Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  July 15, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

1:00 pm
tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation's health. the tax raised could allow fruit and veg to be prescribed on the nhs, and extend free school meal provision, says the report's author. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. but the prime minister responded coolly this morning to the idea of a salt and sugar tax. iam not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on ha rd—working people. we'll be looking at the proposals and asking what affect our eating habits are having on the environment. also this lunchtime...
1:01 pm
at least 30 people have died and dozens are missing after unprecedented flooding in western germany. borisjohnson says his plans for ending inequalities in the uk won't make richer areas poorer. give musicians a fair share of the hundreds of millions of pounds record labels earn from streaming, says a group of mps. and the 149th 0pen gets under way, after a year's delay, in kent. and coming up on the bbc news channel... great britain's women's football squad will take the knee before their matches at the tokyo 0lympic games this month. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. sugar and salt should be taxed,
1:02 pm
and fruit and vegetables prescribed by the nhs in order to improve our diets, an independent review has said. the report, led by the businessman henry dimbleby, says the taxes raised could also be used to extend free school meals to more children. mr dimbleby said that poor eating habits cause "horrific health harms". but the food industry says new taxes could increase the price of food — and, when asked about the review, borisjohnson said that he is "not in favour" of raising taxes on food. here's our correspondent ellie price. maureen has got a number of physical and mental health issues. she knows she needs to eat more fresh food but it's something she can't afford without the help of a charity. if we without the help of a charity. if we had an ideal _ without the help of a charity. if we had an ideal amount _ without the help of a charity. if we had an ideal amount of— without the help of a charity. if we had an ideal amount of fruit without the help of a charity. it we had an ideal amount of fruit and veg in our diet, it would be easier to create stuff, i suppose, that was easy to eat. you need variety and it's the variety that costs. i could
1:03 pm
pay for it but it means something else has to go and it means we go in the red instead of staying in the black, and i can't cope with the worry of being in the red. today's re orts is worry of being in the red. today's reports is a _ worry of being in the red. today's reports is a poor— worry of being in the red. today's reports is a poor diet _ worry of being in the red. today's reports is a poor diet contributes| reports is a poor diet contributes to 64,000 deaths every year in england and cost the economy an estimated £74 billion. there is also an environment will impact, with globalfood production an environment will impact, with global food production the second biggest contributor to climate change. the report recommends a tax on sugary and salty foods. if producers don't change the recipes to use less it could mean a price increase of 15 to 25% for desserts, biscuits and sweets. asda there have been 14 previous obesity plans in this country and been 14 previous obesity plans in this ecum— this country and almost all have been voluntary _ this country and almost all have been voluntary and _ this country and almost all have been voluntary and you - this country and almost all have been voluntary and you are - this country and almost all have been voluntary and you are not| this country and almost all have - been voluntary and you are not going to break thisjunk been voluntary and you are not going to break this junk food cycle, been voluntary and you are not going to break thisjunk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies unless you tackle it and thatis companies unless you tackle it and that is what we are recommending with the sugar and salt
1:04 pm
reformulation tax. it's not a tax to increase price but to make the companies reformulate, as they did was sugary drinks, they take the bad stuff out. , ., stuff out. this morning the prime minister appeared _ stuff out. this morning the prime minister appeared to _ stuff out. this morning the prime minister appeared to oppose - stuff out. this morning the prime minister appeared to oppose the | minister appeared to oppose the idea. ., ., , , , minister appeared to oppose the idea. ., ., , ,, idea. there are doubtless some good ideas in it. idea. there are doubtless some good ideas in it- we _ idea. there are doubtless some good ideas in it. we believe _ idea. there are doubtless some good ideas in it. we believe in _ idea. there are doubtless some good ideas in it. we believe in tackling - ideas in it. we believe in tackling obesity, trying to help people to lose weight with promoting exercise and tackling junk food advertising and tackling junk food advertising and so on. i am not, i and tackling junk food advertising and so on. iam not, i must and tackling junk food advertising and so on. i am not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard—working people. maw; attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard-working people.— attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard-working people. many in the food industry — on hard-working people. many in the food industry agree. _ on hard-working people. many in the food industry agree. there _ on hard-working people. many in the food industry agree. there have - food industry agree. there have already been — food industry agree. there have already been big _ food industry agree. there have already been big changes - food industry agree. there have already been big changes going | already been big changes going across from curry sauces through to breakfast cereals, so we are already seeing those changes, but they take time and they are expensive to make, because you want to make it right so people still buy the product and they still taste great. i think we
