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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 14, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. burned—out buildings and looting mark the sixth day of chaos in south africa. more than 70 are dead, and the crisis is growing. the eu unveils a sweeping plan to tackle climate change, with ambitious proposals to cut emissions in half within nine years. indonesia battles an alarming surge in covid cases with over 69,000 deaths, making it the worst hit nation in southeast asia. and the festival half a century ago they called the black woodstock — how the lost footage is now made into a movie.
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hello and welcome. more than 70 people have now died after a week of unrest in south africa sparked by the jailing of former president jacob zuma. shops and warehouses have been looted and set on fire, with the worst violence in years centred on durban and johannesburg. the government says it plans to deploy 25,000 soldiers on the streets to try to quell the violence. here's our south africa correspondent, nomsa maseko. factory after factory after factory, ransacked and burned by looters. two young men lying dead beside a railway line, 48 hours after they died. this is what six days of looting and rioting in kwazulu—natal and gauteng provinces in south africa looks like. violent protests began just hours after south africa's former
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president, jacob zuma, was jailed for failing to comply with a court order to give evidence at a corruption inquiry. however, speculation is rife that even though this may have started out as a pro—zuma protest, it was a well orchestrated plan designed to embarrass the current president, cyril ramaposa, and to ensure he doesn't get another term in office. but yesterday, amid fear and desperation, a moment of hope. people were screaming, "throw her, throw her, throw her!" and i was scared, i was really scared, but there were people down in the streets. i wasn't. .. they weren't always panicking. i was trusting anyone for my baby, to take my baby away from me, because the flames were spreading and there was a smoke outside. and today, firefighters lined the streets to start cleaning up. armed with broomsticks, residentsjoined in, chasing away anyone trying to loot
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whatever is left. not that much remains. is today the first time that you've come to see the trail of devastation that was left here since the rioting started? yeah, it's the first time we came down there. we have our driver live next door, so he came two times to see what's going on. the first day, they only came through a small hole in the front and broke and stole a few watches, but later that night, they broke everything open and they looted all the shop. it can't happen again. i can't board up this business again. after six months or a year, it's happening again. the rioting comes as the country experiences the highest number of covid—i9 cases in africa, with many wondering if south africa's economy will ever recover. nomsa maseko, bbc news, durban. i'm joined now by darren maule, a radio presenter
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at east coast radio, a popular radio station in the province of kwazulu—natal. he's in umhlanga, a town situated about 15 kilometres away from durban. darren, thank you very much for joining us. it's midnight your time, what's the situation at the moment? thank you, good evening to you and your audience. thank you, good evening to you and youraudience. i'vejust thank you, good evening to you and your audience. i'vejust come thank you, good evening to you and your audience. i've just come off a four hour shift at a makeshift blockade entering into my neighbourhood, and we're only protecting a small garage and a small, really, a corner store. the entire community of my community, about 300 people, are taking shifts and teams of ten or 20 to put bodies between whatever might come and protect... whether we might get a loaf of bread up tomorrow morning. we haven't been able to go ten km in
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either direction because of the wholesale looting and criminalisty and fear in every single direction. it's unprecedented. i'm talking is a south african who has been on the teetering edge of so many moments in our history, the 91 riots that we had in south africa. and 2008, and we've had a lot of scary moments and when they started last week, we thought as south africa, we have a lot of protests. we have lots of people who need service delivery, and our government seems to only respond when the people protest. it just kept emptying up. now when you look at the aerial footage of, it
