Skip to main content

tv   World Business Report  BBC News  July 15, 2021 5:30am-6:01am BST

5:30 am
this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. seeing red over amber. dismay from the travel industry as spain's holiday islands go back on the uk's quarantine list people quarantine list definitely want to holiday people definitely want to holiday but they want to holiday but they want to holiday with confidence and they need clarity, and that's what we are not getting at the moment. fed underfire. america's central bank chief is grilled by congress over soaring inflation, but insists stimulus measures will remain in place losing momentum — growth in china slows sharply in the three months tojune. could some government stimulus be on the way?
5:31 am
plus, red hot property. house prices in sydney are rising at $900 a day. is there trouble ahead? we start with the travel industry. it has been reacting with dismay after spain's popular holiday islands — ibiza, majorca and menorca — are to move to the british government's amber list, just two weeks after they were approved for quarantine—free travel. from next monday, anyone over 18 who's not fully vaccinated will have to quarantine on return home. the scottish and welsh governments said they will do the same, and northern ireland is expected to follow suit
5:32 am
a warm mediterranean beach is attempting prospect for many after more than one year of restrictions. sums of the spanish islands as an appealing choice for a summer getaway, but the changes announced by the government will cause problems for some, due to fly to majorca on the weekend. i’zre to ma'orca on the weekend. i've had to majorca on the weekend. i've had one vaccine, _ to majorca on the weekend. i�*e had one vaccine, three weeks ago, and from monday... i don't want to quarantine when i return from an amber country, but i will need to quarantine and that's not great for my mental health, but i'm very lucky i can work from home. infection rates have doubled in the islands since they were added to the watchlist two weeks ago. the government's traffic light system puts countries with the lease to be situations into the green country, category, no quarantine required. bulgaria and hong kong are being added. then there is the watchlist of
5:33 am
the country is at the risk of moving to the next category, which is amber, adult travellers must quarantine for ten days, but from monday, that will no longer apply to those who are fully vaccinated. many young people aren't, so they will be affected as the spanish islands moved amber, and the red list countries, quarantine in a special hotel is required. four countries including indonesia and cuba are being added. from the government, a warning to further changes to the lists are possible. i warning to further changes to the lists are possible.- the lists are possible. i think we all know _ the lists are possible. i think we all know now _ the lists are possible. i think we all know now that - the lists are possible. i think. we all know now that travelling at the moment is not the same as it was before there was a global pandemic and it does mean that when people book, particularly when you are booking to a green watchlist country, you need to make sure you can get your money back and rebook your accommodation whenever required. the changes come into _ whenever required. the changes come into force _ whenever required. the changes come into force at _ whenever required. the changes come into force at 4am - whenever required. the changes come into force at 4am on - come into force at 4am on monday. there will also apply in wales and scotland. northern ireland is expected to follow suit although it will be a further week before the amber list exemption from quarantine are fully vaccinated adult supplies there.
5:34 am
tom jenkins is chief executive of the european travel association. good to talk to you again. you concerned about the changes to the lists from the government. does not increase anxiety when it comes to holidaymakers and the choices their summer? i think if you are a uk holidaymaker and wanted to go to europe, you are in a state of permanent anxiety. these decisions are chopping and changing. ithink decisions are chopping and changing. i think from the government's point of view, they can be very confident that these are popular measures in these are popular measures in the population as a whole, even though it's catastrophic, if you are that part of the population that wishes to go to the mediterranean on holiday. in terms of the spanish islands now placed on the amber list from monday, how important is
5:35 am
uk tourism to places such as those islands? it’s uk tourism to places such as those islands? it's enormously important _ those islands? it's enormously important. the _ those islands? it's enormously important. the british - those islands? it's enormously important. the british are - those islands? it's enormously important. the british are the| important. the british are the second—biggest, these islands as a whole, the uk is the second—biggest market after germany, although in some parts such as a beta, we are by far the biggest customer. i think roughly around three in a normal year, roughly around three in a normalyear, if roughly around three in a normal year, if we ever have a normal year, if we ever have a normal one of those again, we expect about 3 million visits from the uk, spending on excess of,000 pounds each, this is a multi—million whole. of,000 pounds each, this is a multi-million whole.- of,000 pounds each, this is a multi-million whole. where are we out on _ multi-million whole. where are we out on the _ multi-million whole. where are we out on the green _ multi-million whole. where are we out on the green card - multi-million whole. where are we out on the green card for. we out on the green card for travel, and will such things, moves such as that make a big difference?— difference? that makes a big difference — difference? that makes a big difference within _ difference? that makes a big difference within europe - difference? that makes a big difference within europe and | difference within europe and the good thing about europe at the good thing about europe at the moment is it is opening up internally, that means like places like the islands have a
