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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 15, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. at least nine people have died — and dozens are missing — after floods in western germany. proposals for a "snack tax" on salty and sugary foods — to try to tackle britain's obesity crisis. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. majorca, minorca and ibiza are back on the amber travel list — two weeks after going green. south africa is putting 25,000 troops on the streets — in response to widespread violence sparked by the jailing of the former president, jacob zuma. britney spears has a new lawyer in her case to win control
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of her business affairs from her father — and she's been celebrating with cartwheels. the husband of a bbc radio presenter who died after having the astra zeneca covid vaccination calls for everyone to be given a choice about which vaccine they have — until more research can be carried out into rare side effects. she was just. giving the right thing, that was all— just. giving the right thing, that was all she was doing. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. at least nine people have died and more than 70 are missing after heavy rain and flooding in south western germany. at least four people died
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in the village of schuld in the western state of rhineland—palatinate, reports say that they were on the roof of houses that were swept away as they waiting for help. also among the dead are two firemen and two men who were caught in flooded cellars. heavy flooding has turned streams and streets into raging torrents, sweeping away cars and causing some buildings to collapse. helicopters are trying to pick up people from rooftops and flooded streets. let's bring in our germany correspondent damien mcguinness, in berlin. what are the details? this region has never seen _ what are the details? this region has never seen anything - what are the details? this region has never seen anything like - what are the details? this region| has never seen anything like this. what we've seen over the past 2a hours is record levels of rainfall, this is because there's been an area of low pressure stock over the region for the past week. as a result, rivers, and there are lots
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of small rivers in this region, had been filling up for a while and this latest bout of heavy rainfall really kicked things over the edge. at least nine people are dead, at least 70 are missing. police have set up a hotline calling for information about people who are missing, any links to potential fatalities. about people who are missing, any links to potentialfatalities. this whole region now, which is huge and incredibly densely populated, has been hit very hard. we are seeing right throughout areas of north rhine—westphalia, rhineland—palatinate and also the region touching france are really affected by terrible pictures of cars being swept away, people stuck on their roof, people trying to rescue them. some of those areas are cut off, so rescue forces are finding it difficult to reach
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people. finding it difficult to reach --eole. . ~' ,, in england there are fresh calls for sugar and salt taxes to be introduced and for vegetables to be prescribed on the nhs. it's part of a wide—ranging review into the nation's health and eating habits, which was commissioned by the government in 2019. the review is calling for what it calls "historic reforms of the food system", which it says are needed to protect the nhs and save the environment. let's take a look at the review�*s main proposals.
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0ur correspondent ellie price has more. it's just what the doctor ordered, but not what you might expect. cathy runs the charity care merseyside, involved in what's called social prescribing. patients are referred by their local gp, and then offered things like exercise support and cooking advice. here, they also provide healthy food to low income families. from the point of referral, we assess a person's needs. we assess what it is they need support with, and we offer them a various range of levels of support. so what we aim to do is to reduce gp consultations, to reduce hospitalisations, and to try and tackle in a holistic way, how to help people improve their health and well—being. maureen's got a number of physical and mental health issues, and has used the local prescribing
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service in different ways. today's report recommends the government tries out projects like this across the country, with the aim to improve people's health and reduce the cost to the nhs of treatment. i try not to get emotional, but i find it very difficult to manage. if we had an ideal amount of fruit and veg in our diet, it would be easier to create stuff, i suppose, that was easy to eat. you need variety, and it's the variety that costs. i could pay for it, but it means something else has to go, and it means we go in the red instead of staying in the black, and i can't cope with the worry of being in the red. today's report says a poor diet contributes to 64,000 deaths every year in england alone, and costs the economy an estimated £74 billion. there's an environmental impact too — globalfood production is the second biggest contributor to climate change.
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the report recommends a tax on sugary and salty foods. if producers don't change their recipes to use less, it could mean a price increase of 15—25% for desserts, biscuits and sweets. the report also calls for food education in schools to be taken more seriously. that's exactly what andrew hartshorn, a teacher in coventry, is already trying to do. and by the way, his students don't say, "yes, sir", they say, "0ui, chef." this has got to be a sustained effort with lots of support across the country, support in the classroom, helping fund ingredients, ensuring its place on the curriculum, ensuring its place on the timetable is safeguarded. it needs to be supported for our parents at home, so they're able to access ingredients. the national food strategy estimates its recommendations would cost around eli; billion a year, and bring in up to £31; billion a year in tax revenue. for the report's author, the cost of doing nothing would be terrible damage to the environment — and to our bodies.
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ellie price, bbc news. the review was led by the co—founder of the leon restaurant chain, henry dimbleby. he explained the findings. so, the current way people think in this country is what you need to do about diet—related disease is educate people, we need to exercise and assert willpower. the corollary is that is if you can't get off your bum and exercise, it's your own fault. simply, none of that is true. exercise is a fantastic benefit in itself but it's not very good at helping you lose weight. we tell these people exercise will help them lose weight, they go to the gym, they don't lose weight and they stop exercising. exercise is fantastic it's just not good at helping you lose weight. there is an interaction between the commercial incentives of companies and our appetite. we find the speeds they are marketing delicious, they don't make us feel as quickly, we eat more, they invest more, we eat more, they invest more.
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there have been 14 previous obesity plans in this country and almost all of them have been voluntary measures. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly — and that is what we are recommending with the sugar and salt reformulation tax. it's not a tax increase price, it's to make the companies reformulate, as they did with the sugary drinks tax. they take the bad stuff out and make the worst food better. i'm nowjoined by tam fry, who is the chairman of the national 0besity forum. hello. a new tax on sugar and salt to drive up the price of bad food, goodidea? to drive up the price of bad food, good idea? i’m to drive up the price of bad food, good idea?— to drive up the price of bad food, aood idea? �* . , _, ., good idea? i'm fairly welcoming of this. a good idea? i'm fairly welcoming of this- a few — good idea? i'm fairly welcoming of this. a few years _ good idea? i'm fairly welcoming of this. a few years ago, _ good idea? i'm fairly welcoming of this. a few years ago, the - good idea? i'm fairly welcoming of this. a few years ago, the chief. this. a few years ago, the chief medical officer for england said to borisjohnson, the sugary drinks levy in 2018 was a great success,
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what you've now got to do is extend it to more drinks but also onto food. this is where we are going and i congratulate mr dimbleby on his report. i congratulate mr dimbleby on his reort. ~ , , �* ., i congratulate mr dimbleby on his reort, . , , �* ., ., i congratulate mr dimbleby on his report-— this - i congratulate mr dimbleby on his report._ this food i i congratulate mr dimbleby on his report._ this food is| simply say to people, this food is bad for you, this is good for you, now make your decision? it’s bad for you, this is good for you, now make your decision? it's not aood now make your decision? it's not good enough. — now make your decision? it's not good enough, because _ now make your decision? it's not good enough, because the - now make your decision? it's not good enough, because the food i good enough, because the food available is not as healthy as it fig“??? é fit??? fig??? 555 if. be. eee'leele ie fieeee eeeiee�*s ee ie be. food is an effort to tell the food industry reformulate, they industry to reformulate, and they can in industry to reformulate, and they can be in industry to reformulate, and they can be done in industry to reformulate, and they can had be done in know m buy it. that hasn't qm...”
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buy it. tha the ;n�*t qm...” buy it. tha the point qm...” buy it. tha the point where n t.........., we've come to the point where we think welcome it. when it sugary e ee' when itee:ee;e,;; l..- sugary drinks, eeeeeee when itee:ee;e,;; e..e.eee sugary drinks, they when itee:eee,;; e..e.eee to sugary drinks, they profited from it and i think will from =z= further tax. 5 this further tax. it is interesting about the - levy, _ this further tax. it is interesting about the - levy sugar - this further tax. it is interesting about the - levy sugar in i such eii such so eii such so it eii such so it has eii such so it has actually; of such drinks. so it has actually been more profitable for them in the end. you think we need legislation of the back of these proposals, actual legislation to push producers to reduce salt and sugar in tomato ketchup, breakfast cereals, etc? absolutely. some of the amounts of sugar being put in biscuits, cakes, milkshakes and things like that is extortionate. and people have said, you've got to do something about it. at the industry knows that fat and sugar particularly are extremely inviting the taste and they will
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just go on doing it until they are told to stop. now they are being told to stop. now they are being told to stop and i think it will happen. it won't happen immediately, it's going to take some time for this to work through but i think in two or three years we will see a totally different scene when we come totally different scene when we come to buy other snacks. there will not be so much salt, fat or sugar and everybody will win.— the uk government has defended the decision to put majorca and ibiza on the amber list for travel — just two weeks after they were moved to green. it means that — from monday morning — most holiday—makers returning to the uk from the spanish islands will have to isolate for ten days unless they're fully vaccinated. andrew walker reports. a warm mediterranean beach is a tempting prospect for many after more than a year of restrictions. some saw the spanish balearic islands as an appealing choice for a summer getaway. but the changes announced by the government will cause problems for some, like medi, who's due to fly to majorca at the weekend.
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i've had one vaccine three weeks ago. i know from monday people who are double vaccinated don't need to quarantine when they return from amber list countries. however, i will need to quarantine, and that's not great for my mental health, but i'm very lucky i can work from home. infection rates have doubled on the island since they were added to the green watch listjust over two weeks ago. the government traffic light system puts countries with the least severe covid situations into the green category. no quarantine is required for returning travellers. bulgaria and hong kong are being added. then there's the green watch list, which is a warning that the country is at risk of moving to the next category, which is amber. adult travellers have to quarantine for ten days. from monday, that will no longer apply to those who are fully vaccinated. many young people aren't, so they will be affected as the balearic islands moves to amber.
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and for red list countries, quarantine in a special hotel is required. four countries, including indonesia and cuba, are being added. and from the government, a warning that further changes to the lists are possible. i think we all know by now that travelling at the moment is not the same as it was before there was a global pandemic. and it does mean that when people book, particularly if you're booking to a green watch list country, you need to make sure you can get your money back. you need to make sure you can re—book your accommodation whenever required. the changes come into force at 4am on monday. they will also apply in wales and scotland. northern ireland is expected to follow suit, though it will be a further week before the amber list exemption from quarantine for fully vaccinated adults applies there. andrew walker, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. at least nine people have died and more than 70 are missing after floods in western germany. proposals for a tax on sugary and salty foods to try to tackle britain's obesity crisis.
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majorca, minorca and ibiza are back on the amber travel list, two weeks after going green. south africa is increasing the number of troops on the streets to 25,000 — in response to widespread violence sparked by the jailing of the former president, jacob zuma. more than 1,700 people have been arrested since the violence erupted — and at least 72 have been killed. the south african government is trying to ensure there are no food shortages as a result of the looting of shops. mark lobel has more. surveying what's left of her looted shop. with few easy answers in a lawless south africa. even taxi drivers are taking matters into their own hands.—
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drivers are taking matters into their own hands. ever since from monda , their own hands. ever since from monday. we _ their own hands. ever since from monday, we don't _ their own hands. ever since from monday, we don't see _ their own hands. ever since from monday, we don't see business. | monday, we don't see business. that's why we say, we need to come here and try to protect whatever is still left. �* , here and try to protect whatever is still left. . , ., . here and try to protect whatever is still left. . , ., _ still left. after being outpaced by rotesters still left. after being outpaced by protesters for — still left. after being outpaced by protesters for almost _ still left. after being outpaced by protesters for almost a _ still left. after being outpaced by protesters for almost a week, - still left. after being outpaced by| protesters for almost a week, the government is promising thousands more troops on the streets. figs government is promising thousands more troops on the streets.- more troops on the streets. as the deployments _ more troops on the streets. as the deployments improve, _ more troops on the streets. as the deployments improve, numbers i deployments improve, numbers increase — deployments improve, numbers increase and the situation stabilises, a decision will be taken by the _ stabilises, a decision will be taken by the state president of whether to declare _ by the state president of whether to declare or— by the state president of whether to declare or not declare a state of emergency. declare or not declare a state of emergency-— emergency. for this grieving grandmother _ emergency. for this grieving grandmother and _ emergency. for this grieving l grandmother and heartbroken emergency. for this grieving - grandmother and heartbroken sister, it's all too late. morning 15—year—old reportedly shot by a stray bullet in the unrest. it’s stray bullet in the unrest. it�*s unprecedented. we haven't been able to go ten kilometres in either direction because of the wholesale looting and criminality and fear in every single direction. this
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looting and criminality and fear in every single direction.— every single direction. this chaos was initially _ every single direction. this chaos was initially sparked _ every single direction. this chaos was initially sparked by _ every single direction. this chaos was initially sparked by the i every single direction. this chaos| was initially sparked by the arrest of former anc presidentjacob zuma of former anc president jacob zuma for failing of former anc presidentjacob zuma forfailing to appear of former anc presidentjacob zuma for failing to appear before a corruption commission. now, a dire warning from his son. we corruption commission. now, a dire warning from his son.— warning from his son. we are one massacre away. _ warning from his son. we are one massacre away, just _ warning from his son. we are one massacre away, just one - warning from his son. we are one | massacre away, just one massacre away _ massacre away, just one massacre away from _ massacre away, just one massacre away from a — massacre away, just one massacre away from a complete spiralling out of control— away from a complete spiralling out of control of the situation. his proposed _ of control of the situation. h 3 proposed solution is to of control of the situation. h e proposed solution is to deal with two issues he says are to blame. the imprisonment ofjacob zuma number one, imprisonment ofjacob zuma number one. and _ imprisonment ofjacob zuma number one, and numberto the imprisonment ofjacob zuma number one, and number to the lockdown which _ one, and number to the lockdown which i _ one, and number to the lockdown which i believe is causing these issues — which i believe is causing these issues. ~ ., which i believe is causing these issues. . , �*, issues. whatever the cause, it's as if a pandora's _ issues. whatever the cause, it's as if a pandora's box _ issues. whatever the cause, it's as if a pandora's box into _ issues. whatever the cause, it's as if a pandora's box into the - issues. whatever the cause, it's as if a pandora's box into the anc i issues. whatever the cause, it's as if a pandora's box into the anc led j if a pandora's box into the anc led country's problems is now open and set alight. country's problems is now open and set aliuht. ~ i. ., ., , set alight. when you have millions of mm: set alight. when you have millions of young people — set alight. when you have millions of young people with _ set alight. when you have millions of young people with lots - set alight. when you have millions of young people with lots of i of young people with lots of energies and no sense of value, then of course they are going to be available to be used as political pawns by factions of the anc. thea;r pawns by factions of the anc. they are sa in: pawns by factions of the anc. they are saying we _ pawns by factions of the anc. they are saying we have _ pawns by factions of the anc. they are saying we have been looted for many _ are saying we have been looted for many years — are saying we have been looted for many years through the system, our resources, _ many years through the system, our resources, our energy, and when we tried to _
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resources, our energy, and when we tried to put — resources, our energy, and when we tried to put food on the table, why are we _ tried to put food on the table, why are we suddenly do bad guys? south africa's tinderbox _ are we suddenly do bad guys? south africa's tinderbox situation _ are we suddenly do bad guys? salim africa's tinderbox situation needs resolving swiftly. mark label, bbc news. joining us now from durban is our correspondent, vumani mkhize. we can see people queueing up with shopping trolleys because of food shortages due to looting? yes. shortages due to looting? yes, absolutely- _ shortages due to looting? yes, absolutely- i— shortages due to looting? yes, absolutely. i mean _ shortages due to looting? yes, absolutely. i mean a _ shortages due to looting? yes, absolutely. i mean a suburb i shortages due to looting? ye: absolutely. i mean a suburb of durban north and this key is stretching for over a kilometre. people have been queueing up since the early morning and they are here to basically buy groceries. it is just an indication of how they've been affected by the looting, violence. many shops have been completely ransacked. as a result, food is running out in some places. let's speak to a couple of residents
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who live here in this suburb of durban. they've been here since this morning. how long have you been queueing up?— morning. how long have you been ua-ueueinu? �* , , . queueing up? we've been here since 5:30am. it queueing up? we've been here since 5:30am it is— queueing up? we've been here since 5:30am. it is still— queueing up? we've been here since 5:30am. it is still quite _ queueing up? we've been here since 5:30am. it is still quite long - queueing up? we've been here since 5:30am. it is still quite long and i 5:30am. it is still quite long and going _ 5:30am. it is still quite long and going all— 5:30am. it is still quite long and going all the way around the back four people desperate to get food and whatever they can to survive. have _ and whatever they can to survive. have you — and whatever they can to survive. have you been affected by the situation, have you been scared? yes, very. we are very uncertain about— yes, very. we are very uncertain about what's going on in our country and our— about what's going on in our country and our province. if there's any help— and our province. if there's any help on— and our province. if there's any help on the _ and our province. if there's any help on the way, we have no idea. i've help on the way, we have no idea. we had _ help on the way, we have no idea. i've had friends who have been on patrol, _ i've had friends who have been on patrol, i'd — i've had friends who have been on patrol, i'd had a friend who has a baby— patrol, i'd had a friend who has a bahy al— patrol, i'd had a friend who has a baby at home with no formula. i have friends _ baby at home with no formula. i have friends with _ baby at home with no formula. i have friends with cats and dogs who don't have food _ friends with cats and dogs who don't have food. it's a very bad situation _ have food. it's a very bad situation.— have food. it's a very bad situation. . �*, ., ., ., situation. that's an indication of what's going _ situation. that's an indication of what's going on _ situation. that's an indication of what's going on here _ situation. that's an indication of what's going on here in - situation. that's an indication of what's going on here in the i situation. that's an indication of i what's going on here in the suburbs. can you imagine what's happening in the townships, where they have been closed off and unable to buy food.
