said that the problem had been fixed, - comments? well he said that the problem had been fixed, but - comments? well he said that the | problem had been fixed, but since the story has come out, i have had more people contacting me saying that they're still getting that message. now, moderation on social
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media is a different think. instagram has a billion users. but there are simple solutions, you can recognise a monkey emoji on a black person's profile. that should be flagged and referred to moderators in my opinion and that wouldn't be too hard to put in place. but there are nuances with people spelling words differently, perhaps spelling out a word in five different comments with different letters in each and those are harder to track down and tackle. a human being is better at spotting racist comments than artificial intelligence? it racist comments than artificial intelligence?— racist comments than artificial intelliaence? , ., ., intelligence? it is about how you train these _ intelligence? it is about how you train these algorithms, - intelligence? it is about how you train these algorithms, the - intelligence? it is about how you| train these algorithms, the more intelligence? it is about how you - train these algorithms, the more you feed them, the more they learn and i imagine facebook has some of the best technology of this kind, but it is very completed issue but they say
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they have fixed the problem but i am still getting reports from users it has not been fixed. stand still getting reports from users it has not been fixed.— still getting reports from users it has not been fixed. and on sunday it was all happening — has not been fixed. and on sunday it was all happening so _ has not been fixed. and on sunday it was all happening so quickly. - has not been fixed. and on sunday it was all happening so quickly. can i was all happening so quickly. can these algorithms actually learn in real time? these algorithms actually learn in realtime? it these algorithms actually learn in real time? it is no good saying three orfour real time? it is no good saying three or four days later, we have fixed the problem. it needs to be fixed the problem. it needs to be fixed instantly as it is developing. is that possible?— is that possible? they do learn in real time and _ is that possible? they do learn in real time and can _ is that possible? they do learn in real time and can change - is that possible? they do learn in real time and can change from i is that possible? they do learn in | real time and can change from day is that possible? they do learn in - real time and can change from day to day, so it depends how much is being fed into it. since that comment, i have reported lots more and have not received any notifications from instagram back again, meaning they are receiving a huge amount of report and are still trying to review them all and it is a really big problem that is hard to tackle and nobody has done it properly yet. thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. hello. pressure continues to rise here in
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the uk and the weather continues to get sunnier and sunnier. the best of the sunshine is across northern part of the uk. we have cloud across central and eastern england, but it is quite thin, so i am hopeful it will break up this afternoon and towards the evening time. whether sunshine comes out, it will feel warm and temperatures pushing into the mid 20s. 0vernight tonight, it stays dry, more cloud pushing back into northern ireland and western scotland. it will be a warm night. these are the lowest temperatures, 15 degrees in belfast. a warm start to the day tomorrow, another day were plenty of sunshine and across the far north—west, we could see thicker cloud and the odd spot of rain, but for most, dry, sunny and hot are still into the weekend. —— hotter still. hello, this is bbc news.
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the headlines... tax salt and sugar to help improve the nation's health — so says a new review. the money raised could fund more free school meals. you're not going to break thisjunk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies unless you tackle it directly. but the prime minister responded coolly this morning to the idea of a salt and sugar tax. iam not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on ha rd—working people. at least 30 people have died — and dozens are missing — after flooding in western germany. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then—health secretary matt hancock embracing his former aide gina coladangelo. and the prime minister says his plans for ending inequalities in the uk won't make richer areas poorer.
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sport now and for round—up from the bbc sport centre, here is lizzie. good afternoon. we're starting with the golf and the oldest major — the open championship is back after a year off due to covid. the world's best players are on the south coast in kent along with up to 32,000 fans — and after an early start, we're well into the first round. 0ur reporter ben croucher is following the action at royal st george's. and this notoriously difficult course seems to be playing quite well, doesn't it?— course seems to be playing quite well, doesn't it? yes, you said the world's best _ well, doesn't it? yes, you said the world's best players _ well, doesn't it? yes, you said the world's best players are _ well, doesn't it? yes, you said the world's best players are here - well, doesn't it? yes, you said the world's best players are here and l world's best players are here and they are proving why. this is a notoriously difficult course and the wind is blowing, the bunkers are deep, but we currently have 62 players level part of a better at the moment, and out front is the south african 2010 champion, he is coming down the 18th at the moment,
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six under par as we speak. it is one shot clear of the 2017 champion on five under and brian harman. hughes behind. dustinjohnson is to under par, shane lowry, defending champion, is level. the player alongsidejordan speed had a topsy—turvy day, one over par. conditions here are very tricky and the players are handling it well. the sun has disappeared and the wind has picked up and that will make life a little more challenging for some of the later starters, including phil mikkelsen, who is going out in the next ten minutes. and rory mcilroy will take to the cause looking to win the claretjug for the second time later too. thank ou. great britain's women's football squad will take the knee
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before their matches at the tokyo olympic games. earlier this month, the rules around athletes protesting at the games were relaxed by the international olympic committee. the gb coach hege riise said the squad "were all united" in their decision to make the gesture. tennis number one dan evans has had to pull out after staying with the olympics and britain's men's tennis number one dan evans has had to pull out after testing positive for covid—19. jamie murray will take evans' place in tokyo as doubles partner to neal skupski. it'll be murray's fourth 0lympics, having competed in beijing, london and rio. he partnered skupski on the atp tour last season, and they've also played together in the davis cup. it's been announced today that the rugby league world cup in england will go ahead this autumn. the holders and favourites australia have yet to sign up, but organisers are confident they will now it's been agreed. it'll start in october with the men's, women's and wheelchair tournaments taking place simultaneously for the first time. games will be held at 21 venues with capacity crowds before the finals at old trafford in manchester in november.
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alun wynnjones has been named amongst the replacements for the british & irish lions�* final warm up game in south africa. the tour captain will have only been in the country a couple of days after making a remarkable comeback from dislocating his shoulder less than three weeks ago. last night the lions suffered their first defeat of the tour losing to a very strong south africa a team, which included several of the springboks�* world cup winning squad as they were short of match practice after a covid outbreak. and the hosts dominated in cape town, leading the first half 17—3. the lions did score a try early in the second half, but south africa "a" held on for the win, despite being down to 13 men after two yellow cards. it finished 17—13. the first test is a week saturday. the indian wicketkeeper—batsman rishabh pant has covid—19, and is isolating from the rest of the squad. pant was tested after having a sore throat. he won�*t travel to durham, where the team are due to enter a "bio—bubble" and begin training for the series against england.
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india are scheduled to play a tour match against a select counties xi on tuesday, and begin the five—match match test series on fourth august. that�*s all the sport for now. the music industry is weighted against artists, with even successful pop stars seeing "pitiful returns" from streaming, that�*s according to a group of mps. they�*re calling for a "complete reset" of the market, with musicians being given a "fair share" of the money that uk record labels earn from streaming. ramzan karmali reports. # freak out # le freak, c�*est chic. # the unmistakable sound of chic, with founder nile rodgers on guitar. he�*s notjust a performer though. he�*s composed and produced records for some of the biggest artists in history, from bowie to madonna, diana ross to daft punk, and he�*s responsible for the sale of millions of records worldwide. without the song, there is no music business. he was just one high profile star
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to appear before mps to explain why he thought the current music streaming system isn�*t fair. i put out a record with an artist and he had five million streams. five million streams was meaningless. it�*s incredible that a number like five million, or ten million, can be meaningless as far as what you take out economically. i mean, itjust doesn�*t make any sense. in a report out today, a group of mps has concluded the balance needs to be redressed. but several of the performers who gave evidence to the committee said many of their peers weren�*t speaking out against the status quo for fear of losing favour with major record labels and streaming services. streaming has clearly brought significant profits to the music industry. but as nile�*s business partner explains, the distribution of those profits is what�*s at the heart of the problem. the issue is not the streaming services themselves. they've saved the music industry. really what's happened is music has
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gone from being a discretionary purchase in the context of streaming, to now very much being a utility. that money is not being shared by the record companies on a fair and equitable basis with the artists. # now what you hear is not a test �*cos i�*m rapping to the beat. # the group of mps wants the government to order an investigation by the competition and markets authority to look at the impact of the dominance of the major music companies. they hope an overhaul of the streaming industry will help to create an environment where musicians get a fairer slice of the profits. ramzan karmali, bbc news. with me new is legendary musician nile rodgers along with his manager, merck mercuriadis, founder of �*hipgnosis�* an artist management and music publishing firm, both gave evidence to the dcms committee inquiry into the economics of streaming. i would like to start with you,
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nile, in preparation for this interview i encouraged some of my younger colleagues to listen to your songs, including my own favourite, no tories. how much money would you earn each time they stream a song? not very much. —— no tories. not very much! i think merck mercuriadis has the real number, because whenever i hear it, it sends a chill to my spine. whenever i hear it, it sends a chill to my spine-— to my spine. this is what that en a ui to my spine. this is what that enquiry is _ to my spine. this is what that enquiry is about, _ to my spine. this is what that enquiry is about, getting - to my spine. this is what that enquiry is about, getting fair| enquiry is about, getting fair enumeration for the great songwriters and artists that create this beautiful music and can give record _ this beautiful music and can give record company something to sell all streaming _ record company something to sell all streaming services something to offer— streaming services something to offer the — streaming services something to offer the customers, and yet these
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great _ offer the customers, and yet these great songwriters are delivering the greatest _ great songwriters are delivering the greatest component and we are dealing _ greatest component and we are dealing with the results of this emiuiry— dealing with the results of this enquiry and it is amazing it has taken— enquiry and it is amazing it has taken politicians to actually make sense _ taken politicians to actually make sense of— taken politicians to actually make sense of exactly what is going on herea _ sense of exactly what is going on here, which is that there needs to be a _ here, which is that there needs to be a reset— here, which is that there needs to be a reset of streaming. not because of the _ be a reset of streaming. not because of the streaming services, but because — of the streaming services, but because of the major record companies that own and control the biggest _ companies that own and control the biggest publishing companies in the world _ biggest publishing companies in the world. stop those publishing companies from advocating and fighting — companies from advocating and fighting for artists fighting for more — fighting for artists fighting for more money, and they make the record company— more money, and they make the record company the _ more money, and they make the record company the beneficiary at the expense — company the beneficiary at the expense of the songwriter. nile, where does _ expense of the songwriter. nile, where does the _ expense of the songwriter. nile, where does the songwriter - expense of the songwriter. ti ie: where does the songwriter stand in that ecosystem?— where does the songwriter stand in that ecosystem? well, we are at the foundation of — that ecosystem? well, we are at the foundation of that _ that ecosystem? well, we are at the foundation of that industry. - that ecosystem? well, we are at the foundation of that industry. if - that ecosystem? well, we are at the foundation of that industry. if we - foundation of that industry. if we were not, if we did not do what we
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did, they would be no industry. so we actually are the pillars that hold that industry up mac we are honestly the base of the business. it is funny. i didn�*t mean for merck mercuriadis to go into a diatribe, i just wanted him to read the number. that was pretty efficient! i just wanted him to read the number. that was pretty efficient!— that was pretty efficient! i didn't aet the that was pretty efficient! i didn't get the numbers, _ that was pretty efficient! i didn't get the numbers, no! _ that was pretty efficient! i didn't get the numbers, no! i - that was pretty efficient! i didn't get the numbers, no! i wanted l that was pretty efficient! i didn't| get the numbers, no! i wanted to hear that because _ get the numbers, no! i wanted to hear that because it _ get the numbers, no! i wanted to hear that because it is _ get the numbers, no! i wanted to hear that because it is so - hear that because it is so minuscule.— hear that because it is so minuscule. , , ., ., minuscule. the number is not enough to sharepoint — minuscule. the number is not enough to sharepoint together _ minuscule. the number is not enough to sharepoint together in _ minuscule. the number is not enough to sharepoint together in a _ minuscule. the number is not enough to sharepoint together in a pub -- i to sharepoint together in a pub —— share _ to sharepoint together in a pub —— share a _ to sharepoint together in a pub —— share a pint — to sharepoint together in a pub —— share a pint together. this is what this committee is about. the committee — this committee is about. the committee said _ this committee is about. tue: committee said they this committee is about. tte: committee said they want this committee is about. t"t9 committee said they want to this committee is about. tt9: committee said they want to reset this committee is about. t“t9 committee said they want to reset it to make it fair. do you have any idea what fair would be in your mind? :, :, , :, ,
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mind? fair would be the artist havina a mind? fair would be the artist having a seat _ mind? fair would be the artist having a seat at _ mind? fair would be the artist having a seat at the _ mind? fair would be the artist having a seat at the table - mind? fair would be the artist having a seat at the table so l mind? fair would be the artist i having a seat at the table so that we can sit down and negotiate and deal with the numbers. we don�*t have any transparency when it comes to the owners of the masters making the deals. wejust had the owners of the masters making the deals. we just had to the owners of the masters making the deals. wejust had to go the owners of the masters making the deals. we just had to go along with what they have done. if we had a seat at the table, we could be a part of the negotiation and i think that when you are sitting across from people who are the artists themselves or the artists�* representatives, it is at that point that you recognise your partnership and you recognise that these are human beings and the dialogue will take on a completely different flavour. it is very easy to be dismissive when they are not in the room. at that point, they represent a statistic. when a human being is in front of you, that you probably were just dancing to their music or
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they played at your son�*s bar mitzvah something like that, these people are our friends, notjust our colleagues, they are people we have known for most of our lives. and even the new executives in the business have become friendly with us, and i believe that now is the time for them to put our human faces at the table so that we can be a part of these negotiations, because it is just not fair. i part of these negotiations, because it isjust not fair. i think part of these negotiations, because it is just not fair. i think when we are out of sight, we are out of mind. when i think about my secondary master and they will talk about probabilities and things like that, right now what we are experiencing in the music business as far as what they are making from streaming, they have now had
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continuous exponential growth, continuous exponential growth, continuous exponential growth, and continuous exponential growth, and and what continuous exponential growth, and what we learned back in the old days in old maths classes is that, what is the event that happens after continuous exponential growth? it is explosive growth. now is a better time, now could not be a better time to discuss this and to make this fair, because they know that explosive growth is on the horizon. the amount of people that will be consuming music via streaming in the next ten years is going to grow to a massive number and now, when they could look at their shareholders and say, this is the kind of money we are making, we can be fairer to the people who are sitting right next to you or behind you in the negotiating room, to make this right. mile.