1:05 pm
already have those programmes and i don't think that taxing companies will help them. the don't think that taxing companies will help them.— will help them. the report also recommends _ will help them. the report also recommends greater _ will help them. the report also recommends greater use - will help them. the report also recommends greater use of. will help them. the report also - recommends greater use of projects like this one. cathy runs the charity care merseyside involved in what's called social prescribing. patients are referred by their local gp and other things like exercise support, cooking advice and even fresh food. irate support, cooking advice and even fresh food-— fresh food. we assess a person's needs and _ fresh food. we assess a person's needs and what _ fresh food. we assess a person's needs and what they _ fresh food. we assess a person's needs and what they need - fresh food. we assess a person's. needs and what they need support with. we offer them various levels of support. what i aim to do is to reduce gp consultations, to reduce hospitalisations and to try and tackle in a holistic way how to help people improve their health and wellbeing. the people improve their health and wellbeina. ., ., ., wellbeing. the national food strateu wellbeing. the national food strategy estimates _ wellbeing. the national food strategy estimates its - strategy estimates its recommendations would cost around £i.4 recommendations would cost around £1.4 billion a year and bring in up to £3.4 billion a year in tax revenue. the report author, the cost of doing nothing would be terrible damage the and our bodies. ellie
1:06 pm
price, bbc news. —— damage to the environment and our bodies. 0ur chief environment correspondent, justin rowlatt, joins us. the other aspect to this report is the impact our eating habits are having on the environment? it certainly is. the global food system is the second biggest contributor to global warming, but it is also the biggest contributor to biodiversity loss and deforestation, drought, freshwater pollution, the collapse of aquatic wildlife, so a huge problem caused ijy wildlife, so a huge problem caused by the food industry. what henry dimbleby does as he tries to identify the source of that. he says nature is invisible in the economic system. there is no price attached to using nature so we tend to over exploit it. he proposes that, for example, we set aside a fifth of all land in england to be wild, for nature. he says we should designate
1:07 pm
some land for intensive farming and some land for intensive farming and some for low intensity or traditionalfarming. he says some for low intensity or traditional farming. he says that, if farmers make the commitment to switch to more sustainable practices, they should be guaranteed payments at least until 2029, a significant measure for the man the littler government. he says we can't do these things to try and improve in frontal standards and then export infirmity depredation abroad. for example, buying cattle from deforested areas of brazil that he says, when we do trade agreements, they need to be non—negotiable standards that govern sets and says, we will not breach these environmental standards. so a host of packages from henry dimbleby about how to stop or reduce the impact of the food system on the environment.— environment. justin rowlatt reporting- — at least 30 people are reported to have been killed and 70 are missing after heavy rain and flooding caused widespread damage in western germany. at least four people died when their houses were swept away
1:08 pm
in the village of schuld. the region has seen record—high rainfall over the past 24 hours. damien mcguinness reports. these are the worst floods to hit this part of western germany in living memory. translation: our community centre wasjust crushed and stuck _ to the bridge over there, and a 40 tonne truck must be stuck there as well. a housejust standing over there tilted over entirely. you can imagine this sort of thing happening in asia, but not here. at least a dozen people are thought to have died and more than 70 are still missing. buildings collapsed, whole villages almost destroyed, and cars swept away as streets were turned into raging rivers. dozens of people were trapped on the roofs of their houses waiting for rescue and almost 150,000 homes lost electricity. the whole country is affected.
1:09 pm
parts of the rhine have now been closed to shipping and across large parts of germany traffic and rail transport is heavily disrupted. over the past 24 hours this densely populated region saw record levels of rainfall. the heavy rain comes after an unusually stormy summer, causing rivers to burst their banks. the impact has been felt elsewhere in europe too. across the border in belgium, buildings were also destroyed as a river burst its banks. at least two people there have died. in western germany the rain has eased off for now and local people are having to deal with the aftermath, but with so many missing it's also still an emergency situation. with more rain expected in southern germany later today and rivers already at dangerously high levels, other regions are preparing for the worst. after a summer of unusually heavy rains and unpredictable weather, many in germany are already linking these floods to climate change.