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it's quite a devastating situation taking place right now in durban. what will resolve this? the reeked of it, it was _ what will resolve this? the reeked of it, it was sparked _ what will resolve this? the reeked of it, it was sparked by _ what will resolve this? the reeked of it, it was sparked by the - of it, it was sparked by the imprisonment of a former president, jacob zuma and it started with a number of trucks being burned on the m3 towards johannesburg. number of trucks being burned on the m3 towardsjohannesburg. that started at the weekend and it spiralled into a number of different attacks that started off in this province and then spread to johannesburg, soweto as well. some of the root causes can be attributed to poverty, unemployment and inequality. in south africa, the unemployment rate is 32%, youth unemployment rate is 32%, youth unemployment is 74%. about three out of four young people are unemployed and it's been described as a ticking time bomb in terms of the economic situation. added to that is the
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covid—19 pandemic where we have had a very strict lockdown. economically, people haven't been able to make a living and it's been very, very tough. added to that, all of these issues has ignited anger and dissatisfaction and resulted in looting that we have been seeing. thank you. uk prime minister borisjohnson will today insist that his plans for reducing inequality across the uk will not make rich parts of the country poorer. mrjohnson is to give a speech in the west midlands on what he calls his "levelling up" programme — at a time when some conservatives are worried that the party's traditional supporters are being neglected. let's talk to katie schmuecker, deputy director of policy and partnerships, joseph rowntree foundation which is an independent organisation that works to try to solve uk poverty. thank you for talking to us. i
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wonder if you could tell the audience had very little before the pandemic struck, what their situation now?— pandemic struck, what their situation now? ~ ., situation now? well, those who were in ove situation now? well, those who were in poverty before _ situation now? well, those who were in poverty before the _ situation now? well, those who were in poverty before the pandemic- situation now? well, those who were in poverty before the pandemic have | in poverty before the pandemic have been among those hardest hit over the period since it struck. the economic consequences have hit them harder, for those on low incomes, they are more likely to have seen their income is reduced, lost their jobs. they are also more likely to have been building up debt, whilst those better off are more likely to have been building up savings. as we head into a period of recovery, and there's some really good news in the latest employment figures but as we head into recovery, those who had the least to start with are still facing a really challenging time, not least because the government in october is planning to cut the incomes of people on universal
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credit by £20 per week. that, for some people, is the difference between their food budget for the week. that is what's been able to enable people to heat their homes and pay their bills over the winter. at £20 makes a really big difference when you're on a very low income. so, as we've come through towards the end of a really difficult period, taking money away from the poorest people in our country is simply not the right thing to do and it really sits at odds with the government that says it wants to level up. government that says it wants to levelu.�* , ~' government that says it wants to levelu. , ~ ., , level up. because you think that is essentially levelling _ level up. because you think that is essentially levelling down? - level up. because you think that is essentially levelling down? for i essentially levelling down? for those essentially levelling down? fr?“ those individuals, it is. if you look at people in low paid work and rely on universal credit, if you look at people who have lost their jobs and are reliant on social security to get them through this really challenging time they are having, that £20 reduction to their income hits them really hard. we
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estimate it's going to increase poverty, pull half a million people into poverty, so how can we say that is levelling up when some of the worst off in our country are going to be getting worse off?- worst off in our country are going to be getting worse off? thank you for talkinu to be getting worse off? thank you for talking to _ to be getting worse off? thank you for talking to us. _ and our viewers in the uk can watch the prime minister's speech here on the bbc news channel shortly after 11 o'clock this morning. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk is now higher than pre—pandemic levels in the three months tojune. data from the office for national statistics shows there were 862,000 jobs on offer between april and june. that's over 77,000 more than the first three months of 2020. the 0ns says the rise is being fuelled by vacancies in hospitality and retail. the figures also show companies are hiring at a quick pace. there were 356,000 more workers on payrolls injune. that's the biggest rise since the start of the pandemic. however the figure is still over 200,000 down on pre—pandemic levels and stands at 28.9 million.
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the 0ns also said that the unemployment rate was 4.8% between march and may. britney spears has won the right to choose her own lawyer, as she fights to end a conservatorship that has controlled her life since 2008. she told a court her father jamie should be removed from his role in it — and charged with abuse of his position. she thanked herfans for their support — and celebrated by doing cartwheels. britney has chosen the prominent hollywood lawyer mathew rosengart to represent her. he's former federal prosecutor and his a—list clients include steven spielberg and actor sean penn. mr rosengart spoke to reporters following yesterday's hearing. first, i want to thank britney spears for her courage, her passion, her humanity. additionally, as everyone who was present today heard, as they heard onjune the 23rd,
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her testimony was clear, it was lucid, it was powerful and it was compelling. second, i want to thank judge penny for her courtesy, her decency, her rulings, her respect for britney spears' constitutional rights, which we believe have not been fully complied with over the past decade, potentially. my firm and i are going to be taking a top to bottom look at what's happened here over the past decade. drjean cirillo is a new york—based lawyer and psychologist. shejoins me now. what do you think of this decision by thejudge to what do you think of this decision by the judge to allow britney spears to appoint her own lawyer? it’s to appoint her own lawyer? it's wonderful. _ to appoint her own lawyer? it's wonderful, it _ to appoint her own lawyer? ut�*s wonderful, it is a first step but it's a giant step. a murderer can choose their own attorney and they can also choose their own
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psychologist or psychiatrist if they disagree with the court evaluation. britney has been deprived of constitutional rights but the worst criminals have for 13 years. britney has also resisted _ criminals have for 13 years. britney has also resisted a _ criminals have for 13 years. britney has also resisted a psychological . has also resisted a psychological assessment. what is the significance of that? i assessment. what is the significance of that? ., assessment. what is the significance of that? ~' , . ., . assessment. what is the significance of that? ~' , .. . , of that? i think the significance is the same way _ of that? i think the significance is the same way she _ of that? i think the significance is the same way she is _ of that? i think the significance is the same way she is resisting i of that? i think the significance is the same way she is resisting the lawyer, conservatorship, the person managing herfinances, all these managing her finances, all these people managing herfinances, all these people are hired directly or indirectly by her father. they are not working for her technically because they are being paid through her all the money she earns but she has no control over it. the fact she isn't allowed to choose anyone and hasn't been allowed to choose anyone for 13 years, he's going to be on her team, that speaks volumes as far as how little freedom she has had. she's like an adolescent, she's
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allowed to ride in a car with her boyfriend, she's not to have a cell phone. she's being treated like a child and the reality is she has trouble managing her money, as many creative people do, she can a financial manager, she can hire someone to help drive her around, set up appointments. these are people that many celebrities choose of their own volition. brute people that many celebrities choose of their own volition.— of their own volition. we heard her last month — of their own volition. we heard her last month speak— of their own volition. we heard her last month speak for _ of their own volition. we heard her last month speak for the _ of their own volition. we heard her last month speak for the first i of their own volition. we heard her last month speak for the first time | last month speak for the first time in many years when she addressed the court suggesting her father be removed from the legal agreement that has controlled her affairs. this time she addressed the court via her lawyer's phone. she was texting saying, i want to say something, and she actually said, i'm here to press charges, i'm angry, you're allowing my dad to ruin my life, i have to get rid of my dad and charge him with
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conservatorship abuse. is that a realistic possibility? i conservatorship abuse. is that a realistic possibility?— conservatorship abuse. is that a realistic possibility? i don't think it's auoin realistic possibility? i don't think it's going to _ realistic possibility? i don't think it's going to happen _ realistic possibility? i don't think it's going to happen because i realistic possibility? i don't thinkl it's going to happen because what he's done hasn't really been anything criminal, because if he's done something criminal, then the court has to look at their own behaviour in allowing him to continue with this. with so much power for 13 years. continue with this. with so much powerfor 13 years. i continue with this. with so much power for 13 years. i think what she's saying is, i don't want him in charge of anything. everybody else has done the right ethical thing and resigned except forjodie, who she has supposedly been texting and saying she wants her to stay at least for now. this is letting her father know that she is not going to lay down and play dead like she's been doing for 13 years, she's not going to do that any more.- going to do that any more. thank ou. the headlines on bbc news. at least nine people have died
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and dozens are missing after floods in western germany. proposals for a "snack tax" on salty and sugary foods, to try to tackle britain's obesity crisis. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. majorca, minorca and ibiza are back on the amber travel list, two weeks after going green. south africa is putting 25,000 troops on the streets after widespread violence sparked by the jailing of the former president, jacob zuma. the husband of a bbc radio presenter who died after having the astrazeneca covid vaccination calls for everyone to be given a choice about which vaccine they have, until more research can be carried out into rare side effects. she was just doing the right thing. that's all she was doing. the united nations says afghanistan
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is facing a humanitarian catastrophe caused by a surge in violence. attacks by taliban insurgents have increased as american and other forces withdraw from the country. in an exclusive interview, the un's humanitarian coordinator dr ramiz alakbarov said it was one of the worst crises he'd seen. he spoke to our correspondent yogita limaye. afghanistan needs everything. it needs it more than it ever needed it before, and it needs it now. the humanitarian catastrophe we are watching unfolding in front of our eyes is really big. it is caused by war, ongoing human suffering associated with displacement caused by war and by the drought. it is a poor country. people didn't have much before. the war that is coming to them now, they are more than on the edge. why should the world be concerned about what's happening here? afghanistan is the heart of asia.
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what happens in afghanistan will influence every corner of asia, and by influencing every corner of asia, it will influence the world. don't forget it now. don't think it is not your problem. don't think this does not matter, because this matters on a global scale. it is an issue which requires global attention. do you think the world is doing enough right now? no. not nearly. half of the people of afghanistan, about 18 million people, are in extreme need of assistance. right now, over 10 million people are in an acute state of malnutrition. more than half of the children under five are suffering from hunger. we still need more funds to provide food, shelter and meet the immediate needs of the people in terms of access to clean water
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and in terms of providing dignity and safety to all of those who are suffering from the ongoing conflict. is this one of the worst humanitarian crises that the un is dealing with right now in the world? absolutely. it is one of the worst crises. i have served 27 years with the united nations. i have been around the world. i have seen how it has unfolded in africa, in haiti, latin america and other places. this is one of the worst crises we have seen, and it has the potential to get even worse than it is right now. we should stop it before it gets even worse. scientists are warning that the nhs could be pushed to breaking point this winter by the threat from three respiratory viruses, including covid. a report from the academy of medical sciences says action is needed now to prevent that and calls for extra staff and capacity in the health service. here's our health
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correspondent catherine burns. empty streets and deserted stations — lockdown was our first defence in the pandemic, as people stayed at home to stop covid spreading. at the same time, it prevented us catching other viruses, too. but as we're about to ease into something closer to life as normal, researchers are worried that we could see a resurgence in flu cases this winter. a reasonable worst case scenario would be about two times more cases than normal — enough to potentially see tens of thousands of extra deaths. they're also concerned that the burden from rsv, another virus that often affects children and the elderly, could double too. winter is always a pressurised time for the nhs, and that's before considering covid and the record backlog of patients waiting for treatments. but researchers say much depends on what we do between now and then. so, as well as covid, they're calling for tests for flu
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and rsv at the same time, arguing that the technology exists and it's just a question of logistics. it's very important to be able to identify when you've got several different viruses transmitting at the same time, which one it is that people have got. and if you can do that, of course, you can look after them better. another recommendation is to prioritise vaccines, whether for covid, any possible booster jabs in the autumn, or flu vaccines for anybody eligible. the report also stresses the importance of making sure people can afford to isolate if they're infected. but there's a lot of focus too on what people can do to help themselves and others. because the steps we've taken to protect ourselves from covid, like masks, social distancing and fresh air, can only help with other respiratory viruses too. catherine burns, bbc news.
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with me is professor stephen holgate, a respiratory specialist at the university of southampton — he contributed to the report. also i'm joined by lynne laidlaw, who has a rare condition, behcet�*s disease, and has a compromised immune system. thank you forjoining us. so what is thank you for “oining us. so what is the message — thank you forjoining us. so what is the message now _ thank you forjoining us. so what is the message now to _ thank you forjoining us. so what is the message now to make - thank you forjoining us. so what is the message now to make sure i thank you forjoining us. so what is the message now to make sure it l thank you forjoining us. so what is| the message now to make sure it is not so challenging this winter? three messages, really, firstly, vaccination, vaccination, vaccination, vaccination, vaccination and this is for influenza as well as covid—19. secondly, we have got to free up beds in the nhs if we are going to have this increase in respiratory virus infections that professor johnson talked about a few moments ago. and thirdly, we need to support people in self isolation. it is very
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hard for people sometimes to be able to do this unless we provide support. so that is the main reason why we really need to have the localisation of activity in the coming few months, to make sure that communities really do support their fellow citizens and ensure that people are as safe as possible. shes people are as safe as possible. as co—chair of the patients and carers reference group, what are your concerns?— reference group, what are your concerns? , ., ., , ., concerns? just along the lines that were outlined. _ concerns? just along the lines that were outlined. we _ concerns? just along the lines that were outlined. we were _ concerns? just along the lines that were outlined. we were mixed i concerns? just along the lines that i were outlined. we were mixed group, with different things, but we were very clear— with different things, but we were very clear that communication had to be key— very clear that communication had to be key and _ very clear that communication had to be key and also involving communities because i think the success— communities because i think the success we have seen with covid is local— success we have seen with covid is local solutions to local problems when _ local solutions to local problems when it — local solutions to local problems when it comes to vaccine hesitancy and that— when it comes to vaccine hesitancy and that this is scary. you know, i sit and _ and that this is scary. you know, i sit and expert advisory group and this was— sit and expert advisory group and this was scary but if we all band together, — this was scary but if we all band together, we can come through this and we _ together, we can come through this and we can— together, we can come through this and we can deal with it. but things
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need _ and we can deal with it. but things need to— and we can deal with it. but things need to be — and we can deal with it. but things need to be put into place. people want _ need to be put into place. people want to— need to be put into place. people want to shield and isolate but we need _ want to shield and isolate but we need to— want to shield and isolate but we need to help them do so.- want to shield and isolate but we need to help them do so. right, what articularl need to help them do so. right, what particularly was _ need to help them do so. right, what particularly was scary _ need to help them do so. right, what particularly was scary to _ need to help them do so. right, what particularly was scary to you? - need to help them do so. right, what particularly was scary to you? so i i particularly was scary to you? so i think that we _ particularly was scary to you? so i think that we just. .. _ particularly was scary to you? so i think that we just... so on a personal— think that we just... so on a personal level, as somebody that lives with— personal level, as somebody that lives with a rare autoimmune disease, _ lives with a rare autoimmune disease, and who is on immunosuppressants, there was the personal— immunosuppressants, there was the personal risk to me, and i think... we all— personal risk to me, and i think... we all want — personal risk to me, and i think... we all want this to be over, don't we? _ we all want this to be over, don't we? but— we all want this to be over, don't we? but it's— we all want this to be over, don't we? but it's not and we just need to hang _ we? but it's not and we just need to hang on— we? but it's not and we just need to hang on in— we? but it's not and we just need to hang on in there. i think it was the idea that _ hang on in there. i think it was the idea that society was opening up, that, _ idea that society was opening up, that, you — idea that society was opening up, that, you know, this kind of freedom. _ that, you know, this kind of freedom, when actually, it is not, and if— freedom, when actually, it is not, and if we — freedom, when actually, it is not, and if we all— freedom, when actually, it is not, and if we alljust take reasonable precautions, that can help. professor, you said vaccination, vaccination, vaccination by the autumn, the plan is that the whole of the adult population will have been vaccinated. i mean, that is going to help massively, isn't it? oh, hugely. this is our life—saver,
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0h, hugely. this is our life—saver, really, vaccination, people have got to understand that this is the gate through which we have a pass to free us from this virus. the only way we can have success is if we can defend ourselves against it, and of course, if we do that, then the virus eventually, hopefully, will gradually fade away, and that is what we want to see happen. thank ou for what we want to see happen. thank you forjoining _ what we want to see happen. thank you forjoining us. _ researchers have identified more than 200 symptoms of long covid, in the largest international study to date of patients who suffer persistent problems after contracting covid—19. the team, led by ucl scientists, together with a patient—led research collaborative, found that the most common long—term symptoms were fatigue, post—exertional malaise, and cognitive dysfunction, often called brain fog. claire hastie has suffered with long covid for the last 16 months and has set up a long covid support group online, which now has 42,000 members.
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hello. good morning. how has this chanced hello. good morning. how has this changed everyday _ hello. good morning. how has this changed everyday life? _ hello. good morning. how has this| changed everyday life? completely. hello. good morning. how has this l changed everyday life? completely. i now have to — changed everyday life? completely. i now have to use _ changed everyday life? completely. i now have to use a _ changed everyday life? completely. i now have to use a wheelchair - changed everyday life? completely. i now have to use a wheelchair where l changed everyday life? completely. i j now have to use a wheelchair where i used to cycle two miles a day on my commute, and my three children —— to have my three children have long covid and they are off school today with tummy pains and nausea. i have not been able to work for more than a year and i'm onlyjust part—time, easing my way back into reduced duties, and i may or may not end up be able to work in myalgia because i'm not sure i have the cognitive strength and capacity to keep everything in my brain. bend strength and capacity to keep everything in my brain. and how do ou feel everything in my brain. and how do you feel about _ everything in my brain. and how do you feel about the _ everything in my brain. and how do you feel about the effect _ everything in my brain. and how do you feel about the effect on - everything in my brain. and how do you feel about the effect on your i you feel about the effect on your life? �* , , , , , life? i've been surprisingly accepting _ life? i've been surprisingly accepting of— life? i've been surprisingly accepting of it _ life? i've been surprisingly accepting of it in _ life? i've been surprisingly accepting of it in a - life? i've been surprisingly accepting of it in a way i life? i've been surprisingly i accepting of it in a way because i figure i need to focus my efforts on trying to get help for people rather than getting frustrated or angry or anything like that but a lot of people in our group are massively struggling. they are losing their
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livelihoods and their relationships are breaking down. it is incredibly, hugely debilitating and a massive strain on families and carers as well. , ., , strain on families and carers as well. i. , ., ,, well. do you feel it is taken seriously — well. do you feel it is taken seriously now? _ well. do you feel it is taken seriously now? we - well. do you feel it is taken seriously now? we have i well. do you feel it is taken seriously now? we have a l well. do you feel it is taken i seriously now? we have a huge international study today, scientists at ucl talking about the fact there are about 200 potential symptoms of long covid. actually, the are symptoms of long covid. actually, they are scientists _ symptoms of long covid. actually, they are scientists but _ symptoms of long covid. actually, they are scientists but they - symptoms of long covid. actually, they are scientists but they are i they are scientists but they are also patients and that is really important, i would say. they published the pre—reportjust after christmas —— this just before christmas —— this just before christmas and it has taken seven months to be published, due to what you need to do to get peer review. to me, it is crucial, the definitive paper on symptoms and their impact. we fed into the survey and helped review it and disseminated it in the group. it is vitally important that anyone who is studying long covid read this paper as a starting point. why is that?— why is that? because it is the only stud that why is that? because it is the only study that characterises _ why is that? because it is the only study that characterises all - why is that? because it is the only study that characterises all of i why is that? because it is the only study that characterises all of the l study that characterises all of the symptoms that patients have
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identified to date, and so many studies just talk about the classic fatigue, shortness of breath, which really underplays the severity of the symptoms, and the impact on people's ability to function in their daily lives and to work. hand their daily lives and to work. and what have _ their daily lives and to work. and what have medics been able to say to you about the potential of you being how you used to be?— how you used to be? nothing, in a word, how you used to be? nothing, in a word. because _ how you used to be? nothing, in a word, because nobody _ how you used to be? nothing, in a word, because nobody knows, i how you used to be? nothing, in a word, because nobody knows, we| how you used to be? nothing, in a i word, because nobody knows, we will get better, how we will get better and how fully we will recover. the closest proxies we can look at are things like people who recovered from sars or mers. i'm optimistic that i will regain a quality—of—life but it might take a couple of years also but i think a certain proportion of people may have lifelong issues and we don't not white —— we don't know what might come to want us in later life when we are are perhaps more susceptible to things like dementia, parkinson's. nobody knows.