5:36 am
market of 400 million people to sell to. the uk, if you are a uk business, it a slightly different proposal, and one of the great unsung stories at the moment is the catastrophic plight of the uk industry, which is suffering more than anywhere else in europe, because our infection rates are going through the roof, and our government doesn't appear to be talking too much to other people about letting people in, so there is a $30 billion hole in the uk economy, £30 billion hole in the uk economy, from an industry that is more important than the motor manufacturing industry in terms of exports, and it isn't there at the moment, 95% decrease. moment, 9596 decrease. thank you for “oininu moment, 9596 decrease. thank you forjoining us— moment, 9596 decrease. thank you forjoining us once _ moment, 9596 decrease. thank you forjoining us once again _ moment, 9596 decrease. thank you forjoining us once again and - forjoining us once again and expressing the situation with regards to the travel industry. just to say that there is so much more detail on the website
5:37 am
of course, of which countries are on watchlist, what it means if you plan to travel, restrictions, et cetera, so do take a look at. let's move to the us now, because federal reserve chair jerome powell has been defending the central bank's policy during a grilling by members of congress. us inflation soared to 5 point 4% injune — the highest in almost 13 years. but mr powell insisted it's a temporary problem, and said the time for winding down the fed's massive support for the economy is �*still a ways off�*. 0ur north america business correspondent michelle fleury was watching the testimony. inflation was the number one topic facing the room power, the chairman of america's central bank as he appeared before the us house of representatives financial services committee. he predicted inflation would remain elevated in the coming months before moderating, sticking to his view that the current spike in prices is down
5:38 am
to short—term factors like supply bottlenecks, particularly as we have seen in the used car and truck market. steel, lawmakers challenge that conclusion. have a listen to the representative and waggoner, a republican from missouri. in waggoner, a republican from missouri. , ., , waggoner, a republican from missouri. , . , missouri. in february you reiterated _ missouri. in february you reiterated that _ missouri. in february you reiterated that the - missouri. in february you reiterated that the price i reiterated that the price spikes— reiterated that the price spikes are only temporarily, and — spikes are only temporarily, and that_ spikes are only temporarily, and that they will decrease in time, — and that they will decrease in time, as_ and that they will decrease in time, as inflation will move towards _ time, as inflation will move towards your goal of 2%. i can tell you — towards your goal of 2%. i can tell you the families and businesses that i represent in missouri _ businesses that i represent in missouri second traditional district, _ missouri second traditional district, ourfeeling missouri second traditional district, our feeling that these _ district, our feeling that these price hikes aren't very temporary. these price hikes aren't very temporary-— temporary. feeling the heat ahead of the _ temporary. feeling the heat ahead of the federal - temporary. feeling the heat. ahead of the federal reserve, saying the bank would act inflation persisted but for now caution. it inflation persisted but for now caution. ., , ., , ., ,, caution. it would be a mistake to do it at _ caution. it would be a mistake to do it at a — caution. it would be a mistake to do it at a time _ caution. it would be a mistake to do it at a time when - caution. it would be a mistake to do it at a time when we - to do it at a time when we really do believe that these things will come down of their own accord, as the economy reopens. it would be a mistake to act prematurely.—
5:39 am
to act prematurely. since the pandemic— to act prematurely. since the pandemic at _ to act prematurely. since the pandemic at the _ to act prematurely. since the pandemic at the us - to act prematurely. since the| pandemic at the us economy, interest rates have been near zero, and mr powell said the bank expects to keep it there until inflation is near its 2% target, and the labour market is healed. also added that the bank would provide ample notice before it starts to reduce its $120 million per month bond purchases. part of the problem facing the central bank is there is not a roadmap for how to come back from a pandemic, which is why the fed is taking a wait and see approach to removing stimulus. mr powell's appearance before congress was part of his semi—annual testimony on the state of monetary policy and he will appear before members of the senate banking committee later this thursday. kathleen brooks is director of minerva analysis in london. lovely to see you. i'm sure you were listening to what michelle had to say there and jerome powell. give us your take on the fed and where they are at at the moment. i
5:40 am