1:10 pm
damien mcguinness, bbc news, berlin. the prime minister has insisted that his "levelling up" plan is a win—win for the whole of the uk and won't make "rich" areas poorer in order to benefit the most deprived. in a wide—ranging speech in coventry, borisjohnson said the project, which includes new transport infrastructure and the promise of £50 million of investment in football pitches, was a "huge undertaking", as iain watson reports. good morning. just after the last election, boris _ good morning. just after the last election, boris johnson - good morning. just after the last election, boris johnson invaded i good morning. just after the last - election, boris johnson invaded what election, borisjohnson invaded what was once enemy territory. this part of north—east england was represented by a labour prime minister. i represented by a labour prime minister. ~ ., , ., minister. i know people might have been breaking _ minister. i know people might have been breaking the _ minister. i know people might have been breaking the voting _ minister. i know people might have been breaking the voting habits - minister. i know people might have been breaking the voting habits ofl been breaking the voting habits of generations to vote for us. the conservatives _ generations to vote for us. the conservatives didn't just take tony conservatives didn'tjust take tony blair's own constituency of sedgefield but a swathe of seats in the north and midlands, and
1:11 pm
promising the new voters that the government would level up those places which felt they were missing out on economic success. but polling suggests people are not clear what levelling up actually means. today the prime minister sent himself to coventry to try and define it. everybody knows that talent and energy and enthusiasm and flair are evenly spread across the uk. evenly spread. it's opportunity that is not. ., , , spread. it's opportunity that is not. .,, , ., ., , spread. it's opportunity that is not. ., ., , not. the loss of the formerly safe seat of chesham _ not. the loss of the formerly safe seat of chesham and _ not. the loss of the formerly safe seat of chesham and amersham l not. the loss of the formerly safe l seat of chesham and amersham in southern england has made some tory mps nervous. they fear a focus on northern england might mean traditional tory voters feel they are missing out, so the prime minister insisted that levelling up really can be all things to all people. really can be all things to all --eole. ., really can be all things to all eo le, ., ., �* really can be all things to all neale, ., ., �* “ really can be all things to all --eole. ., ., �* ~ .,~ people. you don't think you can make the oor people. you don't think you can make the poor parts — people. you don't think you can make the poor parts of— people. you don't think you can make the poor parts of the _ people. you don't think you can make the poor parts of the country - people. you don't think you can make the poor parts of the country richer i the poor parts of the country richer by making the rich parts poorer. levelling up is not a jam spreading
1:12 pm
operation. it's not robbing peter to pay paul, it's not a zero—sum, it's for the whole uk. to pay paul, it's not a zero-sum, it's for the whole uk.— pay paul, it's not a zero-sum, it's for the whole uk. to emphasise he was facin: for the whole uk. to emphasise he was facing the _ for the whole uk. to emphasise he was facing the future, _ for the whole uk. to emphasise he was facing the future, boris - for the whole uk. to emphasise he| was facing the future, boris johnson was facing the future, boris johnson was speaking at a publicly funded project developing batteries for electric cars. he invited local authority leaders to help drive forward his agenda and suggested there could be more powerfor english counties but labour accused the prime minister of making empty promises he the prime minister of making empty romise , , ., the prime minister of making empty romise , ., ,, ., the prime minister of making empty romise ., ,, ., �*, promises he says 'am spreading, it's alwa s 'am promises he says jam spreading, it's always jam tomorrow _ promises he says jam spreading, it's always jam tomorrow in _ promises he says jam spreading, it's always jam tomorrow in areas - promises he says jam spreading, it's always jam tomorrow in areas in - promises he says jam spreading, it's always jam tomorrow in areas in the | always jam tomorrow in areas in the north. we have severe cuts to our areas. our children are seeing free school meals taken away. even their own government adviser on the catch—up money is only 10% of what the government adviser said was needed. he is not looking at our areas, he is saying sound bites. there are potentially huge political rewards for boris johnson if there are potentially huge political rewards for borisjohnson if he can spread wealth and opportunity more evenly, but turning radius of disadvantage is a long—term project, so it might be difficult tojudge success by the next election. the
1:13 pm
prime minister said we'd have to wait until autumn for more detail on his plans, and these could determine the territory on which the next election is fought. the government has defended the decision to put majorca and ibiza on the amber list for travellers from england, just two weeks after they were moved to green. it means that, from monday morning, most holiday—makers returning to the uk from the spanish islands will have to isolate for ten days unless they're fully vaccinated. theo leggett reports. it is just over two weeks since the government gave the go—ahead for travel to the sun, sea and sand of the balearic islands, but now a change in the rules means that a summer getaway to ibiza or majorca hasjust become more difficult for some. the government has a traffic light system. countries with low levels of covid infections go on to a green list, you can travel there without having to quarantine on your return. four countries will be added to the list on monday, including croatia and hong kong. but the balearics will be removed.
