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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 14, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm christian fraser. the south african government deploys 25,000 troops to contain the violence that has swept the country. there has been widespread arson and looting, with one mother in durban forced to throw her child from a burning building. we will bring you reaction from the city. president biden has lunch on capitol hill, schmoozing his fellow democrats who have just agreed to spend another $3.5 trillion. meanwhile, a top ratings agency has warned the us could lose its aaa credit rating. not because of the mounting debt, but because of the deep political divisions. and the eu unveils a sweeping plan to tackle climate change, with ambitious proposals to cut emissions in half within nine years.
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hello, and welcome. the violence we have witnessed in south africa these past two days is worse than anything the country has suffered since apartheid. protests that began last week over the imprisonment ofjacob zuma, the former south african president, have now devolved into widespread looting and arson. the chaos has spread tojohannesburg. over 70 people have died, hundreds have been arrested. today, the king of the zulu nation, the largest ethnic group, said the chaos was destroying south africa's economy. one of the worst—hit cities is durban, from where our south africa correspondent nomsa maseko reports. dramatic scenes in durban show the extremity of desperation of those people caught in the middle of this mayhem. people were screaming,
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"throw her, throw her!" she threw her child to safety after her home was allegedly set on fire by looters. i was scared, i was really scared, but there were people down in the street. i wasn't. .. like, the way i was panicking, i was trusting anyone to take my baby away from me, because the place was burning, and there was smoke outside. this is day six of looting and rioting in kwazulu—natal and gauteng provinces in south africa. violent protests began hours after south africa's former president, jacob zuma, was jailed for failing to comply with a court order to give evidence at a corruption inquiry. the pro—zuma protesters took to the streets demanding the former president's immediate release from prison. but what started as a political statement has now been taken over by what the secret service described as opportunism and criminality. even the army and police could not initially control the situation. here in durban, firefighters lined
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the streets to start cleaning up. armed with broomsticks, residentsjoined in, chasing away anyone trying to loot whatever is left. not that much remains. is today the first time that you've come to see the trail of devastation that was left here since the rioting started? yeah, it's the first time we came down. 0ur driver lives next door, so he came two times to see what's going on. and the first day, they only came through a small hole in the front, broke and stole a few watches. but later that night, they came, they broke everything open and they came in and looted the whole shop. it can't happen again. i can't build up this business again, and then after six months or a year, it's happening again. all this happening in a country with the highest covid—i9 infections in africa, where authorities fear hospital
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admissions will spike even higher, leaving many wondering how south africa's fragile economy will ever recover. nomsa maseko, bbc news, durban. let's bring in two people who have been living through this violence in durban, lee and michelle van rensburg. welcome to the programme. michelle, you run a beauty salon in durban. tell me about it and when you were last there. ~' , ., tell me about it and when you were last there. ~' i. ,., tell me about it and when you were last there. ~' i. .., last there. like you said can we run a beauty salon. _ last there. like you said can we run a beauty salon, a _ last there. like you said can we run a beauty salon, a small— last there. like you said can we run a beauty salon, a small business, | a beauty salon, a small business, like all business. we specialise in the else but we do offer other services. and we worked last monday morning. he attempted to try and have a full day's work but the clients were cancelling out a fear to travel and then threats coming close to our area, we had to close at about iiam close to our area, we had to close at about 11am and we have been closed since we are not sure we are going back to work.— going back to work. have you been able to leave _ going back to work. have you been able to leave the _ going back to work. have you been
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able to leave the house? - going back to work. have you been able to leave the house? yes, - going back to work. have you been able to leave the house? yes, for| able to leave the house? yes, for short little — able to leave the house? yes, for short little moments. _ able to leave the house? yes, for short little moments. we - able to leave the house? yes, for short little moments. we try - able to leave the house? yes, for short little moments. we try to i able to leave the house? yes, for i short little moments. we try to stay close to home. because we really are not too sure what is happening out there. luckily with our neighbourhood watch we get communication in them as we been able to try and get to some shops and i had to go to the store this morning and managed to do that but we try to be out for too long. it sounds pretty frightening. incredibly frightening. sounds pretty frightening. incredibl friuuhtenin. ., incredibly frightening. lee, you are art of incredibly frightening. lee, you are part of civilian _ incredibly frightening. lee, you are part of civilian patrols _ incredibly frightening. lee, you are part of civilian patrols and - incredibly frightening. lee, you are part of civilian patrols and in - incredibly frightening. lee, you are part of civilian patrols and in fact i part of civilian patrols and in fact have just come back from patrol so what have you seen?— what have you seen? yes, that's correct. what have you seen? yes, that's correct- we _ what have you seen? yes, that's correct. we had _ what have you seen? yes, that's correct. we had to _ what have you seen? yes, that's correct. we had to shut - what have you seen? yes, that's correct. we had to shut down . what have you seen? yes, that's| correct. we had to shut down our office _ correct. we had to shut down our office at — correct. we had to shut down our office at the insurance to protect our streets and infrastructure and shopping — our streets and infrastructure and shopping malls and fuel stations and what i _ shopping malls and fuel stations and what i have seen is absolute anarchx _ what i have seen is absolute anarchy. it isjust absolute chaos. i anarchy. it isjust absolute chaos. i don't _ anarchy. it isjust absolute chaos. i don't know —