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to things like dementia, parkinson's. nobod knows. ., ., , ., parkinson's. nobody knows. thank you for “oininr parkinson's. nobody knows. thank you forjoining us- — the headlines on bbc news. at least nine people have died and more than 70 are missing after floods in western germany. proposals for a tax on sugary and salty foods to try to tackle britain's obesity crisis. majorca, minorca and ibiza are back on the amber travel list, two weeks after going green. lisa shaw was 44 years old when she died, three weeks after having her first astrazeneca vaccination. the award—winning bbc radio presenter�*s family say she was treated for blood clots days after her firstjab, a side effect experts stress is extremely rare. official figures from the regulator the mhra, up to the end of last month, show there were 399 cases of blood clots and 71 deaths after more than 46 million doses of the vaccine.
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and public health england says the vaccination programme has so far prevented an estimated 27,000 deaths in england alone. but lisa's husband gareth is calling for everyone to be given a choice about which vaccine they have. i've been speaking to him in his first interview since her death. scary thing for me is that the vaccines are being given to people, and have been given to people and we were aware early in the year, we are aware that these vaccines come with certain risks. but for whatever reason, we don't know who these adverse reactions are going to appear in. it is a lottery. and... that thought is quite scary, that, you know, people are getting these jabs and we don't know whether it is
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going to have a bad reaction or not. and the guys in the hospital that were treating lisa, as i say, they didn't really know what they were facing. they did not know how to treat it, and for me, in a situation like that, you know, and i say this, and i am absolutely not an anti—vaxxer, but i say this, while we don't know this information, while we don't know how to treat people, while we don't know who it is going to affect, maybe the answer is going to affect, maybe the answer is to give people the alternative. there are alternative vaccines available. there is astrazeneca... so you are not saying because the astrazeneca roll—out? you are saying, give people a choice? linn. astrazeneca roll-out? you are saying, give people a choice? um, if there is a choice _ saying, give people a choice? um, if there is a choice available, _ saying, give people a choice? um, if there is a choice available, yeah. i i there is a choice available, yeah. i can understand it. it is not as if we don't have other vaccines
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available to us. we do. you know, so while there is this cloud over astrazeneca, then maybe put it on ice and say, look, we are going to look into giving people the other jab. brute look into giving people the other 'ab. ~ ., look into giving people the other 'ab. . . . , . ., jab. we have a statement here from the regulator. _ jab. we have a statement here from the regulator, the _ jab. we have a statement here from the regulator, the mhra, _ jab. we have a statement here from the regulator, the mhra, and i jab. we have a statement here from the regulator, the mhra, and theyl the regulator, the mhra, and they say, "we are deeply saddened to hear about the death of miss shaw and our thoughts are with her family. 0ver thoughts are with her family. over 81 million doses of vaccines against covid—19 have now been administered in the uk, saving thousands of lives, through the biggest vaccination programme that has ever taken place in this country. no effective medicine or vaccine is without risk and our advice remains that the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine outweigh the risks in the majority of people and it is still vitally important that people come forward for their vaccination and forward for their vaccination and for their second dose, when invited to do so." i appreciate those numbers, those figures will be absolutely zero consolation to you
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and to your little boy. but you want to speak about what happened to lisa. , .,, , , to speak about what happened to lisa. , , , ., lisa. yes. those numbers that you talk about there _ lisa. yes. those numbers that you talk about there are _ lisa. yes. those numbers that you talk about there are staggering, i talk about there are staggering, incredible. what the vaccine has done is unbelievable and as i say, lisa and i both queued up to get our jabs and had no qualms about doing that. like you say, we were very positive about it. and as i say, the work these people have done to get the country back on its feet is outstanding. but... we need to recognise that there are families who have been affected by... by this jab. you know, i have seen, i have seen numbers that have been... taken from the government's own yellow
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card system, you know, a reputable doctor has pulled this information out that suggests that... the number of fatalities is approaching 1500 people, and... iappreciate... gareth, those are not the figures i have, just to say, in terms of a yellow card reports, that is when people report adverse reactions, there were 399 cases of blood clots with low platelet counts like lisa in the uk, following the astrazeneca jab. the overall case fatality rate was 18%, with 71 deaths. that is out of more than 32 million doses of the vaccine. shes of more than 32 million doses of the vaccine. �* , , of more than 32 million doses of the vaccine. e , ._ ., of more than 32 million doses of the vaccine. e , ,, ., , of more than 32 million doses of the vaccine. e , ., , ., vaccine. as i say, i am 'ust going b the vaccine. as i say, i am 'ust going by the numbers_ vaccine. as i say, i am 'ust going by the numbers i i vaccine. as i say, i am 'ust going by the numbers i have i vaccine. as i say, i amjust going by the numbers i have seen. i vaccine. as i say, i amjust going by the numbers i have seen. an l by the numbers i have seen. an independent doctor has reviewed the yellow card system, and she talked about approaching 1500 deaths. even 1500 deaths, like you say, versus the number of people that have been
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vaccinated, it is a drop in the ocean. it is, you know... but it hasn't been a drop in the ocean for ourfamily. i hasn't been a drop in the ocean for our family-— our family. i want to ask you finall , our family. i want to ask you finally, gareth, _ our family. i want to ask you finally, gareth, how- our family. i want to ask you finally, gareth, how would l our family. i want to ask you l finally, gareth, how would you our family. i want to ask you i finally, gareth, how would you like lisa to be remembered? lisa was always smiling. lisa was... so kind. she was my best friend. she was a fantastic mummy. and daughter and sister. and she was an excellent broadcaster. she would do anything for anybody. and... she wasjust doing the right thing. that's all she was doing. and...
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ijust don't i just don't want what has happened to her to be brushed under the carpet. if anything good can come of what has happened to lisa, so this does not happen to other people. you know, we sat there in the intensive care unit and we saw what they did to my beautiful wife to try and save her. i don't want that to happen to other people. i don't want anybody else to have to tell their children that their mummy�*s not coming home. as i say, if she can be remembered in that way, that she has done some good, that would be a positive. gareth, i am so, so sorry. thank you very much for talking to us today. 0k, very much for talking to us today.
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ok, thanks. 0ur medical editor is fergus walsh talked us through the risks associated with the vaccine and explained a little about lisa's condition. let me tell you about about this condition. in lisa's case, we have to wait for the inquest but the car and a's certificate talks about complications coming from the astrazeneca vaccine for covid—19, first dose. there is an unlikely side—effect, very rare, known as vaccine induced thrombosis and thrombocytopenia, a condition where clots form in combination with low platelet levels, and that is something that does not happen naturally. and therefore, the medical regulator, the mhra, thinks that there is a strong likelihood that there is a strong likelihood that it that there is a strong likelihood thatitis that there is a strong likelihood that it is the vaccine causing this.
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we have had just under 400 cases of that, most of them after the first dose, and we have had 71 deaths. so it is about one death per 650,000 doses. now all medicines, including vaccines, have risks as well as benefits, but you have to obviously set that against, for individuals and society, against the risk that you are trying to caution against and prevent, which is covid. with covid, there have been something like 1900 deaths per1 million people in the uk. and of course, covid itself is known to be a serious cause of clots, something like one in five people who are hospitalised with covid will end up with clots. this condition, i mean, it was first identified in march. it
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did not crop up in the trials, the global trials of the vaccine, because it is so rare. but it first started being investigated in around march. haematologists really went on a real quest to discover what was happening here and it relates, it is very similar to a condition caused very similar to a condition caused very rarely by a blood thinner called heparin, where, for some reason, the body seems to create antibodies against platelets. we want the immune system to create antibodies against covid but in these very rare cases, it seems to create antibodies against platelets. they start to plumb particular —— together. you get low platelet levels as well. and the vitality rate initially was much higher but it is now something like 17%. there is some suggestion that there is a
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slightly higher risk in women than men but it is not absolutely clear, and slightly higher incidence in younger people. and that is why initially the jcvi, the younger people. and that is why initially thejcvi, the body younger people. and that is why initially the jcvi, the body that recommends what vaccines go to which age groups, said ok, not going to give... we think that people under 30 should not have the astrazeneca vaccine, and that policy was introduced. and then in may, early may, they said actually, people under 40 should have moderna or pfizer and that is the policy now. our medical editor fergus walsh, 0ur medical editor fergus walsh, there. some mounis from afp regarding the storms and flooding in germany. aspi report in —— aspi reporting that at least 19 people are dead after the storms and flooding, according to regional officials there, not that long ago, we were reporting that 11 people had lost their lives but the afp agency are now saying that
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storms in western germany have left at least 19 people dead. the cuban government has authorised travellers arriving in the country to bring in food, medicine and other essentials without paying import duties — a move considered a concession to anti—government protesters. it was requested in an open letter by academics and intellectuals as a way to ease the shortages. brazil's president jair bolsonaro has been taken to hospital for tests after suffering persistent hiccups. he apologised for hicupping throughout this press conference, saying he'd had them for over a week. he was originally expected to remain under observation for 24—48 hours, but has since been transferred to sao paolo for additional tests for an obstructed intestine and possible surgery. in a tweet, mr bolsonaro said he would be "back soon, god willing".
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you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt. hello. after that stormy start to the week, we are now settling into a really summery spell of weather across much of the uk. there is going to be one or two exceptions and each day will be probably slightly different than the day that preceded it but a lot of the time it will be sunny for most of you and the temperatures will be on the rise, too. very pleasant out there this afternoon, in fact, for many, with some good, sunny spells. a bit more cloud to the north—west of scotland, which will bring some drizzle back to the hebrides later, and compared with the sunshine this morning across southern parts of england and wales, a bit more cloud here. cloudiest of all down through eastern parts of england. temperatures limited. but 24, 25 in the grampians, lake district fells and to the south—east of wales, compared to the cooler feel across the eastern coasts of england, where the breeze could have a bit of a challenge for the golfers at the start of the open at sandwich.
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the breeze eases down into the weekend, though, and strong sunshine will dominate. this evening and overnight, the breeze is still there in east anglia and the south—east, feeding in cloud. more cloud and breeze to the north—west of scotland with some patchy light rain or drizzle. but with clear skies in between, temperatures could get down into single figures for one or two but what you will find is that the night—time temperatures will rise along with the daytime ones. as we go into friday, high pressure nudging its way and i have got this one with the cloud around the high, to show northern and western areas where the cloud feeds in and that is why in the north—west highlands and islands, it will always be a bit cloudier over the next few days. some patchy drizzle, bit of a breeze on friday. elsewhere, some good sunny spells and fair weather cloud building up, and temperatures on friday afternoon to the east of scotland could hit around 27 degrees. similar kinds of values through parts of the midlands, south—east wales and southern england, 25 to the south—east of northern ireland. then into the weekend we go. still that cloud for the highlands and islands, some patchy rain at times. there will be the odd sunny spell here and there, it won't be grey
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all the way through. but lots of sunshine across much of the country. down a little bit, the temperatures across scotland, still warm in northern ireland, more widely into the upper 20s across parts of england and wales. and that process continues through saturday night into sunday. as the high pressure nudges a bit further south once again, weather fronts start to push in, bringing more cloud to scotland and northern ireland sunday. the temperatures rise a little bit. there will still be some sunshine around. a few showers for the highlands and islands again but with blue skies for much of england and wales, we could see temperatures in the south peak at around 30 degrees. and as i said, the nights are getting warmer, too.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: proposals for a "snack tax" on salty and sugary foods to try to tackle britain's obesity crisis. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. at least nine people have died and more than 70 are missing after flooding in western germany. —— at least 19 people. borisjohnson says his plans to build up areas of the uk won't make richer regions poorer. we'll be live for his speech shortly. the husband of a bbc radio presenter who died after having the astrazeneca covid vaccination calls for everyone to be given a choice about which vaccine they have until more research can be carried out into rare side effects.
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britney spears has a new lawyer in her case to win control of her business affairs from herfather and she's been celebrating with cartwheels. good morning. borisjohnson will today insist that his plans for reducing inequality across the uk will not make rich parts of the country poorer. the prime minister is due to give a speech in the west midlands shortly on what he calls his "levelling up" programme, at a time when some conservatives are worried that the party's traditional supporters are being neglected. borisjohnson has said this morning that "levelling up is not a jam—spreading operation" and "it's not robbing peter to pay paul". so what is it? let's speak to our political
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correspondent, ben wright. we are keeping an eye across what is happening because we are expecting to hear from happening because we are expecting to hearfrom borisjohnson happening because we are expecting to hear from borisjohnson shortly, but to hearfrom borisjohnson shortly, but do to hear from borisjohnson shortly, but do tell to hearfrom borisjohnson shortly, but do tell us, to hear from borisjohnson shortly, but do tell us, what is levelling up? but do tell us, what is levelling u? . ., ., , but do tell us, what is levelling u . ? . ., ., , ., but do tell us, what is levelling up? what does it 'am at spreading amount to? — up? what does it jam at spreading amount to? some _ up? what does it jam at spreading amount to? some of— up? what does it jam at spreading amount to? some of the - up? what does it jam at spreading amount to? some of the phrases l up? what does it jam at spreading i amount to? some of the phrases from this speech have been pre—briefed, as they always are, before the prime minister speaks in coventry and we will be waiting to see what this speech amounts to. it is certainly being pitched as an appeal to traditional tory voters in the south—east of england he may feel they have been forgotten about as they have been forgotten about as the government talks a lot about levelling up deprived parts of england, the midlands, some places in the north, which are clearly the focus of the government's levelling up focus of the government's levelling up agenda, but perhaps politically at the expense of those in the south—east and there are those in the tory party who feel stung after recent losses in the chesham and amersham by—election last month, the local elections in may where there are heavy losses in the south—east of england. borisjohnson clearly
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feels the need to say that levelling up feels the need to say that levelling up is an agenda that is good for the whole country and it will not have an adverse impact on traditional tory heartlands down in the south—east of england. i think that is what he is trying to do. whether there is any policy content to this speech, i do not think we will expect it to be very long, we will have to see. expect it to be very long, we will have to see-— expect it to be very long, we will have to see. ok, i think there may be a slight — have to see. ok, i think there may be a slight delay. _ have to see. ok, i think there may be a slight delay, so _ have to see. ok, i think there may be a slight delay, so we _ have to see. ok, i think there may be a slight delay, so we will- have to see. ok, i think there may be a slight delay, so we will leave | be a slight delay, so we will leave this at the now. there is a five minute delay, just hearing, so it we will return butjust move on to some other news for the meantime. thank you. at least 19 people have died and more than 70 are missing after heavy rain and flooding in south—western germany. at least four people died in the village of schuld in the western state of rhineland—palatinate — reports say that they were on the roof of houses that were swept away as they waited for help. also among the dead are two firemen and two men who were caught in flooded cellars. heavy flooding has turned streams and streets into raging torrents, sweeping away cars and causing some
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buildings to collapse. helicopters are trying to pick up people from rooftops and flooded streets. 0ur correspondent damien mcguiness sent us this from berlin around an hour ago. what we have seen over the past 24 hours is record high levels of rainfall and this is because there has been this level of low pressure stuck over the whole region now for about the past week or two. as a result of this, rivers, and there are lots of small rivers flowing into the rhine, flowing into the moselle in this region, have been filling up for a while now and this latest bout of heavy rainfall last night really tipped things over into the edge. so as you say, now at least nine dead, at least at 17 missing. police have set up a hotline calling for information, photos about people who are missing, about any links to potential fatalities. this whole region now, which is huge and incredibly densely populated, is hit very hard, so what we are seeing is right throughout areas of north rhine—westphalia,
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germany's most popular state, rhineland—palatinate, and also that region touching france, the saarland, are really affected by terrible pictures of cars being swept away, people stuck on their roofs, helicopters trying to rescue them and the difficulty now is that situation is not over in that region, because as we were saying, many people are missing, but also some of those areas are cut off, so rescue forces are finding it difficult to reach people. flooding having a terrible impact on a germany. we will keep you updated. we are waiting for the prime minister to give the speech on a levelling up. let's go back to our political correspondent, we just wanted to get an update on that developing story, but we expected to hear from the prime developing story, but we expected to hearfrom the prime minister shortly. just picking up on where we were, you are saying it is not expected there will be policy announcements today. when the prime minister talks about levelling up and it not being at the expense of
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it better off areas compared to poorer areas, it better off areas compared to poorerareas, he it better off areas compared to poorer areas, he has arrived, sorry i will cut you off again before you got a chance to speak. igrate i will cut you off again before you got a chance to speak.— i will cut you off again before you got a chance to speak. we will speak to ou got a chance to speak. we will speak to you after- — got a chance to speak. we will speak to you after- it _ got a chance to speak. we will speak to you after. it is _ got a chance to speak. we will speak to you after. it is great _ got a chance to speak. we will speak to you after. it is great to _ got a chance to speak. we will speak to you after. it is great to be - got a chance to speak. we will speak to you after. it is great to be here i to you after. it is great to be here at this amazing uk battery industrialisation centre which is a key part, as everyone knows, of our low carb and a vision for the future of uk industry. —— low carbon vision. particularly the automotive sector. wonderful to see you all. i wish i could tell you that this pandemic that we are going through is over and i wish i could say that from monday we could simply throw caution to the wind and behave exactly as we did before we had ever heard of covid for stock i wish i could say that, i can't. but what i can say is if we are careful and continue to respect there disease and its continuing menace, it is
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highly probable and all the scientists, or almost all the scientists, or almost all the scientists, or almost all, are agreed on this, highly probable that the west of the pandemic is behind us. there are difficult days and weeks ahead as we deal with the current wave of delta variant and there will sadly be more hospitalisations and more deaths, but with every day that goes by, we build it higher the wall of a vaccine acquired immunity, a wall thatis vaccine acquired immunity, a wall that is now higher and stronger in this country than almost anywhere else in the world. and with every day that goes by, our economy is slowly and cautiously picking itself up slowly and cautiously picking itself up off the floor, businesses are opening their doors. will have seen the employment figures at this morning, the growth in the number of jobs, people are coming back slowly to the office and over the next few weeks therefore, more and more people will find themselves back on their daily commute and as andy of their daily commute and as andy of the bank of england has said, there
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is every prospect that this country is every prospect that this country is poised to recover like a coiled spring. and it is the mission of this government to ensure that it so far as covid has entrenched problems and deepened inequalities, we need nowt to work double hard to overturn those inequalities. —— we need now to work. so that as far as possible, everyone everywhere feels the benefits of that recovery and that we build back better across the whole of the uk. we need to say from the beginning that before the pandemic began, the uk had, and still has, a more unbalanced economy than almost all our immediate biggest competitors in europe and more unbalanced than pretty much every major developed economy. when i say unbalanced, i mean that for too many people, geography it turns out to be destiny. take life
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expectancy, even before covid hit, it is an outrage that a man in glasgow or blackpool has an average of ten years less on this planet than someone growing up in heart in hampshire or in rutland. i do not know what people do in rutland, who knows? but they do. there is a growing imbalance. take university entrance. if you are a child on free school meals in london today, you now have more than double the chance of going to university than a child on a free school meals growing up outside london. it is an astonishing fact that 31 years after german unification, the capita gdp of the north—east of our country, of yorkshire, these midlands, wales and northern ireland is now lower than in what was the former east germany.