1:14 pm
a rise in infections means they have been placed on the amber list. as of monday, whether you have to quarantine or not will depend on your vaccination status. and then there is the red list. travellers from these regions have to quarantine in designated hotels. four more countries, including cuba, have justjoined that list. the problem is, the rules are not quite the same for everybody. while most older people are fully vaccinated and could go on holiday to an amber list country without having to isolate on their return, many young people have not had their second dose of vaccine yet, which means they would have to go into isolation. i had one vaccine three weeks ago and i know from monday people who are double vaccinated do not need to quarantine when they return from amber list countries. however, i will need to quarantine. 0bviously that is not great for my mental health, but i'm very lucky i can work from home. airlines and travel companies have
1:15 pm
also expressed frustration at the frequent changes, which they claim are deterring people from making bookings. but some within the industry say the restrictions do have public support. these decisions are chopping and changing. i think, from the government's point of view, i think they can be very confident that these are popular measures in the population as a whole, even though it is catastrophic if you are that part of the population that wishes to go to the mediterranean on holiday. the government so far has been unrepentant. ministers have already warned that travel this summer will be far from normal and they say holiday—makers should be ready to cancel their plans at any moment. theo leggett, bbc news. managers at the uk's biggest car plant — nissan in sunderland — have said that production has been affected by hundreds of staff being forced to isolate, after being pinged by the nhs covid app. it's understood that around
1:16 pm
10% of the 6,000—strong workforce has been sent home. well, in the last week a record number of people in england have been pinged by the nhs app. 0ur health editor hugh pym is here. big increases in these numbers? yes, illustratinu big increases in these numbers? yes, illustrating the _ big increases in these numbers? yes, illustrating the sort _ big increases in these numbers? yes, illustrating the sort of _ big increases in these numbers? ye: illustrating the sort of problems employers are having with employees and staff needing to self—isolate, including the nhs where it's a real strain, so more than 500,000 people pinged in a single week, telling them to self—isolate because they've beenin them to self—isolate because they've been in contact with a positive case, up 46%, but in some ways this isjust one part case, up 46%, but in some ways this is just one part of the overall story we've been reporting, cases are going up rapidly. nearly 200,000 tested positive in the same week. these are their contacts being got to through the system, so it's causing more issues. also at the same time there are anecdotal
1:17 pm
reports in a few areas of people waiting a little longer to get a pcr test when they go in person and some more stats out today for england showing that the number who got their result back from a pcr test within 24 hours was down to 63%, down from 77%, and that's the lowest performance number since january. so it's all part of this overall story of the consequences of cases rising quite rapidly and warnings that hospital numbers will go up, but we should always remember the difference from when we've had previous situations like this is the vaccines are there, they are protecting people from serious illness or from not surviving in hospital. but there are other consequences for the economy and for staff and their employers, as we've been hearing. staff and their employers, as we've been hearing-— staff and their employers, as we've been hearinu. , . , ., been hearing. hugh pym, many thanks. it's 1:17 been hearing. hugh pym, many thanks. it's1:17 - been hearing. hugh pym, many thanks. it's 1:17 p m- — our top story this lunchtime... tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation's health.
