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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  July 14, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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the stop—start summer for english holiday—makers continues, as three of spain's most popular holiday islands go on the amber list. anyone over 18 not fully vaccinated will now have to quarantine on return from ibiza, majorca and menorca, throwing some people's plans into turmoil. people want a holiday but they want a holiday with confidence and they need clarity. i think that's what they are not getting at the minute. it comes as doctors here warn of a steep rise in covid cases in some areas, with new daily infections topping 40,000 for the first time since mid—january. also tonight... jadon sancho speaks out, saying hate will never win, after receiving online racist abuse over his missed penalty in the euros final.
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in south africa, a mother's desperate action to save her baby, as widespread looting and arson grip parts of the country. and british olympic hope laura collett tells us how she got back in the saddle after a terrible accident eight years ago. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel... a moment of magic helps south africa a sink the british and irish lions in cape town. good evening. spain's popular holiday islands, ibiza, majorca and menorca, are all being moved onto the government's amber list, just two weeks after they were approved for quarantine—free travel. from next monday, anyone over 18 who's not fully vaccinated will have to quarantine on return home. the announcement applies at the moment only to people travelling from england,
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but other uk nations could follow suit. around 200,000 british tourists are understood to be holidaying on the islands now, with many more booked to travel there over the summer. let's go to our correspondent, colletta smith, who's at manchester airport for us now. those balearic islands of ibiza, majorca and menorca are really popular with young people always, and lots of them have been unable to get their second vaccination yet, which puts them in a difficult conundrum if they have a holiday already booked for this summer. they have to decide if they can quarantine, if that's possible or feasible for them, or whether they postpone or cancel their holiday, which potentially means losing out financially as a result, so yet again there is a government decision that has very different implications depending on your age. it's more
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choppy waters for those dreaming of a summer getaway, as the traffic lights have changed colours again. for those about to fly off it will mean quarantine and more tests when this woman gets home. the mean quarantine and more tests when this woman gets home.— this woman gets home. the timing of the test and — this woman gets home. the timing of the test and things... _ this woman gets home. the timing of the test and things... that _ this woman gets home. the timing of the test and things... that needs - the test and things... that needs another change _ the test and things... that needs another change of _ the test and things... that needs another change of gear. - the test and things... that needs another change of gear. at - the test and things... that needs another change of gear. at this i another change of gear. at this travel agent. with some customers abroad and plenty heading off in the coming weeks, it's more rules to get their heads round. you were confident enough to reopen the shops this week. , . , , , confident enough to reopen the shops thisweek. , . , , , ., this week. demand is up, people want a holida , this week. demand is up, people want a holiday. but— this week. demand is up, people want a holiday. but they _ this week. demand is up, people want a holiday, but they want _ this week. demand is up, people want a holiday, but they want a _ this week. demand is up, people want a holiday, but they want a holiday - a holiday, but they want a holiday with confidence and they need clarity. that's what they are not getting at the minute. the? clarity. that's what they are not getting at the minute. they have sho -s in getting at the minute. they have shops in england _ getting at the minute. they have shops in england and _ getting at the minute. they have shops in england and wales - getting at the minute. they have shops in england and wales and| shops in england and wales and today's changes only apply to passengers from england. announcements from wales, scotland and northern ireland might follow. there's been a rise in covid cases in tourist hotspots in greece and mainland spain for the government
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say cases in the balearic islands have doubled since they were put on the green list and the changes shouldn't come as a surprise to passengers. shouldn't come as a surprise to passengers-_ shouldn't come as a surprise to passengers. everybody who was travellin: passengers. everybody who was travelling by _ passengers. everybody who was travelling by now, _ passengers. everybody who was travelling by now, surely - passengers. everybody who was | travelling by now, surely nobody passengers. everybody who was - travelling by now, surely nobody can be thinking, we can travel and rely on things not changing. we are not in control of this virus, particularly how it affects other countries, their level of vaccinations and genomic sequencing or testing regimes. those are out of our hands so, when we see things change, for the safety and security of everybody at home, we need to react. it of everybody at home, we need to react. ., , ., , , , react. it might not be a surprise but it will be — react. it might not be a surprise but it will be a _ react. it might not be a surprise but it will be a frantic _ react. it might not be a surprise but it will be a frantic few - react. it might not be a surprise but it will be a frantic few