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anarchy. it isjust absolute chaos. i don't know how to describe it. it 'ust i don't know how to describe it. it just seems— i don't know how to describe it. it just seems like there is nothing beyond — just seems like there is nothing beyond communications with our radio networks. _ beyond communications with our radio networks, we have got multiple what that groups and it isjust not ending _ that groups and it isjust not ending it_ that groups and it isjust not ending. it is literally happening 24 hours _ ending. it is literally happening 24 hours a _ ending. it is literally happening 24 hours a day. peace services, support groups _ hours a day. peace services, support groups in_ hours a day. peace services, support groups in a _ hours a day. peace services, support groups in a neighbourhood watch groups _ groups in a neighbourhood watch groups are literally on the ground 24 hours — groups are literally on the ground 24 hours a — groups are literally on the ground 24 hours a day, and we are having to obviously _ 24 hours a day, and we are having to obviously work shifts with people to obviously _ obviously work shifts with people to obviously help out. this obviously work shifts with people to obviously help out.— obviously help out. this is the a civilian army — obviously help out. this is the a civilian army trying _ obviously help out. this is the a civilian army trying to _ obviously help out. this is the a civilian army trying to keep - obviously help out. this is the a| civilian army trying to keep back the looters. what sort of powers do you have? what do you have to protect your property?- you have? what do you have to protect your property? people are leavin: protect your property? people are leaving home — protect your property? people are leaving home with _ protect your property? people are leaving home with whatever - protect your property? people are leaving home with whatever theyl protect your property? people are i leaving home with whatever they can take, _ leaving home with whatever they can take, he _ leaving home with whatever they can take, be it _ leaving home with whatever they can take, be it a — leaving home with whatever they can take, be it a broomstick or be it... hammers — take, be it a broomstick or be it... hammers— take, be it a broomstick or be it... hammers. . , , ., hammers. hammers, yet. there are certain civilians _ hammers. hammers, yet. there are certain civilians that _ hammers. hammers, yet. there are certain civilians that are _ hammers. hammers, yet. there are
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certain civilians that are armed. - certain civilians that are armed. people — certain civilians that are armed. people obviously are wearing ballistic — people obviously are wearing ballistic vests where possible. it's literally— ballistic vests where possible. it's literally whatever they can get their _ literally whatever they can get their hands on. do literally whatever they can get their hands on.— literally whatever they can get their hands on. do you think there is something _ their hands on. do you think there is something deeper _ their hands on. do you think there is something deeper at _ their hands on. do you think there is something deeper at play - their hands on. do you think there j is something deeper at play here? their hands on. do you think there . is something deeper at play here? do you have genuine concerns now for the future of the country?- the future of the country? well, es. the the future of the country? well, yes. the problem _ the future of the country? well, yes. the problem is _ the future of the country? well, yes. the problem is our - yes. the problem is our infrastructure it might not be back together— infrastructure it might not be back together again, infrastructure it might not be back togetheragain, but infrastructure it might not be back together again, but for the vast majority— together again, but for the vast majority of the looters, they have gotten _ majority of the looters, they have gotten away with all of this, it's almost — gotten away with all of this, it's almost like they believe that this can happen again. which we are worried — can happen again. which we are worried about. we don't want this to happen— worried about. we don't want this to happen again in another week's time in my— happen again in another week's time in my month's time, your's time. we are really— in my month's time, your's time. we are really concerned how this might what the _ are really concerned how this might what the future of all this is. we are also what the future of all this is. - are also concerned about what happens tomorrow and the next day and in a week's time. infrastructure is so damaged that we don't know how
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long it is going to take to be repaired, if it ever will be able to be repaired. what future do our children have? everything is still up children have? everything is still up in the air right now.— children have? everything is still up in the air right now. thank you very much — up in the air right now. thank you very much for— up in the air right now. thank you very much for coming _ up in the air right now. thank you very much for coming on - up in the air right now. thank you very much for coming on the - very much for coming on the programme. let's pick up on some of that with the dye... let's bring in political analyst eusebius mckaiser. he's in johannesburg. this began with a demonstration among supporters ofjacob zuma in this illumination but it seems in recent days it is less to do with that and more something different is at play here. what do you think it is? i at play here. what do you think it is? ~' ., ., at play here. what do you think it is? ~' . ., , ., is? i think there are a number of motivations _ is? i think there are a number of motivations for— is? i think there are a number of motivations for the _ is? i think there are a number of motivations for the looting - is? i think there are a number of motivations for the looting