1:18 pm
but the prime minister responds coolly to the idea. and coming up... why some furloughed and self—employed workers with loans are now struggling to get mortgages. coming up on the bbc news channel... 0rganisers say the rugby league world cup will go ahead in england this autumn, but current holders australia are yet to sign up to the tournament. the south african government is increasing the number of troops on the streets to 25,000, in response to widespread looting and violence sparked by the jailing of the former president, jacob zuma. at least 72 people have died and more than 1,700 people have been arrested since the violence erupted. 0ur correspondent vumani mkhize is in the coastal city of durban. this violence has been escalating in the last few days. how would you assess the situation now?-
1:19 pm
the last few days. how would you assess the situation now? yeah, in the ast assess the situation now? yeah, in the past five _ assess the situation now? yeah, in the past five days _ assess the situation now? yeah, in the past five days it's _ assess the situation now? yeah, in the past five days it's been - assess the situation now? yeah, in the past five days it's been quite i the past five days it's been quite severe but thankfully today, things have quietened down a bit. in durban north at the moment, near a shopping centre, and as you can see behind me there are a number of residents who are queueing up forfood, so the situation has actually moved beyond the looting now towards a humanitarian from a sort of like a humanitarian from a sort of like a humanitarian situation where people have run out of food because so many stores have been looted and vandalised and so many shopping malls have been vandalised as well, so people are queueing up for food. they have been limited to around 16 items of groceries and some of the people here behind me have been waiting since the early hours of this morning. they've been streaming in in an orderly fashion and it's an indication of how severe this situation is here in south africa. it's not only happening here in durban but it's happening throughout a number of other towns as well, where people are queueing up for food and fuel as well.—
1:20 pm
where people are queueing up for food and fuel as well. many thanks, that's vumani _ food and fuel as well. many thanks, that's vumani mkhize _ food and fuel as well. many thanks, that's vumani mkhize reporting - food and fuel as well. many thanks, | that's vumani mkhize reporting from durban there. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk surpassed pre—pandemic levels in the three months tojune, according to new data. the office for national statistics said there were 862,000 jobs on offer between april and june, that's 77,500 more than in the first three months of 2020. the 0ns said the rise was driven by vacancies in hospitality and retailing. the number of people on payrolls also grew injune, showing the biggest rise since the start of the pandemic. almost 7,000 people are waiting for life—saving transplants in the uk — the highest number in six years — according to nhs blood and transplant. their analysis, of the 12 months to march 2021, found some key services were forced to close during the first peak of the pandemic. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson reports. ambulance worker ted has spent his adult life helping strangers, but last year,
1:21 pm
a stranger saved him. months before the coronavirus pandemic, his health began to deteriorate. he was told he needed a new kidney and was put on the transplant waiting list. as someone waiting for an organ, you are already vulnerable, so the idea of going into a hospital to have an operation is terrifying, especially when you know that those hospitals are full of covid patients. when the first coronavirus wave struck the uk last march, it significantly disrupted nhs services. already a particularly complex area of medicine, organ transplants became even more challenging. stretched resources and fears about patients' safety led to the number of operations falling significantly. new figures show 474 people in the uk died last year while waiting for an organ, a 26% increase compared
1:22 pm
to the previous year. analysis by nhs blood and transplant estimates 7000 people are now on a transplant list, the highest it has been in six years. the focus now is to get through the backlog as quickly as possible. it is really difficult for each and every one of those patients waiting for that transplant, waiting for a call to get the gift of life, and that is why it is really important that everybody has that conversation about organ donation and lets their family know what they would want to do if they were in the difficult and sad situation where they were given the option of organ donation. after months of waiting, last may, ted was told a donor had been found. up until the operation, i had been struggling to climb the stairs at home without having to stop and take a breath. i was getting very, very poorly and about a month and a half or two months later, i went out for a walk with my friend for eight miles and did not even notice it. ted had always dreamed of doing a road trip around scotland.
1:23 pm
as soon as he felt well enough, he set off with his partner and his dad. he has this message to his donor and theirfamily. i like to think that in some way, through thejob i do, i give back in a small part, you know, so that is the one way i consider that i am able to say thank you when i know that i can't say it in person. anna collinson, bbc news. some of britain's biggest high street banks are refusing to give mortgages to furloughed workers, and to self—employed people who took out covid grants during the pandemic. that's despite the banking watchdog saying that the payments should not prevent people from being able to access credit. our business correspondent sarah corker has more. swapping the city for the country — lockdown has left people yearning for green spaces and bigger homes. over the past year the uk has had a property boom. but some people who took out covid support during the pandemic, like the grant for the self—employed or furlough, say they're
1:24 pm
being locked out of the market. i almost feel like i'm being treated like a bankrupt in some way, you know, that i'm being penalised that strongly for something that wasn't my fault. in lincolnshire, lisa says she can't get a mortgage because she was previously furloughed and works in hospitality. she is back full—time, but is still being turned down by lenders. i just feel really unfairly penalised, if the truth be told. furlough has been brilliant in that it's protected myjob, because i would have lost that, but i didn't then expect to come out the other side, as you say, to have a deposit and no debt and all of the things that theoretically should make me an idealfirst—time buyer, only to find out that banks and building societies just will not lend to me at all, so ijust feel really let down, really let down by it. the bbc asked all the major banks and building societies about their policies. most of them don't accept mortgage applications from people currently on furlough or wouldn't include furloughed income when
1:25 pm
looking at affordability. there are tighter rules for the 5 million self—employed too. natwest and the royal bank of scotland won't even consider people who have taken out the government's self—employment grant in the last year. others, like metro bank and santander, are asking for larger deposits. when the government announced this support package they did explicitly say that it wouldn't affect your credit score or your chances of getting a mortgage. in reality however, lenders and their underwriters are looking at it, and we have seen evidence that they are taking this into account and in some cases it is counting against people taking a mortgage. uk finance represents the industry. it told us lenders must carry out thorough income assessments to make sure mortgages are affordable in the long term. decisions are made on a case—by—case basis. but there are concerns that people working in hospitality and travel are increasingly being seen as high risk.