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you or behind you in the negotiating room, to make this right.— room, to make this right. nile, you rose u- room, to make this right. nile, you rose up during _ room, to make this right. nile, you rose up during an _ room, to make this right. nile, you rose up during an era _ room, to make this right. nile, you rose up during an era of _ room, to make this right. nile, you rose up during an era of hard-corel rose up during an era of hard—core music, you needed to buy it and the majority of money went to the artist, presumably. what about young people trying to make their names in the streaming industry? tt is people trying to make their names in the streaming industry?— the streaming industry? it is very difficult because _ the streaming industry? it is very difficult because you _ the streaming industry? it is very difficult because you see - the streaming industry? it is very difficult because you see the - the streaming industry? it is very l difficult because you see the model that they have to go along with, and it is a model that is based on a purchase, when in fact a stream is not a purchase, a stream should be a licence. and we all know that once you�*ve licensed the product, the amount that you pay for that licensing of any kind of ip is considerably higher than a purchase. so we would be sharing that profit with the record company as opposed to them paying as if we sold the song. we did not sell the song. when
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a person listens to music now, they can just a person listens to music now, they canjust pick and a person listens to music now, they can just pick and choose any songs they want to hear at any given time and we get paid based on the interaction with the music, so if they happen to listen to your music a lot, you should be paid a lot. you know, so it isjust... it is really just upside down at the moment. . it just upside down at the moment. , if ou hear just upside down at the moment. , if you hear your music in a shopping centre being played, presumably that is enjoyable, but do you also think, i hope i get paid for that? t do i hope i get paid for that? i do experience — i hope i get paid for that? i do experience the _ i hope i get paid for that? t rr experience the spiritual enjoyment and say, i can�*t believe this. i was just a kid sitting in my bedroom writing songs hoping to get one hit
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record, two hit records may be. i never had any idea this would go on for the rest of my life and my songs would outlive me. so when i hear my music played at the airport or at a supermarket or something like that, i relate to that artistic experience and that happy feeling. i do not think about the money because i sit down and it is actually laughable. it is laughable to me because at least i have already made a good living, but it is sad and what is it like for a young person coming up and they are getting played all over the place and they don�*t have a life like i have and they don�*t have... they never shared in the type of royalty structure or type of
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enumeration environment that existed when you really were selling product, when you really solve allitems and cds and cassettes. —— when you really sold items. allltems and cds and cassettes. -- when you really sold items.- when you really sold items. there has never been _ when you really sold items. there has never been more _ when you really sold items. there has never been more money - when you really sold items. there has never been more money coming into the _ has never been more money coming into the music business than today, and to— into the music business than today, and to your— into the music business than today, and to your point, almost all consumption of music today is paid for but _ consumption of music today is paid for but it— consumption of music today is paid for but it is— consumption of music today is paid for but it is not being shared fairly— for but it is not being shared fairly among songwriters and artists — fairly among songwriters and artists |s— fairly among songwriters and artists. , ,:, , artists. is it sometimes the aublic's artists. is it sometimes the public's fault? _ artists. is it sometimes the public's fault? we - artists. is it sometimes the public's fault? we think- artists. is it sometimes the public's fault? we think it | artists. is it sometimes the | public's fault? we think it is artists. is it sometimes the - public's fault? we think it is free public�*s fault? we think it is free and wejust think, i can listen public�*s fault? we think it is free and we just think, i can listen to this forfree, whereas and we just think, i can listen to this for free, whereas 20 years ago, if i wanted to listen to something, i had to pay for it.— i had to pay for it. music has gone from being _ i had to pay for it. music has gone from being a _ i had to pay for it. music has gone from being a discretionary - i had to pay for it. music has gone from being a discretionary luxuryl from being a discretionary luxury purchase — from being a discretionary luxury purchase to being a utility. the offering — purchase to being a utility. the offering you get from an album or spotify— offering you get from an album or spotify where you can listen from everything from the beatles to beethoven in one place, it doesn't matter—
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beethoven in one place, it doesn't matter whether it is in your home, in your— matter whether it is in your home, in your car, — matter whether it is in your home, in your car, at— matter whether it is in your home, in your car, at the beach, the office. — in your car, at the beach, the office. that _ in your car, at the beach, the office, that convenience is something the public has decided they are — something the public has decided they are willing to pay £10 per month— they are willing to pay £10 per month for, and that is bringing in more _ month for, and that is bringing in more money than ever before, and the public— more money than ever before, and the public is _ more money than ever before, and the public is not _ more money than ever before, and the public is not doing that because they necessarily want nile to get paid or— they necessarily want nile to get paid or a — they necessarily want nile to get paid or a songwriter to get paid. they— paid or a songwriter to get paid. they are — paid or a songwriter to get paid. they are paying that money out of convenience and the record companies are benefiting from this technology that the _ are benefiting from this technology that the streaming companies have brought— that the streaming companies have brought that allows people to consume music in this fashion, and theyjust _ consume music in this fashion, and theyjust need to share it more fairly— theyjust need to share it more fairly and — theyjust need to share it more fairly and equitably with the creators. :, , , :, , fairly and equitably with the creators. :, , , :, :, creators. finally, you must have had to one over— creators. finally, you must have had to one over some _ creators. finally, you must have had to one over some tough _ creators. finally, you must have had to one over some tough audiences i creators. finally, you must have had| to one over some tough audiences in your time, what where the british parliament like?— your time, what where the british parliament like? they were friendly and open-minded. _ parliament like? they were friendly and open-minded. they _ parliament like? they were friendly and open-minded. they were - and open—minded. they were open—minded, because this is a very
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simple problem to understand. this is a question of numbers, work, effort, energy put in and it is really simple. so i think that in today�*s world, it is easy to deflect the problem and say, it is this person, that person, and when we talk about streaming, they think that we�*re talking about streaming services like spotify is the enemy or apple is the enemy. that is not what we�*re talking about at all. we think what they done is amazing and i and a music lover. i love the fact i and a music lover. i love the fact i canjust go on and hear any obscure record that i used to have in my collection, that is donated, and i can enjoy that at any time. and that is a wonderful service they
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have provided. what we have a problem with other people who own our masters, and yesterday merck mercuriadis said something really funny, he said, why do they call it masters? and i said, i don�*t want to go there, but i don�*t feel like a slave because i volunteer. but think about that. there are the masters, the people who own the masters, that even sounds a little uncomfortable. so if they are the masters and the only masters, what are we? tt so if they are the masters and the only masters, what are we? it has been a pleasure, _ only masters, what are we? it has been a pleasure, thank— only masters, what are we? it has been a pleasure, thank you - only masters, what are we? it has been a pleasure, thank you both l only masters, what are we? it hasl been a pleasure, thank you both so much. :, ~ been a pleasure, thank you both so much. :, ,, i. the dutch crime reporter peter r de vries has died, after being shot in amsterdam last week. the 64—year—old journalist was known for investigating organised crime. he was shot minutes after leaving a tv studio last tuesday, where he had appeared on a chat show.
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my colleague anna holligan is in amsterdam and said the news was what his family had dreaded. confirmed the family�*s very worst fears, but not just the family, this was one of the most acclaimed journalists here in the netherlands. peter r de vries made his name in the early 1980s, covering the kidnapping of freddy heineken, the beer magnate, but then he specialised in helping with cold cases, so solving child murders, disappearances, and i was at the scene last week shortly after he was shot outside the television studio around 7:30 local time, so in daylight. he became the victim of what he had spent his life reporting on and being involved in, assisting those who were involved in investigations and that kind of thing. and down at the scene where he was shot in the head multiple times.
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people have travelled all over in the netherlands, actually, to lay flowers and messages of support for him and his family. and in fact, we have had a statement from peter r de vries�*s family. they say peter fought to the end but was unable to win the battle. he was surrounded by the people who love him, he was when he died. he lived by his conviction, they say, "on bended knee is no way to be free." there has been a lot of discussion here in the netherlands since his shooting about the amount of security he had, whether it should have been more. but he absolutely said he would rather stand and fight than be hiding in a corner for his life. and that is the way that he has passed away. the family have now asked for privacy as they make arrangements for his funeral. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. full uk forecast for the rest of this week and the weekend injusta moment, but first of all, i thought we would take a look at the extreme rainfall that has been affecting parts
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of europe, particularly some western areas of germany. some torrential downpours yesterday showing up on the radar picturejust to the south—west of bonn. how much rain fell? well, we had up to 158 millimetres of rain. this looks to be about three times as much rainfall we would expect in the whole of the month ofjuly and that fell in just the space of one day. those storms were kicked off by this upper area of low pressure that was stuck overhead in germany, whereas here in the uk, thejet stream pattern is ridged. what that does is it builds pressure. so this area of high pressure which is building across the uk is going to be with us through the rest of this week, the weekend and even influencing the weather into next week as well. it means we will have more scenes like this. it really has been a glorious day so far in parts of cumbria, whereas across central and eastern england, we do have some patches of cloud around. the cloud, though, is very thin, it�*s only about 300 metres thick, so there is a chance, i think, particularly later this afternoon and towards the evening time, it will break up and will see
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some sunshine coming through. but the best of the sunshine today is wales, south west england, northern ireland, scotland, eastern counties of northern ireland. 0vernight tonight, a bit more cloud pushes back into the north—west, otherwise it is dry with clear spells around. temperatures 11 to 15 degrees or so. they are the minimum temperatures by the end of the night. friday another dry day coming up as that area of high pressure continues to flex its muscles. could see an odd patch of rain, though, across the western isles, perhaps, with some thicker cloud here. but otherwise sunshine, and in the sunshine it is getting warmer. 2a in aberdeen, 26 the top temperature for birmingham, cardiff and for london. and the weekend continues with a similar story. again, there could be a few patches of rain across the very far north—west of scotland, where it is going to be a little bit cloudier, but away from that north—west corner, it is hot and it is sunny. temperatures 22 in belfast, warm in thejuly sunshine here, 27 for birmingham, 28 for both cardiff and london, and if anything, it gets even hotter again as we head into sunday. in fact, as we go through sunday afternoon, the highest temperatures
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could hit the 30 celsius mark, so some very hot weather indeed. but of course, all this heat means we�*ve got some very warm nights to come as well.
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this is bbc news, i�*m james reynolds. the headlines at 3: tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation�*s health. the money raised could extend free school meal provision. you�*re not going to break this link, this interaction between our appetite forjunk food and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. but the prime minister responded coolly this morning to the idea of a salt and sugar tax. lam not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard—working people. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then health secretary matt hancock embracing his former aide gina coladangelo. police say at least 42 people have died — and dozens are missing — after unprecedented
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flooding in western germany. borisjohnson says his plans for ending inequalities in the uk won�*t make richer areas poorer. give musicians a fair share of the hundreds of millions of pounds record labels earn from streaming, say a group of mps. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. there are fresh calls for sugar and salt taxes to be introduced in england and for vegetables to be prescribed on the nhs. it�*s part of a wide—ranging review into the nation�*s health and eating habits, which was commissioned by the government in 2019. the review is calling for what it calls "historic reforms of the food system", which it says are needed to protect the nhs and save the environment.
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let�*s take a look at the review�*s main proposals: a tax set at £3 per kilogram for sugar and £6 per kilogram for salt sold for use in processed foods and restaurants — which it says could raise as much as 5.6 billion a year. some of the money raised from these new taxes could be used to extend free school meals to families with a household income of £20,000 or less. there�*s also a recommendation that the government set a target to reduce the nation�*s meat consumption by 30% over ten years. and a suggestion that the government trial a programme which involves gps prescribing fruit and vegetables, as well as food education, to patients who are suffering the effects or poor diet or food insecurity. 0ur correspondent ellie price has more. maureen has got a number of physical and mental health issues. she knows she needs to eat more fresh food but it�*s something she can�*t afford without
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the help of a charity. if we had an ideal amount of fruit and veg in our diet, it would be easier to create stuff, i suppose, that was easy to eat. you need variety and it�*s the variety that costs. i could pay for it but it means something else has to go and it means we go in the red instead of staying in the black, and i can�*t cope with the worry of being in the red. today�*s reports says a poor diet contributes to 64,000 deaths every year in england alone and costs the economy an estimated £74 billion. there is an environmental impact too — globalfood production is the second biggest contributor to climate change. the report recommends a tax on sugary and salty foods. if producers don�*t change their recipes to use less, it could mean a price increase of 15 to 25% for desserts, biscuits and sweets. there have been 14 previous obesity plans in this country and almost all of them have been voluntary
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measures and you are not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies unless you tackle it directly and that is what we are recommending with the sugar and salt reformulation tax. it's not a tax to increase price, it's a tax to make companies reformulate, as they did with the sugary drinks tax, they take the bad stuff out. but this morning, the prime minister appeared to oppose the idea. there are doubtless i some good ideas in it. we believe in tackling obesity, - trying to help people to lose weight with promoting exercise and tackling junk food advertising and so on. - lam not, i must say, _ attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard—working people. many in the food industry agree. there have already been some quite big changes and that goes across from curry sauces through to breakfast cereals, so we are already seeing those
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changes, but the changes do take time and they are expensive to make, because you want to make it right so that people still buy the product and they still taste great. i think we already have those programmes and i don�*t think that taxing companies will help them move them along. the report also recommends greater use of projects like this one. cathy runs the charity care merseyside, involved in what�*s called social prescribing. patients are referred by their local gp and then offered things like exercise support, cooking advice and even fresh food. from the point of referral, we assess a person's needs, we assess what it is they need support with and we offer them a various range of levels of support. what our aim to do is to reduce gp consultations, to reduce hospitalisations and to try and tackle, in a holistic way, how to help people improve their health and wellbeing. the national food strategy
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estimates its recommendations would cost around £1.4 billion a year and bring in up to £3.4 billion a year in tax revenue. for the report�*s author, the cost of doing nothing would be terrible damage the environment and to our bodies. ellie price, bbc news. computers and electronic devices have been seized from two residential properties in the south of england as part of an investigation into the leaking of cctv images of the former health secretary matt hancock. 0ur political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. what more do we know? this relates to that image — what more do we know? this relates to that image of— what more do we know? this relates to that image of matt _ what more do we know? this relates to that image of matt hancock - to that image of matt hancock captured on cctv hugging his colleague. that led to his resignation, gina coladangelo quit herjobs at the department of health
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and social care too. but there was concern about how the images front their way on to the front—page of their way on to the front—page of the sun newspaper injune. now, today what we are hearing is that the information commissioner�*s office has confirmed it is investigating an alleged data breach and the company that provides cctv had submitted a breach report saying that the, alleging the images were taken from the department of health cctv system without its consents or the consent of the department of health. the result of that is the investigation is that two residential properties in the south of england have been searched by teams from the information commissioner�*s office and computers and electronic devices have been seized. the director of investigations said it was vital
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that all people had trust and confidence in the protection of their personal data captured by cctv. a spokesperson at the department of health said it takes the security of its system seriously and the department will continue to engage and co—operation with the commissioner�*s office. we have contacted the company who provide the cctv at the department of health, but the not —— but they have not come back to us yet. at least 30 people are reported to have been killed and 70 are missing after heavy rain and flooding caused widespread damage in western germany. at least four people died when their houses were swept away in the village of schuld. the region has seen record—high rainfall over the past 24 hours. damien mcguinness reports. these are the worst floods to hit this part of western germany in living memory.