the fed and where they are at at the moment.— the fed and where they are at at the moment. i think they are in uuite at the moment. i think they are in quite a _ at the moment. i think they are in quite a tricky _ at the moment. i think they are in quite a tricky place _ at the moment. i think they are in quite a tricky place because l in quite a tricky place because as the republican senator pointed out for individuals, nearly five and a half % rise in inflation on the mind, that is huge and that will hurt you in the pocket, but yes, the federal reserve, six, 12, even 24 months out, so transitory to them could be 12 months, but an average person, they don't want to see month on month increases, so he's not doing very much to increase his popularity but i would see the financial markets have bought his narrative on transitory inflation, and we did not see huge increases, particularly in the bond market which is normally very sensitive to rising prices in the us, so they are trusting what he is saying. they are trusting what he is sa in. , , ., they are trusting what he is sa in. , saying. interesting you say that because _ saying. interesting you say that because the _ saying. interesting you say that because the previousl saying. interesting you say - that because the previous day, when that inflation number came through we saw a real rise in the bond markets, quite significant shift. in terms of what is ahead then, your thoughts, because some of the
5:41 am
issues causing price hikes are very unusual, aren't they? for example the shortage in ships causing secondhand car sales to be rising rapidly.— be rising rapidly. absolutely. we have the _ be rising rapidly. absolutely. we have the perfect - be rising rapidly. absolutely. we have the perfect storm i we have the perfect storm really from rising prices are. obviously delays linked to the 0bviously delays linked to the pandemic which started a year ago, the blockage in the panama canal which did not help things either, huge demand for certain things, for example building materials, as society shift towards more working from home, or people looking to upgrade their homes as they stay in, and we have seen massive inflation in house prices, and thatis inflation in house prices, and that is globally, so that's what's really quite interesting. that's what largely driving prices, obviously fuel prices have been impacted and what you tend to see is when you see these main price rises, they do filter through to other things, so when you see headline prices increase, that comes down to
5:42 am
core prices which are considered to have more of an impact on consumer spending, so the consumer is still propping up the consumer is still propping up a lot of economies right now, it will be interesting to see if they can do that at the end of the year, every will have price increases of four or five or 6% every month. have price increases of four or five or 696 every month.- have price increases of four or five or 696 every month. good to talk to you. _ five or 696 every month. good to talk to you, thank _ five or 696 every month. good to talk to you, thank you _ five or 696 every month. good to talk to you, thank you for - talk to you, thank you for getting up so early. to china now where the rate of economic growth has fallen sharply in the three months tojune. gdp expanded 7.9% in the second quarter compared with the same period last year. that's lower than expected, and down from a record growth rate of 18.3% in the previous three months. yue su is from the economist intelligence unit in beijing. good to have you on the programme. those numbers, we
5:43 am
must put into context for our viewers because of because the 18.3% rise in the previous quarter, that's very skewed, isn't it, by the covid pandemic?- isn't it, by the covid pandemic? isn't it, by the covid andemic? , , pandemic? yes, so the first uuarter pandemic? yes, so the first quarter data _ pandemic? yes, so the first quarter data is _ pandemic? yes, so the first quarter data is definitely . quarter data is definitely quite skewed by the base number last year and the second quarter as well so what we're looking at is the two year average compared with the pre— covid—19 period, which was 2019, and that number is 5.9%, two year average growth, so very close to the pre— covid world in china's economy. fiend world in china's economy. and that 5-9% _ world in china's economy. and that 5.996 is _ world in china's economy. and that 5.996 is around _ world in china's economy. and that 5.9% is around the growth rate the government is looking for a year on year, isn't it, in this new normal that was the new normal pre— covid for china? new normal pre- covid for china? , ., ., china? yes, so the target for the chinese _ china? yes, so the target for the chinese government - china? yes, so the target for the chinese government is i the chinese government is actually above 6%, so according
5:44 am
to the latest data, the chinese government will be quite comfortable to achieve that target, and according to our forecast china's gdp will still grow by 8.5%, compared with 2020, and what's new for china's economy compared with the pre— covid period is personable, the external demand is super strong as we have seen that in june, is super strong as we have seen that injune, exports grew by 40%. domestic demand is quite weak, orwe 40%. domestic demand is quite weak, or we can say it's very weak. ~ , , . weak, or we can say it's very weak-_ the - weak, or we can say it's very l weak._ the reason weak. why is that? the reason wh that weak. why is that? the reason why that is _ weak. why is that? the reason why that is is _ weak. why is that? the reason why that is is the _ weak. why is that? the reason why that is is the chinese - why that is is the chinese government is very reluctant to distribute money to the household, so because of this we find that household income growth is actually much lower than the real gdp growth. who; than the real gdp growth. why is the government _ than the real gdp growth. why is the government reluctant to give households wealth right now? , ., ,