that l is? i think there are a number of. motivations for the looting that we are seeing — motivations for the looting that we are seeing on— motivations for the looting that we are seeing on television _ motivations for the looting that we are seeing on television was - motivations for the looting that we are seeing on television was up - motivations for the looting that wei are seeing on television was up and i are seeing on television was up and i don't _ are seeing on television was up and “font think— are seeing on television was up and idon't think that _ are seeing on television was up and i don't think that one _ are seeing on television was up and i don't think that one single - i don't think that one single narrative _ i don't think that one single narrative does _ i don't think that one single narrative doesjustice - i don't think that one single narrative does justice to - i don't think that one single | narrative does justice to the confluence _ narrative does justice to the confluence of— narrative does justice to the confluence of factors - narrative does justice to the confluence of factors that i narrative does justice to the i confluence of factors that are narrative does justice to the - confluence of factors that are at plav _ confluence of factors that are at play. some _ confluence of factors that are at play. some people _ confluence of factors that are at play. some people might - confluence of factors that are at play. some people might have i confluence of factors that are at i play. some people might have as confluence of factors that are at - play. some people might have as they approximate _ play. some people might have as they approximate cause _ play. some people might have as they approximate cause in _ play. some people might have as they approximate cause in motivation - approximate cause in motivation discontent— approximate cause in motivation discontent to _ approximate cause in motivation discontent to the _ approximate cause in motivation discontent to the former- approximate cause in motivation i discontent to the former president has been _ discontent to the former president has beeniailed _ discontent to the former president has beenjailed for— discontent to the former president has beenjailed for contempt - discontent to the former president has beenjailed for contempt of. has beenjailed for contempt of court — has beenjailed for contempt of court 0thers— has beenjailed for contempt of
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court. others might _ has beenjailed for contempt of court. others might be - has beenjailed for contempt of- court. others might be opportunistic criminals. _ court. 0thers might be opportunistic criminals. but— court. others might be opportunistic criminals. but i _ court. others might be opportunistic criminals, but i think— court. others might be opportunistic criminals, but i think there - court. others might be opportunistic criminals, but i think there are - criminals, but i think there are also _ criminals, but i think there are also tens— criminals, but i think there are also tens of— criminals, but i think there are also tens of thousands - criminals, but i think there are also tens of thousands of - criminals, but i think there are also tens of thousands of port| criminals, but i think there are - also tens of thousands of port black south _ also tens of thousands of port black south africans _ also tens of thousands of port black south africans who _ also tens of thousands of port black south africans who simply - also tens of thousands of port black south africans who simply feel- south africans who simply feel invisible, — south africans who simply feel invisible, who— south africans who simply feel invisible, who feel— south africans who simply feel invisible, who feel they- south africans who simply feel invisible, who feel they don't i south africans who simply feel- invisible, who feel they don't have a stake _ invisible, who feel they don't have a stake in — invisible, who feel they don't have a stake in democracy, _ invisible, who feel they don't have a stake in democracy, who- invisible, who feel they don't have a stake in democracy, who have i invisible, who feel they don't have i a stake in democracy, who have got little to _ a stake in democracy, who have got little to lose — a stake in democracy, who have got little to lose by— a stake in democracy, who have got little to lose by looting _ a stake in democracy, who have got little to lose by looting because - little to lose by looting because their— little to lose by looting because their lives — little to lose by looting because their lives are _ little to lose by looting because their lives are already— little to lose by looting because their lives are already of- little to lose by looting because their lives are already of little i their lives are already of little material _ their lives are already of little material value. _ their lives are already of little material value. and _ their lives are already of little material value. and they - their lives are already of little material value. and they are i their lives are already of little - material value. and they are looting as a result _ material value. and they are looting as a result of— material value. and they are looting as a result of the _ material value. and they are looting as a result of the deep _ material value. and they are looting as a result of the deep levels - material value. and they are looting as a result of the deep levels of - as a result of the deep levels of structure — as a result of the deep levels of structure injustice _ as a result of the deep levels of structure injustice in— as a result of the deep levels of structure injustice in south- as a result of the deep levels of i structure injustice in south africa. in structure injustice in south africa. in fact _ structure injustice in south africa. in fact i _ structure injustice in south africa. in fact i think— structure injustice in south africa. in fact i think we _ structure injustice in south africa. in fact i think we should _ structure injustice in south africa. in fact i think we should also - structure injustice in south africa. in fact i think we should also rent| in fact i think we should also rent ourselves— in fact i think we should also rent ourselves in— in fact i think we should also rent ourselves in and _ in fact i think we should also rent ourselves in and the _ in fact i think we should also rent ourselves in and the way- in fact i think we should also rent ourselves in and the way we - in fact i think we should also rent ourselves in and the way we are i ourselves in and the