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translation: our community centre wasjust crushed and is stuck to the bridge over there and a 40 tonne truck must be stuck there as well. a housejust standing over there tilted over entirely. you can imagine this sort of thing happening in asia, but not here. at least a dozen people are thought to have died and more than 70 are still missing. buildings collapsed, whole villages almost destroyed and cars swept away, as streets were turned into raging rivers. dozens of people were trapped on the roofs of their houses, waiting for rescue and almost 150,000 homes lost electricity. the whole country is affected. parts of the rhine have now been closed to shipping and across large parts of germany, traffic and rail transport is heavily disrupted. over the past 24 hours, this densely—populated region saw record levels of rainfall. the heavy rain comes after an unusually stormy summer, causing rivers
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to burst their banks. the impact is being felt elsewhere in europe too. across the border in belgium, buildings were also destroyed as a river burst its banks. at least two people there have died. in western germany, the rain has eased off for now and local people are having to deal with the aftermath, but with so many missing it�*s also still an emergency situation. with more rain expected in southern germany later today and rivers also at dangerously high levels, other regions are preparing for the worst. after a summer of unusually heavy rains and unpredictable weather, many in germany are already linking these floods to climate change. the prime minister has insisted that his "levelling up" plan is a "win—win" for the whole of the uk and won�*t make "rich" areas poorer in order to benefit the most deprived. in a wideranging speech in coventry, borisjohnson said the project, which includes new transport infrastructure and the promise of £50 million of investment in football pitches, was a "huge undertaking",
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as iain watson reports. just after the last election boris johnson invaded what was once enemy territory and this part was represented by a labour prime minister. :, , :, , minister. people may have been breakina minister. people may have been breaking the _ minister. people may have been breaking the voting _ minister. people may have been breaking the voting habits - minister. people may have been breaking the voting habits of. breaking the voting habits of generations to vote for us. the conservatives _ generations to vote for us. the conservatives didn't just take tony conservatives didn�*tjust take tony blair�*s old constitution of sedgefield, but a swathe of seats in the north and midlands with a promise the government could level “p promise the government could level up those places that felt they were missing out. but polling suggests people are not clear what levelling up people are not clear what levelling up means and today the prime minister sent himself to coventry to try to define it. minister sent himself to coventry to try to define it— try to define it. even knows that talent and _ try to define it. even knows that talent and energy _ try to define it. even knows that talent and energy and _ try to define it. even knows that l talent and energy and enthusiasm try to define it. even knows that - talent and energy and enthusiasm and flair are evenly spread across the
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uk. evenly spread. it is opportunity thatis uk. evenly spread. it is opportunity that is not. the uk. evenly spread. it is opportunity that is not. :,, , uk. evenly spread. it is opportunity that is not. , :, uk. evenly spread. it is opportunity that is not-— that is not. the loss of one seat in the south has _ that is not. the loss of one seat in the south has made _ that is not. the loss of one seat in the south has made some - that is not. the loss of one seat in the south has made some of- that is not. the loss of one seat in the south has made some of the l that is not. the loss of one seat in - the south has made some of the boris johnson�*s mps nervous. they fear that a focus on northern england may mean traditional tory voters feel they�*re missing out. the prime minister said it can be all things to all people. minister said it can be all things to all people-— minister said it can be all things to all people. you don't think you make the poor — to all people. you don't think you make the poor parts _ to all people. you don't think you make the poor parts of _ to all people. you don't think you make the poor parts of country i to all people. you don't think you | make the poor parts of country by making the rich parts poorer. it is not a jam—spreading operation. its not a jam—spreading operation. its not zero sum, it is win—win. to not zero sum, it is win-win. to emphasise _ not zero sum, it is win—win. to emphasise he was facing the future, borisjohnson was at a project developing batteries for electric cars and asked local authority leaders to drive forward the agenda. labour accused the prime minister of making empty promises. tts
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labour accused the prime minister of making empty promises.— making empty promises. its always “am making empty promises. its always jam tomorrow— making empty promises. its always jam tomorrow in _ making empty promises. its always jam tomorrow in areas _ making empty promises. its always jam tomorrow in areas in _ making empty promises. its always jam tomorrow in areas in the - making empty promises. its always| jam tomorrow in areas in the north, in areas _ jam tomorrow in areas in the north, in areas in _ jam tomorrow in areas in the north, in areas in my— jam tomorrow in areas in the north, in areas in my background, we have had severe — in areas in my background, we have had severe cuts, our children have seen _ had severe cuts, our children have seen the _ had severe cuts, our children have seen the free school meals taken away _ seen the free school meals taken away and — seen the free school meals taken away and even their own government advise _ away and even their own government advise on— away and even their own government advise on the catch up money it is only 10%— advise on the catch up money it is only 10% of— advise on the catch up money it is only 10% of what he said is needed. he is— only 10% of what he said is needed. he is saying — only 10% of what he said is needed. he is saying sound bites. only 1096 of what he said is needed. he is saying sound bites.— he is saying sound bites. there are aotentiall he is saying sound bites. there are potentially huge — he is saying sound bites. there are potentially huge rewards _ he is saying sound bites. there are potentially huge rewards for - he is saying sound bites. there are potentially huge rewards for boris l potentially huge rewards for boris johnson if he can spread wealth across the country, but turning around years of disadvantage is a long—term project and it may be difficult tojudge long—term project and it may be difficult to judge success by the time of the next election. the prime minister said we would have to wait until the autumn for the plans and this could determine the territory on which the next election is fought. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk is now higher than pre—pandemic levels in the three months tojune. data from the office for national statistics shows there were 862,000 jobs on offer between april and june.
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that�*s over 77,000 more than the first three months of 2020. the 0ns says the rise is being fuelled by vacancies in hospitality and retail. the figures also show companies are hiring at a quick pace. there were 356,000 more workers on payrolls injune. that�*s the biggest rise since the start of the pandemic. however the figure is still over 200,000 down on pre—pandemic levels and stands at 28.9 million. the 0ns also said that the unemployment rate was 4.8% between march and may. the headlines on bbc news: tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation�*s health. the money raised could fund more free school meals. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then health secretary matt hancock embracing his former aide gina coladangelo. at least 42 people have died and dozens are missing after unprecedented flooding
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in western germany. the government has defended the decision to put majorca and ibiza on the amber list for travellers from england — just two weeks after they were moved to green. it means that — from monday morning — most holidaymakers returning to the uk from the spanish islands will have to isolate for ten days unless they�*re fully vaccinated. theo leggett reports. it is just over two weeks since the government gave the go—ahead for travel to the sun, sea and sand of the balearic islands, but now a change in the rules means that a summer getaway to ibiza or majorca hasjust become more difficult for some. the government has a traffic light system. countries with low levels of covid infections go on to a greenlist, you can travel there without having to quarantine on your return. four countries will be added to the list on monday, including croatia and hong kong. but the balearics will be removed. a rise in infections means they have
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been placed on the amber list. as of monday, whether you have to quarantine or not will depend on your vaccination status. and then there is the red list. travellers from these regions have to quarantine in designated hotels. four more countries, including cuba, have justjoined that list. the problem is, the rules are not quite the same for everybody. while most older people are fully vaccinated and could go on holiday to an amber list country without having to isolate on their return, many young people have not had their second dose of vaccine yet, which means they would have to go into isolation. i had one vaccine three weeks ago and i know from monday people who are double vaccinated do not need to quarantine when they return from amber list countries. however, i will need to quarantine. 0bviously that is not great for my mental health, but i�*m very lucky i can work from home. airlines and travel companies have also expressed frustration at the frequent changes,
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which they claim are deterring people from making bookings. but some within the industry say the restrictions do have public support. these decisions are chopping and changing. i think from the government's point of view, i think they can be very confident that these are popular measures in the population as a whole, even though it is catastrophic if you are that part of the population that wishes to go to the mediterranean on holiday. the government so far has been unrepentant. ministers have already warned that travel this summer will be far from normal and they say holiday—makers should be ready to cancel their plans at any moment. theo leggett, bbc news. bringing you up—to—date with the floods— bringing you up—to—date with the floods in— bringing you up—to—date with the floods in europe. we heard about the situation _ floods in europe. we heard about the situation in _ floods in europe. we heard about the situation in germany where more than 30 people _ situation in germany where more than 30 people have been killed in floods — 30 people have been killed in floods. there is a situation in belgium _
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floods. there is a situation in belgium. the belgian authorities according to our report are urging residentses to quit the flood threatened liege river front. germany's chancellor, angela merkel, is travelling _ germany's chancellor, angela merkel, is travelling in the united states, we are _ is travelling in the united states, we are expecting her to speak shortly — we are expecting her to speak shortly. that is where she will speak— shortly. that is where she will speak in— shortly. that is where she will speak in washington. she has been planning _ speak in washington. she has been planning to hold talks with president biden. if she does mention the floods. _ president biden. if she does mention the floods, we shall bring that to you _ the south african government is increasing the number of troops on the streets to 25,000 in response to widespread looting and violence sparked by the jailing of the former president, jacob zuma. at least 72 people have died and more than 1,700 people have been arrested since the violence erupted. 0ur correspondent vumani mkhize is in the coastal city of durban. how are things today, please? thankfully here in durban and in
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area things have largely quietened down. that is a relief for security forces and the public. 0ver down. that is a relief for security forces and the public. over the past few days we have seen numerous shopping centres and businesses being ransacked and looted. today it has been quiet. i spent most of the afternoon at a shopping centre, where residents were queueing for food and for basic essentials, because that is what we are seeing in some parts of durban. many shops have been looted and they have no food and so therefore people are having to line up for the basic necessities. we have seen fuel as well running short. so it is quite a desperate situation at the moment up untilfood and fuel can desperate situation at the moment up until food and fuel can be restored to some form of normality. the disturbances _
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to some form of normality. the disturbances were _ to some form of normality. the disturbances were sparked by the imprisonment of former president, jacob zuma, for our audience in the uk, can you bring us up—to—date with how influential he is and why an imprisonment of him might have caused all this?— imprisonment of him might have caused all this? :, ~ . :, : :, , :, caused all this? yeah, mrjacob zuma is very influential, _ caused all this? yeah, mrjacob zuma is very influential, particularly - caused all this? yeah, mrjacob zuma is very influential, particularly in - is very influential, particularly in his home province. mr zuma was imprisoned after failing to appear for a contempt of court charge, for failing to appear at a commission of inquiry, which he had set up as president. after he failed to appear, then he was stepsed to 15 —— sentenced to 15 months in imprisonment. that has caused his supporters to start rioting within the area and these protests spread to other parts of the country, where he also still has a number of support. so mr zuma, although he is no longer president, he maintains
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quite a significant amount of support within a certain faction of the governing african national congress party, which is still in support of him and we see the factions aligned with cyril ramaphosa, who is touted as somebody fighting corruption in the government and the anc being pitted against each other. mr zuma�*s jailing has been quite a significant impact in terms of how the country�*s security essentially is at the moment. but thankfully the situation has calmed down as we have seen through the day, where we have not seen any violence. t5 it through the day, where we have not seen any violence.— seen any violence. is it fair to say it is a battle _ seen any violence. is it fair to say it is a battle between _ seen any violence. is it fair to say it is a battle between two - seen any violence. is it fair to say it is a battle between two anc- it is a battle between two anc rivals? tt it is a battle between two anc rivals? , , ~ it is a battle between two anc rivals? , , ,, :, , rivals? it seems like it. it does seem like _ rivals? it seems like it. it does seem like it. _ rivals? it seems like it. it does seem like it. mr _ rivals? it seems like it. it does
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seem like it. mr ramaphosa i rivals? it seems like it. it does. seem like it. mr ramaphosa has rivals? it seems like it. it does - seem like it. mr ramaphosa has been on an anticorruption campaign. that is why he was elected as president of the country and as the president of the country and as the president of the country and as the president of the african national congress, thatis of the african national congress, that is the governing par party. he ran on a ticket of battling corruption and helping the economy that has been battered after mr zuma�*s rule as president. many south africans has been very tired and angry regarding how the country was governed. but at the same time, mr zuma�*s faction has been fighting back, because they can see that cyril ramaphosa is relentless in fighting corruption and they have been fighting that in terms of trying to reclaim ground in the african national congress and in certain government departments. thank you. scientists are warning
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that the nhs could be pushed to breaking point this winter by the threat from three respiratory viruses, including covid. a report from the academy of medical sciences says action is needed now to prevent that and calls for extra staff and capacity in the health service. here s our health correspondent catherine burns. empty streets and deserted stations — lockdown was our first defence in the pandemic, as people stayed at home to stop covid spreading. at the same time, it prevented us catching other viruses, too. but as we�*re about to ease into something closer to life as normal, researchers are worried that we could see a resurgence in flu cases this winter. a reasonable worst case scenario would be about two times more cases than normal — enough to potentially see tens of thousands of extra deaths. they�*re also concerned that the burden from rsv, another virus that often affects children and the elderly, could double too. winter is always a pressurised time
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for the nhs, and that�*s before considering covid and the record backlog of patients waiting for treatments. but researchers say much depends on what we do between now and then. so, as well as covid, they�*re calling for tests for flu and rsv at the same time, arguing that the technology exists and it�*s just a question of logistics. it�*s very important to be able to identify when you�*ve got several different viruses transmitting at the same time, which one it is that people have got. and if you can do that, of course, you can look after them better. another recommendation is to prioritise vaccines. whether for a covid, any possible boosterjabs in the autumn, or flu vaccines for anybody eligible. the report also stresses the importance of making sure people can afford to isolate if they�*re infected. but there�*s a lot of focus too, on what people can do to help
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themselves and others. because the steps we�*ve taken to protect ourselves from covid like masks, social distancing and fresh air, can only help with other respiratory viruses too. catherine burns, bbc news. angela merkel is now speaking in washington. in the last few minutes, according to reuters she has expressed her solidarity by those affected by flooding in her country and calls it a catastrophe. she said many countries are offering help. a reminder more than 30 people have been killed in flooding in western germany. been killed in flooding in western german . �* , :, been killed in flooding in western german . �*, :, :, been killed in flooding in western german. �*, :, :, :, been killed in flooding in western german . �*, :, :, :, :, germany. let's move on to other stories. germany. let's move on to other stories- the — germany. let's move on to other stories. the number _ germany. let's move on to other stories. the number of _ germany. let's move on to other stories. the number of people i germany. let's move on to other i stories. the number of people being told to test and trace has
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increased. alerts were have increased. alerts were have increased by 46%. alerts were have increased by 46%. managers at the uk�*s biggest car plant — nissan in sunderland — have said that production has been affected by hundreds of staff being forced to isolate, after being "pinged" by the nhs covid app. it�*s understood that around 10% of the 6,000—strong workforce has been sent home. four people have been arrested after england footballers were racially abused online following their euro 2020 final defeat. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were targeted after they missed penalties in the euro 2020 final. police say social media companies are working closely with them as they investigate those responsible. police are now treating the death of a newborn baby boy found in a canal as murder. the discovery was made in may in a country park near walsall. a reward s being offered for information. some of britain s biggest high street banks are refusing to give mortgages to furloughed workers, and to self—employed people who took out covid grants during the pandemic. that s despite the banking watchdog saying that the payments should not prevent people from being able to access credit.