days | react. it might not be a surprisel but it will be a frantic few days in majorca, as some holiday—makers rush to get home before the quarantine rules kick in, and it's more frustration for businesses relying on a wave of young people arriving this summer. on a wave of young people arriving this summer-— on a wave of young people arriving this summer. .,, ., ., , _ ., , this summer. people are happy to be here, to this summer. people are happy to be here. to be — this summer. people are happy to be here. to be on _ this summer. people are happy to be here, to be on the _ this summer. people are happy to be here, to be on the beach, _ this summer. people are happy to be here, to be on the beach, loads - this summer. people are happy to be here, to be on the beach, loads of i here, to be on the beach, loads of people that the island is relaxed and content, and i think that this isjust going to and content, and i think that this is just going to be another spanner in the works, and it's one step
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forward, five steps back. other chances forward, five steps back. other changes include _ forward, five steps back. other changes include good - forward, five steps back. other changes include good news - forward, five steps back. other changes include good news for| forward, five steps back. other changes include good news for those travelling to bulgaria and hong kong, which moved to green, and croatia and taiwan moved to the green watchlist. for those shifting amber, weighing up the extra frustration and expense against the lure of a holiday has become even more complicated. colletta smith, bbc news. the latest official figures on the virus show another 49 deaths recorded in the last 2a hours and 42,302 new infections across the uk. it means, on average, there were more than 35,000 new cases per day in the past week. there are currently 3,615 patients in hospital with coronavirus. just over 59,000 people had a first dose of the vaccine in the last 2a hours. that means over 46 million people have had theirfirstjab — that's just over 87% of uk adults. more than 158,000 people have just had a second dose,
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which means over 35 million — or more than 66% of all adults — are fully vaccinated. as england looks to drop most covid restrictions next week, there are warnings from doctors about a steep rise in some areas. nine of the uk's top ten hotspots are in the north—east of england, with increasing numbers of covid patients needing hospital treatment. the welsh government today said most restrictions will be lifted but not until august 7th, and face coverings will still be required in most indoor public places. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, reports. we are planning for war and praying for peace. that's probably the best way of describing it. facing up to the third wave — dr catherine monaghan, who is a respiratory consultant, has worked right through the pandemic. now she and her colleagues at this hospital on teesside know the bleak reality. they'll have to cope with another covid surge.
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just absolutely gutted. it's really hard. i know the whole country wants this to be over but the reality is that that's not what's happening in the hospitals. people are still critically unwell with it and i almost can't quite believe that we're back at this stage again. there were six covid patients here a week ago. since then, that's nearly quadrupled. two of those who are seriously ill are in their 30s and haven't had jabs. the fear is that covid hospital admissions will carry on rising and lead to other work being postponed. no one here is denying that the covid numbers are, at the moment, relatively low, but the hospital is extremely busy with other patients, including here in a&e, and the worry is about what might happen and the uncertainty in the weeks ahead. 0ne local resident, sandra, told us she wasn't vaccinated and got covid. were you planning to have yourjabs? yes, iam now. i can't go through it again. i was hospitalised for a day
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and we've had the ambulance service out to me as well, because it's all on the chest. it's awful. there's been a plea from community leaders in the region to the public to take extra care with social distancing and mask wearing. the elected mayor of middlesbrough told me, if he had the power, he'd keep it compulsory. if you are shopping indoors, if you are going to be on public transport, if you're in a taxi, wear a mask. if you don't care about it, do it out of respect for others. london's mayor, sadiq khan, has said masks will remain mandatory on public transport in the capital after restrictions are eased on july the 19th. 0ther mayors in england don't have the same powers. today, some called for legislation requiring face coverings to continue after that date. ministers in wales, like scotland, say masks will remain compulsory in most indoor public places and public transport, with most other covid rules due
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to end on august the 7th. we will not abandon those simple but effective and successful measures that have helped to keep us all safe. hospitals in england, meanwhile, are waiting with some concern to see the full impact of the ending of legal restrictions on monday. hugh pym, bbc news. the england footballerjadon sancho has made his first public comments following the online racist abuse he received after missing a penalty in the euro 2020 final, saying "hate will never win". he said the abuse he and his team—mates got was nothing new, but "as a society we need to do better". the prime minister has promised to ban people guilty of sending online racist abuse to footballers from attending matches. 0ur deputy political editor, vicki young, reports. a heartbreaking defeat that quickly became a debate about racism. tonight, one of the three england players subjected