way we are framing — ourselves in and the way we are framing this _ ourselves in and the way we are framing this journalistically- framing this journalistically because _ framing this journalistically because the _ framing this journalistically because the language - framing this journalistically because the language of. because the language of criminaliszation - because the language of criminaliszation and - because the language of. criminaliszation and looting because the language of- criminaliszation and looting also is a bit of— criminaliszation and looting also is a bit of a _ criminaliszation and looting also is a bit of a reductive _ criminaliszation and looting also is a bit of a reductive way _ criminaliszation and looting also is a bit of a reductive way of - a bit of a reductive way of understanding _ a bit of a reductive way of understanding the - a bit of a reductive way of - understanding the psychology of a bit of a reductive way of _ understanding the psychology of many of the _ understanding the psychology of many of the folks _ understanding the psychology of many of the folks that _ understanding the psychology of many of the folks that we _ understanding the psychology of many of the folks that we are _ understanding the psychology of many of the folks that we are seeing - of the folks that we are seeing stealing — of the folks that we are seeing stealinr. ., , of the folks that we are seeing stealinr. . , ., , ., stealing. ultimately that must flow from the top. _ stealing. ultimately that must flow from the top, and _ stealing. ultimately that must flow from the top, and the _ stealing. ultimately that must flow from the top, and the president. stealing. ultimately that must flow i from the top, and the president came to power pledging to reform the anc and establish better governance in south africa. hassey ultimately failed? , , ., , .,
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failed? the president has failed, and what we _ failed? the president has failed, and what we see _ failed? the president has failed, and what we see today - failed? the president has failed, and what we see today is - failed? the president has failed, i and what we see today is ultimately not connected — and what we see today is ultimately not connected to _ and what we see today is ultimately not connected to jacob _ and what we see today is ultimately not connected to jacob zuma - and what we see today is ultimately not connected to jacob zuma a's i not connected to jacob zuma a's imprisonment _ not connected to jacob zuma a's imprisonment. jacob— not connected to jacob zuma a's imprisonment. jacob zuma i not connected to jacob zuma a's imprisonment. jacob zuma is i not connected to jacob zuma a's imprisonment. jacob zuma is a i imprisonment. jacob zuma is a trigger— imprisonment. jacob zuma is a trigger for— imprisonment. jacob zuma is a trigger for these _ imprisonment. jacob zuma is a trigger for these events- imprisonment. jacob zuma is a trigger for these events but. imprisonment. jacob zuma is a i trigger for these events but they have _ trigger for these events but they have their— trigger for these events but they have their roots _ trigger for these events but they have their roots in _ trigger for these events but they have their roots in the _ trigger for these events but they have their roots in the slow i have their roots in the slow degradation— have their roots in the slow degradation of— have their roots in the slow degradation of the - have their roots in the slow degradation of the anc- have their roots in the slow degradation of the anc led| have their roots in the slow - degradation of the anc led state. the anc— degradation of the anc led state. the anc state _ degradation of the anc led state. the anc state is _ degradation of the anc led state. the anc state is technical - degradation of the anc led state. i the anc state is technical radically inept _ the anc state is technical radically inept it— the anc state is technical radically inept it is— the anc state is technical radically inept it is not— the anc state is technical radically inept. it is not been— the anc state is technical radically inept. it is not been able _ the anc state is technical radically inept. it is not been able to - the anc state is technical radically inept. it is not been able to grow. inept. it is not been able to grow the economy— inept. it is not been able to grow the economy which _ inept. it is not been able to grow the economy which is _ inept. it is not been able to grow the economy which is why - inept. it is not been able to grow the economy which is why we i inept. it is not been able to grow. the economy which is why we have inept. it is not been able to grow- the economy which is why we have for example _ the economy which is why we have for example 74%— the economy which is why we have for example 74% of— the economy which is why we have for example 74% of folks _ the economy which is why we have for example 74% of folks under _ the economy which is why we have for example 74% of folks under the - the economy which is why we have for example 74% of folks under the age i example 74% of folks under the age of 25 in_ example 74% of folks under the age of 25 in south — example 74% of folks under the age of 25 in south africa _ example 74% of folks under the age of 25 in south africa jobless - example 74% of folks under the age of 25 in south africa jobless and i of 25 in south africa jobless and not in _ of 25 in south africa jobless and not in any— of 25 in south africa jobless and not in any education _ of 25 in south africa jobless and not in any education or- of 25 in south africa jobless and not in any education or training i not in any education or training facilitv — not in any education or training facilitv now— not in any education or training facility. now when _ not in any education or training facility. now when you - not in any education or training facility. now when you have i not in any education or training i facility. now when you have millions of young _ facility. now when you have millions of young people _ facility. now when you have millions of young people with _ facility. now when you have millions of young people with lots _ facility. now when you have millions of young people with lots of- of young people with lots of energies— of young people with lots of energies and— of young people with lots of energies and no _ of young people with lots of energies and no sense i of young people with lots of energies and no sense of. of young people with lots of. energies and no sense of value of young people with lots of- energies and no sense of