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folks, some of you may remember going to former east germany in the era of communism. i went in 1990, just after the wall had gone down. remember being amazed how far behind west germany it was without funny 2—stroke engine cars and their fake coffee, but we have to be honest with ourselves, to a large extent, germany has it succeeded in levelling up where we have not and it is vital to understand that these imbalances and inequalities are found within the regions of the uk and notjust between them. a woman from york has on average a decade or longer of how free life expect to see than a woman in doncaster. —— healthy life expect to see. in
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pre—set why does it need to have one in five working age people rose in bradford next door at the number is one in three? no one believes, i do not believe, you do not believe, there is any basic difference in the potential of babies born across this country. everybody knows that talent and energy and enthusiasm and flair are evenly spread across the uk, evenly spread. it is opportunity thatis evenly spread. it is opportunity that is not and it is the mission of this government to unite and level “p this government to unite and level up across the whole of the uk, not just because that is morally right, but because if we fail, we are simply squandering vast reserves of human capital and failing to allow people to fulfil their potential and we are holding our country back. today i wanted to talk again about
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that project of levelling up and define it more closely in advance of a white paper later this year that will set out our plan to level up. we should begin by stressing in all humility that this is a huge undertaking that many governmentss have debated about and double din before and have been some the overall results are disappointing. —— dabbled in before. it could be so very different. we do not need to look at what has happened in the old east germany, we can look at our own history and the ability of places to recover and regenerate. without natural resources, without discovering gold or oil under their streets. look at london, we should never forget that our national capital suffered a 50 year period of decline when its population shrank by as many as 2 million people between the 1930s in the mid—80s.
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and at the same urban decay was seen in cities around the country. the inequalities were so acute that when i became mayor in 2008, you could travel from westminster to canning town east on thejubilee line and lose a year of life is patency with every stop, it was not the tube that was at fault, it was the environment in the city. yet at the end of my time as mayor eight years later, that was no longer true. life expect and see had increased across the capital, but the gains had been greatest amongst the poorest groups. that is what i mean by levelling up. there is much more to do in london and there is still huge inequalities, but deprivation levels have been dramatically reduced. let's be clear about the difference, the philosophical difference, between this project, levelling up, and levelling down. we do not want at a level down, we do not want to
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make the poorer parts which are by making the rich are part poorer. you cannot stimulus growth around the country by constraining companies as the labour did in the 1960s whether ludicrous industrial development certificates. bring up can only be achieved by a strong and dynamic wealth creating economy. there has to be a catalytic role of the government and government must provide a strategic lead. that requires consistency from government, not chopping and changing. in the last 40 years, we have had 40 different schemes or bodies to boost local or regional growth. we had the abercrombie planner in london, the new towns, a bone regeneration corporations, the regional develop meant agencies and none of these initiatives have been powerful enough to deal with the
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long—term secular trends of deindustrialisation or the decline of coastal resorts. that basic half heartedness of a governmental approach has been coupled with an unspoken assumption by policymakers that investment should always follow success, so to use a football metaphor, the approach has always been to hang around the goal mouth rather than being the playmaker. i'm not a great expert on football, but you get the general gist. 0r not a great expert on football, but you get the general gist. or to borrow a biblical comparison, governments have created a sort of matthew effect, to him that hath shall be given. you invest in areas where house prices are already high, transport is already congested and bi— turbo charging those areas, especially in london and the south—east, you drive prices even higher and you force more and more people to move to the same expensive areas. two thirds of graduates from
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our top 30 universities end up in london. result is that their commutes are longer, their trains are more crowded and they have less time with their kids and they worry at the same time that the younger generation will not be able to get a home and that their leafy suburb will village will have new housing develop meant without the infrastructure to go with it. i said the process of levelling up is not just aimed at creating opportunity across the uk, it is relieving the pressure in those parts that are currently over heating and to those who seriously worry that levelling up who seriously worry that levelling up could in some way be to the detriment of london and the south—east, let me make some obvious points and i speak as someone who has spent more than a decade now campaigning to extend the lead of london as the greatest city on earth. does anyone seriously believe it would be bad for london, or has
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been bad for london, to see the bbc growing and flourishing as it has in manchester? is it bad for london that they have atjpmorgan now having an enormous back office in bournemouth and the biggest employer in dorset, one of the biggest private sector investors in dorset? that is not bad for london, of course it isn't. greater regional prosperity means that more customers and more business for our national metropolis, that already leads the world in so many financial and business services and are so many other sectors of the 21st century economy. levelling up is not a jam spreading operation, it is not robbing peter to pay paul, it is not a zero—sum, it is a win win for the whole kingdom. this is the plan and i believe we have made progress on a levelling up when we have begun to raise living standards, spread opportunity, improve our public services and restore people's sense of pride in the community across the
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whole of the uk. you have to begin by getting the basics right. we have to begin by fighting crime, because we will never level up when some kids face the misery of dealing with the county lines drugs gangs and some kids do not. that is why we are putting rings of steel around towns that are plagued with these gangs and steadily driving them out. so far we have squeezed more than a thousand county lines drugs gangs out of business. that is where we want tough sentences, we are imposing them and we are recruiting 20,000 more police. we will be ruthless in fighting crime, because it is the poorest and most vulnerable who suffer the most. and obviously to give kids alternatives to these gangs, we will invest in all sorts of things, but
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particularly grassroots sports and i can today announce another 50 mil in pounds for instance first football pitch is so that we give new opportunities to the football stars of the future and ultimately you are never more than 15 minutes away from a high quality football pitch. and we will not succeed in levelling up when so many people are off work because they are sick or stressed because they are sick or stressed because they are sick or stressed because they suffer from obesity or problems with their mental health and that is why we are tackling those problems, tackling the problem ofjunk those problems, tackling the problem of junk food. those problems, tackling the problem ofjunk food. we are a rewarding exercise and we are investing colossally more than ever before in our national health service, building 40 new hospitals, recruiting 50,000 more nurses, we will deal with the backlog of those waiting for elective surgeries. and the single biggest thing we can do, of course, in addition to investing in public services, to change people's lives and to give them the
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confidence and the serotonin that everybody needs to deal with the day, is to give people the chance of a good job on a decent pay. that means the private sector has to invest to create those jobs and we must create the conditions for business confidence. when people look at the west midlands, here where we are today, the birthplace of the industrial revolution, the place that changed the world, they remember, and you will remember this, unbelievably, the number of private sector jobs actually fell 3% under the last labour government in the west midlands. 0ne under the last labour government in the west midlands. one of the reasons for that lack of productivity, one of the things that was holding the ice maiden is back, has been the lack of mass transit. —— holding the west midlands back. the lack of public transport to get
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there and that is why today i am filling my promise to give eight city regions like the west midlands the funding to start making that bus and train networks as good as london. by launching our city region sustainable transport fund, £4.2 billion that local leadership can spend on projects like contactless ticketing, new tramlines, bike lanes, and ice because it someone who is putting more bike lanes in than anyone else. they are deeply resisted by some people but overall are massively popular and thoroughly recommend them. this is part of the biggest infrastructure investment in the history of our country. £640 million on roads, rail, housing, clean power generation. we will use the findings of sir peter hendy�*s union productivity review to see how we can strengthen the sinews of the
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whole united kingdom, getting hs2 trains to scotland, giving new impetus to projects that benefit the whole country, the a1 that link scotland and england, the a75 that links northern ireland, scotland and england, the links along the a55. dozens of other crucial projects long overdue like the a303 to the greater southwest. and we have made huge progress in rolling out gigabit broadband throughout the uk for that when i became a prime minister almost exact me two years ago, 7% of the country, as i never tired of saying at the time, had a gigabit connection. by the end of this year, we will be hitting 60%. that has the potential to revolutionise our patterns of work and provide a tailwind for levelling up. no matter how frustrating we may find life on zuma, we can see how this
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technology, and its successors, will allow the places that have been left behind or far allow the places that have been left behind orfar left allow the places that have been left behind or far left behind allow the places that have been left behind orfar left behind to become places that retain their talent. —— life on zoom. professionals will be able to stay and bring up their families and enjoy a higher quality of life without the need to move to a supposedly fashionable conurbation and we are also helping young people to fulfil their dream of owning the home in a place where they want to live with that 95% mortgage guarantee as well as receiving a portion of new homes for first—time buyers at a discount of at least 30%. this government is backing the improvement of the lives of people growing up in these areas with the levelling up fund, £4.8 billion to be spent across the whole of britain, england, scotland and wales. and with town deals, another 15 of them announced today, helping
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local people to renew the places they live from the civic square in tilbury, to the hippodrome theatre in todmorden. removing chewing gum, breathing new life into our high streets. and each change may be individually a small, but the overall effect can be transformative. in making that environment attractive as a place to live and bring up a family and to invest. the key question that people are some cells, young families asked themselves about a neighbourhood, not just about whether it is themselves about a neighbourhood, notjust about whether it is it themselves about a neighbourhood, not just about whether it is it safe and has good transport, it is whether the schools are good and we need to give all our children the guarantee of a great education with safe and well disciplined classes, fantastic teachers, so we are literally levelling up funding for primary and secondary education with a high level of funding per pupil so
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that every teacher starts on a salary of £30,000. and we must face the reality that in loss of learning and loss of life chances, some children have been hit harder by this pandemic than others. and so we put in place the biggest tutoring programme anywhere in the world to help them catch up, catch up programme by the way that is already worth £3 billion on top of the £14 billion that we invested as soon as this government came in. but it is in post 16 education, post 16, by the differences across our society are a starkest. it cannot be right that bath has 70% of its population with a level three or equivalent qualification, bradford has only 42% and that is why this government is so obsessed, the chancellor, everybody, we are all obsessed with
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skilling up our population. we love our universities, we believe one of the great glories of this country. but we need to escalate the value of practical and vocational education with its power to transform people's lives and that is why we are rolling out apprenticeships because we know that high level apprentices it can earn more than the average graduate five years after graduation. that is why we are creating the life of skill guarantee so that adults can go on to create those level three convocations. so as we improve skills and cut crime and upgrade transport and ensure that gigabit broadband is extended, electronic potentials into the country, and opening up opportunity, by that process, we want to make the whole
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country more attractive for investment. and as we turn this country into a science superpower, doubling public investment in r&d to 22 billion, we want to use that state lead to trigger private sector investment across the whole country. we have hubs of research or innovation like the one we are in today, exactly like the one we are in, which is actually driving battery technology. this battery industrialisation at centre is helping to drive battery technology. we will need huge numbers of these batteries, 70,000 people we will need skilled to be working just in making the batteries alone. this battery industrialisation at centre is driving growth from cornwall to sasser, so that we can do that without detracting from the golden triangle of oxford, london,
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cambridge, which is the greatest scientific in this country and we will use prospective freedoms such as free ports to drive those investments across the uk, especially in green technology, from wind turbines commits batteries such as the ones we see being developed here today. a zero emission planes, solar power, nuclear power, hydrogen, all of which is set out in the government's ten point plan for a green industrial revolution. 0ur a green industrial revolution. our new office of investment will land investment, and continues to land investments in all parts of the uk, like nissan are coming in to sunderland as he saw the other day, the new gigafactory for batteries, stellantis, to ellesmere port, teesside, orjust in the last few weeks and not forgetting the wise
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decision of heinz tomato ketchup to relocate manufacture of that vital product to wigan from holland. and about time too. now is the time to scrutinise the incentives we offer as a country against those offered by other countries and yes, business overwhelmingly chooses britain for all sorts of good reasons and it was good to see the london stock market recover if amsterdam the other day, but now is the time to do even better and there is one final ingredient. the most important factor in levelling up. the yeast that lifts the whole match as of though, the magic source, the ketchup of catch up, and that is leadership. that brings me to the crux of this argument. this country is not only one of the most
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imbalanced economies in our neighbourhood, the developed world, it is also one of the most centralised and those two defects are obviously connected. we are making progress now, we have a created metric mayors, used to be won, and some of the best of them are relentless are champions for their communities, like andy. andy provides the tiffany kissinger question, who would you call in the west made as if you want to set up a factory? —— provides the answer to the kissinger question. who would you call it to make things happen? and you know exactly who to bring, you ring andy. after 20 years of trial and error, we are starting to see the results of this devolution. it is not entirely a coincidence that that long—term secular trend i
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described as being reversed and cities that had seemed to be in a long—term decline are now seeing a resurgence in their population and a growth in productivity that actually outstripped the rest of the country and we need theirs at levelling up to go much further and faster, because the uk is outstandingly successful, in spite of its handicap, in spite of only firing on one cylinder, if i can use that metaphor innate battery factory, in a great battery industrialisation centre if you understand what i mean. if you look at france and germany, other european g7 economies, the level of productivity across their great cities are much more directly comparable, and it is much more even. imagine if we could level up notjust even. imagine if we could level up not just lengthening even. imagine if we could level up notjust lengthening london's lead around the world, but closing the
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gap between london and the rest of the uk's great cities? that would increase the productivity, gdp of our country, the opportunities for millions of people in our country and it would increase gdp by tens of billions, many tens of billions, and then of course, we should go further. because the political geography was as rich and as diverse and idiosyncratic as the landscape itself. the uk will never fit into some cookie—cutter division into regions named after points of the compass. but where there are obvious communities of identity and affinity, and real economic geographies, there is a chance, and i know you're all listening, to encourage local leadership. and i want to return to that point. this country is the most centralised, because for many decades, central
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government in london relentlessly crushed local leadership, and we must be honest about why that was necessary, we were then in the grip of a real ideological conflict in which municipal socialist governments were irresponsibly bankrupting cities and genuinely hostile to business in such a way that government was actually forced to intervene. with some notable exceptions, some parts of opposing parties, that argument is over. and most of the big metro mayors know that private sector investment is crucial. they know that one of their jobs, which they will of course be attacked in the local media, is to get on a plane and go to the big trade and property fares and hustle for their hometown. and today we want to go a step further. because if the big cities are beginning to catch up, it is the rest of the country, those historic famous towns or our shires where local leaders
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now need to be given the tools to make things happen for their communities. and to do that we must take a more flexible approach to devolution in england. we need to rewrite the rule book with new deals for the counties, and there is no reason why our great counties cannot benefit from the same powers we have devolved to city leaders, so that they can take charge of levelling up local infrastructure, likely bypassed they desperately want to end congestion and pollution, crime of newjobs or bus routes, applied by clean, green buses, made with batteries pioneered in this place, because they get the chance to control the bus routes. 0r because they get the chance to control the bus routes. or they can level up the skills of the people in their area because they know what local business wants and needs, because they are working with them every day. and you can see the risk and the catch in all of this. we have to learn the lessons of the
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last 50 years. we must get the right local leadership, and ken livingstone of the few thousands was a very different creature of ken livingstone of the 1980s, if you see what i mean, but the loony left remains pretty lonely, my friends. and we need accountability. we will not be proceeding with a one size fits all template. 0ne responsible tape is for directly elected mayor for counties, if you can think of a better title than mayor for someone who represents a title, please send an e—mail. but there are other possibilities. we could devolve power for a specific local purpose, the key county or a city coming together to improve local services like buses. so my offer to you, that is to say all the would—be local leaders who are tuning in to this conversation about levelling up, my
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offer to you is, all of you who see a role for yourselves in local leadership, come to us in government, come to neil 0'brien or to me or to rob with your vision of how you will level up, how you will back business, attract more good jobs and improve your services. come to us with your plan for strong accountable leadership, and we will give you the tools to change your area for the better. and it can be done. there is no intrinsic reason why one part of this country should be fated to decline or indeed fated to succeed. the towns and cities that people say have been left behind have not lacked for human ingenuity, they have not been short of people with courage or intelligence or imagination, and there is no place in this country
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that does not have something special about it. something about their scenery or culture or history or tradition, some selling point. unlike anything else, or anywhere else in the world. and they don't think that they are left behind. and they are right. they think that they are the future or they could be the future. and they are right about that too. and all they need is the right people to believe in them, to lead them, and to invest in them. and for government to get behind them. and that is what we are going to do. thank you all very much for listening. thank you very much for listening to that extensive speech about levelling up. and i am now going to
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go to ourfriends levelling up. and i am now going to go to our friends from... i levelling up. and i am now going to go to ourfriends from... i am going to go to tony of the cbi and then professor pam thomas before we go to beth. ., ., professor pam thomas before we go to beth. . «e i. ., ., professor pam thomas before we go to beth. . «e ., ., ,, . beth. thank you for that speech, businesses _ beth. thank you for that speech, businesses up — beth. thank you for that speech, businesses up and _ beth. thank you for that speech, businesses up and down - beth. thank you for that speech, businesses up and down the i beth. thank you for that speech, i businesses up and down the country are very— businesses up and down the country are very highly motivated by... i am keen— are very highly motivated by... i am keen to _ are very highly motivated by... i am keen to work— are very highly motivated by... i am keen to work with you to turn it from _ keen to work with you to turn it from ambition into action. 0ne keen to work with you to turn it from ambition into action. one of the most — from ambition into action. one of the most exciting developments in recent— the most exciting developments in recent years as the emergence of local— recent years as the emergence of local economic clusters across every part of _ local economic clusters across every part of the _ local economic clusters across every part of the uk, and everything from the renewable energy to advanced manufacturing to digital services. i am wondering how you think we can turn those _ am wondering how you think we can turn those local success stories international and ultimately global success— international and ultimately global success stories, and how can business _ success stories, and how can business and government work together— business and government work together to achieve that? thank you very much. — together to achieve that? thank you very much. tony- — together to achieve that? thank you very much. tony- i— together to achieve that? thank you very much, tony. i think— together to achieve that? thank you very much, tony. i think the - very much, tony. i think the answer... you're so right. what is happening across country as you are seeing this story of local success, the dispersal of high—tech jobs,
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innovation arriving in all parts of the country, and what it needs as it needs business and local leadership to work together, to hold up a mirror to that part of the country, that city, that town, that region, and say this is the narrative about us. this is what is happening. this is the story of our success. this is what we have to offer. if you come and invest your this is how we will help you. and that's why i put this emphasis on leadership. you need the local champion, you need to bring together, whether it is the... what everything means is, whether through the mayoralty, you need to bring people together and then project the story to the world. that is absolutely vital. i have no doubt at all that it can be done, but i'm glad that the basic agenda has the
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support of the cbi, and it's great, by the way, that after a long period to find the government and the cbi in lockstep, at least on this. so thank you very much for coming. pam? thank you, prime minister. i was very— thank you, prime minister. i was very encouraged _ thank you, prime minister. i was very encouraged to _ thank you, prime minister. i was very encouraged to hear- thank you, prime minister. i was very encouraged to hear you i thank you, prime minister. i was i very encouraged to hear you speak about— very encouraged to hear you speak about britain— very encouraged to hear you speak about britain as _ very encouraged to hear you speak about britain as a _ very encouraged to hear you speak about britain as a science - about britain as a science superpower. _ about britain as a science superpower, so - about britain as a science superpower, so i - about britain as a science superpower, so i was i about britain as a science - superpower, so i was wondering about britain as a science _ superpower, so i was wondering what your vision— superpower, so i was wondering what your vision of— superpower, so i was wondering what your vision of levelling _ superpower, so i was wondering what your vision of levelling up _ superpower, so i was wondering what your vision of levelling up across i your vision of levelling up across the country— your vision of levelling up across the country together— your vision of levelling up across the country together with - your vision of levelling up across the country together with the i the country together with the ambition— the country together with the ambition to _ the country together with the ambition to be _ the country together with the ambition to be a _ the country together with the ambition to be a scientific- ambition to be a scientific superpower— ambition to be a scientific superpower means- ambition to be a scientific superpower means for. ambition to be a scientific| superpower means for the ambition to be a scientific— superpower means for the involvement of world _ superpower means for the involvement of world class _ superpower means for the involvement of world class research _ superpower means for the involvement of world class research institutions i of world class research institutions such as _ of world class research institutions such as mine? _ of world class research institutions such as mine?— of world class research institutions such as mine? your institution is an incredible body, _ such as mine? your institution is an incredible body, based _ such as mine? your institution is an incredible body, based in _ such as mine? your institution is an incredible body, based in oxford, i incredible body, based in oxford, but links together all the universities that are conducting research into batteries, amongst other things. and we need these