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to online abuse spoke out. jadon sancho has said, "as a society, we need to do better and hold these people accountable. hate will never win." under pressure the government has hastily adopted labour�*s idea, extending football banning orders so they don't just apply to those shouting from the terraces. if you are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online of footballers, then you will not be going to the match. but campaigners want ministers to go further. what the government needs to do is to get its skates on on the 0nline safety bill and to beef it up. we need to be absolutely clear that the kind of vile abuse from last weekend will be criminal under the new legislation. boris johnson wants to focus on practicalities, saying he's coming down tough on social media platforms, threatening them with massive fines if they don't remove online abuse. but the conservative party has been on the back foot on this whole issue, as it struggled to explain
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whether it supports players taking the knee or not. home secretary priti patel described the action as gesture politics. another conservative minister said it was divisive and a tory mp refused to watch the whole tournament in protest. today, the labour leader accused the prime minister of being too slow to condemn those who booed players taking the knee and that had given the green light to racism. either the prime minister is with the england players in their stand against racism, or he can defend his own record, those of his ministers and some of his mps. but he can't have it both ways. i don't want to engage in a political culture war of any kind. i want to get on with delivering for the people of this country. he simply wants to get on with dithering. many conservative mps have associated taking the knee with the political organisation black lives matter. but that's missing the point, says one. it is a wake—up call
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for the conservative party. just how powerful our words are when we navigate these issues and we just have to get alongside those players who are taking the knee and understand that they are not saying defund the police, they are not anti—capitalist. what they are doing is saying, we suffer racism. these england players have been hailed as role models. some conservatives are worried the party is sounding unsympathetic to their cause. vicki young, bbc news, westminster. more than 70 people have now died after a week of unrest in south africa sparked by the jailing of former president jacob zuma. shops and warehouses have been looted and set on fire, with the worst violence in years centred on durban and johannesburg. the government says it plans to deploy 25,000 soldiers on the streets to try to quell the violence. 0ur south africa correspondent nomsa maseko reports. factory, after factory, after factory, ransacked and burned by looters.
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two young men lying dead beside a railway line 48 hours after they died. this is what six days of looting and rioting in kwazulu—natal and gauteng provinces in south africa looks like. violent protests began hours after south africa's former president, jacob zuma, was jailed for failing to comply with a court order to give evidence at a corruption inquiry. however, speculation is rife that even though this may have started out as a pro—zuma protest, it was a well orchestrated plan designed to embarrass the current president, ciryl ramaposa, and to ensure he doesn't get another term in office. but yesterday, amid fear and desperation, a moment of hope. people were screaming, throw her, throw her, throw her. i was scared, i was really scared but there were
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people down in the street. the way i was panicking, i was trusting anyone to take my baby away from me because the flames were burning and there was smoke outside. find the flames were burning and there was smoke outside.— was smoke outside. and today, firefighters _ was smoke outside. and today, firefighters lined _ was smoke outside. and today, firefighters lined the _ was smoke outside. and today, firefighters lined the streets - was smoke outside. and today, firefighters lined the streets to | firefighters lined the streets to start cleaning up. armed with broomsticks, residentsjoined in, chasing away anyone trying to loot whatever was left. not that much remains. it is today the first time you have come to see the trail of devastation that was left here since the writing started? yes. devastation that was left here since the writing started?— the writing started? yes, it is the first time we _ the writing started? yes, it is the first time we came _ the writing started? yes, it is the first time we came down. - 0ur driver lives next door, so he came two times to see what's going on. and the first day, they only came through a small hole in the front, broke and stole a few watches. but later that night, they came, they broke everything open and they came in and looted the whole shop. it can't happen again. i can't build up this business again, and then after six months or a year,
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it's happening again. the rioting comes as the country experiences the highest number of covid—19 cases in africa. with many wondering if south africa's economy will ever recover. nomsa maseko, bbc news, durban. a proposal to ban all prosecutions related to the sectarian conflict of the troubles in northern ireland has been announced by the government. it would apply both to british soldiers and to former paramilitaries. but relatives of those who died say they've waited decades forjustice, and have vowed to challenge the government's plans in the courts. here's our ireland correspondent, emma vardy. explosion. a bitter sense of injustice over northern ireland's past still haunts many families today. the vast majority of victims were killed by paramilitaries and around 10% by british armed forces. there are hundreds of investigations into decades—old cases still taking place.