value and any reason — energies and no sense of value and any reason for _ energies and no sense of value and any reason for being _ energies and no sense of value and any reason for being hopeful- energies and no sense of value and any reason for being hopeful about| any reason for being hopeful about their futures, — any reason for being hopeful about theirfutures, roaming _ any reason for being hopeful about their futures, roaming around, i any reason for being hopeful aboutl theirfutures, roaming around, then of course _ theirfutures, roaming around, then of course they— theirfutures, roaming around, then of course they are _ theirfutures, roaming around, then of course they are going _ theirfutures, roaming around, then of course they are going to - theirfutures, roaming around, then of course they are going to be - of course they are going to be available _ of course they are going to be available to— of course they are going to be available to be _ of course they are going to be available to be used _ of course they are going to be available to be used as - of course they are going to be i available to be used as political pods _ available to be used as political pods by— available to be used as political pods by fashions _ available to be used as political pods by fashions of— available to be used as political pods by fashions of the - available to be used as political pods by fashions of the anc- available to be used as politicall pods by fashions of the anc and independent _ pods by fashions of the anc and independent of— pods by fashions of the anc and independent of that, _ pods by fashions of the anc and independent of that, they - pods by fashions of the anc and independent of that, they havel pods by fashions of the anc and i independent of that, they have got -ood independent of that, they have got good reason — independent of that, they have got good reason to _ independent of that, they have got good reason to not _ independent of that, they have got good reason to not be _ independent of that, they have got good reason to not be scared - independent of that, they have got good reason to not be scared of. good reason to not be scared of being _ good reason to not be scared of being arrested _ good reason to not be scared of being arrested for— good reason to not be scared of being arrested for looting - good reason to not be scared of. being arrested for looting because
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after all. — being arrested for looting because after all. the — being arrested for looting because after all, the status— being arrested for looting because after all, the status quo _ being arrested for looting because after all, the status quo already. after all, the status quo already condemns — after all, the status quo already condemns them _ after all, the status quo already condemns them to _ after all, the status quo already condemns them to the - after all, the status quo already condemns them to the margins| after all, the status quo already. condemns them to the margins of societv _ condemns them to the margins of societv so — condemns them to the margins of societv so i — condemns them to the margins of society. so i think— condemns them to the margins of society. so i think the _ condemns them to the margins of society. so i think the best - condemns them to the margins of society. so i think the best way i condemns them to the margins of society. so i think the best way to read _ society. so i think the best way to read what — society. so i think the best way to read what is — society. so i think the best way to read what is going _ society. so i think the best way to read what is going on— society. so i think the best way to read what is going on in— society. so i think the best way to read what is going on in south- read what is going on in south africa — read what is going on in south africa is— read what is going on in south africa is it _ read what is going on in south africa is it is _ read what is going on in south africa is it is ultimately- read what is going on in south africa is it is ultimately an- africa is it is ultimately an expression _ africa is it is ultimately an expression of— africa is it is ultimately an expression of anc - africa is it is ultimately an. expression of anc statehood africa is it is ultimately an- expression of anc statehood that africa is it is ultimately an— expression of anc statehood that has failed completely. _ expression of anc statehood that has failed completely. so _ expression of anc statehood that has failed completely.— failed completely. so where does this no failed completely. so where does this go then? _ failed completely. so where does this go then? is _ failed completely. so where does this go then? is there _ failed completely. so where does this go then? is there a - failed completely. so where does this go then? is there a danger i failed completely. so where does i this go then? is there a danger the country slides back to the ethnic infighting of the early 90s under apartheid? ihlat infighting of the early 90s under a artheid? ., ,., infighting of the early 90s under aartheid? ., ,., . infighting of the early 90s under aartheid? ., . ., ., . apartheid? not so much along ethnic lines but i think— apartheid? not so much along ethnic lines but i think along _ apartheid? not so much along ethnic lines but i think along class - apartheid? not so much along ethnic lines but i think along class lines. i lines but i think along class lines. i lines but i think along class lines. i agree _ lines but i think along class lines. i agree with — lines but i think along class lines. i agree with the _ lines but i think along class lines. i agree with the two _ lines but i think along class lines. i agree with the two people - lines but i think along class lines. i agree with the two people that i lines but i think along class lines. i i agree with the two people that you have just _ i agree with the two people that you have just interviewed, _ i agree with the two people that you have just interviewed, except - i agree with the two people that you have just interviewed, except for. have just interviewed, except for the inevitable _ have just interviewed, except for the inevitable dystopia _ have just interviewed, except for the inevitable dystopia towards l have just interviewed, except for. the inevitable dystopia towards the end of— the inevitable dystopia towards the end of the — the inevitable dystopia towards the end of the last _ the inevitable dystopia towards the end of the last remark. _ the inevitable dystopia towards the end of the last remark. i— the inevitable dystopia towards