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batteries. there is absolutely no question. at the moment, it was great that in vision brought the gigerfactory to great that in vision brought the giger factory to sunderland, we great that in vision brought the gigerfactory to sunderland, we have high hopes of the british vault plant in but even those two added together will only supply a fraction of the demand of the uk plus my own domestic vehicle market will have. —— the uk's own domestic vehicle market. the answer to your question is, we want to work with you, with institutions, with this body here, to make sure that we produce those giger factories across the whole of the uk. there is obviously a case
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for having won here in the west midlands, you're going to want one next to centre of automotive manufacturing, but even that won't be enough to satisfy the demands, just of the uk domestic market. so we want to do that. what we also need to do is to make sure that the value in those batteries comes from the uk as well. because everybody knows that the raw materials that go into batteries are often sourced from around the world. we can do much, much more to source those chemicals, those metals from the uk. and to make sure that this country retains its lead in devising ever greener, ever greener and more beautiful technology. why was the lithium ion battery invented? —— where? 0xford, ithink. it is lithium ion battery invented? —— where? 0xford, i think. it is other countries that have so often taken that british invention come and gone away, and become pioneers
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themselves. we now need to recapture our leading role, and i have absolutely no doubt that we can do it. beth rigby, sky news.— absolutely no doubt that we can do it. beth rigby, sky news. thank you. prime minister, _ it. beth rigby, sky news. thank you. prime minister, eat _ it. beth rigby, sky news. thank you. prime minister, eat you _ it. beth rigby, sky news. thank you. prime minister, eat you talk - it. beth rigby, sky news. thank you. prime minister, eat you talk to i it. beth rigby, sky news. thank you. prime minister, eat you talk to your i prime minister, eat you talk to your speech— prime minister, eat you talk to your speech about a moral duty to unite and level— speech about a moral duty to unite and level up our country, but over the past _ and level up our country, but over the past month your ministers have stoked _ the past month your ministers have stoked division over footballers taking — stoked division over footballers taking the knee, saying it was gesture — taking the knee, saying it was gesture politics, saying it was van's — gesture politics, saying it was van's choice to boot the team. going back there _ van's choice to boot the team. going back there is — van's choice to boot the team. going back there is further evidence of this divisive politics and language from _ this divisive politics and language from you. — this divisive politics and language from you, be it describing muslim women _ from you, be it describing muslim women in — from you, be it describing muslim women in veils as letter boxes or
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other— women in veils as letter boxes or other such — women in veils as letter boxes or other such comments. your record undermines — other such comments. your record undermines your image as a unifying prime _ undermines your image as a unifying prime minister. what are you going to do— prime minister. what are you going to do to _ prime minister. what are you going to do to change that?— prime minister. what are you going to do to change that? thanks, beth. obviousl i to do to change that? thanks, beth. obviously i reject _ to do to change that? thanks, beth. obviously i reject that. _ to do to change that? thanks, beth. obviously i reject that. i _ to do to change that? thanks, beth. obviously i reject that. i disagree i obviously i reject that. i disagree with that. i think that racism has absolutely no place in our society and i think that the england team represented the very best of us and our country, and i think the overwhelming support in outpouring of love for thee in the team after the match on sunday showed this country at its best, and at its most united. i think what we all want to do is take practical steps to prevent racism in all its forms, and i think that the football banning order regime, the changes to that we have an ounce will be valuable, you cannot go to the match if you are guilty of promoting hate and racism online. but we have got to go further and we are going to use the online harms bill to ensure that the big internet companies, the social
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media platforms that allow race eight to be peddled on their platforms can face fines amounting to 10% of their global revenues, and as i said to them the other day, facebook, twitter, snapchat, instagram, we had the men, can't remember the other ones, those are the main ones, i say we will not hesitate to go further, because they do have the technology to sort this out. they can adjust their algorithms. and we will use legislation, if we have to, just as we have used the threat of legislation for instance to stop the european super league. alex forsyth of the bbc. you european super league. alex forsyth of the bbc. ., i. . of the bbc. you said you re'ected what i of the bbc. you said you re'ected whet t sate — of the bbc. you said you re'ected what i said but i of the bbc. you said you re'ected what i said but it i of the bbc. you said you re'ected what i said but it is i of the bbc. you said you re'ected what i said but it is true i of the bbc. you said you rejected what i said but it is true your i what i said but it is true your ministers _ what i said but it is true your ministers did— what i said but it is true your ministers did not— what i said but it is true your ministers did not from - what i said but it is true your ministers did not from the i what i said but it is true your. ministers did not from the start condemn— ministers did not from the start condemn the _ ministers did not from the start condemn the booing _ ministers did not from the start condemn the booing of- ministers did not from the start condemn the booing of the i ministers did not from the start i condemn the booing of the players. the you _
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condemn the booing of the players. the you think — condemn the booing of the players. the you think that _ condemn the booing of the players. the you think that was _ condemn the booing of the players. the you think that was a _ condemn the booing of the players. the you think that was a mistake? i condemn the booing of the players. i the you think that was a mistake? as pm, the you think that was a mistake? as pm. do— the you think that was a mistake? as pm. do you _ the you think that was a mistake? as pm, do you personally _ the you think that was a mistake? as pm, do you personally now— the you think that was a mistake? as pm, do you personally now regret i the you think that was a mistake? as| pm, do you personally now regret not being _ pm, do you personally now regret not being strong — pm, do you personally now regret not being strong enough— pm, do you personally now regret not being strong enough about _ pm, do you personally now regret not being strong enough about this - pm, do you personally now regret not being strong enough about this right. being strong enough about this right from the _ being strong enough about this right from the start? _ being strong enough about this right from the start? i— being strong enough about this right from the start?— from the start? i always said it was wront from the start? i always said it was mom to from the start? i always said it was wrong to boo _ from the start? i always said it was wrong to boo the _ from the start? i always said it was wrong to boo the england - from the start? i always said it was wrong to boo the england players, | wrong to boo the england players, beth, and that is my firm belief. i think as a society we need to understand that we made progress in tackling racism. iwould understand that we made progress in tackling racism. i would say, understand that we made progress in tackling racism. iwould say, in understand that we made progress in tackling racism. i would say, in my lifetime. a loss of progress. but i think we have to recognise there is a long way to go. we have got as a government to lead and to use the tools we have at our disposal, the ones —— to show we are firm and will not tolerate, to take the argument and the to those who control these very powerful media platforms, social media platforms, with their immense ability to wound and to undermine. they can stop it, and we
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are going to make sure that they do. thanks very much, beth. let's go to alex forsyth of the bbc. thanks very much, beth. let's go to alex forsyth of the sac.— alex forsyth of the bbc. prime minister, alex forsyth of the bbc. prime minister. you _ alex forsyth of the bbc. prime minister, you have _ alex forsyth of the bbc. prime minister, you have painted i alex forsyth of the bbc. prime minister, you have painted a i alex forsyth of the bbc. prime i minister, you have painted a clear picture _ minister, you have painted a clear picture of— minister, you have painted a clear picture of the _ minister, you have painted a clear picture of the day _ minister, you have painted a clear picture of the day of _ minister, you have painted a clear picture of the day of the _ minister, you have painted a clear picture of the day of the impact i minister, you have painted a clear picture of the day of the impact of an unbalanced _ picture of the day of the impact of an unbalanced economy, - picture of the day of the impact of an unbalanced economy, but - picture of the day of the impact of an unbalanced economy, but youl picture of the day of the impact of - an unbalanced economy, but you have not given— an unbalanced economy, but you have not given us— an unbalanced economy, but you have not given us a — an unbalanced economy, but you have not given us a lot _ an unbalanced economy, but you have not given us a lot of— an unbalanced economy, but you have not given us a lot of new— an unbalanced economy, but you have not given us a lot of new detail - not given us a lot of new detail about— not given us a lot of new detail about how— not given us a lot of new detail about how you _ not given us a lot of new detail about how you deal— not given us a lot of new detail about how you deal with - not given us a lot of new detail about how you deal with it. - not given us a lot of new detaill about how you deal with it. you not given us a lot of new detail - about how you deal with it. you are almost _ about how you deal with it. you are almost two — about how you deal with it. you are almost two years _ about how you deal with it. you are almost two years into _ about how you deal with it. you are almost two years into the - about how you deal with it. you are almost two years into the job, - about how you deal with it. you are. almost two years into the job, where is the _ almost two years into the job, where is the clear— almost two years into the job, where is the clear strategy— almost two years into the job, where is the clear strategy beyond - is the clear strategy beyond investment _ is the clear strategy beyond investment in— is the clear strategy beyond investment in high- is the clear strategy beyond investment in high streets. is the clear strategy beyond i investment in high streets and infrastructure, _ investment in high streets and infrastructure, as _ investment in high streets and infrastructure, as to _ investment in high streets and infrastructure, as to how - investment in high streets and infrastructure, as to how to i investment in high streets and - infrastructure, as to how to tackle what _ infrastructure, as to how to tackle what is _ infrastructure, as to how to tackle what is often _ infrastructure, as to how to tackle what is often entrenched - what is often entrenched inequalities— what is often entrenched inequalities in— what is often entrenched inequalities in health, i what is often entrenched - inequalities in health, education, aspiration — inequalities in health, education, aspiration and. _ inequalities in health, education, aspiration and, of _ inequalities in health, education, aspiration and, of course, - inequalities in health, education, aspiration and, of course, how. inequalities in health, education, i aspiration and, of course, how you measure _ aspiration and, of course, how you measure and — aspiration and, of course, how you measure and define _ aspiration and, of course, how you measure and define success? - aspiration and, of course, how you measure and define success? if. aspiration and, of course, how you measure and define success? if i l measure and define success? if i may, _ measure and define success? if i may, prime _ measure and define success? if i may, prime minister, _ measure and define success? if i may, prime minister, henry- measure and define success? if i - may, prime minister, henry dimbleby has released — may, prime minister, henry dimbleby has released his _ may, prime minister, henry dimbleby has released his national— may, prime minister, henry dimbleby has released his national food - has released his national food strategy— has released his national food strategy today, _ has released his national food strategy today, are _ has released his national food strategy today, are you - has released his national food strategy today, are you may . has released his national food . strategy today, are you may need has released his national food - strategy today, are you may need to accept _ strategy today, are you may need to accept the _ strategy today, are you may need to accept the recommendations, - accept the recommendations, including _ accept the recommendations, including those _ accept the recommendations, including those in— accept the recommendations, including those in taxes? - accept the recommendations, including those in taxes? aleix, thank you _ including those in taxes? aleix, thank you very _ including those in taxes? aleix, thank you very much. _ including those in taxes? aleix, thank you very much. i'm - thank you very much. i'm respectfully going to are due to go back over some of what i said, because i do think that in all fairness there was at least the skeleton of what to do. you are right to focus on education, and
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aspiration. but the point i want to... and all the investments we are making in public services, and fighting crime, all these are vital for levelling up. perhaps the most important thing you have got to achieve is to have got to restore a local sense of pride and ambition and self expectation amongst the local leadership. and that can be done. we in this government are absolutely determined to do everything in our power to achieve it. what i would say to people thinking about this is, just imagine the potential of this country, what this country could be like, it follows areas where as productive as the most productive parts, or even half as productive as the most productive parts. we have a real... are half as productive again, i should say, a similar structure parts. we have a real opportunity to improve people's lives and change the way the country is going on this
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government is going to continue to drive it with all our might. on your point about henry dimbleby and obesity, obviously i will study the report, i think it is an independent report, i think it is an independent report, i think there... final —— as i said earlier on we believe in tackling obesity, to help people lose weight, to help promote exercise and tackling junk food, advertising and so on. i'm not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on hard—working people. let me just ignore that. but i will study his report with interest. itv. robert. ~ ., study his report with interest. itv. robert. a, ~ , ., robert. morning, prime minister. you ointed out robert. morning, prime minister. you
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pointed out that _ robert. morning, prime minister. you pointed out that levelling _ robert. morning, prime minister. you pointed out that levelling up - robert. morning, prime minister. you pointed out that levelling up will - pointed out that levelling up will not succeed if businesses lack confidence... we are leaving that news conference, let's go to our political correspondent. then right, what is your overview? the correspondent. then right, what is your overview?— your overview? the line of the seech your overview? the line of the speech at _ your overview? the line of the speech at the _ your overview? the line of the speech at the end _ your overview? the line of the speech at the end when - your overview? the line of the speech at the end when he - your overview? the line of the l speech at the end when he says your overview? the line of the - speech at the end when he says he does not approve of new taxes on unhealthy food, that is what the prime minister had to say about henry dimbleby�*s report. on levelling up it match the briefing, he said he does not think they levelling up agenda could be at the detriment of london and the south—east, an attempt to reassure tory voters who might think that this focus on putting money, government spending into the north of england, the midlands, kitson house harmony cities. i think he hit those lines. much of the speech, i don't think really transformed our understanding of what he means by levelling up or added much clarity to it. the definition of the phrase. it was a breathless canter through
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crime, building football pitches, getting chewing gum up the streets. he talks about establishing new rail links, building battery factories, he went through the problem, talent wasted, opportunity squandered, this huge economic divergence between the south of england and parts of the north and the midlands. in terms of policy prescription, this was then, he tell is very much indeed. the most interesting part, i thought, was when he said even more local leadership and local autonomy was part of the way of making this levelling up agenda a reality and he talks about having a new directly elected town mayors, more devolution for counties, may be new mayors of counties in the same way we have metro mayors... continuing a sort of trend started by the cambrian osborne government, they started the metro mare innovation, borisjohnson clearly thinks that is part of the way to get levelling up going. in terms of hard policy, this is not really have any, but there will be a
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white paper on levelling up later in the year. white paper on levelling up later in the ear. �* , ., white paper on levelling up later in the ear. �*, ., ., white paper on levelling up later in the ear. �*, ., , the year. let's go to some breaking news that four _ the year. let's go to some breaking news that four people _ the year. let's go to some breaking news that four people have - the year. let's go to some breaking news that four people have been i news that four people have been arrested over online a racist abuse towards the england football team. a specialist team is looking into the offensive comments after some players were targeted on social media with racist abuse, and the police are saying that they have now made four arrests over racist base. let's go back... let's get more now on the wide—ranging review into the nation's health commissioned by the government. it suggests "historic reforms of the food system" are needed to protect the nhs and the environment. a key part of the review involves taxation. it recommends a tax set at £3 per kilogram for sugar and £6 per kilogram for salt sold for use in processed foods and restaurants —
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which it says could raise as much as £31; billion a year. some of the money raised from these new taxes could be used to extend free school meals to families with a household income of £20,000 or less — which is well above the current ceiling of £7,400. well, one of the charities welcoming the review is the charity school food matters. it's long argued that the number of children entitled to free school meals should be increased and that all school children should have access to healthy and sustainable food. during the pandemic, more than a million breakfast boxes were handed out by the charity. stephanie slater is the chief executive of school food matters and shejoins me now. has borisjohnson put the kibosh on this blessing he does not mind going for taxes? and that there are the core of the report... you like said he had not gone into the detail yet so hopefully when he sits down and
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looks at the financial modelling, he will see that this will be a push, hopefully towards reformulation. what we saw with the sugary drinks like it was that manufacturers started reformulating their products to take sugar out, so they could avoid the levy. the most exciting thing about this, of course, is the fact it will raise an enormous amount of money for health initiatives to try and tackle some of the issues around obesity. and so we are very much in favour. the call of nanny state is very loud this morning, but as far as we are concerned, it is cigarettes and seat belts, some public health issues need a nanny. in belts, some public health issues need a nanny-— belts, some public health issues need a nanny. in terms of how that tax will fall. _ need a nanny. in terms of how that tax will fall, it — need a nanny. in terms of how that tax will fall, it is _ need a nanny. in terms of how that tax will fall, it is designed - need a nanny. in terms of how that tax will fall, it is designed as - tax will fall, it is designed as being a push towards reformulation, so design to hit the food producers, not the people at the other end who are buying the products. and that was borisjohnson saying he does not
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mind going for taxes that that he does not want to go for taxes that hit people in the pocket. i hit people in the pocket. i understand when he was making the speech today, but i think we need to encourage all departments to dig into the detail and look at the financial modelling and we need to understand that calorie dense food is three times more expensive than fruit and veg. we need to do everything we can to support families to access healthy food. the research that henry dimbleby�*s team went into it, talking to families up and down the country, i don't think they came across anybody that didn't want to feed their children well but prices were a problem. if we can support families to access more food —— fruit and veg, that has got to be a good thing, and if it takes a levy or a tax to raise money to do that, we are all for it. in or a tax to raise money to do that, we are all for it.— we are all for it. in terms of the school meals, _ we are all for it. in terms of the school meals, as _ we are all for it. in terms of the school meals, as i _ we are all for it. in terms of the school meals, as i mentioned, l we are all for it. in terms of the - school meals, as i mentioned, your charity would like free school meals for everybody. the report suggests
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they should be available to all households that have an income of £20,000 or less. presumably you support that?— support that? absolutely. it is interesting — support that? absolutely. it is interesting because _ support that? absolutely. it is interesting because a - support that? absolutely. it is interesting because a lot - support that? absolutely. it is interesting because a lot of i support that? absolutely. it is | interesting because a lot of the criticism this morning is about wealthierfamilies, but we criticism this morning is about wealthier families, but we are talking about £20,000 a year of household earned income. that is not a well—off family. what we have been saying throughout the covid... school closures, she mentioned earlier in your piece, there we ran a response programme. it was into london boroughs, and what we were finding was that one in four of the families we were supporting could not access free school meals, so it was really clear tours during school closures that the threshold was just too low, so absolutely we support this move. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor
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after the storming start to the week we are settling into a real summary speu we are settling into a real summary spell of weather across much of the uk. going to be one or two exceptions stop there is going to be one or two exceptions and each day will be probably slightly different than the day that preceded it but a lot of the time it will be sunny for most of you and the temperatures will be on the rise, too. very pleasant out there this afternoon, in fact, for many, with some good, sunny spells. a bit more cloud to the north—west of scotland, which will bring some drizzle back to the hebrides later, and compared with the sunshine this morning across southern parts of england and wales, a bit more cloud here. cloudiest of all down through eastern parts of england. temperatures limited. but 2a, 25 in the grampians, lake district fells and to the south—east of wales, compared to the cooler feel across the eastern coasts of england, where the breeze could have a bit of a challenge for the golfers at the start of the open at sandwich. the breeze eases down into the weekend, though, and strong sunshine will dominate. this evening and overnight, the breeze is still there in east anglia and the south—east,
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feeding in cloud. more cloud and breeze to the north—west of scotland with some patchy light rain or drizzle. but with clear skies in between, temperatures could get down into single figures for one or two but what you will find is that the night—time temperatures will rise along with the daytime ones. as we go into friday, high pressure nudging its way and i have got this one with the cloud around the high, to show northern and western areas where the cloud feeds in and that is why in the north—west highlands and islands, it will always be a bit cloudier over the next few days. some patchy drizzle, bit of a breeze on friday. elsewhere, some good sunny spells and fair weather cloud building up, and temperatures on friday afternoon to the east of scotland could hit around 27 degrees. similar kinds of values through parts of the midlands, south—east wales and southern england, 25 to the south—east of northern ireland. then into the weekend we go. still that cloud for the highlands and islands, some patchy rain at times. there will be the odd sunny spell here and there, it won't be grey all the way through. but lots of sunshine across much of the country. down a little bit, the temperatures across scotland, still warm in northern ireland, more widely into the upper 20s across parts of england and wales. and that process continues through saturday night into sunday. as the high pressure nudges a bit
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further south once again, weather fronts start to push in, bringing more cloud to scotland and northern ireland sunday. the temperatures rise a little bit. there will still be some sunshine around. a few showers for the highlands and islands again but with blue skies for much of england and wales, we could see temperatures in the south peak at around 30 degrees. and as i said, the nights are getting warmer, too.