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sarah corker reports. swapping the city for the country — lockdown has left people yearning for green spaces and bigger homes. over the past year the uk has had a property boom. but some people who took out covid support during the pandemic, like the grant for the self—employed or furlough, say they�*re being locked out of the market. i almost feel like i�*m being treated like a bankrupt in some way, you know, that i�*m being penalised that strongly for something that wasn�*t my fault. in lincolnshire, lisa says she can�*t get a mortgage because she was previously furloughed and works in hospitality. she is back full—time, but is still being turned down by lenders. i just feel really unfairly penalised, if the truth be told. furlough has been brilliant in that it�*s protected myjob, because i would have lost that, but i didn�*t then expect to come out the other side, as you say, to have a deposit and no debt and all of the things that theoretically should make me
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an idealfirst—time buyer, only to find out that banks and building societies just will not lend to me at all, so ijust feel really let down, really let down by it. the bbc asked all the major banks and building societies about their policies. most of them don�*t accept mortgage applications from people currently on furlough or wouldn�*t include furloughed income when looking at affordability. there are tighter rules for the 5 million self—employed too. natwest and the royal bank of scotland won�*t even consider people who have taken out the government�*s self—employment grant in the last year. others, like metro bank and santander, are asking for larger deposits. when the government announced this support package they did explicitly say that it wouldn't affect your credit score or your chances of getting a mortgage. in reality however, lenders and their underwriters are looking at it, and we have seen evidence that they are taking this into account and in some cases it is counting against people taking a mortgage.
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uk finance represents the industry. it told us lenders must carry out thorough income assessments to make sure mortgages are affordable in the long term. decisions are made on a case—by—case basis. but there are concerns that people working in hospitality and travel are increasingly being seen as high risk. back in lincolnshire, lisa says she�*ll now have to spend a big chunk of her deposit on finding a new property to rent. i genuinely feel that the opportunity own my own home has gone — and it�*s devastating. lisa harding ending that report, by sarah corker. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. hello. the best of the sunshine today is across northern areas, this is cumbria earlier in the day. there is
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some cloud, but it is thin and that should break up later this afternoon and into the evening. whether sunshine comes out, it will feel warm, temperatures pushing on into the mid 20s. 0vernight tonight, there will be more cloud in northern ireland and western scotland and it will be another warm night. these are the lowest temperatures, 15 degrees in belfast. a warm start to the day on friday, another date with plenty of sunshine for most of us, but across the far north—west we could see some cloud and the odd spot of rain, but it is increasingly hot into the weekend. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation�*s health. the money raised could extend free school meal provision.
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you�*re not going to break thisjunk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies unless you tackle it directly. but the prime minister responded coolly this morning to the idea of a sugar and salt tax. iam not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on ha rd—working people. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then health secretary matt hancock embracing his former aide gina coladangelo. police say at least 42 people have died — and dozens are missing — after unprecedented flooding in western germany. and the prime minister says his plans for ending inequalities in the uk won�*t make richer areas poorer. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s lizzie. good afternoon.
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we�*re starting with the golf because the open championship is midway through the first round at royal st george�*s in kent. despite its notorious difficulties, the course is playing well. the south african and 2010 open winner louis 0ustguizen is out in front, he�*s on six under par. the best of the british players are andy sullivan, justine rose, danny willet and jack senior all in the clubhouse on three under par. rory mcilroy has just started his first round along with american patrick reed. mcilroy�*s looking for his second career claretjug. there are highlights on bbc two at eight o�*clock this evening. it�*s nowjust six days until team gb�*s women�*s football squad get their 0lympics campaign under way against chile. head coach hege riise has today said that the team will have three captains, with england�*s steph houghton, wales�* sophie ingle and scotland�*s kim little chosen to lead out the side on a rotation basis. it�*s also been confirmed that the side will take the knee before all their games in tokyo. earlier this month, the rules around athletes protesting at the games were relaxed by the international olympic committee. the squad have said they "were all united" in their decision to make the gesture.
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it was a group consensus. there wasn�*t anyone specific, but i think we all feel strongly as individuals and as a team, and i think we all understand what has been going on and the discrimination, and we know we have a big part to play and i think it is important we use our platform is to help in anyway we can. the people that do not have the voice, they are who we are standing up voice, they are who we are standing up for. who we are standing up for. staying with the olympics and britain�*s men�*s tennis number one dan evans has had to pull out after testing positive for covid—19. jamie murray will take evans�* place in tokyo as doubles partner to neal skupski. it�*ll be murray�*s fourth 0lympics, having competed in beijing, london and rio. he partnered skupski on the atp tour last season, and they�*ve also played together in the davis cup. it�*s been announced today
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that the rugby league world cup in england will go ahead this autumn. the holders and favourites australia have yet to sign up, but organisers are confident they will now it�*s been agreed. it�*ll start in october with the men�*s, women�*s and wheelchair tournaments taking place simultaneously for the first time. games will be held at 21 venues with capacity crowds before the finals at old trafford in manchester in november. alun wynnjones has been named amongst the replacements for the british & irish lions�* final warm up game in south africa. the tour captain will have only been in the country a couple of days after making a remarkable comeback from dislocating his shoulder less than three weeks ago. last night, the lions suffered their first defeat of the tour, losing 17—13 to a very strong south africa "a" team, which included several of the springboks�* world cup—winning squad who were short of match practice after a covid outbreak. the first test is a week saturday. the indian wicketkeeper—batsman rishabh pant and a training assistant have both tested positive for covid—19, and are isolating
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from the rest of the squad. pant tested positive on 8thjuly after having a sore throat, but if he returns two negative tests, he may be able to travel to durham, where the team are due to enter a "bio—bubble" and begin training for the series against england. india are scheduled to play a tour match against a select counties xi on tuesday, and begin the five—match match test series on 4th august. that�*s all the sport for now. i�*ll have more for you in the next hour. thank you, lizzie. the music industry is weighted against artists, with even successful pop stars seeing "pitiful returns" from streaming, that�*s according to a group of mps. they�*re calling for a "complete reset" of the market, with musicians being given a "fair share" of the money that uk record labels earn from streaming. ramzan karmali reports. # freak out # le freak, c�*est chic. # the unmistakable sound of chic, with founder nile rodgers on guitar. he�*s notjust a performer though. he�*s composed and produced records
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for some of the biggest artists in history, from bowie to madonna, diana ross to daft punk, and he�*s responsible for the sale of millions of records worldwide. without the song, there is no music business. he was just one high profile star to appear before mps to explain why he thought the current music streaming system isn�*t fair. i put out a record with an artist and he had five million streams. five million streams was meaningless. it�*s incredible that a number like five million, or ten million, can be meaningless as far as what you take out economically. i mean, itjust doesn�*t make any sense. in a report out today, a group of mps has concluded the balance needs to be redressed. but several of the performers who gave evidence to the committee said many of their peers weren�*t speaking out against the status quo for fear of losing favour with major record labels and streaming services. streaming has clearly
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brought significant profits to the music industry. but as nile�*s business partner explains, the distribution of those profits is what�*s at the heart of the problem. the issue is not the streaming services themselves. they've saved the music industry. really what's happened is music has gone from being a discretionary purchase in the context of streaming, to now very much being a utility. that money is not being shared by the record companies on a fair and equitable basis with the artists. # now what you hear is not a test �*cos i�*m rapping to the beat. # the group of mps wants the government to order an investigation by the competition and markets authority to look at the impact of the dominance of the major music companies. they hope an overhaul of the streaming industry will help to create an environment where musicians get a fairer slice of the profits. ramzan karmali, bbc news.
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with me now is the songwriter and producer crispin hunt, who was in the �*90s band the longpigs. he�*s the chair of the ivors academy, which represents composers and has campaigned for streaming reform. thank you forjoining us. looking at your own band, how much do you make fun streaming and how much do you think would be fair to make from streaming?— think would be fair to make from streamina ? :, ~' i. :, :, streaming? thank you for having me, i make streaming? thank you for having me, i make very — streaming? thank you for having me, i make very little _ streaming? thank you for having me, i make very little from _ streaming? thank you for having me, i make very little from streaming. - i make very little from streaming. for example, from my own band, i make absolutely nothing because my record contract is still under a cube, even the record label will still be making money from those streams. since then, i have written an awful lot of songs for many successful people, it has been wonderful, but the music industry keeps on talking about how successful british streaming is and they say there are 200 british artists getting over 100 million streams. i have had that number and
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in less than my 18—year—old son does working in the local pub. —— and i earn less. working in the local pub. -- and i earn less-— working in the local pub. -- and i earn less. ~ :, :, :, , :, earn less. would you want to see a reset? we — earn less. would you want to see a reset? we are _ earn less. would you want to see a reset? we are incredibly _ earn less. would you want to see a reset? we are incredibly grateful. earn less. would you want to see a| reset? we are incredibly grateful to this committee _ reset? we are incredibly grateful to this committee and _ reset? we are incredibly grateful to this committee and it _ reset? we are incredibly grateful to this committee and it is _ reset? we are incredibly grateful to this committee and it is no - reset? we are incredibly grateful to this committee and it is no surprise j this committee and it is no surprise to any musician that when you have proper scrutinising and investigation into the music industry, it revealed in equity —— and in equity that the music industry is built upon. i think the truth is, streaming is replacing not only shops but broadcasts and radio and so songwriters and performers have had strong and valuable rights on which we have survived in broadcast and radio and those rights must be transferred to streaming otherwise people will lead the industry in their droves. do the
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--eole industry in their droves. do the people know — industry in their droves. do the people know this _ industry in their droves. do the people know this when - industry in their droves. do the people know this when they i industry in their droves. do the i people know this when they click industry in their droves. do the - people know this when they click on youtube to listen to one of your songs that this is not a deal that this is not fair? t songs that this is not a deal that this is not fair?— this is not fair? i think so, there was a fantastic _ this is not fair? i think so, there was a fantastic survey _ this is not fair? i think so, there was a fantastic survey done - this is not fair? i think so, there was a fantastic survey done of i was a fantastic survey done of primary schoolchildren and even the primary schoolchildren and even the primary schoolchildren and even the primary schoolchildren were making comments like, we think the artist must be paid fairly even though we love streaming. i think everybody apart from the pp! understand this needs reform. we are incredibly grateful to the select committee for calling this out. the promise of streaming is enormous and it should be aiming to create a flourishing music ecosystem, but under the current structures, because of the dominance and the application of 20th—century models, it has been forced into a fantastic 21st—century format, but it needs reform. i am so
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excited at this revolutionary report. excited at this revolutionary re -ort. :, excited at this revolutionary re-ort. :, ~ :, :, excited at this revolutionary re-ort. :, ~' :, :, :, excited at this revolutionary re-ort. :, ~ :, :, :, report. you know anyone who makes a livina from report. you know anyone who makes a living from streaming? _ report. you know anyone who makes a living from streaming? there - report. you know anyone who makes a living from streaming? there are - living from streaming? there are handful of people _ living from streaming? there are handful of people making - living from streaming? there are handful of people making a - living from streaming? there are j handful of people making a living off streaming, but as the report said, actually, the numbersjust do not add up and the deals people are underjust do not make economic sense. it is pitiful. as we heard in the select committee, there are hits writing songwriters driving movements in order to make ends meat and that isjust movements in order to make ends meat and that is just not right. fundamentally, the music industry used to be manufacturing industry and they are no longer that and they have to face the fact that they cannot expect to take manufacturing and distributing cut any more and those savings should be passed on to the people who actually make music because they drive the value. thank ou for because they drive the value. thank you forjoining _ because they drive the value. thank you forjoining us. _ because they drive the value. thank you forjoining us. and _ because they drive the value. thank you forjoining us. and we _
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because they drive the value. thank you forjoining us. and we do - because they drive the value. thank you forjoining us. and we do hope to have the chief executive of the pp! joining us later in this ppi joining us later in this programme. ppi joining us later in this programme. almost 7,000 people are waiting for life—saving transplants in the uk — the highest number in six years, according to nhs blood and transplant. their analysis, of the 12 months to march 2021, found some key services were forced to close during the first peak of the pandemic. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson reports. ambulance worker ted has spent his adult life helping strangers, but last year, a stranger saved him. months before the coronavirus pandemic, his health began to deteriorate. he was told he needed a new kidney and was put on the transplant waiting list. as someone waiting for an organ, you are already vulnerable, so the idea of going into a hospital to have an operation is terrifying, especially when you know that those hospitals are full of covid patients. when the first coronavirus wave struck the uk last march, it significantly
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disrupted nhs services. already a particularly complex area of medicine, organ transplants became even more challenging. stretched resources and fears about patients�* safety led to the number of operations falling significantly. new figures show 474 people in the uk died last year while waiting for an organ, a 26% increase compared to the previous year. analysis by nhs blood and transplant estimates 7000 people are now on a transplant list, the highest it has been in six years. the focus now is to get through the backlog as quickly as possible. it is really difficult for each and every one of those patients waiting for that transplant, waiting for a call to get the gift of life, and that is why it is really important that everybody has that conversation about organ donation and lets their family know what they would want to do if they were in the difficult and sad situation where they were given the option
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of organ donation. after months of waiting, last may, ted was told a donor had been found. up until the operation, i had been struggling to climb the stairs at home without having to stop and take a breath. i was getting very, very poorly and about a month and a half or two months later, i went out for a walk with my friend for eight miles and did not even notice it. ted had always dreamed of doing a road trip around scotland. as soon as he felt well enough, he set off with his partner and his dad. he has this message to his donor and theirfamily. i like to think that in some way, through thejob i do, i give back in a small part, you know, so that is the one way i consider that i am able to say thank you when i know that i can�*t say it in person. anna collinson, bbc news.