the end of the last remark. i think- the inevitable dystopia towards the end of the last remark. i think we i end of the last remark. i think we have _ end of the last remark. i think we have got— end of the last remark. i think we have got one _ end of the last remark. i think we have got one more _ end of the last remark. i think we have got one more opportunity. end of the last remark. i think we have got one more opportunity to deal with— have got one more opportunity to deal with the _ have got one more opportunity to deal with the real— have got one more opportunity to deal with the real issue. - have got one more opportunity to deal with the real issue. the i deal with the real issue. the fundamental— deal with the real issue. the fundamental issue _ deal with the real issue. the fundamental issue for- deal with the real issue. the fundamental issue for south| deal with the real issue. the - fundamental issue for south africa is that— fundamental issue for south africa is that deep— fundamental issue for south africa is that deep inequality _ fundamental issue for south africa is that deep inequality is _ fundamental issue for south africa is that deep inequality is what i is that deep inequality is what correlates _ is that deep inequality is what correlates with— is that deep inequality is what correlates with gratuitous i is that deep inequality is what| correlates with gratuitous acts is that deep inequality is what i correlates with gratuitous acts of violence — correlates with gratuitous acts of violence most _ correlates with gratuitous acts of violence most reliably. _ correlates with gratuitous acts of i violence most reliably. incidentally even more — violence most reliably. incidentally even more so _ violence most reliably. incidentally even more so than _ violence most reliably. incidentally even more so than poverty, - violence most reliably. incidentally even more so than poverty, on- violence most reliably. incidentally even more so than poverty, on a i violence most reliably. incidentally. even more so than poverty, on a plum and low— even more so than poverty, on a plum and low growth — even more so than poverty, on a plum and low growth. we _ even more so than poverty, on a plum and low growth. we are _ even more so than poverty, on a plum and low growth. we are one _ even more so than poverty, on a plum and low growth. we are one of- even more so than poverty, on a plum and low growth. we are one of the i and low growth. we are one of the most _ and low growth. we are one of the most unjust— and low growth. we are one of the most unjust societies _ and low growth. we are one of the most unjust societies on _ and low growth. we are one of the most unjust societies on the - and low growth. we are one of the i most unjust societies on the planet. so once _ most unjust societies on the planet. so once we — most unjust societies on the planet. so once we have _ most unjust societies on the planet. so once we have to _ most unjust societies on the planet. so once we have to do _ most unjust societies on the planet. so once we have to do is _ most unjust societies on the planet. so once we have to do is to - most unjust societies on the planet. so once we have to do is to make i so once we have to do is to make sure _ so once we have to do is to make sure that — so once we have to do is to make sure that across _ so once we have to do is to make
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sure that across class _ so once we have to do is to make sure that across class lines, i so once we have to do is to make sure that across class lines, we i sure that across class lines, we come _ sure that across class lines, we come together— sure that across class lines, we come together and _ sure that across class lines, we| come together and strategically cooperate — come together and strategically cooperate to _ come together and strategically cooperate to solve _ come together and strategically cooperate to solve the - come together and strategicallyl cooperate to solve the inequality problem — cooperate to solve the inequality problem if — cooperate to solve the inequality problem if we _ cooperate to solve the inequality problem. if we can _ cooperate to solve the inequality problem. if we can deal- cooperate to solve the inequality problem. if we can deal with i problem. if we can deal with inequality— problem. if we can deal with inequality in _ problem. if we can deal with inequality in particular, i problem. if we can deal withl inequality in particular, which honestly— inequality in particular, which honestly requires _ inequality in particular, which honestly requires the - inequality in particular, which. honestly requires the economy inequality in particular, which i honestly requires the economy to grow— honestly requires the economy to grow again — honestly requires the economy to grow again to— honestly requires the economy to growagain to my— honestly requires the economy to grow again to my people - honestly requires the economy to grow again to my people to - honestly requires the economy to grow again to my people to get i honestly requires the economy to i grow again to my people to get into jobs, _ grow again to my people to get into jobs. then— grow again to my people to get into jobs. then we — grow again to my people to get into jobs, then we might _ grow again to my people to get into jobs, then we might have _ grow again to my people to get into jobs, then we might have a - grow again to my people to get into jobs, then we might have a chancel grow again to my people to get into i jobs, then we might have a chance of getting _ jobs, then we might have a chance of getting more — jobs, then we might have a chance of getting more significance _ jobs, then we might have a chance of getting more significance hopeful- getting more significance hopeful about— getting more significance hopeful about their— getting more significance hopeful about their individual— getting more significance hopeful about their individual futures i getting more significance hopeful about their individual futures and| about their individual futures and our collective _ about their individual futures and our collective future _ about their individual futures and our collective future but - about their individual futures and our collective future but here - about their individual futures and our collective future but here is i our collective future but here is the problem _ our collective future but here is the problem. we _ our collective future but here is the problem. we lack— our collective future but here is the problem. we lack political. our collective