5:45 am
now? the chinese government is very reluctant — now? the chinese government is very reluctant to _ now? the chinese government is very reluctant to give _ now? the chinese government is very reluctant to give the - very reluctant to give the money to the household because of the relatively higher saving rate, especially under the backdrop of the pandemic, the household will be at anxiety of losing theirjob so the spending rate will dominate today will be reluctant to spend. last time when china was doing stimulus, they still give the money to the public sector as well as local government and asked them to invest and produce, and to generate employment. eitherway, produce, and to generate employment. either way, to further boost consumption. could you give us a sense of where china is at at the moment in terms of the progression of the pandemic, because we are seeing in tokyo, japan, hong kong and other areas in south east asia, we are seeing a rise in the number of covid cases. what is happening in china at the moment with regards to that? in china there is an outbreak
5:46 am
happening in may and june and currently there is another wave that happened in the border city of yunnan province as well as the western provinces. so far everything is kind of under control and because of the vaccination rate actually surged and we expect that china will be able to achieve 60 —— 50% of vaccination rate by the end of this here. 5096 of vaccination rate by the end of this here.— 5096 of vaccination rate by the end of this here. thank you for 'oinin~ end of this here. thank you for joining us- _ stay with us on bbc news, still to come: back behind the wheel — america's biggest auto show returns. we'll bring you the latest from chicago. after months of talks and missed deadlines, a deal has been struck to keep greece within the euro zone. the immediate prospect of greece going bust in the worst crisis to hit the euro zone has been averted. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worst
5:47 am
floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally called the great white way by americans, but tonight, it's completely blacked out. it's a timely reminder to all americans of the problems that the energy crisis has brought to them. leaders meet in paris for a summit on pollution, inflation and third world debt. this morning, theyjoined the revolution celebrations for a show of military might on the champs—elysees. wildlife officials in australia have been coping with a penguin problem. fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much, they could barely stand. this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: the the latest headlines: un issue is a stark warning about
5:48 am
the un issue is a stark warning about the of the taliban in afghanistan as nato troops prepare for their final withdrawal. the south african government is deploying up to 25,000 soldiers to combat the violence sparked by the jailing of former president jacob zuma. to australia now where to call the real—estate market �*red hot�* would be something of an understatement. in sydney the price of an average home has been rising at $900 per day. it's raised fears many families are being forced into taking on unsustainable debt — and that a crisis could be on the way — as phil mercer reports from sydney. packing up to chase the great australian dream as house prices soar, laura and dan are leaving their rented seaside apartment in sydney to move in with his parents. they need to save more money to buy a house. but keeping up with a fast moving market is a struggle.
5:49 am
sometimes it feels like we're just fighting against something that we are never going to win that we are never going to win that i think we just need to remain positive and keep naming as hard as we can so when the right opportunity presents itself we can take opportunity. it is frustrating and annoying, it is— it is frustrating and annoying, it is upsetting. it was literally a planjust it is upsetting. it was literally a plan just to save and — literally a plan just to save and we _ literally a plan just to save and we are now looking at other ways _ and we are now looking at other ways of— and we are now looking at other ways of invest our money. house rices in ways of invest our money. house prices in australia _ ways of invest our money. house prices in australia have _ ways of invest our money. house prices in australia have defied i prices in australia have defied a covid recession. here in sydney they have risen by 15% in the last year. they have been even bigger rises in darwin and hobart. the market has been boosted to a recovering economy and ultralow interest rates. there are signs it is beginning to slow down. this is one of our premier locations _ this is one of our premier locations. we _ this is one of our premier locations. we did - this is one of our premier locations. we did not- this is one of our premier. locations. we did not expect it. locations. we did not expect it it — locations. we did not expect it it is — locations. we did not expect it it is the _ locations. we did not expect it. it is the reverse - locations. we did not expect it. it is the reverse of- locations. we did not expect it. it is the reverse of what. it. it is the reverse of what we anticipated. _ it. it is the reverse of what we anticipated. we - it. it is the reverse of whati we anticipated. we thought it. it is the reverse of what- we anticipated. we thought the market— we anticipated. we thought the market would _ we anticipated. we thought the market would tank _ we anticipated. we thought the market would tank and - we anticipated. we thought the market would tank and it - we anticipated. we thought the market would tank and it has i market would tank and it has done — market would tank and it has done the _ market would tank and it has done the exact _ market would tank and it has