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major changes to covid rules in wales have been announced, which could mean life returns almost to normality within weeks. but some think restrictions are being lifted too quickly. 0ur reporter mark hutchings has been to meet a man who�*s still suffering from long—covid, and lost his wife to coronavirus. hello, gwyn. at home, gwyn tovey is doing his best to shape out a new life after the most punishing of years. the death of my wife, my mother being diagnosed with dementia and i got long covid. gwyn took up part—time warehouse work to buy his wife a mobility scooter for christmas. but he caught covid—19. the extent i thought that would go to, was that i would lose my part—timejob. i thought that would be it. you lost so much more? yes, everything. well, everything that mattered. rita got the virus too and died on new year�*s day in hospital. from the time my wife went in on the 10th of december, i didn�*t see her alive after that.
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how are you feeling today? his 94—year—old mother betty, who also caught covid while living with the couple, was discharged from hospital in february. back home, she has recovered from the virus despite other medical concerns. i was sorry to lose rita. she was my best friend. gwyn is looking after you? yeah, he is a good boy, a good son. struggling to find extra care for his mother, gwyn has his own complications as a consequence of thrombosis. he is worried the lessons of the past year haven�*t been learned. do we really need to push so hard to perhaps dispense with many of the benefits that have already accrued? where is the freedom coming from for those who are going to follow myself, my family, and catch the same virus and perhaps, for them,
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also have a death in the family? when gwyn and rita moved into the property, they called it theirforever home. now he is left with cherished memories. this was specifically for my wife. her crafting shed. and she is standing there at the door, queen of her domain, looking really... really happy. tremendous memory. mark hutchings, bbc news, carmarthenshire. let�*s get more on on boris johnson�*s so—called levelling up agenda now. the prime minister insists that his plans for reducing inequality across the uk won�*t make rich parts of the country poorer. mrjohnson is rejecting suggestions
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that the plan to boost investment in the midlands and the north will mean london and the south east losing out. i�*m joined now byjoan dixon, principal policy officer at the industrial communities alliance, also leader of labour group at derbyshire county council. thank you forjoining us. how far behind our some former industrial areas? taste behind our some former industrial areas? ~ :, :, , :, :, , areas? we have to remember that many ofthe areas? we have to remember that many of the areas industrial _ areas? we have to remember that many of the areas industrial communities - of the areas industrial communities represent are still suffering some of the legacy issues from the closures of the coalmines in the 90s and the steelworks and other big industries. and certainly, what you find only have recessions like we did in 2010, is that london and other big cities tend to bounce back faster than our sort of areas but it is really good because there has been so much emphasis on cities for a long time. it is really good to
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have a government that seems to want to genuinely engage with the whole of the country and acknowledge that all areas need to be able to contribute to the economy and need to have investment to grow. iloathed to have investment to grow. what would it take _ to have investment to grow. what would it take for _ to have investment to grow. what would it take for derbyshire to be as as sorry? t would it take for derbyshire to be as as sorry?— as as sorry? i think one of the thinas, as as sorry? i think one of the things, obviously _ as as sorry? i think one of the things, obviously today - as as sorry? i think one of the things, obviously today the i as as sorry? i think one of the - things, obviously today the prime minister has talked about leadership. there is a feeling that we have some strong leaders around the country for the metropolitan areas, such as andy street in the north—east and steve rotherham and andy burnham, and by not having some sort of devolution deal available to other parts of the country that we are losing out. that is really welcome. but the age—old problem is money and investment and speaking on behalf of local authorities, at the moment we have had a lot of one—off
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funding, whether they are talking about welcome money for the towns fund all the levelling up fun, but regeneration is notjust about infrastructure. it is about tackling the whole economic and social problems of an area and what we really need to see from the prime minister and what we will be looking forward to when he brings out the white paper is that there is long—term multi—yearfunding white paper is that there is long—term multi—year funding for local authorities so that they can make wires strategic plans for the future —— why is strategic plans for the future and deliver a long—term regeneration programme. the future and deliver a long-term regeneration programme.- the future and deliver a long-term regeneration programme. thank you for “oinina regeneration programme. thank you forjoining us- _ thank you forjoining us. britney spears has won the right to choose her own lawyer, as she fights to end a conservatorship that has controlled her life since 2008. she told a court her fatherjamie should be removed from his role in it, and charged with abuse of his position. she thanked her fans for their support and celebrated by doing cartwheels.
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britney spears has chosen the prominent hollywood lawyer mathew rosengart to represent her. he�*s a former federal prosecutor and his a—list clients include steven spielberg and actor sean penn. mr rosengart spoke to reporters following yesterday�*s hearing. first, i want to thank britney spears for her courage, her passion, her humanity. additionally, as everyone who was present today heard, as they heard onjune 23rd, her testimony was clear, it was lucid, it was powerful and it was compelling. second, i want to thank judge penny for her courtesy, her decency, her rulings, her respect for britney spears�* constitutional rights, which we believe have not been fully complied with over the past decade, potentially.
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my firm and i are going to be taking a top—to—bottom look at what�*s happened here over the past decade. back in february, a little bit of space landed on earth. a 4.5 billion—year—old meteorite was seen streaking across the sky, before crashing into a field in gloucestershire. members of one space charity were given special permission to go searching for fragments, and they�*re now recruiting scientists from around the world to help them analyse what they found. 0ur science correspondent richard westcott reports. from somewhere between the orbits ofjupiter and mars, to a muddy field in gloucestershire. these incredibly rare fragments of meteorite were found in a horseshoe print by derek here, a retired chemist and passionate astronomer, who was part of a cambridge team given special permission to search during lockdown. my dad died a few years ago, and at times of need i sometimes call out for his help and support.
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and just in the middle of the field ijust shouted out, "come on, dad, help us to find the meteorite." and within half an hour i had come across this blue black stone. we knew straightaway it was a meteorite, a fresh meteorite. ijust couldn�*t believe it. he has brought one piece to his friend david, whose unique sci—fi looking machines knock atoms off the sample so they can see what it is made of. what's really interesting is the thing is that we haven't seen, because we are not seeing anything lighter than carbon, lithium or boron. we are not seeing anything heavier than arsenic — like tin. there is an awful lot up there. and we don't see that. i keep trying to retire and winding down steadily, but when something like this comes along, it really stimulates the curiosity. and i can go back to my grandchildren and say,
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"i've got a bit of meteorite in the back. we are going to look at that today. isn't that interesting?" just up the road at loughborough university, derek has recruited more help. the machine shaun is using is magnifying the rock 18,000 times, producing these astonishing images that help them map the surface. the shape is incredibly and incredibly fragile. if you were to pick it up with your hand, it could crumble. it is very dusty. the material itself is just loosely held together, almost like talcum powder. slightly moist. it is basically dust from the early universe. so it has been stuck and froze in time. it has never had the opportunity to coalesce, to form a body. it�*s just been a loose clump in space. he has been working with materials chemist sandy, another one of derek�*s friends. the minerals we are finding
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in the meteorite are similar to those that we find on earth but a little bit different. that tells us the chemistry up there in outer space is a bit different to what we see on terrestrial earth. next, the cambridge team has offered samples to scientists in the us and germany. these tests could help answer a key question. did some of the ingredients that triggered life on earth arrive on rocks from outer space? richard westcott, bbc news, loughborough. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris. hello again. full uk forecast for the rest of this week and the weekend injusta moment, but first of all, i thought we would take a look at the extreme rainfall that has been affecting parts of europe, particularly some western areas of germany. some torrential downpours yesterday showing up on the radar picturejust to the south—west of bonn. how much rain fell? well, we had up to 158 millimetres of rain. this looks to be about three times as much rainfall we would expect in the whole of the month ofjuly
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and that fell in just the space of one day. those storms were kicked off by this upper area of low pressure that was stuck overhead in germany, whereas here in the uk, thejet stream pattern is ridged. what that does is it builds pressure. so this area of high pressure which is building across the uk is going to be with us through the rest of this week, the weekend and even influencing the weather into next week as well. it means we will have more scenes like this. it really has been a glorious day so far in parts of cumbria, whereas across central and eastern england, we do have some patches of cloud around. the cloud, though, is very thin, it�*s only about 300 metres thick, so there is a chance, i think, particularly later this afternoon and towards the evening time, it will break up and will see some sunshine coming through. but the best of the sunshine today is wales, south west england, northern ireland, scotland, eastern counties of northern ireland. 0vernight tonight, a bit more cloud pushes back into the north—west, otherwise it is dry with clear spells around. temperatures 11 to 15 degrees or so. they are the minimum temperatures
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by the end of the night. friday another dry day coming up as that area of high pressure continues to flex its muscles. could see an odd patch of rain, though, across the western isles, perhaps, with some thicker cloud here. but otherwise sunshine, and in the sunshine it is getting warmer. 24 in aberdeen, 26 the top temperature for birmingham, cardiff and for london. and the weekend continues with a similar story. again, there could be a few patches of rain across the very far north—west of scotland, where it is going to be a little bit cloudier, but away from that north—west corner, it is hot and it is sunny. temperatures 22 in belfast, warm in thejuly sunshine here, 27 for birmingham, 28 for both cardiff and london, and if anything, it gets even hotter again as we head into sunday. in fact, as we go through sunday afternoon, the highest temperatures could hit the 30 celsius mark, so some very hot weather indeed. but of course, all this heat means we�*ve got some very warm nights to come as well.
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this is bbc news. i�*m james reynolds. the headlines at 4pm. police say at least 42 people have died and dozens are missing after unprecedented flooding in western germany. translation: in western german . : :, , translation: in western german . , : was translation: our community centre was crushed. _ translation: our community centre was crushed, and _ translation: our community centre was crushed, and it _ translation: our community centre was crushed, and it is _ translation: our community centre was crushed, and it is stuck _ translation: our community centre was crushed, and it is stuck to - translation: our community centre was crushed, and it is stuck to the - was crushed, and it is stuck to the bridge over there, and a 40 tonne truck must be stuck there as well. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then health secretary matt hancock embracing his then aide gina coladangelo. tax sugar and salt to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at tackling britain�*s obesity crisis. but the prime minister says he isn�*t keen on imposing such taxes. borisjohnson has also been speaking about his plans for ending inequalities in the uk — he says it won�*t make richer areas poorer.
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give musicians a fair share of the hundreds of millions of pounds record labels earn from streaming, say a group of mps. at least 42 people have died and many more are missing after severe floods in western germany. at least four people died when their houses were swept away in the village of schuld. the region has seen record—high rainfall over the past 24 hours. the worst—affected district has been ahrweiler, in the state of rhineland—palatinate, where 18 people have died. the netherlands have also been badly
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affected and in belgium six people are known to have died, with the city of liege urging all residents to leave. the germany chancellor angela merkel says she�*s had messages of solidarity from other countries, who have also offered help. and in the past few minutes, borisjohnson says his thoughts are with the families of the victims and those affected, and that the uk is ready to provide any support needed in the rescue and recovery effort. damian mcguinness reports. these are the worst floods to hit this part of western germany in living memory. translation: our community centre was just crushed and is stuck to the bridge over there and a 40 tonne truck must be stuck there as well. a housejust standing over there tilted over entirely. you can imagine this sort of thing happening in asia, but not here. at least a dozen people are thought to have died and more than 70 are still missing. buildings collapsed,
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whole villages almost destroyed and cars swept away, as streets were turned into raging rivers. dozens of people were trapped on the roofs of their houses, waiting for rescue and almost 150,000 homes lost electricity. the whole country is affected. parts of the rhine have now been closed to shipping and across large parts of germany, traffic and rail transport is heavily disrupted. over the past 24 hours, this densely—populated region saw record levels of rainfall. the heavy rain comes after an unusually stormy summer, causing rivers to burst their banks. the impact is being felt elsewhere in europe too. across the border in belgium, buildings were also destroyed as a river burst its banks. at least two people there have died. in western germany, the rain has eased off for now and local people are having to deal with the aftermath, but with so many missing, it�*s also still an emergency situation.