future but here is l the problem. we lack political will and ethical— the problem. we lack political will and ethical leadership _ the problem. we lack political will and ethical leadership at - the problem. we lack political will and ethical leadership at the - the problem. we lack political will and ethical leadership at the top i and ethical leadership at the top within_ and ethical leadership at the top within our— and ethical leadership at the top within our body— and ethical leadership at the top within our body politic, - and ethical leadership at the top within our body politic, both - and ethical leadership at the top within our body politic, both in l and ethical leadership at the top . within our body politic, both in the opposition— within our body politic, both in the opposition and _ within our body politic, both in the opposition and within _ within our body politic, both in the | opposition and within government. and so_ opposition and within government. and so there — opposition and within government. and so there is _ opposition and within government. and so there is leadership- opposition and within government. and so there is leadership vacuum | and so there is leadership vacuum and there — and so there is leadership vacuum and there is— and so there is leadership vacuum and there is no— and so there is leadership vacuum and there is no one _ and so there is leadership vacuum and there is no one to— and so there is leadership vacuum and there is no one to lead - and so there is leadership vacuum and there is no one to lead us- and so there is leadership vacuum and there is no one to lead us on. and there is no one to lead us on that conversation— and there is no one to lead us on that conversation of— and there is no one to lead us on that conversation of how - and there is no one to lead us on that conversation of how we - and there is no one to lead us on that conversation of how we go l and there is no one to lead us on. that conversation of how we go into problem _ that conversation of how we go into problem solving _ that conversation of how we go into problem solving for _ that conversation of how we go into problem solving for deep _ that conversation of how we go intoi problem solving for deep inequality, which _ problem solving for deep inequality, which is _ problem solving for deep inequality, which is ultimately _ problem solving for deep inequality, which is ultimately the _ problem solving for deep inequality, which is ultimately the long—term i which is ultimately the long—term driver— which is ultimately the long—term driver of— which is ultimately the long—term driver of the _ which is ultimately the long—term driver of the discontent. - which is ultimately the long-term driver of the discontent.— driver of the discontent. deeply concerning- _ driver of the discontent. deeply concerning. thank _ driver of the discontent. deeply concerning. thank you - driver of the discontent. deeply concerning. thank you very - driver of the discontent. deeply i concerning. thank you very much driver of the discontent. deeply - concerning. thank you very much for being with us. senate democrats say they have agreed a budget of $3.5 trillion over the next ten years to fulfil presidentjoe biden's economic agenda. the party has been divided about the size and scope of the package needed,
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with bernie sanders initially pushing for $6 trillion. today, president biden attended a lunch on the hill to give the plan his blessing, but that's the easy bit. now the various committees have to decide how that money will be apportioned while keeping all 50 senators on board. we are pleased to welcome back the democratic congresswoman from pennsylvania madeleine dean. good to have you with us most of the fact he is on the hill today having lunch does that suggest he is giving the deal that they have a green light? it the deal that they have a green liuht? , , ,., the deal that they have a green liuht? , , . ., , light? it seems so. i am not they are to my — light? it seems so. i am not they are to my district, _ light? it seems so. i am not they are to my district, but _ light? it seems so. i am not they are to my district, but it - light? it seems so. i am not they are to my district, but it is - light? it seems so. i am not they are to my district, but it is a - light? it seems so. i am not they are to my district, but it is a veryi are to my district, but it is a very good sign that senate democrats have come up with such a robust plan, $3.5 trillion, and it's a very great notion the president is there. after all, he is a man of that chamber, of the senate. he is very good friends there and said this negotiated deal with the chairman bernie sanders, i think it's a very good step forward
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and i'm proud of democrats for doing it. i and i'm proud of democrats for doing it. . , and i'm proud of democrats for doing it. ., ., ., ~ and i'm proud of democrats for doing it. i was looking today at the size ofthe it. i was looking today at the size of the us it. i was looking today at the size of the us debt. _ it. i was looking today at the size of the us debt. it _ it. i was looking today at the size of the us debt. it is _ it. i was looking today at the size of the us debt. it is $26 - it. i was looking today at the size of the us debt. it is $26 trillion | of the us debt. it is $26 trillion currently. $600 billion for the bipartisan structure built in another 3.5 trillion here in the reconciliation package and all told it comes to about $4 trillion. can the country afford it? i it comes to about $4 trillion. can the country afford it?— the country afford it? i think we can come _ the country afford it? i think we can come and — the country afford it? i think we can come and actually - the country afford it? i think we can come and actually think - the country afford it? i think we can come and actually think it i the country afford it? i think we l can come and actually think it will be an economic engine for our country. i serve on financial services and judiciary committees and just today we had the fed chairman sharon powell in front of us as he comes in semiannually and spoke about our economy in recovery and spoke of the strength of our economies recovery. but also spoke of the uneven nature of it. i did the chance to talk to them about the power of investment, so public and private investment at a time of economic growth and recovery is i think exactly the right thing for us to be dealing. this is our opportunity, and i would say our