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but now the government's announced it will bring forward legislation to ban all prosecutions in cases up to the peace deal in 1998. we know that the prospect of the end of criminal prosecutions will be difficult for some to accept, and this is not a position that we take lightly. but we've come to view that this is the best and only way to facilitate an effective information retrieval and provision process. the plans would apply to former british soldiers as well as paramilitaries and would move towards a system in which families can be given information about their relatives' about their relatives' deaths. but it's opposed by political parties on all sides in northern ireland and victim's groups are angry. one campaigner, whose brother was killed by the british army on bloody sunday, says she will always believe veterans should be held to account, no matter how much time has passed. somebody's decided at 19 or 20 that they're going to kill two, three, four people, god knows. no, you can't get away with that.
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there cannot... there cannot be an amnesty for murder. the changes would also mean an end to the many inquests and civil actions relating to the troubles. the government believes its plans would help the process of reconciliation in northern ireland. but here, the past is still so vividly present, it would require a huge shift in many people's mindsets to accept. the announcement comes not long after high—profile murder trials against three elderly veterans were dropped, showing the legal difficulties in prosecuting cases up to 50 years old. we've seen with the collapse i of recent trials that trying to get admissible evidence to follow- a resolution through the courts just isn't working, so thisl statute of limitations, to have an open fact—finding - process, i think, is to be welcomed. the irish government has insisted that ending prosecutions is not a done deal, but with the british government's large majority at westminster, it may mean a major step change for northern ireland's peace process that will be difficult to reverse.
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emma vardy, bbc news. thousands of foreign children, including some from britain, are facing a lifetime of imprisonment in camps and jails in north—eastern syria. a bbc investigation has found that the children, whose parents supported the islamic state group, are being moved from desert camps to secure children's homes and then on to adult prisons. britain has repatriated only a handful of children from syria, mostly orphans. the kurdish authorities in charge say they can't cope, and that very young children are being radicalised there by is. the bbc�*s middle east correspondent, quentin sommerville, reports. from the smiles... ..and the giggles... ..you wouldn't know that these children are prisoners. this is home for the last children of the islamic state group. it's the same camp where
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shamima begum is held. inside, i meet two brothers. they're british, but their mum has been stripped of her citizenship. because it's in the past now... some countries are taking children back, but only without their mums. there are nearly a dozen british children in this camp. it's not so easy to leave. she travelled here when her first husband joined is. she claims she was tricked into coming. you have your passports taken away... on a walk around the camp, she explains that when he died, she married another is fighter. if you said to the british government, "our kids are british, i can send them home, i'll stay here..." my children are my everything. i cannot... it will break my heart, especially their hearts. but it's their safety. yes, i know, but they have been separated from everything. their whole life is always
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on the run, just trying to survive. but don't you worry that if you don't recognise that you are part of this, that the kids will never escape it? i'm sorry, but how can i separate the children from their mother? it is very, very wrong, very cruel, after all that's happened. in the shadow of the islamic state group's destruction, the ruins of childhood. a home for orphans and the unruly. it too is a prison. there's dragon boy again. i recognise him there. yeah. london and pakistan were once home for 13—year—old ahmed until his mum joined is. his sketchbook, his imagination and a single t—shirt are the only reminders of a carefree childhood. one direction? yeah. tell me what happened
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to your brothers and sisters. what do you think about the people who are bombing you and shooting? when you leave syria, what's the first thing you're going to do? but this is no sanctuary. when he turns 18, he'll go to an adult prison.
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more than 100 young men have already been transferred from here. this is the biggest camp, al—hawl. it's also the worst. some 5000 foreign children are held here. with no prospect of freedom, they're being driven further into is�*s grip. the foreign section of al—hawl camp has been called by many a caliphate, and it's filthy, it's chaotic, but it isn't lawless. the islamic state group is the law here. in the last year, there have been about 45 murders. in the last month, eight murders alone. and we're told that as long as these foreign women remain here, is will continue to thrive.