1:26 pm
back in lincolnshire, lisa says she'll now have to spend a big chunk of her deposit on finding a new property to rent. i genuinely feel that the opportunity own my own home has gone — and it's devastating. lisa harding ending that report by sarah corker. the music industry is weighted against artists, with even successful pop stars seeing "pitiful returns" from streaming — that's according to a group of mps. they're calling for a "complete reset" of the market, with musicians being given a "fair share" of the money that uk record labels earn from streaming. our business reporter ramzan karmali has more. # freak out # le freak, c'est chic. # the unmistakable sound of chic, with founder nile rodgers on guitar. he's notjust a performer though. he's composed and produced records for some of the biggest artists in history, from bowie to madonna, diana ross to daft punk, and he's responsible for the sale of millions of records worldwide.
1:27 pm
without the song there is no music business. he was just one high profile star to appear before mps to explain why he thought the current music streaming system isn't fair. i put out a record with an artist and he had five million streams. five million streams was meaningless. it's incredible that a number like five million, or ten million, can be meaningless as far as what you take out economically. i mean, itjust doesn't make any sense. in a report out today, a group of mps has concluded the balance needs to be redressed. but several of the performers who gave evidence to the committee said many of their peers weren't speaking out against the status quo for fear of losing favour with major record labels and streaming services. streaming has clearly brought significant profits to the music industry. but as nile's business partner explains, the distribution of those profits is what's at the heart of the problem. the issue is not the streaming
1:28 pm
services themselves. they've saved the music industry. really what's happened is music has gone from being a discretionary purchase in the context of streaming, to now very much being a utility. that money is not being shared by the record companies on a fair and equitable basis with the artists. # now what you hear is not a test �*cos i'm rapping to the beat. # the group of mps wants the government to order an investigation by the competition and markets authority to look at the impact of the dominance of the major music companies. they hope an overhaul of the streaming industry will help to create an environment where musicians get a fairer slice of the profits. ramzan karmali, bbc news. now, after it was postponed last summer because of covid, the open championship is finally under way at sandwich. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss reports. ? morning, everybody. you have your qr code on your ticket. what's a little bit of queueing
1:29 pm
when you've waited two years? after being postponed by the pandemic, finally, the fans flock to sandwich. the crowd limited to 32,000 but, under blue skies, the excitement was boundless. yeah, i've missed being back at golf, so really enjoying being back on the course. a lovely day for it. really looking forward to the day. it's great. it's very special. the weather's out and the sun's shining for us, so it's wonderful. the fact you're out in the fresh air, in the open, and don't feel particularly at risk with the current situation, it's good to be here. and, atjust after 6:30am, england's richard bland got the ball rolling, the start of what is one of sport's most unpredictable events. among the first to impress, america's brian harman, who soon found his range and raced to the top of the leaderboard. it's nearly 30 years since an englishman won the open, but andy sullivan posted a fine opening round, while danny willett was soon reminding everyone why he's
1:30 pm
a former masters champion. and he wasn't the only one enjoying himself. jordan spieth won the open four years ago. could he do it again? but, among the long grass, others were losing their way, big—hitting bryson dechambeau lurching from one calamity to another. golf can sometimes seem a very cruel game. yes, this course is always a really tough test for the players. lots of long grass, lots of humps and bumps. very early days of course at the moment but at the moment's canada's mackenzie hughes leads the way. andy sullivan and danny willett both in the chasing pack. lots of big names still to start their rounds, including rory mcilroy, who goes off at 3:20pm. many thanks, andy. time for the weather now, here's chris fawkes.

44 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on