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looks like 100,000 strong mobs moving from mall to mall and clearing everything out, then the distribution sectors and moving towards us in the suburbs, it's frightening. every single person in south africa are on the edge of their seats.— south africa are on the edge of their seats. the king of the zulu nation has _ their seats. the king of the zulu nation has said _ their seats. the king of the zulu nation has said that _ their seats. the king of the zulu nation has said that these - their seats. the king of the zulu | nation has said that these waves their seats. the king of the zulu i nation has said that these waves of violence and looting have brought shame on the country. how likely are his words to calm things down set against 25,000 troops?— his words to calm things down set against 25,000 troops? well, two thins. against 25,000 troops? well, two thinqs- the _ against 25,000 troops? well, two things. the troops, _ against 25,000 troops? well, two things. the troops, we _ against 25,000 troops? well, two things. the troops, we have - against 25,000 troops? well, two things. the troops, we have a - things. the troops, we have a population of about 10 million in kwazulu—natal alone. and about 70% unemployed, so we would need to enfold the military that has been promised to actually make any kind
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of difference. i don't think a military will make any difference. it needs to be leadership. the zulu king has been in the role of king for about five minutes, taking the role from the queen, who was there for a couple of months before she passed, and of course, the long—standing king, he passed away earlier this year as well. so, i think this might be a first address. it wasn't very convincing. he wasn't very... how i am right now. there didn't seem to land his speech. it seemed like he was a puppet for a long standing competition sitting next to him, the prince. i just next to him, the prince. i 'ust wanted to fl next to him, the prince. i 'ust wanted to thanki next to him, the prince. i 'ust wanted to thank you i next to him, the prince. i 'ust wanted to thank you for h next to him, the prince. ijust i wanted to thank you for coming next to him, the prince. ijust - wanted to thank you for coming to talk to us after several hours at the barricade protecting your community, and we appreciate you
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talking to us at such a late hour after an exhausting day.- talking to us at such a late hour after an exhausting day. the european union has set out sweeping policy proposals to try to reach its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2050. the plans include new taxes on shipping and aviation fuel and ending the sale of new petrol cars by 2035. frans timmermans is the eu climate policy chief. he says the plans are groundbreaking. this is really epic, what are colleagues were able to offer us in terms of quality, depth, analysis. so, i believe we now have a package that can take us to our goal, which is now a legal obligation of reducing our emissions with at least 55% by 2030, which would set us on a path of climate neutrality. 0ur correspondent in brussels, nick beake, is following developments. this is something which is going to cause quite a lot of discussion in the coming months and potentially years because, by their own admission,
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the eu has come up with a road map it says which is something other parts of the world should aspire to. certainly, it will change the lives of individual eu citizens and lots of different ways. if you just look at heating bills, for example, they're set to increase. the cost of air travel will also go up. and what brussels officials are saying is that they'll be able to mitigate some of these costs and they won't leave the poorest in society to suffer because of this. but certainly, the aviation industry, the fact that petrol and new diesel cars by 2035, that will be a thing of the past — they're trying to do lots here to try and change the economies of the 27 eu countries. but of course, that is something which is likely to face opposition from the countries themselves. let's get some of the day's other news. authorities in ethiopia's amhara region say they will go on the offensive against forces from neighbouring tigray, potentially opening up a new phase
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in the eight—month civil war. the tigrayan rebels have recaptured much of tigray in recent weeks, and are pushing towards territory held by amhara. regional leaders said they were mobilising reservists and volunteer militias to attack the rebels. poland's top court has ruled that measures imposed by the european court ofjustice against the country s controversialjudicial reforms are unconstitutional. the justice minister welcomed the decision, saying it offered protection against unjustified interference by the eu. but some observers believe it signals poland's departure from the bloc�*s legal order. brazilian presidentjair bolsonaro has been taken to hospital for tests after suffering persistent hiccups. he apologised for hicupping throughout this press conference, saying he'd had them for over a week. he is expected to remain under observation for 2a to 48 hours, but not necessarily in hospital. a statement by staff said he was "feeling good and doing well".