5:50 am
done the exact reverse. - market would tank and it has . done the exact reverse. people are dipping _ done the exact reverse. people are dipping their— done the exact reverse. people are dipping their toes - done the exact reverse. people are dipping their toes into- done the exact reverse. people are dipping their toes into the i are dipping their toes into the market— are dipping their toes into the market and _ are dipping their toes into the market and securing - are dipping their toes into the| market and securing high—end property _ market and securing high—end property. it— market and securing high—end property. if you _ market and securing high—end property. if you are _ market and securing high—end property. if you are going - market and securing high—end property. if you are going to l property. if you are going to be property. if you are going to he in — property. if you are going to he in a — property. if you are going to be in a lockdown _ property. if you are going to be in a lockdown they - property. if you are going to be in a lockdown they will i property. if you are going to i be in a lockdown they will have a damn — be in a lockdown they will have a damn fine _ be in a lockdown they will have a damn fine place _ be in a lockdown they will have a damn fine place to— be in a lockdown they will have a damn fine place to be - a damn fine place to be lockdown _ a damn fine place to be lockdown in. _ a damn fine place to be lockdown in. $- a damn fine place to be lockdown in.— a damn fine place to be lockdown in. �* . , , lockdown in. a recent study warned that _ lockdown in. a recent study warned that rising - lockdown in. a recent study l warned that rising household debt is exposing a ticking economic timebomb should interest rates rise in australia. consumer advocates have listed ten so—called crisis suburbs where tens of thousands of families are on the brink. thousands of families are on the brink-— the brink. we know that a number — the brink. we know that a number of _ the brink. we know that a number of households - the brink. we know that a | number of households are already in mortgage stress. around 40% of australian households are already spending more every fortnight than what they bring in in wages with mortgage being a huge component. we know that many people are already in trouble. many households are still invulnerable economic circumstances so they do not have secure work and while people are employed they are underemployed and that means that they are exposed to volatility in the economy. runaway house prices are also
5:51 am
fuelled by a fear of missing out. in a red—hot market for many australians the dream of home ownership remains elusive. finally — a big day for the global car industry as america's biggest and longest—running auto show gets under way. the chicago auto show was last held in february 2020 — just before the world went into lockdown. its big comeback will look rather different — it's a summer event allowing many exhibits to be held outside to make it more covid—safe. dave sloan is president of the chicago automobile trade association — and general manager of the chicago auto show. a big day for you, talk us through it. did you see it last night? through it. did you see it last niuht? ~ . , through it. did you see it last niuht? ., , ,., night? we have been planning this for over _ night? we have been planning this for over a _ night? we have been planning this for over a year _ night? we have been planning this for over a year now - night? we have been planning this for over a year now trying | this for over a year now trying to figure out how we could open the show once we found out that
5:52 am
february, ourtraditionaltime, was not going to work. we decided to have a shorter and smaller show, decided to have a shorter and smallershow, move decided to have a shorter and smaller show, move across the street to the west building and try to adapt to the situation we were in. so we have a lot of outdoor displays to go along with the indoor displays and it seems to be working quite well. and i assume you have fewer people coming. d0 and i assume you have fewer people coming-— and i assume you have fewer people coming. do you have to restrict numbers? _ people coming. do you have to restrict numbers? we - people coming. do you have to restrict numbers? we had - restrict numbers? we had restrictions and that is how we were allowed to open. but those restrictions have been lifted now that the state of illinois is in phase five. 0ur numbers have been quite low for at least a month now and we have beenin least a month now and we have been in phase five so all the restrictions lifted. we will still have requiring people who are not vaccinated to wear a mask but other than that we do not have restriction, other than the smaller size of the show. b. than the smaller size of the show. �* , ., ,
5:53 am