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with more rain expected in southern germany later today and rivers also at dangerously high levels, other regions are preparing for the worst. after a summer of unusually heavy rains and unpredictable weather, many in germany are already linking these floods to climate change. so what do we know about the weather systems causing the flooding in germany and belgium? bbc weather forecaster nick miller gave this explanation. this is the same weather systems that brought severe flooding to london on monday. it is now across central parts of europe. it�*s an area of low pressure. you can see it on the satellite picture, with these bands of clouds swirling around it, and that cloud delivering bands of heavy, torrentialflooding rain. this is the radar picture, the rainfall as it developed during wednesday, and particularly wet across parts of germany, as we have seen, with severe impacts as a result. but also heavy rain in parts of the netherlands, belgium, france too, switzerland, with torrential and in places flooding downpours.
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worse hit, though, were those parts of germany that saw 100 to 150 millimetres of rain. they are 24 hour rain totals, but a lot of that fell in a much shorter space of time, and well above what you would normally get for the entire month ofjuly. that area of low pressure is still around on thursday. it is a bit weaker. the downpours may not be quite as intense, and then over the weekend, it slowly makes its way towards the south and south—east of europe. again, with the impact for flooding for some of these downpours, but moving away from those areas of europe which had the worst of it for the past few days. britain has new cases reported on thursday. arise from day to day of 5000 cases there, although we would
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have to look at the weekly average as well in terms of deaths, britain has reported 63 new covid 19 deaths, compared with 409a.d last week. computers and electronic devices have been seized from two residential properties in the south of england as part of an investigation into the leaking of cctv images of the former health secretary matt hancock. our political correspondent helen catt has the latest. that helen catt has the latest. image of matt hancock, health that image of matt hancock, then the health secretary, captured apparently on cctv kissing his eight gina colangelo, apparently on may the sets come at a time when government guidance that they shouldn�*t be hugging people from outside your household or support bubble. that led ultimately to matt hancock�*s resignation, gina colangelo quit herjob at the department of health and social care is warmer, but there was a lot of concern at the time about how those images have found their way onto the front page of the sun newspaper on
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the 25th ofjune. today, what we are hearing is that the information commissioner�*s office has confirmed it is investigating an alleged data breach, that the firm which provides cctv to the department of health had submitted what it called a breach report to the ico, saying that the elected images were taken from the department of health cctv system without its consent and without the consent of the department of health. now, as you said, the result of that is that investigation is to residential properties in the south of england have been searched today from teams from the information commissioners office, and computers and electronic devices been seized. the director of investigations at the icc the director of investigations at the ico said it was vital that all people, including employees and visitors to public buildings, have trust and confidence in the protection of their personal data captured by cctv. i have spoken as well to the department of health.
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the spokesperson said it takes of his office personnel systems extreme and seriously, and the department will continue engage and cooperate with the information commissioners office the information provided. we have also provided the providers of the cctv, and they haven�*t got back to us yet. sugar and salt should be taxed, and fruit and vegetables prescribed by the nhs in order to improve our diets, an independent review has said. the report, led by the businessman henry dimbleby, says the taxes raised could also be used to extend free school meals to more children. mr dimbleby said that poor eating habits cause "horrific health harms." but the food industry says new taxes could increase the price of food, and when asked about the review, borisjohnson said that he is "not in favour" of raising taxes on food. here�*s our correspondent, ellie price. maureen has got a number of physical and mental health issues. she knows she needs to eat more fresh food but it�*s something she can�*t afford without the help
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of a charity. if we had an ideal amount of fruit and veg in our diet, it would be easier to create stuff, i suppose, that was easy to eat. you need variety and it�*s the variety that costs. i could pay for it but it means something else has to go and it means we go in the red instead of staying in the black, and i can�*t cope with the worry of being in the red. today�*s reports says a poor diet contributes to 64,000 deaths every year in england alone and costs the economy an estimated £74 billion. there is an environmental impact too — globalfood production is the second biggest contributor to climate change. the report recommends a tax on sugary and salty foods. if producers don�*t change their recipes to use less, it could mean a price increase of 15 to 25% for desserts, biscuits and sweets. there have been 14 previous obesity plans in this country and almost all of them have been voluntary
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measures and you are not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies unless you tackle it directly, and that is what we are recommending with the sugar and salt reformulation tax. it's not a tax to increase price, it's a tax to make companies reformulate, as they did with the sugary drinks tax, they take the bad stuff out. but this morning, the prime minister appeared to oppose the idea. there are doubtless i some good ideas in it. we believe in tackling obesity, - trying to help people to lose weight with promoting exercise and tackling junk food advertising and so on. - lam not, i must say, _ attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard—working people. many in the food industry agree. there have already been some quite big changes and that goes
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across from curry sauces through to breakfast cereals, so we are already seeing those changes, but the changes do take time and they are expensive to make, because you want to make it right so that people still buy the product and they still taste great. i think we already have those programmes and i don�*t think that taxing companies will help them move them along. the report also recommends greater use of projects like this one. cathy runs the charity care merseyside, involved in what�*s called social prescribing. patients are referred by their local gp and then offered things like exercise support, cooking advice and even fresh food. from the point of referral, we assess a person's needs, we assess what it is they need support with and we offer them a various range of levels of support. what our aim to do is to reduce gp consultations, to reduce hospitalisations and to try and tackle, in a holistic way, how to help people improve their health and wellbeing. the national food strategy estimates its recommendations
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would cost around £1.4 billion a year and bring in up to £3.4 billion a year in tax revenue. for the report�*s author, the cost of doing nothing would be terrible damage the environment and to our bodies. ellie price, bbc news. minette batters is the president of the national farmers�* union and shejoins me now from wiltshire. there was a specific recommendation for farming there was a specific recommendation forfarming in this report. the suggestion we need to reduce meat consumption by 30% by 2032. do you agree with that? consumption by 3096 by 2032. do you agree with that?— agree with that? there are many arts of agree with that? there are many parts of the _ agree with that? there are many parts of the report _ agree with that? there are many parts of the report that - agree with that? there are many parts of the report that i - agree with that? there are many parts of the report that i had - agree with that? there are many parts of the report that i had to i parts of the report that i had to agree with, but i think i would ambitious, but ultimately bog to create a new paradigm and run for it, but on the specific point that you raise, no, we don�*t agree with it. and if many nutritionists were
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on the skull talking to you, the british nutrition foundation, for instance, there has been so much scientific research that actually shows that meet and daily, fish, eggs are a vital part of a healthy, balanced diet. t�*m eggs are a vital part of a healthy, balanced diet.— eggs are a vital part of a healthy, balanced diet. i'm so sorry to “ump in, we balanced diet. i'm so sorry to “ump in. we — balanced diet. i'm so sorry to “ump in. we out i balanced diet. i'm so sorry to “ump in, we are out to i balanced diet. i'm so sorry to “ump in, we are out to talk * balanced diet. i'm so sorry to “ump in, we are out to talk about h in, we are out to talk about greenhouse gas emissions. t in, we are out to talk about greenhouse gas emissions. i was 'ust aoain to greenhouse gas emissions. i was 'ust going to come — greenhouse gas emissions. i was 'ust going to come on �* greenhouse gas emissions. i was 'ust going to come on to i greenhouse gas emissions. i was 'ust going to come on to that i greenhouse gas emissions. i was 'ust going to come on to that point i greenhouse gas emissions. i was 'ust going to come on to that point toh going to come on to that point to run greenhouse gas emission. what is missing here are the game changing innovations in livestock production that we believe will allow livestock farmers to get to a net zero by 2040. we have said, or 2050. we would never have said that if you felt it was about loading numbers. the new narratives that are coming online, the new genetics, the new tools effectively to lessen the livestock for production footprints are readily available now commands are readily available now commands are going to see changes in innovation in the next ten years
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more than we have seen to date. this is where we believe it goes on, because it is not about loading livestock numbers here. their national delight will be the national delight will be the national dat, and that is not for me to be influencing that or having a view, but it is about making sure that we maintain the same level. otherwise, this will put farmers out of business. but being what can be done differently, and we know in the next ten years, the next 20 years we are going to see those game changing technologies come on board that will lower emission. d0 technologies come on board that will lower emission.— technologies come on board that will lower emission. do you think you can do that by 2032? — lower emission. do you think you can do that by 2032? some _ lower emission. do you think you can do that by 2032? some viewers - lower emission. do you think you can | do that by 2032? some viewers might say it is an awful long time away, 2040, 2050, when this is an emergency. 2040, 2050, when this is an emergency-— 2040, 2050, when this is an emergency. 2040, 2050, when this is an emeraen . ~ i. :, emergency. when you look at where we are compared — emergency. when you look at where we are compared to — emergency. when you look at where we are compared to other— emergency. when you look at where we are compared to other countries, - emergency. when you look at where we are compared to other countries, we i are compared to other countries, we are compared to other countries, we are already a very long way down this road compared to them, sort by the town 2050 comes along, we will be able to be there with the right policies, the right incentives to
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face the real danger of penalising ourfarmers, exportabroad, and face the real danger of penalising ourfarmers, export abroad, and we import food that is produced to lower with higher emissions. that would be an absolute travesty and cannot be allowed to happen. that is why we at the national farmers�* union set net zero, we are in the external position of being the source of emissions, 10%, but with the right incentives we can do something about it and get to carbon neutral by 2040. the government has said, of course, 2050, but that is with maintaining the same livestock numbers. :, :, , ., numbers. there are a number of recommendations _ numbers. there are a number of recommendations in _ numbers. there are a number of recommendations in this - numbers. there are a number of recommendations in this report, j recommendations in this report, investing in research, dividing up land. do you welcome every recommendation? tt land. do you welcome every recommendation?— land. do you welcome every recommendation? it is a very comprehensive _ recommendation? it is a very comprehensive report, - recommendation? it is a very comprehensive report, and l recommendation? it is a very i comprehensive report, and you recommendation? it is a very - comprehensive report, and you had the prime minister today, thus starts the government discussion on a wide range of proposals. so, this is allowing a greater conversation across government. i think they made it very clear that they do not want to take aboard our recommendations,
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but there are some key ones. some of them are legally binding that the government faces on reporting on all aspects of trade deals. again, you wouldn�*t want to see our farmers being penalised here when we are importing food that is produced in lower standard. at present, the support has asked us government what their standards about the rougher environmental protection will be, and as david and will be so pointed out, we are yet to receive an answer. there are many parts of the report that a very positive. he talks a lot about provenance in this country, and the message above all else i think is if you want to have a balanced outcome by whole foods, natural foods, a balanced outcome by whole foods, naturalfoods, and a balanced outcome by whole foods, natural foods, and above all us by british come and look out for the logo. at least 42 people have died and dozens are missing after unprecedented flooding in western germany.
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electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then health secretary matt hancock embracing his former aide gina coladangelo. tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation�*s health. the money raised could fund more free school meals. the prime minister has insisted that his "levelling up" plan is a "win—win" for the whole of the uk and won�*t make rich areas poorer in order to benefit the most deprived. in a wideranging speech in coventry, borisjohnson said the project, which includes new transport infrastructure and the promise of £50 million of investment in football pitches, was a "huge undertaking," as iain watson reports. just after the last election, borisjohnson invaded what was once enemy territory, this part of north—east england was represented
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by a labour prime minister. i know people may have been breaking the voting habits of generations to vote for us. the conservatives didn�*t just take tony blair�*s old constituency of sedgefield, but a lot of seats in the north and midlands and promised that the government would level up the places that felt they were missing out on economic success. but polling suggests that people are not clear about what levelling up actually means. so today the prime minister sent himself to coventry to try to define it. everybody knows that talent and energy and enthusiasm and flare and energy and enthusiasm and flair are evenly spread across the uk. evenly spread. it is opportunity that is not. the loss of a seat in the south has made some of borisjohnson�*s mps nervous. they fear that a focus on northern england might mean traditional tory voters feel they�*re missing out and the prime minister
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said levelling up can be all things to all people. we don�*t think that you can make the poor parts of country richer by making the rich parts poorer. levels up is not a jam—spreading operation. it is not robbing peter to pay paul, it is win—win for the whole united kingdom. to emphasise he was facing the future, boris johnson was speaking at a project developing batteries for electric cars and invited local authority leaders to help drive the agenda. labour accused him of making empty promises. he said jam spreading, it is always jam tomorrow in areas in my background, we have had severe cuts we have seen free school meals taken and even their own advisor, of what thee advisor said.
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there are potential huge political rewards for borisjohnson if he can spread wealth more evenly, but turning around years of disadvantage is a long—term project and it may be difficult to judge success by the time of the next election. the prime minister said we would have to wait until the autumn for more detail of the plans and these could determine the territory on which the next election is fought. four people have been arrested after england footballers were racially abused online following their euro 2020 final defeat. marcus rashford, jadon sancho and bukayo saka were targeted after they missed penalties in the euro 2020 final. police say social media companies are working closely with them as they investigate those responsible. the number of people being told to self—isolate in england and wales by the nhs test and trace app has risen sharply, causing significant disruption to some workplaces. alerts were sent to more than 530,000 people last week, an increase of 46%.