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indonesia is currently battling multiple outbreaks and an alarming spike in coronavirus cases. over 2.6 million cases have been recorded and 69,000 plus deaths, making it the worst hit nation in southeast asia. the latest surge is believed to have been fuelled by the more infectious delta variant. hospitals in many areas are stretched beyond capacity with medicines and oxygen supplies scarce. i'm joined now by dr dicky budiman, an epidemiologist at griffith university in queensland, australia, who advises the indonesian government on how best to contain the pandemic. thank you very much forjoining us. when do you expect this to peak in indonesia? i when do you expect this to peak in indonesia? , ~ when do you expect this to peak in indonesia? , . ., .,. when do you expect this to peak in indonesia? , . ., .. ., indonesia? i expected to reach at the end of— indonesia? i expected to reach at the end ofjuly. — indonesia? i expected to reach at the end ofjuly, and _ indonesia? i expected to reach at the end ofjuly, and at _ indonesia? i expected to reach at the end ofjuly, and at least - indonesia? i expected to reach at the end ofjuly, and at least until| the end ofjuly, and at least until the end ofjuly, and at least until the early week of august, but my
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concern is so far, i give many advice to government that if you follow this. early this year, i predicted we will reach the peak, even after one year of... we will reach a peak onjuly orjune at least, but then, it may become worse. again, even now, they already respond with the emergencies restrictions, but the problem is already big and we need a bigger response. already big and we need a bigger resonse. ~ . ., already big and we need a bigger resonse. ~ . . ,, , response. what have you been urging them to do and _ response. what have you been urging them to do and why _ response. what have you been urging them to do and why aren't _ response. what have you been urging them to do and why aren't they - response. what have you been urging them to do and why aren't they doing | them to do and why aren't they doing it? ., , g
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them to do and why aren't they doing it? ., _ , , it? so, in early june, i suggest we have to do — it? so, in early june, i suggest we have to do locked _ it? so, in early june, i suggest we have to do locked down _ it? so, in early june, i suggest we have to do locked down because l it? so, in early june, i suggest we l have to do locked down because the current restrictions, there is some loose and activities and even we face a very big problem with our testing and testing capacity since last year. and put the country in a very vulnerable situation. as we know, the indonesian health care system will face a big challenge when we see the spike of the cases. the government will extend their emergency restrictions until five weeks later. but again, the problem is not about the strategy, but how do we implement this strategy under fear. that's the main problem since last year, the consistency, the
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commitment, the leaders are a very big challenge in indonesia.— big challenge in indonesia. doctor budiman, thank _ big challenge in indonesia. doctor budiman, thank you _ big challenge in indonesia. doctor budiman, thank you very - big challenge in indonesia. doctor budiman, thank you very much i big challenge in indonesia. doctor| budiman, thank you very much for your time. budiman, thank you very much for our time. . ~ budiman, thank you very much for your time-— stay with us on bbc news. still to come: the �*60s music celebration that was almost lost to history. how a new film is bringing the harlem cultural festival to a modern audience. after months of talks and missed deadlines, a deal has been struck to keep greece within the euro zone. the immediate prospect of greece going bust in the worst crisis to hit the euro zone has been averted. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worst floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally called the great white way by americans, but tonight, it's completely blacked out. it's a timely reminder to all americans of the problems
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that the energy crisis has brought to them. leaders meet in paris- fora summit on pollution, inflation and third world debt. this morning, theyjoinedl the revolution celebrations for a show of military might on the champs—elysees. . wildlife officials in australia have been coping with a penguin problem. fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much, they could barely stand. this is bbc news. our top story: burned—out buildings and looting mark the sixth day of chaos in south africa. more than 70 are dead, and the crisis is growing. staying with that story, i'm joined now by professor sipho seepe, a political analyst and deputy vice chancellor at the university of zululand.