show. a few big names within the car industry _ show. a few big names within the car industry have - show. a few big names within the car industry have chosen l the car industry have chosen not to come, not to take part. jaguar, volvo, land rover, audi for example, hyundai, mass star. and that was part of the plan. that is why we moved to the smaller hall. we already knew that some of those manufacturers would take 2021 off, they told us that. so we moved to a smaller hall. we came over here for 500,000 square feet and adjacent to the outdoor street that we could do a lot of ride and drive. so we have over 50 cars available for test rates for consumers plus we have the bronco test track outdoors and they are going head to head with the camp jeep. the indoor test track inside the show. the conversation in the car industry is all about electric vehicles, the future of travel. where is america at in regards to ev�*s and the infrastructure to ev�*s and the infrastructure to make that happen? it
5:54 am
to ev's and the infrastructure to make that happen? it seems like the industry _ to make that happen? it seems like the industry is _ to make that happen? it seems like the industry is a _ to make that happen? it seems like the industry is a few- like the industry is a few steps ahead of consumers right now. there are a lot of electric vehicles, a lot of great electric vehicles being introduced and the consumer is not quite there but we are going to see that in the next year or two whether they accept all these, the mustang an all mustang based suv from ford has been very well received since it was introduced a couple of months ago. and there are a bunch of tvs on the show floor and out for a test drive so we will get a very good idea of how popular those look this year. how popular those look this ear. . ~' how popular those look this ear. ., ~ , ., how popular those look this ear. ., ~ ., ., , year. thank you for “oining us. lookin: year. thank you for “oining us. looking at the _ year. thank you for “oining us. looking at the time- year. thank you forjoining us. looking at the time it - year. thank you forjoining us. looking at the time it is - year. thank you forjoining us. looking at the time it is quite | looking at the time it is quite late where you are, locally. thank you for being on the programme and good luck with the event. we hope it goes well. . ., the event. we hope it goes well. ., ,, , ., ., well. thank you and we appreciate _ well. thank you and we appreciate the - well. thank you and we
5:55 am
appreciate the time. i well. thank you and we l appreciate the time. that brin . s appreciate the time. that brings you _ appreciate the time. that brings you up-to-date i appreciate the time. that brings you up-to-date on appreciate the time. that brings you up—to—date on all things whether it be news, sport or business. thank you for your company, sport or business. thank you foryour company, have sport or business. thank you for your company, have a lovely day and we will see you soon. hello there. sunshine did wonders for the temperatures on wednesday. aberdeenshire, one of the places that got above 25 degrees with scenes like this. lots of southern england saw similar temperatures as well. and over the next few days with more sunshine on the way those temperatures could have a little further to climb. it may be up into the high 20s and parts of the south over the weekend. but it's not all about sunshine, this is the earlier satellite picture from wednesday. you can see this cloud that has spilt in across scotland and northern ireland, that working down into england and wales as well. so a lot of places having a fair amount of cloud through thursday, maybe even given the odd light shower in eastern england. but that cloud will tend to break. we will see spells of sunshine. i think the best of those across parts of northern england and northern ireland and a good part of scotland. and in the sunniest places, temperatures will get up to 25,
5:56 am
maybe 26 degrees. but some eastern parts of england will be affected by a keen breeze, and that will feed more cloud in across east anglia and the south—east once again as we head through thursday night into friday. at the same time, cloud will tumble in from the north—west, but in between a slice of clear sky and a mild start to friday morning. now, through friday, this area of high pressure continues to establish itself. that means mainly settled conditions, but we do have a frontal system close to the north of scotland, so the closer you are to that frontal system, the more cloud you are likely to see. northern and western scotland, parts of northern ireland as well, quite breezy, quite cloudy maybe with the odd spot of drizzle. cloud first thing towards the south—east, that will tend to clear for most places friday. it will bring plentiful sunshine and temperatures well up into the middle 20s celsius. and then we get on into saturday. again, more cloud up towards the north—west of scotland. some light and patchy rain is possible in the north—west highlands, but further south it is largely fine with plenty of sunshine and temperatures likely to peak at 27 degrees.
5:57 am
but those temperatures could climb even further by sunday. this area of high pressure is still with us into the second half of the weekend. this frontal system still with us in the north as well, and that may reinvigorate a little through the day. so we could see some slightly more widespread and heavier rain into the far north—west of scotland later. but elsewhere, some good spells of sunshine, and in the south we're looking at highs of 29 degrees. that's all from me for now.
5:58 am
5:59 am
6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today. a snack tax on sugary and salty food is proposed to help improve the nation's health. good morning. the report also calls for better education about how our food is produced and where it comes from. i am on a farm this morning looking at what it could mean for farmers. the spanish islands of ibiza, majorca and menorca are moved back to the amber list, two weeks after going green. good morning. golf's oldest major is back. in pursuit of the claretjug
6:01 am
at the

23 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on