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this is the mass incarceration of children. from infancy to adulthood, they will remain here. left behind, they will endure a life as bleak as anything the islamic state once promised them. quentin sommerville, bbc news, northeastern syria. john lewis and waitrose are planning to cut 1,000 jobs as part of a shake—up of store management. the move follows the closure of eightjohn lewis shops earlier this year, which put nearly 1,500 jobs at risk. john lewis, which owns waitrose and the department store chain, is trying to cut costs as shopping habits change and more people shop online. team gb is on its way to tokyo for the start of the olympic games next week. one of great britain's best chances of gold lies with horse rider laura collett, who's making her debut with the eventing team. a terrible accident eight years ago that left her in a coma could have
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ended her ambitions. but stubbornness and determination got her back on her horse, as she has been telling our sports correspondent, laura scott. achieving harmony with half a tonne of horse isn't easy. laura collett makes it look effortless. but this has taken years of building trust. now, on a horse called london 52, she is taking on tokyo 2020. it means everything, really. it's obviously a childhood dream when you're growing up. you know, everyone you speak to, no matter whether they're into horses or not into horses, you say the word olympics and everyone knows what it is. you know, it's the pinnacle of everything, really. equestrian sport is inherently dangerous. collett knows that well. this time eight years ago she was in a coma with horrific injuries after a fall in which her horse somersaulted. but it didn't stop her. all i wanted to do was get back on.
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and a lot of people questioned whether i would, and whether i had the mentality to want to get back on a horse after such a bad accident. but all of thatjust kind of made me want to prove everyone wrong as quickly as possible. so, i guess that's why i'm a bit stubborn. two years later, she experienced trauma of a different kind. she'd been entrusted with teaching the legendary racehorse kauto star to do dressage, but he was put down after a freak accident. a malicious backlash followed. that was, i'd say, the hardest thing i've ever had to deal with in my life, really. it was really hard to receive, you know, the death threats and the abuse that i did. i thought, wall i'm doing is looking after the horse, you know? i thought, well i'm doing is looking after the horse, you know? he is being treated like a king. and i don't really know why i am being abused.
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no woman has ever won individual gold for olympic eventing, but collett and london 52 are a combination to be feared. do you see yourself as a gold medal prospect? you have to have the belief that, if everything goes right, then, you know, he does stand a chance of winning a gold medal. but, deep down, i know he is one of the best horses in the world. collett has ridden through the risks of her sport. now it's time to reap the rewards. laura scott, bbc news. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. have a very good night. hello again. our weather is going to become sunnier and warmer over the next few days as high pressure builds in, but before we get there, we do have some cloud that's drifting its way southwards overnight. what that cloud will tend to do is it will stop temperatures from falling, and so for some, it's going to be quite a warm night for sleeping. temperatures, for example, in liverpool dropping no lower than around 16 degrees celsius.
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so, quite a warm start to the day on thursday already. there will be more cloud for england and wales slowly breaking with some sunny spells coming through during the afternoon. for northern england, parts of northern ireland and certainly most of scotland, there will be quite a lot of sunshine around through the afternoon and it's going to be warmer. 24—25 degrees possible for eastern scotland. another warm spot will be southern wales and south west england, where again temperatures will reach the mid—20s. now, on friday, there's going to be more sunshine to go around, and so we expect those temperatures to creep a little bit higher. could see highs of around 26 degrees celsius, and it gets even warmer and even sunnier as we head into the weekend for most.
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this is bbc news, the headlines.
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south africa is to increase to 25,000 thousand the number of troops deployed in response to widespread violence sparked by the jailing of former president zuma. the zulu king said six days of unrest had brought shame on the entire country. the european union has announced ambitious proposals to cut carbon emissions to net zero by the year 2050. they would end the sale of new petrol cars by 2035, and impose new taxes on shipping and aviation fuel. a bbc investigation has revealed that thousands of children may be facing life in prison in syria — because their parents were members of the islamic state group. there's been a firework display in paris to mark the bastille day national holiday. it follows a traditional military parade down the champs—elysees attended by president macron.

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