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professor, thank you very much for joining us. how significant is this particular unrest in a country like south africa, which has seen so much violence and its past?— violence and its past? well, it's significant _ violence and its past? well, it's significant nationwide. - violence and its past? well, it's significant nationwide. south i violence and its past? well, it's - significant nationwide. south africa is a country where every weekend, almost every day, but we tend to be very isolated. what some people seem to be as coordinated, so it is simply an expression. you could say and of the discretion of social by a majority of the people in this country. you just have to look at the unemployment levels. they have
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skyrocketed to the extent that about 35% of young people who are black. it's almost 50%. what we are coming to terms with is the there is so much of american to ourselves, we thought addressing the injustices. when leaders do not pay attention to that, people in this country have been told to go to the states. we are a protesting nation, but where there is a sense that even that should be trusted, you wind up with a trigger moving from one problem in getting to the states. for any
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protest, there will always be opportunistic elements, and what we saw here was probably those protesting against a position by the judiciary. taking advantage of ensuring that we... 0nce judiciary. taking advantage of ensuring that we... once i happens, you ended up with the mayhem. just briefl , if you ended up with the mayhem. just briefly, if the catalyst was the imprisonment ofjacob zuma, howell, if you can be brief, is this going to change the political landscape in south africa and since affect the future of the president? minot
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south africa and since affect the future of the president? what this forced us to _ future of the president? what this forced us to do _ future of the president? what this forced us to do is _ future of the president? what this forced us to do is i _ future of the president? what this forced us to do is i have _ future of the president? what this forced us to do is i have a - forced us to do is i have a discussion around everything. what the president has not done is to provide a credible story. he has been very good in dealing with it, but when you have all the leading party, that is focused on itself, the president got into power, and when you do that, the people you said will deliver, they do not see you delivering, they see more battles and they feel helpless and hopeless. and that hopelessness and helplessness expresses itself in forms of protest. but what we have not done, without paying attention to the general sense of alienation every week. what you have this week
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is simply almost nationwide, although it sends to be... professor see e, we although it sends to be... professor seepe, we really — although it sends to be... professor seepe, we really appreciate - although it sends to be... professor seepe, we really appreciate you - seepe, we really appreciate you talking to us and giving us your insight. thank you very much. you're welcome. a proposal to ban all prosecutions related to the sectarian conflict of the troubles in northern ireland has been announced by the british government. it would apply to both british soldiers and former paramilitaries, but relatives of those who died say they've waited decades forjustice, and have vowed to challenge the government's plans in the courts. here's our ireland correspondent, emma vardy. explosion. a bitter sense of injustice over northern ireland's past still haunts many families today. the vast majority of victims were killed by paramilitaries and around 10% by british armed forces. there are hundreds of investigations into decades—old cases
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still taking place. but now the government's announced it will bring forward legislation to ban all prosecutions in cases up to the peace deal in 1998. we know that the prospect of the end of criminal prosecutions will be difficult for some to accept, and this is not a position that we take lightly. but we've come to the view that this is the best and only way to facilitate an effective information retrieval and provision process. the plans would apply to former british soldiers as well as paramilitaries and would move towards a system in which families can be given information about their relatives' deaths. but it's opposed by political parties on all sides in northern ireland and victim's groups are angry. 0ne campaigner, whose brother was killed by the british army on bloody sunday, says she will always believe veterans should be held to account, no matter how much time has passed. somebody's decided at 19 or 20 that they're going to kill two, three, four people, god knows.
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no, you can't get away with that. there cannot... there cannot be an amnesty for murder. the changes would also mean an end to the many inquests and civil actions relating to the troubles. the government believes its plans would help the process of reconciliation in northern ireland. but here, the past is still so vividly present, it would require a huge shift in many people's mindsets to accept. the announcement comes not long after high—profile murder trials against three elderly veterans were dropped, showing the legal difficulties in prosecuting cases up to 50 years old. we've seen with the collapse i of recent trials that trying to get admissible evidence to follow- a resolution through the courts just isn't working, so thisl statute of limitations, to have an open fact—finding - process, i think, is to be welcomed. the irish government has insisted that ending prosecutions is not a done deal, but with the british government's large majority at westminster, it may mean a major step change
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for northern ireland's peace process that will be difficult to reverse. emma vardy, bbc news. it was called the black woodstock. in 1969, stevie wonder, nina simone and gladys knight were some of the stars who played at the harlem cultural festival in new york. it was all filmed, but the footage was left to gather dust in a basement. now, the archives have been turned into an award winning movie. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. the summer of 1969. woodstock. neil armstrong walking on the moon. and more than 300,000 people attended the harlem cultural festival. are you ready, black people, are you ready? an event almost no one has heard of until now. six weekends of major artists. the panthers were the security and kids sitting in the trees.