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it comes as managers at the uk�*s biggest car plant, nissan, in sunderland, have said that production has been affected by hundreds of staff being forced to isolate, after being �*pinged�*. it�*s understood that around 10% of the 6000 strong workforce has been sent home. the government has defended the decision to put majorca and ibiza on the amber list for travellers from england just two weeks after they were moved to green. it means that, from monday morning, most holiday—makers returning to the uk from the spanish islands will have to isolate for ten days unless they�*re fully vaccinated. theo leggett reports. it is just over two weeks since the government gave the go—ahead for travel to the sun, sea and sand of the balearic islands, but now a change in the rules means that a summer getaway to ibiza or majorca hasjust become more difficult for some. the government has a traffic light system. countries with low levels of covid infections go on to a greenlist,
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you can travel there without having to quarantine on your return. four countries will be added to the list on monday, including croatia and hong kong. but the balearics will be removed. a rise in infections means they have been placed on the amber list. as of monday, whether you have to quarantine or not will depend on your vaccination status. and then there is the red list. travellers from these regions have to quarantine in designated hotels. four more countries, including cuba, have justjoined that list. the problem is, the rules are not quite the same for everybody. while most older people are fully vaccinated and could go on holiday to an amber list country without having to isolate on their return, many young people have not had their second dose of vaccine yet, which means they would have to go into isolation. i had one vaccine three weeks ago and i know from monday people who are double vaccinated do not need to quarantine when they return from amber list countries. however, i will need to quarantine.
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obviously that is not great for my mental health, but i�*m very lucky i can work from home. airlines and travel companies have also expressed frustration at the frequent changes, which they claim are deterring people from making bookings. but some within the industry say the restrictions do have public support. these decisions are chopping and changing. i think from the government's point of view, i think they can be very confident that these are popular measures in the population as a whole, even though it is catastrophic if you are that part of the population that wishes to go to the mediterranean on holiday. the government so far has been unrepentant. ministers have already warned that travel this summer will be far from normal and they say holiday—makers should be ready to cancel their plans at any moment. theo leggett, bbc news. the dutch crime reporter peter r de vries has died after being shot in amsterdam last week.
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the 64—year—old journalist was known for investigating organised crime. he was shot minutes after leaving a tv studio last tuesday, where he had appeared on a chat show. my colleague anna holligan is in amsterdam and said the news was what his family had dreaded. confirmed the family�*s very worst fears, but not just the family, this was one of the most acclaimed journalists here in the netherlands. peter r de vries made his name in the early 1980s, covering the kidnapping of freddy heineken, the beer magnate, but then he specialised in helping with cold cases, so solving child murders, disappearances, and i was at the scene last week shortly after he was shot outside the television studio around 7:30 local time, so in daylight. he became the victim of what he had spent his life reporting on and being involved in, assisting those who were involved in investigations and that kind of thing. and down at the scene where he was shot in the head multiple times.
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people have travelled all over in the netherlands, actually, to lay flowers and messages of support for him and his family. and in fact, we have had a statement from peter r de vries�*s family. they say peter fought to the end but was unable to win the battle. he was surrounded by the people who love him, he was when he died. he lived by his conviction, they say, "on bended knee is no way to be free." there has been a lot of discussion here in the netherlands since his shooting about the amount of security he had, whether it should have been more. but he absolutely said he would rather stand and fight than be hiding in a corner for his life. and that is the way that he has passed away. the family have now asked for privacy as they make arrangements for his funeral. the south african government is increasing the number of troops on the streets to 25,000 in response to widespread looting and violence sparked by the jailing of the former president,
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jacob zuma. at least 72 people have died and more than 1,700 people have been arrested since the violence erupted. earlier, i spoke to our correspondent vumani mkhize, who�*s in the coastal city of durban, about the current situation. thankfully here in durban and in gauteng as well, things have largely quietened down and that�*s quite a relief for security forces and for the general public at large. over the past four, five days we�*ve seen numerous malls, shopping centres and numerous businesses and warehouses being essentially ransacked and looted and being cleaned out. so thankfully today it�*s been really, really quiet. i spent most of the afternoon at a shopping centre where residents of durban north were queueing for food and for basic essentials because that�*s what we are seeing now in some parts of durban, because many shops have been looted and they�*ve got no food. so therefore people are actually having to line up for the basic necessities.
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we are also seeing fuel as well running short, so it�*s quite a desperate situation at the moment up until food and fuel can be restored again to some form of normality. the disturbances were sparked by the imprisonment of the former presidentjacob zuma, for our audience in the uk who don�*t always follow south african politics, can you bring us up today with how influential he is and why an imprisonment of him might have caused all this? yeah, mrjacob zuma is very influential, particularly in his home province of kwazulu—natal. and mr zuma was imprisoned after failing to appear... for a contempt of court charge, rather, for failing to appear at a commission of enquiry which he had set up as president. so after he failed to appear then he was sentenced to 15
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months imprisonment. that�*s essentially caused his supporters to start rioting within kwazulu—natal and then these protests spread to other part of the country in gauteng as well, where he also still has a number of supporters. so mr zuma, even though he is no longer president of the country, he maintains quite a significant amount of support within a certain faction of the governing african national congress party, which is still very much in support of him and we have seen the faction aligned with mr ciryl ramaphosa, who has been touted as someone who is fighting corruption within government and within the anc, also being pitted against each other. yeah, mr zuma�*sjailing has been quite a significant impact in terms of how the country�*s security, essentially, is at the moment. but thankfully the situation has calmed down a bit, as we have seen
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through the course of the day, where we haven�*t seen any acts of looting and violence. is it fair to describe this as a battle between two anc rivals, mr zuma and the current president, ramaphosa? it seems like it. it does seem like it, because ciryl ramaphosa, who is the current president, has really been on an anti—corruption campaign. that�*s why he was actually elected as the president of the country and as the president of the african national congress, which is the governing party. he ran on a ticket of anti—corruption, cleaning up the country and restoring the country�*s economy, which has been battered through around nine or ten years of mrjacob zuma�*s rule as the president. many south africans have been very tired and angry regarding how the country was governed and therefore we saw mr ramaphosa�*s election. but at the same time, mr zuma�*s faction has been fighting back because they can see ciryl ramaphosa is relentless
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in fighting corruption and therefore they have been fighting back in terms of trying to reclaim ground within the african national congress and also within certain government departments as well. just to bring you right up to date, we have seen a statement posted on twitter about the cayo sakho, the third of the players to miss a penalty on sunday. the arsenal star, who is only 19 has published this message, essentially he is saying he has stayed away from social media for a few days to spend time with his family, it was an honour to be part of the squad, he was disappointed with the result, and he also goes on, in the final paragraphs, to address the racist abuse that he jadon sancho and marcus rashford suffered afterward. for those who have campaigned on my behalf, i am so thankful. to the social media platforms, i don�*t want
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any child or adult to have to receive the hateful and hurtful messages that me, marcus and jadon sancho received the speak, and that is a sad reality that the powerful platforms are not doing enough to stop the messages. he goes on to say there is no place for racism or gait of any kind in football or in any area of society, and the majority of people coming together to call out the people sending those messages by taking action, by reporting comments to the police, by driving out the hate, we will win. love always wins. he signs a saka bakayo. now it�*s time for a look at the weather, with chris fawkes. the best at the sunshine is across northern areas of the uk. this was cumbria earlier in the day with lots of sunshine. cloud across eastern england, pretty thin but i am
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hopeful that will break up, more especially late this afternoon and towards the evening time as well. where the sunshine comes out it will feel warm. temperatures pushing into the mid 20s in the warmest spots. overnight it stays dry, cloud pushing into northern ireland and western scotland. it will be another warm night for sleeping and these are the lowest temperatures, 15 degrees in belfast and liverpool by the end of the night. a warm start to the day on friday and another day with plenty of sunshine for most. across the far north—west, slightly thicker cloud and the odd spot of rain. but for most, dry, sunny and increasingly hot. it gets hotter still into this weekend. hello this is bbc news. the headlines.
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that is the highest number of deaths reported in one day since march. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of the investigation into the leak of cct the footage showing matt hancock embracing his then aide. tax sugar and salt to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at tackling britain�*s obesity crisis. but the prime minister says he isn�*t keen on imposing such taxes. borisjohnson has also been speaking about his plans for ending inequalities in the uk. he says it won�*t make richer areas poorer now, let�*s get the sport. good afternoon. we�*re starting with the golf because the open championship is midway through the first
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round at royal st george�*s in kent. can we start with rory mcilroy, he looks like a man who means business, could this be his year? he looks like a man who means business, could this be his year?— could this be his year? he will be ho-ian could this be his year? he will be hoping so- _ could this be his year? he will be hoping so- he — could this be his year? he will be hoping so. he started _ could this be his year? he will be hoping so. he started off - could this be his year? he will be hoping so. he started off very, i could this be his year? he will be i hoping so. he started off very, very well. up to 32,000 fans here at royal st george�*s in sand wedge. it seems half of them are following rory mcilroy. he teed offjust over an hour ago rory mcilroy. he teed offjust over an hourago and rory mcilroy. he teed offjust over an hour ago and made a birdie on the very first hole. he nearly holed his second shot and is one under par through his first four holes. we are based on the second and it is very, very quiet right now. but when rory mcilroy came through around about 20 minutes ago, there were thousands of fans streaming through. before that we had england�*s tommy fleetwood. he hasn�*t made the best of starts, he is on one over par and they are trying to chase the south african,
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lily used haven. a six under par round of 64, one shot clear of brian harman and jordan spieth. just behind them are mackenzie hughes of canada, and anotherformer behind them are mackenzie hughes of canada, and another former champion in stewart cink. we have been talking for most of the day about just how hard this golf course is, about how tricky the conditions are, how long the rough is. we currently have 74 players level par or better, so they are not finding it tough and they are showing why they are the best. tote they are showing why they are the best. ~ :, :, , :, best. we will have to see what ha--ens best. we will have to see what happens with _ best. we will have to see what happens with the _ best. we will have to see what happens with the weather, - best. we will have to see what - happens with the weather, anything can happen at the open. the kyer sacko has released a statement on social media in response to the racist abuse he and other england players missed penalties in the euro 2020 final received. he said to the social media platforms, i don�*t want any
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child or adult to receive the hateful and hurtful messages that may, marcus and jade ended this week. it is a sad reality your powerful platforms are not doing enough to stop these messages. he went on to say there is no place for racism or any kind of hate or football or in society, love will always win. it�*s nowjust six days until team gb�*s women�*s football squad get their olympics campaign under way against chile. head coach hege riise has today said that the team will have three captains, with england�*s steph houghton, wales�* sophie ingle and scotland�*s kim little chosen to lead out the side on a rotation basis. it�*s also been confirmed that the side will take the knee before all their games in tokyo. earlier this month, the rules around athletes protesting at the games were relaxed by the international olympic committee. the squad have said they "were all united" in their decision to make the gesture. it was a group consensus. there wasn�*t anyone specific, but i think
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we all feel strongly as individuals and as a team, and i think we all understand what has been going on and the discrimination, and we know we have a big part to play and i think it is important we use our platforms to help in anyway we can. the people that do not have the voice, they are who we are standing up for. alun wyn jones alun wynjones has been named for the final warm up game in south africa. he will have only been in the country for a couple of days after making a remarkable comeback from dislocating his shoulder less than three weeks ago. they suffered their first defeat to a very strong south africa which included several of the springbok world cup winning squad he was short of match practice after the covid—19 a brick. in the last few minutes the defending
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champion has run the next stage of the tour de france. the music industry is weighted against artists, with even successful pop stars seeing "pitiful returns" from streaming, that�*s according to a group of mps.they�*re calling they�*re calling for a "complete reset" of the market, with musicians being given a "fair share" of the money that uk record labels earn from streaming. ramzan karmali reports. it would be fair for the artist to have a seat at the table so we can sit down and negotiate and deal with the numbers. we don�*t have any transparency when it comes to the owners of the masters making the deals. wejust owners of the masters making the deals. we just have to go along with what they have done. if we had a
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seat at the table we could be part of the negotiation.— of the negotiation. geoff taylor is the chief executive _ of the negotiation. geoff taylor is the chief executive of _ of the negotiation. geoff taylor is the chief executive of the - of the negotiation. geoff taylor is the chief executive of the body i the chief executive of the body representing over five record labels. let me read you something from the committee report. while streaming has brought significant profits to the recorded music industry, the talent behind it are losing out. only a complete reset of streaming that enshrines in law, their rights to a fair share of the earnings will do. do you agree? obviously, we will carefully consider the report. the starting point is understand what label business is. it is to maximise the success of the artist, invest in them and help them market themselves in the global marketplace. we want to see artists earning more from streaming. to see artists earning more from streaming-— to see artists earning more from streaming. to see artists earning more from streamina. , , :, :, , streaming. they say they want to be 'ust aid.