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centre if you understand what i mean. this is bbc news. the headlines: 19 people have died and dozens are missing after flooding in western germany. proposals for a "snack tax" on salty and sugary foods to try to tackle britain's obesity crisis. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. borisjohnson says plans to reduce inequalities in the uk will not make richer areas poorer. the husband of a bbc radio presenter who died after having the astrazeneca covid vaccination calls for everyone to be given a choice about which vaccine they have, until more research can be carried out into rare side effects. she was just she wasjust doing she was just doing the right thing,
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that was all that she was doing. and... ijust do not want what happened to her to be brushed under the carpet. britney spears has a new lawyer in her case to win control of her business affairs from herfather and she's been celebrating with cartwheels. german chancellor angela merkel says she's "shocked" by the devastation caused by heavy rain and flooding in western germany. at least 19 people have died and more than 70 are missing. at least four people died
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in the village of schuld in the western state of rhineland—palatinate — reports say that they were on the roof of houses that were swept away as they waited for help. also among the dead are two firemen and two men who were caught in flooded cellars. heavy flooding has turned roads into rivers and streets into raging torrents, sweeping away cars and causing some buildings to collapse. helicopters are trying to pick up people from rooftops and flooded streets. jonelle awomoyi reports. in western germany's rhineland—palatinate, rates have become rivers. a collapsed building crashes into a bridge, it seems that you would not expect at this time of year. —— roads have become rivers put up houses left destroyed, leaving thousands without shelter, warmth and electricity. the flooding is said to have been caused by a river which flows into the rhine.
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people were seen fleeing from windows and aiming to connect with maps of the community. in some areas there is a fast current wet muddy water flows throughout towns, leaving cars submerged and pavements there are to be seen. many people dead and many more missing, but the authorities expect to see that number rise. malike fachrou is a freelance journalist in dusseldorf — she's spoken about the impact the flooding has had on the community. as you can see in my background, the whole street and the whole area has been evacuated. we have police officers here, fire workers and germany is also sending special rescue forces to rescue people from the area. people could not have been going to work. i have been speaking to residents here in the background and they have been left in complete awe. one of the residents with me, he has been living here for 50 years and in 50 years of his lifetime, he has never seen anything like this
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and i'm shocked myself, because i have been living in dusseldorf all my life and have never seen a flood like that. so everything is currently quite paralysed. everything was quite rushed and sudden yesterday. i was out with my sister and suddenly our main road was blocked, we could not go home. the train could not work and for a way of five minutes, we took 20 minutes. as i said, fire workers, police officers, special water rescue forces are very, very busy, but it is just not enough. one of the residents in the background that i spoke to earlier said to me that he feels the fire workers have given up on them. they drive past, they look at the area, they look at the floods and it is just too much for them. in england there are fresh calls for sugar and salt taxes to be introduced and for vegetables to be prescribed on the nhs. it's part of a wide—ranging review into the nation's health and eating habits, which was commissioned
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by the government in 2019. the review is calling for what it calls "historic reforms of the food system", which it says are needed to protect the nhs and save the environment. let's take a look at the review�*s main proposals... ..which it says could raise as much as £3.1i billion a year. some of the money raised from these new taxes could be used to extend free school meals to families with a household income of £20,000 or less. there's also a recommendation that the government set a target to reduce the nation's meat consumption by 30% over ten years and a suggestion that the government trial a programme which involves gps prescribing fruit and vegetables, as well as food education to patients who are suffering the effects or poor diet or food insecurity. our correspondent ellie price has more.
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it's just what the doctor ordered, but not what you might expect. cathy runs the charity care merseyside, involved in what's called social prescribing. patients are referred by their local gp, and then offered things like exercise support and cooking advice. here, they also provide healthy food to low income families. from the point of referral, we assess a person's needs. we assess what it is they need support with, and we offer them a various range of levels of support. so what we aim to do is to reduce gp consultations, to reduce hospitalisations, and to try and tackle in a holistic way, how to help people improve their health and well—being. maureen's got a number of physical and mental health issues, and has used the local prescribing service in different ways. today's report recommends the government tries out projects like this across the country, with the aim to improve people's health and reduce the cost to the nhs of treatment. i try not to get emotional, but i find it very difficult to manage.
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if we had an ideal amount of fruit and veg in our diet, it would be easier to create stuff, i suppose, that was easy to eat. you need variety, and it's the variety that costs. i could pay for it, but it means something else has to go, and it means we go in the red instead of staying in the black, and i can't cope with the worry of being in the red. today's report says a poor diet contributes to 64,000 deaths every year in england alone, and costs the economy an estimated £74 billion. there's an environmental impact too — globalfood production is the second biggest contributor to climate change. the report recommends a tax on sugary and salty foods. if producers don't change their recipes to use less, it could mean a price increase of 15—25% for desserts, biscuits and sweets. the report also calls for food education in schools to be taken more seriously.
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that's exactly what andrew hartshorn, a teacher in coventry, is already trying to do. and by the way, his students don't say, "yes, sir", they say, "0ui, chef." this has got to be a sustained effort with lots of support across the country, support in the classroom, helping fund ingredients, ensuring its place on the curriculum, ensuring its place on the timetable is safeguarded. it needs to be supported for our parents at home, so they're able to access ingredients. the national food strategy estimates its recommendations would cost around £i.4 billion a year, and bring in up to £3.4 billion a year in tax revenue. for the report's author, the cost of doing nothing would be terrible damage to the environment — and to our bodies. ellie price, bbc news. kate halliwell is the chief scientific adviser at the food & drink federation. shejoins us now from central london.
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what do you think about the idea at the heart of that report, that tax on sugar and salt?— the heart of that report, that tax on sugar and salt? obviously, there are a lot of — on sugar and salt? obviously, there are a lot of recommendations - on sugar and salt? obviously, there are a lot of recommendations in - on sugar and salt? obviously, there are a lot of recommendations in the report, but in terms of the sugar and salt tax, that is something that we would disagree with. i think it will not help incentivise the reformulation, which is really how it was pitched, but it will increase the cost of shopping to people, so we have seen some estimates this morning that it could put up the price of shopping by roundabout £180 a year and of course, listening just now to the people you are chatting to, for some that is a real worry and they are already worried about going into the red and i do not think the way to help those people is to increase the cost of their shopping basket. the is to increase the cost of their shopping basket.— is to increase the cost of their shopping basket. is to increase the cost of their sho -|n~ basket. ,., ., shopping basket. the point made in the re ort shopping basket. the point made in the report is — shopping basket. the point made in the report is the _ shopping basket. the point made in the report is the way _ shopping basket. the point made in the report is the way to _ shopping basket. the point made in the report is the way to help - shopping basket. the point made in the report is the way to help those l the report is the way to help those people, the way to help everybody, and they say it is good for business too, is for businesses to actually reformulate the food that they are
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producing so that they do not have to pay for it so much sugar and salt and that would reduce the bill. i and that would reduce the bill. i did think reformulation is something companies can do is what is looking at their portion sizes, but it is hard to reformulate. we already have a reformulation programmes and if you look at what is on the shelf now compared to five years ago, there have already been a quite big changes and that comes from sources, through to breakfast cereals. so we are already seeing those changes, but they do take time and they are expensive to make those changes because he wanted to make it right so people are still buy the product and they still taste great. i thing we already have those programmes and i do not think that taxing companies will help. i do not think that taxing companies will hel. ~ ., i. i do not think that taxing companies will hel. ~ ., ,, ., ., i do not think that taxing companies will hel. ~ ., i. ., ., .,, will help. what you look at what has ha--ened will help. what you look at what has happened with _ will help. what you look at what has happened with the _ will help. what you look at what has happened with the sugary _ will help. what you look at what has happened with the sugary drink- will help. what you look at what has happened with the sugary drink tax| happened with the sugary drink tax it has reduced consumption from sugarin it has reduced consumption from sugar in soft drinks by a 10%, so as you point out, it is not a quick
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fix, but over time it can make a big difference. ~ fix, but over time it can make a big difference-— difference. with the soft drinks specifically. — difference. with the soft drinks specifically, that _ difference. with the soft drinks specifically, that work - difference. with the soft drinks specifically, that work was - difference. with the soft drinks - specifically, that work was ongoing way before the tax, so you can see a decline from at least 2010 and of course we have big guns that are already zero sugar, consumers were already zero sugar, consumers were already looking to drink more zero sugar. —— big brands. that work was already there and actually if you look at things like milkshakes, which are not subject to soft drinks tax is a part of the voluntary work, we are seeing a similar reduction in milkshakes as well as we do to those drinks that are taxed, so i think thatis drinks that are taxed, so i think that is more to do with the fact that is more to do with the fact that it that is more to do with the fact thatitis that is more to do with the fact that it is easier in drink than it is in a food where sugar plays that will integral part of the structure of the food. i will integral part of the structure of the food-— of the food. i spoke to one campaigner— of the food. i spoke to one campaigner earlier - of the food. i spoke to one campaigner earlier for - of the food. i spoke to one . campaigner earlier for healthy of the food. i spoke to one - campaigner earlier for healthy food in schools who said that she would liken salt and sugar in processed
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foods as being similar to cigarettes and seat belts when it comes to government taking a policy that is about the health of the nation. 50. about the health of the nation. so, i would say — about the health of the nation. sr i would say that everybody about the health of the nation. sr3, i would say that everybody has to eat. you do not have to smoke and one cigarette is detrimental to your health whereas actually if you eat a balanced diet, then it feeds like chocolate and cake can play a role in that, but of course we should be eating lots of fruit and vegetables and whole grains as well and that is the best policy for a healthy balanced diet. it the best policy for a healthy balanced diet.— the best policy for a healthy balanced diet. it is a very good oint, balanced diet. it is a very good point. everyone _ balanced diet. it is a very good point, everyone has— balanced diet. it is a very good point, everyone has to - balanced diet. it is a very good point, everyone has to eat, - point, everyone has to eat, obviously, but it is about a balanced diet and when you look at how much is spent on sugary food versus fruit and veg, the more money is spent on the bad stuff than the good stuff, so that does not give an impression of it being a balanced diet. , ., ~ diet. yes, and i think we definitely... _ diet. yes, and i think we definitely... there - diet. yes, and i think we - definitely... there definitely is a problem in this country, we have an
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obesity crisis and it does impact on people's health and it is absolutely right this report has looked at the ways we can improve that and i think some of those recommendations in their call government to consider, as it produces its white paper later in the air, they are great actually and things particularly thinking about school meals, free school meals, thinking about can you work with local communities to make out actually what will really help those individuals? can we look at holiday hunger? which we know is a huge issue, last year during lockdown. there is a huge amount in the reporter to commend itself and should be considered, but did not think taxing food are making it more expensive is a way to go. you think taxing food are making it more expensive is a way to go.— expensive is a way to go. you say that the taxes _ expensive is a way to go. you say that the taxes would _ expensive is a way to go. you say that the taxes would fall - expensive is a way to go. you say that the taxes would fall on - expensive is a way to go. you say that the taxes would fall on the i that the taxes would fall on the consumers, but that does not necessarily have to be the case. these taxes very specifically and up are not falling on the consumers about the producers. thea;r are not falling on the consumers about the producers.— about the producers. they are initially paid — about the producers. they are initially paid by _ about the producers. they are initially paid by the _ about the producers. they are initially paid by the producer, | about the producers. they are - initially paid by the producer, that
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is right, but if there has been a lot of pressure on food prices over the last year, there's more to come with a whole range of government policies that are due to come into place, it is highly likely that companies will have to pass that price through to the consumer, sol think at the end the day... price through to the consumer, so i think at the end the day. . .- think at the end the day... thank ou ve think at the end the day... thank you very much — think at the end the day... thank you very much for _ think at the end the day... thank you very much forjoining - think at the end the day... thank you very much forjoining us - think at the end the day... thank you very much forjoining us if. think at the end the day... thankl you very much forjoining us if you are watching on bbc two, goodbye. joining me now is dr kawther hashem who is the campaign lead at action on sugar and is a nutrition researcher at queen mary university of london. thank you very much forjoining us. just had a robust defence of their on why this tax should not fall on the food and drink industry. what do you think about it? i the food and drink industry. what do you think about it?— you think about it? i think for the ast you think about it? i think for the past couple _ you think about it? i think for the past couple of — you think about it? i think for the past couple of years, _ you think about it? i think for the past couple of years, i _ you think about it? i think for the past couple of years, i have - past couple of years, i have mentioned there has been a reformation programme. what has actually happened is reductions that have happened for the categories of products that contribute to a
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significant amount of sugar had very little reformulation and that is because the programme is voluntary, it is the countries that want to be progressive —— companies that want to be progressive and it was in the right thing, but they sit in a competitive market. if they want to be reformulating, their competitors that need to be forced to do the same thing and a system like this, a tax, will level the playing field and get all the companies to abide by that similar rules and all will have to reformulate and if they do not, they will be subject to this tax. so even though we have had a reformulation programme for salt and sugar, for sugar it has been only a reduction of 3%, despite it needing to get to 20% by the end of last year actually, and for the salt reduction programme, we had really great success in the first few years of it, but actually it has stalled for the last ten years and at the success has been quite poor, there has not been much success and progress has been quite poor and do
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so again we need another mechanism like a tax and we have seen the soft drinks levy which really gets companies to accommodate and i think thatis companies to accommodate and i think that is a very strong point. kate said that the _ that is a very strong point. kate said that the point _ that is a very strong point. kate said that the point of _ that is a very strong point. kate said that the point of the - that is a very strong point. kate said that the point of the tax is to drive reformulation, as you are talking about, but she says it would not actually have that impact and with food producers having very tight margins, the tax would actuallyjust tight margins, the tax would actually just end tight margins, the tax would actuallyjust end up being passed on to the consumer which would mean price rises between 15 and 20%. this is a reall price rises between 15 and 20%. in 3 is a really interesting point, but the reality is when you talk to companies, those that are progressive, the national food strategy, the committee on there did talk to food companies and behind closed doors, there is a fiat from the companies that are not doing the right thing. —— that is a fear. and if you can get all companies to do the right thing, reduce salt and sugarin the right thing, reduce salt and sugar in their products, and level the playing field, that has a huge big impact and the playing field, that has a huge big impactand i can the playing field, that has a huge big impact and i can only be done
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with systems like this. there would be a significant increase in reformulation if we had taxes coming in on companies, just like we have seen with soft drinks and it will bring about change. there will still be some companies that say actually, we will not change our recipes and for those products, prices might go up, but really, if you have seen 80% of products contain some sugar and salt added into them, if we could cut it back a tiny bit in each one and therefore the cost of the companies coming down, we know that has a very big impact on their bottom line and they will do something about it.- bottom line and they will do something about it. thank you very much. good morning, we're starting
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with the golf and the oldest major — the open championship is back after a year off due to covid. the world's best players are on the south coast along with up to 32,000 fans — and after an early start we're well into the first round. our reporter ben croucher is following the action at royal st george's and ben what's the latest? the players are now in the clubhouse and that includes an englishman very near to the top of the leaderboard. and the celljust one shot off the lead at the moment after a fine three under par round yesterday. he shot six birdies in a total. he currently sits alongside a fellow englishman danny willett. out in front at the moment is the american brian harman. he is four under par, four of his first five, he has just gone through the turn alongside the canadian mckenzie issues. bryson is struggling at the moment, two over paras struggling at the moment, two over par as he makes his way down. he has really not found it and he is
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playing alongsidejordan who was motoring along nicely at three under as well. still lots of golf to be played this afternoon and the sun has just gone in played this afternoon and the sun hasjust gone in it played this afternoon and the sun has just gone in it from the clouds and the wind has picked up which will make things pretty tricky for the players teeing off about now. even harder because we know how tough that causes. and some big names teeing off later on? including people like rory mcllroy? absolutely, around about 2:45pm is when you want to mark your card for some of the marquee groups. phil mickelson and patterson, they go off about 2:50pm. and as you mentioned, rory mcllroy, the former champion, goes off atjust rory mcllroy, the former champion, goes off at just after 20 past three and the conditions are here at st george's is particularly difficult and with this wind at swelling in the sun and clouds are starting to
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break some of these greens and fairways, it could make things challenging some of those going out later today. challenging some of those going out later toda . ., ~ challenging some of those going out later toda . ., ,, , ., , challenging some of those going out later toda . ., ~' ,, , . great britain's women's football squad have announced they will take the knee before their matches at the olympics. earlier this month, the rules around athletes protesting at the games had been relaxed by the international olympic committee. gb's coach hege riise said the squad "were all united" in their decision to make the gesture. and just before we go the rugby league world cup in england will go ahead this autumn. you can find more on that and the rest of today's stories on the bbc sport website. the government has defended the decision to put majorca and ibiza on the amber list for travel, just two weeks after they were moved to green. it means that, from monday morning,
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most holiday—makers returning to the uk from the spanish islands will have to isolate for ten days unless they're fully vaccinated. andrew walker reports. a warm mediterranean beach is a tempting prospect for many after more than a year of restrictions. some saw the spanish balearic islands as an appealing choice for a summer getaway. but the changes announced by the government will cause problems for some, like medi, who's due to fly to majorca at the weekend. i've had one vaccine three weeks ago. i know from monday people who are double vaccinated don't need to quarantine when they return from amber list countries. however, i will need to quarantine, and that's not great for my mental health, but i'm very lucky i can work from home. infection rates have doubled on the island since they were added to the green watch listjust over two weeks ago. the government traffic light system puts countries with the least severe covid situations into the green category. no quarantine is required for returning travellers. bulgaria and hong kong are being added. then there's the green watch list,
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which is a warning that the country is at risk of moving to the next category, which is amber. adult travellers have to quarantine for ten days. from monday, that will no longer apply to those who are fully vaccinated. many young people aren't, so they will be affected as the balearic islands moves to amber. and for red list countries, quarantine in a special hotel is required. four countries, including indonesia and cuba, are being added. and from the government, a warning that further changes to the lists are possible. i think we all know by now that travelling at the moment is not the same as it was before there was a global pandemic. and it does mean that when people book, particularly if you're booking to a green watch list country, you need to make sure you can get your money back. you need to make sure you can re—book your accommodation whenever required. the changes come into force at 4am on monday. they will also apply in wales and scotland. northern ireland is expected to follow suit, though it will be a further week before the amber list exemption from quarantine for fully vaccinated adults applies there.