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i was nervous. i didn't expect a crowd like that. something very important was happening. summer of soul is a documentary exploring why this event, which it argues could have become the black woodstock, has been ignored for more than half a century. the film is directed by questlove, who drums for hip—hop outfit the roots and is a professor at nyu, where he is an expert in black music history. but even he hadn't heard of the festival. we're talking about stevie wonder, nina simone, sly and the family stone, comedians, politicians, everybody was there. the thing is that it is preserved professionally on tape and what winds up happening is that not one producer or outlet is interested. so, this film just sits in the basement for 50 years. nobody ever heard of the harlem culture festival. nobody would believe it happened. however, a couple of film producers
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heard about the a0 hours of archive, managed to secure the rights, and decided that questlove was the man to bring it to life. it took me five months ofjust constantly having these monitors in my house, in every room in my house — my kitchen, my bathroom, my bedroom. i kept it on a 24—hour loop. i kept notes on anything that gave me goose bumps. 1969 was a change of era in the black community. the styles were changing. music was changing. a revolution was coming together. but as well as highlighting sensational performances, questlove also wanted to put the event into a cultural context. this might be my new destiny and i didn't even know it yet. but, you know, iwelcome it, i welcome it. colin paterson, bbc news.
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check your basements very carefully. thanks for watching. this is bbc news. hello there. sunshine did wonders for the temperatures on wednesday. aberdeenshire, one of the places that got above 25 degrees with scenes like this. lots of southern england saw similar temperatures as well. and over the next few days with more sunshine on the way those temperatures could have a little further to climate. it may be up into the high 20s and parts of the south over the weekend. but it's not all about sunshine, this is the earlier satellite picture from wednesday. you can see this cloud that has spilt in across scotland and northern ireland, that working down into england and wales as well. so a lot of places having a fair amount of cloud through thursday, maybe even given the odd light shower in eastern england. but that cloud will tend to break. we'll see some spells of sunshine. i think the best of those across parts of northern england,
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northern ireland and a good part of scotland. and in the sunniest places, temperatures will get up to 25, maybe 26 degrees. but some eastern parts of england will be affected by a keen breeze, and that will feed more cloud in across east anglia and the southeast once again. as we head through thursday night into friday. at the same time, cloud will tumble in from the northwest, but in between a slice of clear skies and a mild start to friday morning. now, through friday, this area of high pressure continues to establish itself. that means mainly settled conditions, but we do have a frontal system close to the north of scotland, so the closer you are to that frontal system, the more cloud you're likely to see. northern and western scotland, parts of northern ireland as well, quite breezy, quite cloudy maybe with the odd spot of drizzle. cloud first thing towards the southeast, that will tend to clear for most places friday. it will bring plentiful sunshine and temperatures well up into the middle 20s celsius. and then, we get on into saturday. again, more cloud up towards the northwest of scotland. some light and patchy rain is possible in the northwest highlands, but further south, it is largely
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fine with plenty of sunshine and temperatures likely to peak at 27 degrees. but those temperatures could climb even further by sunday. this area of high pressure is still with us into the second half of the weekend. this frontal system still with us in the north as well, and that may reinvigorate a little through the day. so we could see some slightly more widespread and heavier rain into the far northwest of scotland later. but elsewhere, some good spells of sunshine, and in the south we're looking at highs of 29 degrees. that's all from me for now.
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this is bbc news, the headlines.
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south africa is to increase to 25,000 thousand the number of troops deployed in response to widespread violence sparked by the jailing of former president zuma. the zulu king said six days of unrest had brought shame on the entire country. the european union has announced ambitious proposals to cut carbon emissions to net zero by the year 2050. they would end the sale of new petrol cars by 2035, and impose new taxes on shipping and aviation fuel. a bbc investigation has revealed that thousands of children may be facing life in prison in syria — because their parents were members of the islamic state group. there's been a firework display in paris to mark the bastille day national holiday. it follows a traditional military parade down the champs—elysees attended by president macron.

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