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streaming. they say they want to be just paid- they _ streaming. they say they want to be just paid. they are _ streaming. they say they want to be just paid. they are the _ streaming. they say they want to be just paid. they are the geniuses? i just paid. they are the geniuses? they are, absolutely. it takes a lot of investment and effort a great success in a competitive marketplace. what has been lost in this report is the fact that there are thousands of artists who are already earning tens of thousands of pounds from streaming just from their uk streams and that is without considering the streaming outside the uk. normally a uk artist would have more streams outside the uk. they would be earning money from physical sales, they would be earning money from physicalsales, cd they would be earning money from physical sales, cd sales and downloads and merchandise. haifa physical sales, cd sales and downloads and merchandise. how they earn in other— downloads and merchandise. how they earn in other formats _ downloads and merchandise. how they earn in other formats is _ downloads and merchandise. how they earn in other formats is not _ downloads and merchandise. how they earn in other formats is not the - earn in other formats is not the subject, the subject is how they earn from streaming. you have had one of the most legendary figures in the history of music coming to testify to the committee saying, musicians, songwriters are not paid properly. without songwriters, there are no labels. songwriting is the basis of everything? songwriting is
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incredibly important, _ basis of everything? songwriting is incredibly important, but _ basis of everything? songwriting is incredibly important, but it - basis of everything? songwriting is incredibly important, but it also i incredibly important, but it also takes an artist and a great deal of investment and marketing to create a fantastic performance of a song. one of the things that has been overlooked in this report is the share that song writers received from streaming revenues is double what it was on a cd. the songwriter is already getting a larger share than they wear. we have seen since the advent of streaming, big increases in the shares artists receive. the royalty rate on a cd was about 15, 18%. it is now 25 to 30%. we are surprised that things have been overlooked by the committee, because everybody shares the gold are to should earn well from streaming. tt the gold are to should earn well from streaming.— the gold are to should earn well from streaming. if you share the aoal, -a from streaming. if you share the goal. pay them _ from streaming. if you share the goal, pay them the _ from streaming. if you share the goal, pay them the money? - from streaming. if you share the goal, pay them the money? we | from streaming. if you share the i goal, pay them the money? we are 'ust goal, pay them the money? we are just concerned _ goal, pay them the money? we are just concerned the _ goal, pay them the money? we are just concerned the policies - goal, pay them the money? we are just concerned the policies that - goal, pay them the money? we are just concerned the policies that are | just concerned the policies that are being recommended in this report that hit investment into new talent. it is a new talent that makes our business is successful. it is what makes the uk the second most
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important successful exporting nation in the world.— important successful exporting nation in the world. when you say investment _ nation in the world. when you say investment into _ nation in the world. when you say investment into new _ nation in the world. when you say investment into new talent, - nation in the world. when you say investment into new talent, why i nation in the world. when you say| investment into new talent, why is it when i spoke to the composerjust now, he said people are leaving because they cannot make money from streaming. the money that is rightfully theirs is the intellectual authors, are said by all the musicians we have spoken to and as agreed now by the parliamentary committee? sorry, i am not sure if there _ parliamentary committee? sorry, i am not sure if there is _ parliamentary committee? sorry, i am not sure if there is a _ parliamentary committee? sorry, i am not sure if there is a question - parliamentary committee? sorry, i am not sure if there is a question in - not sure if there is a question in the. , :, , , :, not sure if there is a question in the. , :, , not sure if there is a question in the. , the. the question is, you said you are investing. _ the. the question is, you said you are investing, the _ the. the question is, you said you are investing, the musician - the. the question is, you said you are investing, the musician i - the. the question is, you said you| are investing, the musician i spoke to said they are leaving in droves, so how can you be investing if someone told me they are leaving in droves? :, ::, someone told me they are leaving in droves? :, :, ,, someone told me they are leaving in droves? :, :,~ :, someone told me they are leaving in droves? :, :, , �*, droves? you can take one pleasant's o-inion or droves? you can take one pleasant's opinion or you _ droves? you can take one pleasant's opinion or you can — droves? you can take one pleasant's opinion or you can look _ droves? you can take one pleasant's opinion or you can look at _ droves? you can take one pleasant's opinion or you can look at the - opinion or you can look at the evidence. the evidence is, there are many more musicians available on streaming services than ever available through retail before. very often acting as their own
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record label and the further issue, artists don�*t have to sign to a record label. streaming has meant that artists can choose how to manage their careers. many act as their own record label or they may choose to sign to a label or do something in between with a distributional share deal. artists have more control than ever and they receive a higher percentage than ever before. there are lots of positives from the streaming market which has helped the industry recover from 15 years when it was struggling because of piracy. geott struggling because of piracy. geoff ta lor, struggling because of piracy. geoff taylor. thank _ struggling because of piracy. geoff taylor, thank you _ struggling because of piracy. geoff taylor, thank you for _ struggling because of piracy. geoff taylor, thank you forjoining us. scientists are warning that the nhs could be pushed to breaking point this winter by the threat from three respiratory viruses, including covid. a report from the academy of medical sciences says action is needed now to prevent that — and calls for extra staff and capacity in the health service. here s our health correspondent catherine burns. empty streets and deserted stations — lockdown was our first defence in the pandemic,
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as people stayed at home to stop covid spreading. at the same time, it prevented us catching other viruses, too. but as we�*re about to ease into something closer to life as normal, researchers are worried that we could see a resurgence in flu cases this winter. a reasonable worst case scenario would be about two times more cases than normal — enough to potentially see tens of thousands of extra deaths. they�*re also concerned that the burden from rsv, another virus that often affects children and the elderly, could double too. winter is always a pressurised time for the nhs, and that�*s before considering covid and the record backlog of patients waiting for treatments. but researchers say much depends on what we do between now and then. so, as well as covid, they�*re calling for tests for flu and rsv at the same time, arguing that the technology exists and it�*s just
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a question of logistics. it�*s very important to be able to identify when you�*ve got several different viruses transmitting at the same time, which one it is that people have got. and if you can do that, of course, you can look after them better. another recommendation is to prioritise vaccines, whether for covid, any possible boosterjabs in the autumn, or flu vaccines for anybody eligible. the report also stresses the importance of making sure people can afford to isolate if they�*re infected. but there�*s a lot of focus too on what people can do to help themselves and others. because the steps we�*ve taken to protect ourselves from covid, like masks, social distancing and fresh air, can only help with other respiratory viruses too. catherine burns, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... at least 42 people have died and dozens are missing
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after unprecedented flooding in western germany. latest official figures show 48,553 new coronavirus infections in the uk and 63 deaths within 28 days of a positive test. that�*s the highest number of deaths reported in one day since march. electronic devices have been seized from two homes as part of an investigation into the leak of cctv footage showing the then health secretary matt hancock embracing his former aide gina coladangelo. almost 7,000 people are waiting for lifesaving transplants in the uk — the highest number in six years — according to nhs blood and transplant. their analysis, of the 12 months to march 2021, found some key services were forced to close during the first peak of the pandemic. our health correspondent anna collinson reports. ambulance worker ted has spent his adult life helping strangers, but last year, a stranger saved him.
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months before the coronavirus pandemic, his health began to deteriorate. he was told he needed a new kidney and was put on the transplant waiting list. as someone waiting for an organ, you are already vulnerable, so the idea of going into a hospital to have an operation is terrifying, especially when you know that those hospitals are full of covid patients. when the first coronavirus wave struck the uk last march, it significantly disrupted nhs services. already a particularly complex area of medicine, organ transplants became even more challenging. stretched resources and fears about patients�* safety led to the number of operations falling significantly. new figures show 474 people in the uk died last year while waiting for an organ, a 26% increase compared to the previous year. analysis by nhs blood and transplant
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estimates 7000 people are now on a transplant list, the highest it has been in six years. the focus now is to get through the backlog as quickly as possible. it is really difficult for each and every one of those patients waiting for that transplant, waiting for a call to get the gift of life, and that is why it is really important that everybody has that conversation about organ donation and lets their family know what they would want to do if they were in the difficult and sad situation where they were given the option of organ donation. after months of waiting, last may, ted was told a donor had been found. up until the operation, i had been struggling to climb the stairs at home without having to stop and take a breath. i was getting very, very poorly and about a month and a half or two months later, i went out for a walk with my friend for eight miles and did not even notice it. ted had always dreamed of doing a road trip around scotland. as soon as he felt well enough, he set off with his
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partner and his dad. he has this message to his donor and theirfamily. i like to think that in some way, through thejob i do, i give back in a small part, you know, so that is the one way i consider that i am able to say thank you when i know that i can�*t say it in person. anna collinson, bbc news. some of britain s biggest high street banks are refusing to give mortgages to furloughed workers, and to self—employed people who took out covid grants during the pandemic. that s despite the banking watchdog saying that the payments should not prevent people from being able to access credit. sarah corker reports. swapping the city for the country — lockdown has left people yearning for green spaces and bigger homes. over the past year the uk has had a property boom. but some people who took out covid support during the pandemic, like the grant for the self—employed or furlough, say they�*re being locked out of the market. i almost feel like i�*m being treated
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like a bankrupt in some way, you know, that i�*m being penalised that strongly for something that wasn�*t my fault. in lincolnshire, lisa says she can�*t get a mortgage because she was previously furloughed and works in hospitality. she is back full—time, but is still being turned down by lenders. i just feel really unfairly penalised, if the truth be told. furlough has been brilliant in that it�*s protected myjob, because i would have lost that, but i didn�*t then expect to come out the other side, as you say, to have a deposit and no debt and all of the things that theoretically should make me an idealfirst—time buyer, only to find out that banks and building societies just will not lend to me at all, so ijust feel really let down, really let down by it. the bbc asked all the major banks and building societies about their policies. most of them don�*t accept mortgage applications from people currently on furlough or wouldn�*t include furloughed income when looking at affordability. there are tighter rules
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for the 5 million self—employed too. natwest and the royal bank of scotland won�*t even consider people who have taken out the government�*s self—employment grant in the last year. others, like metro bank and santander, are asking for larger deposits. when the government announced this support package they did explicitly say that it wouldn�*t affect your credit score or your chances of getting a mortgage. in reality however, lenders and their underwriters are looking at it, and we have seen evidence that they are taking this into account and in some cases it is counting against people taking a mortgage. uk finance represents the industry. it told us lenders must carry out thorough income assessments to make sure mortgages are affordable in the long term. decisions are made on a case—by—case basis. but there are concerns that people working in hospitality and travel are increasingly being seen as high risk. back in lincolnshire, lisa says she�*ll now have to spend a big chunk of her deposit
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on finding a new property to rent. i genuinely feel that the opportunity own my own home has gone — and it�*s devastating. back in february, a little bit of space landed on earth. a four—and—a—half—billion year old meteorite was seen streaking across the sky, before crashing into a field in gloucestershire. members of one space charity were given special permission to go searching for fragments, and they�*re now recruiting scientists from around the world to help them analyse what they found. our science correspondent richard westcott reports. from somewhere between the orbits ofjupiter and mars, to a muddy field in gloucestershire. these incredibly rare fragments of meteorite were found in a horseshoe print by derek here, a retired chemist and passionate astronomer, who was part of a cambridge team given special permission to search during lockdown. my dad died a few years ago,
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and at times of need i sometimes call out for his help and support. and just in the middle of the field ijust shouted out, "come on, dad, help us to find the meteorite." and within half an hour i had come across this blue black stone. we knew straightaway it was a meteorite, a fresh meteorite. ijust couldn�*t believe it. he has brought one piece to his friend david, whose unique sci—fi looking machines knock atoms off the sample so they can see what it is made of. what's really interesting is the thing is that we haven't seen, because we are not seeing anything lighter than carbon, or lithium, boron. we are not seeing anything heavier than arsenic, tin. there is an awful lot up there. and we don't see that. i keep trying to retire and winding down steadily. but when something like this
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comes along, it really stimulates the curiosity. and i can go back to my grandchildren and say, "i've got a bit of meteorite in the back. we are going to look at that today. isn't that interesting?" just up the road at loughborough university, derek has recruited more help. the machine shaun is using is magnifying the rock 18,000 times, producing these astonishing images that help them map the surface. the shape is incredibly and incredibly fragile. if you were to pick it up your hand, it could crumble. it is very dusty. the material itself is just loosely held together, almost like a talcum powder. slightly moist. it is basically dust from the early universe. so it has been stocking frozen time. it has never had the opportunity to coalesce, to form a body. it�*s just been a loose
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slump in space. he has been working with materials chemist sandy, another one of derek�*s friends. the minerals we are finding in the meteorite are similar to those that we find on earth but a little bit different. that tells us the chemistry up there in outer space is a bit different to what we see on terrestrial earth. next, the cambridge team has offered samples to scientists in the us and germany. these tests could help answer a key question. did some of the ingredients that triggered life on earth arrive on rocks from outer space? richard westcott, bbc news, loughborough. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. full uk forecast for the rest of this week and the weekend in just a moment, but first of all i thought we would take a look at the extreme rainfall that has been affecting parts of europe, particularly some western areas of germany, torrential downpours yesterday showing up on the radar picture just to the south—west of bonn.
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how much rain fell? well, we had up to 158 millimetres of rain. this looks to be about three times as much rainfall we�*d expect in the whole of the month ofjuly. and that fell in the space ofjust one day. those storms were kicked off by this upper area of low pressure that was stuck overhead in germany. whereas here in the uk the jet stream passing is ridged and what that does is it builds pressure. so this area of high pressure that�*s building across the uk is going to be with us through the rest of this week, the weekend and even influences the weather into next week as well. it means we will have more scenes like this, it really has been a glorious day so far in parts of cumbria. whereas across central and eastern england we do have some patches of cloud around. the cloud, though, is very thin, it�*s only about 300 metres thick so there is a chance i think, particularly later this afternoon, towards the evening time it will break up and we will see some sunshine coming through. but the best of the sunshine today, wales, south—west england, northern england, scotland and eastern counties of northern ireland. overnight tonight, a bit more cloud pushes back
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into the north—west otherwise it�*s dry with clear spells around. temperatures, 11 to 15 degrees or so. they are the minimum temperatures by the end of the night. friday, another dry day coming up is that the area of high pressure continues to flex its muscles. we could see an odd patch of rain though across the western isles perhaps, with some thicker cloud here. but otherwise sunshine and in the sunshine it�*s getting warmer — 24 in aberdeen, 26 the top temperature for birmingham, cardiff and for london. and that weekend continues with a similar story. then there could be a few patches of rain across the very far north—west of scotland where it�*s going to be a little bit cloudier. but away from that north—west corner, it�*s hot and it is sunny. temperatures 22 in belfast, warm in thejuly sunshine here. 27 for birmingham, 28 for both cardiff and for london. and if anything, it gets even hotter again as we head into sunday. in fact, as we go through sunday afternoon the highest temperatures could hit the 30 celsius mark, so some very hot weather indeed. but of course, all this heat means we�*ve got some very warm nights to come as well.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. police say at least 42 people have died — and dozens are missing — after flooding in western germany our community centre was just crushed and it stuck to the bridge over there. a 40 tonne truck must be stuck there as well. latest official figures show 48,553 new coronavirus infections in the uk and 63 deaths within 28 days of a positive test. that�*s the highest number of deaths reported in one day since march. tax sugar and salt to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at tackling britain�*s obesity crisis. but the prime minister says he isn�*t keen on imposing such taxes. borisjohnson has also been speaking about his plans for ending
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inequalities in the uk. he says it won�*t make richer areas poorer

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