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andrew walker, bbc news. lisa francesca nand is a travel journalist and host of the big travel podcast. when they went on the greenest, there was a scramble for people to book travel to the balearics. how many people can be affected by this in terms of being there right now or due to go? irate in terms of being there right now or due to to? ~ ., in terms of being there right now or duetouo? ., , ., due to go? we reckon a couple of hundred thousand _ due to go? we reckon a couple of hundred thousand people - due to go? we reckon a couple of hundred thousand people will- due to go? we reckon a couple of hundred thousand people will be | hundred thousand people will be affected at the moment, so it is so frustrating for anyone who thought that it was going to be ok, who has booked a holiday and an outsider meet some people will be scrabbling to get back. of course, if you have had the double vaccine you will be ok, but there will be many young people, especially those who have at not have the vaccine for any reason, will think when we scrabbled back for a place on a plane right now or will we face ten days in home isolation when we get back? it is
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difficult to predict what will happen with these moving lists because it was said that the balearics were on the green watchlist, how clear is the distinction and it moving from a list to another? i distinction and it moving from a list to another?— list to another? i would love to live ou list to another? i would love to give you a _ list to another? i would love to give you a definitive _ list to another? i would love to give you a definitive answer . list to another? i would love to| give you a definitive answer but this is what is frustrating, does not make sense when you look at the data. we have about 200 cases in 100,000 in the balearics at the moment and that is far less than what we have here, so the travel industry are saying itjust does not seem like the government to care about the travel industry. it is not just about holidays any more, it does not seem to me that they are following the data from what we can see and it is about hundreds of thousands ofjobs that could be at risk and we just need more clarity. they said they were going to come up with a greenest change in our midst does make a green list announcement today and it came yesterday. i speak today and it came yesterday. i speak to people every day he said it is
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frustrating, the chopping and changing, but it does not seem to be following the date as far as we can see. ~ ., following the date as far as we can see, ~ ., ., , ., following the date as far as we can see. . . ., ., see. what about the prospect of an backed list countries _ see. what about the prospect of an backed list countries going - see. what about the prospect of an backed list countries going right. backed list countries going right because it is one thing to go from green to amber, and quarantine obviously going to be a problem for many, may be for most, but it is at least a quarantine at home, but if you come back from a red list, quarantine in a hotel and did now with that change that enables people to go to an bit list without quarantine if they are double vaccinated, does potentially put a lot of people in the position where they might suddenly find themselves on holiday facing the prospect of hotel quarantine on their return. that would be absolutely awful, wouldn't it? bad enough having to come back and isolate if you did not think you are going to, but there is no amber watchlist, we have this green watchlist which croatia has now gone on, but there isn't really now gone on, but there isn't really no way of saying and that is why this uncertainty, it is killing the travel industry and anyone who wants to holiday, there is no shame in wanting a holiday at the moment and it is uncertain. last summer we did
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not have the vaccines and there was more freedom and ability to travel at last summer. this summer should be totally different and itjust does not look like it is shaping up to be. ~ ., does not look like it is shaping up to be. ~ . , ., to be. when i asked the question about how _ to be. when i asked the question about how can — to be. when i asked the question about how can we _ to be. when i asked the question about how can we predict, - to be. when i asked the question about how can we predict, how . to be. when i asked the question i about how can we predict, how can to be. when i asked the question - about how can we predict, how can we know how the decisions are made and you said it was very opaque, last to some the comment did actually put a figure, didn't it, and how many cases i had to be 100,000 for people to have to quarantine? i think, if my memory serves me right, it was about 50 per 100,000, so we were in about 50 per 100,000, so we were in a completely different situation, but they have not put a figure on it to this year. but they have not put a figure on it to this year-— to this year. they have not. when ou said to this year. they have not. when you said it — to this year. they have not. when you said it was — to this year. they have not. when you said it was 50, _ to this year. they have not. when you said it was 50, i _ to this year. they have not. when you said it was 50, i thought - to this year. they have not. when you said it was 50, i thought it. to this year. they have not. when l you said it was 50, i thought it was 20 at one point! 20 and 100,000 seemed to be the number, so it will be much higher rates this year, but i am not a scientist, it is not a specialist area, but we are doing much better in terms of vaccines, they are doing the job, they are breaking the link between serious illness, so the numbers are different, but maybe what we are at this point when we do not need to be
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going on in case numbers any more, but serious illnesses and deaths, as awful as that is. pare but serious illnesses and deaths, as awful as that is.— awful as that is. are you able to track what _ awful as that is. are you able to track what is _ awful as that is. are you able to track what is happening - awful as that is. are you able to track what is happening with - track what is happening with people's travel plans, you say about 200,000 will be affected by this, how many people have bookings this summer? what sort of level in terms of the normal capacity, the normal number of people that we would expect to travel at this kind of time of year, pre—pandemic? expect to travel at this kind of time of year, pre-pandemic? compared to normal, time of year, pre-pandemic? compared to normal. people _ time of year, pre-pandemic? compared to normal, people are _ time of year, pre-pandemic? compared to normal, people are expecting - to normal, people are expecting their net talking about it being busy and prices going up, but compared to normal it is next to zero. my parents flew out of gatwick this morning, on a full flight eventually, they are going to malaga and he said the airport was absolutely dead. people are booking, there is an appetite for travel, but know when compared to normal. you have to be quite used to taking to think i will book holiday now. that is the appetite for travel, people are going, but in terms of what would normally be happening around this time of year, school holidays coming up, very dead in comparison.
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thank you. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk is now higher than pre—pandemic levels in the three months tojune. data from the office for national statistics shows there were 862,000 jobs on offer between april and june. that's over 77,000 more than the first three months of 2020. the ons says the rise is being fuelled by vacancies in hospitality and retail. the figures also show companies are hiring at a quick pace. there were 356,000 more workers on payrolls injune. that's the biggest rise since the start of the pandemic. however the figure is still over 200,000 down on pre—pandemic levels and stands at 28.9 million. the ons also said that the unemployment rate was 4.8% between march and may. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor.
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hello. it is suncream rather than a rain jacket which is now more essential for the next few days. plenty of sunshine this afternoon although a bit more cloud across central and southern parts of england and wales. blue skies for much of scotland, away from the north—west, where cloud will thicken this afternoon and the hebrides will start to see a bit of patchy rain. more sunshine breaking through in northern ireland but 24 degrees across the grampians, 25 in the lake district and towards the south—east of wales, feeling very pleasant in the sunshine here. always cool down the eastern coast with the breeze, which remains in place this evening and overnight, feeding that cloud through east anglia and the south—east. more rain clouds to the north—west of scotland and returning to the north—west of northern ireland with some patchy drizzle but clear skies in between and temperatures could drop into single figures for one or two. early morning mist and fog patches will clear through the day. brightening up across east anglia and the south—east after a cloudy start. the highlands and islands stay fairly cloudy with a chance of a shower but for many, a hot day on friday, 27 in eastern scotland, and 27 in southern england, too. goodbye for now.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines... 19 people have died — and dozens are missing — after flooding in western germany proposals for a "snack tax" on salty and sugary foods to try to tackle britain's obesity crisis. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. borisjohnson says his programme to reduce inequalities in the uk won't make richer areas poorer. britney spears has a new lawyer in her case to win control of her business affairs from her father — and she's been celebrating with cartwheels. borisjohnson has today insisted that his plans for reducing
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inequality across the uk will not make rich parts of the country poorer. during a speech in the west midlands, he has rejected suggestions that his so—called "levelling up" programme to boost investment in the north and midlands will mean london and the south east losing out. but also said that there is a "glaring imbalance" that needs tackling. we don't want to level down, we don't want to make the purpose of the country richer by making the rich part of the country purred. and you can't hope to stimulate growth around the country by actually constraining areas from developing likely labour government did with their ludicrous industrial development certificates. levelling up development certificates. levelling up can only be achieved with a strong and dynamic wealth creating economy. there's got to be a catalytic role for government and government must provide a strategic lead. but that requires consistency
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from government, not chopping and changing. and in the last 40 years we have had 40 different schemes or bodies to boost local or regional growth. we had the abercrombie plan in london, the new towns, economic development committees, the new deal of communities, the regional development agencies, and yet none of these initiatives have been powerful enough to deal with the long—term secular trends of deindustrialisation or the decline of coastal resorts. and that basic half heartedness of governmental approach has been coupled with an unspoken assumption by policy makers that investment should always follow success. so to that investment should always follow success. soto use that investment should always follow success. so to use a that investment should always follow success. soto use a football metaphor, the approach has always been to hang around the goalmouth, rather than being the playmaker, if you see what i mean. i am not a great expert in football you get a general gist of what i'm trying to say. orto general gist of what i'm trying to say. or to borrow a bible, a biblical comparison, governments
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have created a sort of matthew effect, to him that hath should be given, so you end up investing in areas where house prices are already high, trans were already congested, and by turbo—charging those areas, especially in london and the south—east, you drive prices even higher and you force as more and more people to move to the same expensive areas. with me is the conservative mp for north west durham, richard holde. also i'm joined by stuart elford, chief executive officer at devon chamber of commerce. welcome both of you. richard, what would it mean for your area? i welcome both of you. richard, what would it mean for your area?- would it mean for your area? i think this is really — would it mean for your area? i think this is really good _ would it mean for your area? i think this is really good to _ would it mean for your area? i think this is really good to see _ would it mean for your area? i think this is really good to see some - would it mean for your area? i think| this is really good to see some more meat on the bones for what the prime minister has said previously. when he came up to sedgefield the day after the election and met me mps in the north—east, he north—east, he said he was going to repay the trust of the voters had pretenders, —— had
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put in hours, and this is a direct way, we have seen some good stuff, bits since the levelling up fund, lifelong earning allowance went there in september this year, and some transport project bids in, but this is the transformational thing wait to see, really highlighted by the primitive today, and looking forward to the white paper later in the year. forward to the white paper later in the ear. ~ ., ., , forward to the white paper later in the ear. ~ . . , ., forward to the white paper later in the ear. ~ . ., , ., ., the year. what was the meat on the bones he got _ the year. what was the meat on the bones he got today _ the year. what was the meat on the bones he got today in _ the year. what was the meat on the bones he got today in terms - the year. what was the meat on the bones he got today in terms of - bones he got today in terms of specifics for your area? the specifics — specifics for your area? the specifics were _ specifics for your area? the specifics were very - specifics for your area? he specifics were very much specifics for your area? tie: specifics were very much they were bringing forward the white paper, which will outline everything in a cohesive way, because we have already seen, as i said, some of the specifics come into force up one bed, benson for restoring the railways funds, the truth is, areas like mine have been ignored for too long and the prime minister has already started talking about the changes in the green book, saying investment in the north, as he was saying, with the football analogy, no point in consulate putting it where there has always been success, you need to build from the bottom
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up, from the grassroots areas for areas to grow. i was with the payments are at nissan a couple of weeks ago looking at the long—term investment for the next generation of manufacturing jobs. that's what we want to see, a real transformation in the economy, and i'm sure this is where it's going to come from. it can'tjust be for ages like mine, i have friends down the other parts of the country who there is coastal towns across the country, also feel this disconnect. with what has happened in central london over the last couple of decades. and they want to see some of that change too. stewart, what do you think about the plan? stewart, what do you think about the lan? ., ~' , ., , . plan? thank you very much. let me start off by — plan? thank you very much. let me start off by saying — plan? thank you very much. let me start off by saying that _ plan? thank you very much. let me start off by saying that chambers i plan? thank you very much. let me start off by saying that chambers ofj start off by saying that chambers of commerce — start off by saying that chambers of commerce are completely apolitical, we work— commerce are completely apolitical, we work with or whatever government is in power. _ we work with or whatever government is in power, the spirit of levelling up is in power, the spirit of levelling up this— is in power, the spirit of levelling up this a — is in power, the spirit of levelling up this a great idea, but what does it actually— up this a great idea, but what does it actually mean? for businesses in the south—west of england i would say it— the south—west of england i would say it means nothing. they are fed
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up say it means nothing. they are fed up with— say it means nothing. they are fed up with hearing the expression levelling — up with hearing the expression levelling up and not seeing any investment in arcadia. i have core support— investment in arcadia. i have core support from a business point of two hsz, it _ support from a business point of two hsz, it is _ support from a business point of two hsz, it is good for the country and what _ hsz, it is good for the country and what have — hsz, it is good for the country and what have you, however, what tangibty— what have you, however, what tangibty is— what have you, however, what tangibly is going to come to the south—west? we have been ignored for far too— south—west? we have been ignored for far too long _ south-west? we have been ignored for far too lona . , south-west? we have been ignored for far too long-— far too long. there is the pot of money that _ far too long. there is the pot of money that the _ far too long. there is the pot of money that the prime - far too long. there is the pot of money that the prime minister| money that the prime minister mentioned. i was actually announced by the transfer last year, £640 billion —— it was actually announced by the chancellor. it is a five year plan, i am assuming that is what you were referring to, richard, when you talked about bidding for cash. every area has the opportunity to bid for that cash. , ., ., , that cash. they do and we will be biddin: as that cash. they do and we will be bidding as much _ that cash. they do and we will be bidding as much as _ that cash. they do and we will be bidding as much as we _ that cash. they do and we will be bidding as much as we can - that cash. they do and we will be bidding as much as we can but i that cash. they do and we will be j bidding as much as we can but so that cash. they do and we will be . bidding as much as we can but so far i bidding as much as we can but so far i have _ bidding as much as we can but so far i have hot— bidding as much as we can but so far i have not see anything tangible come _ i have not see anything tangible come this— i have not see anything tangible come this way. we actually welcome the review— come this way. we actually welcome the review and the devolution white paper— the review and the devolution white paper and _ the review and the devolution white paper and i— the review and the devolution white paper and i am glad they're bringing
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forward, _ paper and i am glad they're bringing forward, because an argument i've had a _ forward, because an argument i've had a lot— forward, because an argument i've had a lot as — forward, because an argument i've had a lot as we don't get anything in the _ had a lot as we don't get anything in the south—west because we don't have an _ in the south—west because we don't have an elected mayor. that is not the fault _ have an elected mayor. that is not the fault of — have an elected mayor. that is not the fault of ours or business, we have _ the fault of ours or business, we have a _ the fault of ours or business, we have a very— the fault of ours or business, we have a very strange geopolitical map. _ have a very strange geopolitical map. the — have a very strange geopolitical map, the whole of the south—west is a particular— map, the whole of the south—west is a particular political colour, part of a coupte _ a particular political colour, part of a couple of small dots of the other— of a couple of small dots of the other colour, and it doesn't seem any incentive to get behind that region. — any incentive to get behind that region, this region, this majestic region. _ region, this region, this majestic region. and — region, this region, this majestic region, and invest. region, this region, this ma'estic region, and investfi region, and invest. sorry to interrupt— region, and invest. sorry to interrupt you, _ region, and invest. sorry to interrupt you, because - region, and invest. sorry to interrupt you, because the | region, and invest. sorry to - interrupt you, because the prime minister was saying areas like you still need a voice to champion the area, talking about mayors for counties. would that make a difference?— counties. would that make a difference? ~ . ., ,, , counties. would that make a difference? ~ . .«r , ., difference? well, whatever makes a difference? well, whatever makes a difference if — difference? well, whatever makes a difference if we _ difference? well, whatever makes a difference if we are _ difference? well, whatever makes a difference if we are being _ difference? well, whatever makes a difference if we are being listened i difference if we are being listened to, but _ difference if we are being listened to, but i_ difference if we are being listened to, but i do not think we are as solution — to, but i do not think we are as solution. latertoday to, but i do not think we are as solution. later today we will hear resutts _ solution. later today we will hear results of — solution. later today we will hear results of expressions of interest to run— results of expressions of interest to run trailblazer beds and the locat— to run trailblazer beds and the local skills improvement plan, skills— local skills improvement plan, skills accelerators, i will make a lot of— skills accelerators, i will make a lot of money not any of that will go west of— lot of money not any of that will go west of bristol and that is a constant _ west of bristol and that is a constant frustration to businesses in the _ constant frustration to businesses in the south—west.
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constant frustration to businesses in the south-west.— constant frustration to businesses in the south-west. richard, how do ou in the south-west. richard, how do you respond — in the south-west. richard, how do you respond to _ in the south-west. richard, how do you respond to what _ in the south-west. richard, how do you respond to what shirt _ in the south-west. richard, how do you respond to what shirt is - in the south-west. richard, how do you respond to what shirt is saying | you respond to what shirt is saying there about him feeling like his area of the country is actually been neglected? i area of the country is actually been neulected? ~ area of the country is actually been neulected? ,, ,., , ., neglected? i think some parts of the country have — neglected? i think some parts of the country have similar _ neglected? i think some parts of the country have similar problems, - neglected? i think some parts of the | country have similar problems, some of the skill gaps we want to see close, we have seen the lifelong learning and as we year. i'm sure south—west mps will be bidding like i will be bidding for levelling funds coming through. it should help transform some of the local economy is in our areas, some things will be nationwide, some things will be nationwide, some things will be nationwide, something is area specific. i think this is a real opportunity for all of the areas of the country outside of that central london hub, which i think is what the prime minister is really talking about this year, sorry, today, in coventry. we want to see something transformational, notjust for one transformational, not just for one part transformational, notjust for one part of the country or another, but for everywhere outside the central
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london bubble, but i think there's been so much concentration, and we probably agree with this, the chambers of commerce in devon, there has been fortunate much concentration on putting more where there has already been massive success in central london and we need to see that spread across the country, so that people in our areas, whether in rural county durham are in devon, can actually live and work in those communities. we are proud towns out there, small cities, rural communities, who really want to see their young people be able to live and thrive in those communities do not move elsewhere for work, that is what perimeter is pushing for.- elsewhere for work, that is what perimeter is pushing for. saying he thinks you're _ perimeter is pushing for. saying he thinks you're both _ perimeter is pushing for. saying he thinks you're both in _ perimeter is pushing for. saying he thinks you're both in the _ perimeter is pushing for. saying he thinks you're both in the same - perimeter is pushing for. saying he l thinks you're both in the same camp, really. are you worried, as that what will happen going forward as the north takes away from the south—west mac the prime minister said today that absolutely will not be the case. said today that absolutely will not be the case-— be the case. listen, there is undated _ be the case. listen, there is undated two _ be the case. listen, there is undated two the _ be the case. listen, there is undated two the spirit - be the case. listen, there is undated two the spirit of. be the case. listen, there is undated two the spirit of it, | be the case. listen, there is| undated two the spirit of it, i be the case. listen, there is - undated two the spirit of it, i am four. let's see what comes out
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about. there is said to be a north and south of i, there is an east and west divide. the south—west is completely ignored by government. we are not on the agenda. that is a constant frustration. employment, depending on your postcode you have a nine year life expectancy difference because of the socio economic back and you have. we have a lower than average level of people with higher level education, our wages are lower than national average by a country mile, and we have very expensive places to live. this is not helpful at all to business. we have a much awaited comes into devon and stops at exeter. there is another two hours before you reach the far end of her peninsula, but where is the government investing quest? the proof in the pudding will be... love the words, lets see the results. good to talk to you both. the music industry is weighted against artists, with even successful pop stars seeing "pitiful returns" from streaming, according to a group of mps. they've called for a "complete
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reset" of the market, so that musicians get a "fair share" of the £736.5 million uk record labels earn from streaming. currently artists only receive about 16% of any royalties. with me now is jazz musician soweto kinch — soweto gave evidence to the inquiry. welcome. thank you forjoining us. what is your view? it is welcome. thank you for 'oining us. what is your viewh what is your view? it is market failure that _ what is your view? it is market failure that has _ what is your view? it is market failure that has been _ what is your view? it is market failure that has been shown, i what is your view? it is market | failure that has been shown, the what is your view? it is market - failure that has been shown, the top three streaming labels are something like £4.2 billion in the past year, whereas eight out of ten artists who stream their music online earn less than £200 a year. most music fans, most audience members would be quite rightly repulsed or annoyed or disgusted by that fact. and want a more equitable way to play —— pr craters for their work. haifa more equitable way to play -- pr craters for their work.— more equitable way to play -- pr craters for their work. how do you do out of streaming? _ craters for their work. how do you do out of streaming? it _ craters for their work. how do you do out of streaming? it is -
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do out of streaming? it is difficult- _ do out of streaming? it is difficult. not _ do out of streaming? it is difficult. not only - do out of streaming? it is difficult. not only is - do out of streaming? it is difficult. not only is a - do out of streaming? it 3 difficult. not only is a paltry amount paid by streaming but i have seen contraction of the other sources of income that are normally there. obviously there have been no live gigs are relatively few for the past 18 months. the way in which merchandise itself is quite difficult, when you cannot have face—to—face interaction with fans, and most people are sort of winding up and most people are sort of winding up their cd players, sol and most people are sort of winding up their cd players, so i really need to find a way to let the music, record albums of the scale and breadth i want to come and find a new way of doing that in the future, because itjust doesn't work economically. because it just doesn't work economically.— because it just doesn't work economically. because it just doesn't work economicall . ., ., economically. you mentioned the fi . ure 200 economically. you mentioned the figure 200 pounds _ economically. you mentioned the figure 200 pounds being - economically. you mentioned the figure 200 pounds being what - economically. you mentioned the | figure 200 pounds being what the majority of musicians might make out of spot i or any of the other online streaming platforms. i heard earlier a writer saying a song streamed a million times earned £200 for her. what do you actually get from the streaming platforms yourself, if you don't mind telling us? i’m streaming platforms yourself, if you don't mind telling us?— don't mind telling us? i'm not going to disclose- —
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don't mind telling us? i'm not going to disclose. not _ don't mind telling us? i'm not going to disclose. not much _ don't mind telling us? i'm not going to disclose. not much more - don't mind telling us? i'm not going to disclose. not much more than i to disclose. not much more than between 200— £1000 a year. when you consider how much revenue is generated, something like $200 million a day during the last year generated just from the streaming platforms. the idea of them sought a pleading poverty... doing things like charging shipping costs and breakages for cds, even though on streaming platforms, and you discover some of the scandalous practices the music industry is still getting away with... haifa practices the music industry is still getting away with... how many lease still getting away with... how many please would _ still getting away with... how many please would you _ still getting away with... how many please would you be _ still getting away with... how many please would you be getting - still getting away with... how many please would you be getting on - still getting away with... how many l please would you be getting on those platforms? —— how many plays? you said other streams of income have gone, live performance out the window, for now, obviously it will come back. when you look at that in terms of your hourly rate, i don't know, how would you say in terms of the pay for a job that this presumably full—time, pretty much?
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it is more about a move in model because it is not at the moment i am getting millions or something like that, but on a platform like spotify, as much as 80%... 80% of the money that people pay to subscription services go to art as they have never even listen to it because the way that money is divvied up, sol because the way that money is divvied up, so i am more of an advocate of paying a more equitable royalty. something more like 30—40% for artists and creators who created the work, that would make more sense. ., ,., the work, that would make more sense. ., ~ , ., sense. the reason i keep digging on the finances — sense. the reason i keep digging on the finances of _ sense. the reason i keep digging on the finances of this _ sense. the reason i keep digging on the finances of this is _ sense. the reason i keep digging on the finances of this is because - the finances of this is because while you sit opposite 80% of subscriptions go to those that are already doing really well out of the music industry, the majority of the artists who are being listened to are not doing financially well and you wonder to viability thousand? can people continue to actually produce music as a living in that
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context? and then it does become a problem for everyone suddenly they listen to the artist they want to listen to the artist they want to listen to? ., ., ., listen to? some of the framing of this discussion _ listen to? some of the framing of this discussion is _ listen to? some of the framing of this discussion is really _ this discussion is really misleading. the idea that there is not enough to go around. we know that the top executives of the streaming companies pay themselves something that £600 million of bonuses over the past year of lockdown, so this framing of not being an offer having to make the vigorous work—out, i think it is a bit disingenuous. there is actually more ample revenues are never coming to streaming platforms. i think it is a more equitable formula to be worked out, and i am pleased the government select committee have decided to take what we are saying so seriously and your pudsey record and people to say enough is enough, we have to do something about it. —— and to approach the record industry people to say enough is enough. lisa shaw was 44—years—old when she died 3 weeks after having her first
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astrazeneca vaccination. the award winning bbc radio presenter�*s family say she was treated for blood clots days after her firstjab, a side effect experts stress is extremely rare. official figures from the regulator the mhra, up to the end of last month, show there were 399 cases of blood clots and 71 deaths after more than 46 million doses of the vaccine. and public health england says the vaccination programme has so far prevented an estimated 27,000 deaths in england alone. but lisa's husband gareth eve is calling for everyone to be given a choice about which vaccine they have. victoria derbyshire spoke to him in his first interview since her death. scary thing for me is that the vaccines are being given to people, and have been given to people and we were aware early in the year, we are aware that these vaccines come with certain risks. but for whatever
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reason, we don't know who these adverse reactions are going to appear in. it is a lottery. and... that thought is quite scary, that, you know, people are getting these jabs and we don't know whether it is going to have a bad reaction or not. and the guys in the hospital that were treating lisa, as i say, they didn't really know what they were facing. they did not know how to treat it, and for me, in a situation like that, you know, and i say this, and i am absolutely not an anti—vaxxer, but i say this, while we don't know this information, while we don't know how to treat people, while we don't know who it is going to affect, maybe the answer
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is to give people the alternative. there are alternative vaccines available. there is astrazeneca... so you are not saying pause the astrazeneca roll—out? you are saying, give people a choice? um, if l there is a choice available, yeah. i l can understand it. it is not as if we don't have other vaccines available to us. we do. you know, so while there is this cloud over astrazeneca, then maybe put it on ice and say, look, we are going to look into giving people the other 'ab. . . . , . ., the regulator, the mhra, and they say, "we are deeply saddened to hear about the death of miss shaw and our thoughts are with her family. over 81 million doses of vaccines against covid—19 have now been administered in the uk, saving thousands of lives, through the biggest vaccination programme that has ever taken place in this country. no effective medicine or vaccine is without risk and our advice remains
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that the benefits of the astrazeneca vaccine outweigh the risks in the majority of people and it is still vitally important that people come forward for their vaccination and for their second dose, when invited to do so." i appreciate those numbers, those figures will be absolutely zero consolation to you and to your little boy. but you want to speak about what happened to lisa. , , , ., talk about there are staggering, incredible. what the vaccine has done is unbelievable and as i say, lisa and i both queued up to get our jabs and had no qualms about doing that. like you say, we were very positive about it. and as i say, the work these people have done to get the country back on its feet is outstanding. but... we need to
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recognise that there are families who have been affected by... by this jab. you know, i have seen, i have seen numbers that have been... taken from the government's own yellow card system, you know, a reputable doctor has pulled this information out that suggests that... the number of fatalities is approaching 1500 people, and... iappreciate... gareth, those are not the figures i have, just to say, in terms of a yellow card reports, that is when people report adverse reactions, there were 399 cases of blood clots with low platelet counts like lisa in the uk, following the astrazeneca jab. the overall case fatality rate was 18%, with 71 deaths. that is out
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of more than 32 million doses of the vaccine. as i say, i amjust going by the numbers i have seen. an l independent doctor has reviewed the yellow card system, and she talked about approaching 1500 deaths. even 1500 deaths, like you say, versus the number of people that have been vaccinated, it is a drop in the ocean. it is, you know... but it hasn't been a drop in the ocean for our family. i want to ask you - finally, gareth, how would you like lisa to be remembered? lisa was always smiling. lisa was... so kind. she was my best friend. she was a fantastic mummy. and daughter
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and sister. and she was an excellent broadcaster. she would do anything for anybody. and... she wasjust doing the right thing. that's all she was doing. and... i just don't want what has happened to her to be brushed under the this carpet. if anything good can come of what has happened to lisa, so this does not happen to other people. you know, we sat there in the intensive care unit and we saw what they did to my beautiful wife to try and save her. i don't want that to happen to other people. i don't want anybody else to have to tell their children that their mummy�*s not coming home.
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as i say, if she can be remembered in that way, that she has done some good, that would be a positive. gareth, i am so, so sorry. thank you very much for talking to us today. ok, thanks. and victoria also spoke to our medical editor fergus walsh — who talked us through the risks associated with the vaccine and explained a little about lisa's condition. let me tell you about about this condition. in lisa's case, we have to wait for the inquest but the certificate talks about complications coming from the astrazeneca vaccine for covid—19, first dose. there is an unknown side—effect, very rare, known as vaccine induced
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thrombosis and thrombocytopenia, a condition where clots form in combination with low platelet levels, and that is something that does not happen naturally. and therefore, the medical regulator, the mhra, thinks that there is a strong likelihood that it is the vaccine causing this. we have had just under 400 cases of that, most of them after the first dose, and we have had 71 deaths. so it is about one death per 650,000 doses. now all medicines, including vaccines, have risks as well as benefits, but you have to obviously set that against, for individuals and society, against the risk that you are trying to caution against and prevent, which is covid. with covid, there have been something like 1900 deaths
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per1 million people in the uk. and of course, covid itself is known to be a serious cause of clots, something like one in five people who are hospitalised with covid will end up with clots. this condition, i mean, it was first identified in march. it did not crop up in the trials, the global trials of the vaccine, because it is so rare. but it first started being investigated in around march. haematologists really went on a real quest to discover what was happening here and it relates, it is very similar to a condition caused very rarely by a blood thinner called heparin, where, for some reason, the body seems to create antibodies against platelets. we want the immune system to create antibodies against covid but in these very rare cases, it seems to create antibodies against platelets.
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they start to clump together. you get low platelet levels as well. and the fatality rate initially was much higher but it is now something like 17%. there is some suggestion that there is a slightly higher risk in women than men but it is not absolutely clear, and slightly higher incidence in younger people. and that is why initially thejcvi, the body that recommends what vaccines go to which age groups, said ok, not going to give... we think that people under 30 should not have the astrazeneca vaccine, and that policy was introduced. and then in may, early may, they said actually, people under 40 should have moderna or pfizer and that is the policy now. our medical editor fergus walsh, there. in a moment, the bbc news at one with reeta chakrabarti
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but first it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor plenty of sunshine this afternoon. a bit more cloud, blue skies for much of scotland away from the north west, clyde will take on this afternoon. the hebrides. to see a bit of patchy rain. more sunshine break through northern ireland. 23-25. break through northern ireland. 23—25 . feeling pleasant and essential overhead. collude in the eastern coast with the priest, that remains overnight. more anyway of cloud to the north—west of scotland. returning to the north—west of northern ireland. clear skies in between. temperatures could drop to single figures for one or two. early morning mist and fog patches, which will clear through the day, brightening up across east anglia and the south—east after a cloudy start. highlands and islands will the fairly cloudy, chance of a share, but for many, a hot day on
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friday. 27 in eastern scotland, and in southern england two. 27 in eastern scotland, and in southern england, too.
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tax salt and sugar to help support better diets — so says a review aimed at improving the nation's health. the tax raised could allow fruit and veg to be prescribed on the nhs, and extend free school meal provision, says the report's author. you're not going to break this junk food cycle, this interaction between our appetite and the commercial incentive of companies, unless you tackle it directly. but the prime minister responded coolly this morning to the idea of a salt and sugar tax. lam not, i must say, attracted to the idea of extra taxes on ha rd—working people. we'll be looking at the proposals and asking what affect our eating habits are having on the environment. also this lunchtime...
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