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obligation to make this investment. it's a generational investment. here in the us, we earned an inherited frankly generational investments in infrastructure, whether it was the highway administration or the railroads or before that, the canal systems and others, it is our turn and my generation's turn to make sure we offer my grandchildren and their children innovative, safe infrastructure. both physical infrastructure. both physical infrastructure and human infrastructure.— infrastructure and human infrastructure. w , ., infrastructure and human infrastructure. w , . ., infrastructure. breaking bread at the lunch today, _ infrastructure. breaking bread at the lunch today, the _ infrastructure. breaking bread at the lunch today, the question . infrastructure. breaking bread at the lunch today, the question is| the lunch today, the question is when they come to apportioning the money and where it goes, do they stick together? ultimately does senatorjoe mansion back something so big because initially he balked at $2 trillion and now it is a 3.5? i believe thatjoe is an honest broker of information and and of
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what senate democrats can and should be doing for our future also i hope the investments will be very sincere and substantial in childcare, in health care. one of the things that is very important in this is the expansion of medicare to include dental, hearing and vision. this thing we should have done generations ago but how important will be for us to do that now. something i care deeply about and i hope senator manchin does is education investment. let's get argo people fully educated without being burdened with such depth. this is an exciting opportunity for us to move our country forward at a time of economic growth. this can add to and become an engine for greatest economic growth.— become an engine for greatest economic growth. good to talk to ou. economic growth. good to talk to yon thank _ economic growth. good to talk to yon thank you — economic growth. good to talk to you. thank you for _ economic growth. good to talk to you. thank you for coming - economic growth. good to talk to you. thank you for coming on. i economic growth. good to talk to - you. thank you for coming on. thank ou, you. thank you for coming on. thank you. christian- _ america could lose its perfect credit rating due in part to the big lie. that's the warning from fitch ratings, who highlight governance as a weakness in the united states. citing the january 6th attacks in their report, they say...
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in other words, you would't expect to see this kind of political division and unrest in a country with a perfect credit rating. and what does that mean? well, a downgraded credit rating means more uncertainty, more volatility, and crucially at a time whenjoe biden is ramming through more spending, it could mean it becomes more expensive to refinance the debt. what to make of it? let's bring in charles seville, senior director at fitch ratings. good to have you with us. when you are buying emerging market bonds commuted to focus on the stability of a government in those countries in which you are investing, so it stands to reason then the people should be alarmed about what is going on in america.— should be alarmed about what is going on in america. yeah, we look at 120 countries _ going on in america. yeah, we look at 120 countries across _ going on in america. yeah, we look at 120 countries across the - going on in america. yeah, we look at 120 countries across the world i at 120 countries across the world and we _
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at 120 countries across the world and we look at how their credit worthiness stacks up to my governance is a very important part of that _ governance is a very important part of that i_ governance is a very important part of that. i should underline that us governance institutions and politics compare _ governance institutions and politics compare with the rest of the world are still— compare with the rest of the world are still very strong. we are only highlighting in this statement that among _ highlighting in this statement that among other things that governance in the _ among other things that governance in the us— among other things that governance in the us is— among other things that governance in the us is a bit weaker than the average — in the us is a bit weaker than the average aaa country which is the small— average aaa country which is the small group of countries with the very highest rating. you mentioned in our very highest rating. you mentioned in your report _ very highest rating. you mentioned in your report and _ very highest rating. you mentioned in your report and only _ very highest rating. you mentioned in your report and only what - in your report and only what happened onjanuary in your report and only what happened on january the 6th in your report and only what happened onjanuary the 6th with the storming of congress but also some of these voting restrictions that have been passed in republican states. do you echo really whatjoe biden was saying yesterday in pennsylvania that there is a genuine threat here to political stability in america was met i think we have to stand back and see how well the system is working. i to stand back and see how well the system is working.— system is working. i think we have had a number _ system is working. i think we have had a number of _ system is working. i think we have had a number of demonstrations l system is working. i think we have i had a number of demonstrations over the past _ had a number of demonstrations over the past few years that
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bipartisanship is in quite short supply. — bipartisanship is in quite short supply. we have had standoffs over raising _ supply. we have had standoffs over raising the — supply. we have had standoffs over raising the debt limit, another overaii— raising the debt limit, another overall sort of productivity of law out of _ overall sort of productivity of law out of congress declining because parties _ out of congress declining because parties find it harder to agree. and ithink— parties find it harder to agree. and i think that — parties find it harder to agree. and i think that reflects polarisation in society— i think that reflects polarisation in society at large to some extent. so i in society at large to some extent. so i think— in society at large to some extent. so i think that those two issues are linked _ so i think that those two issues are linked. ., ,., ., ., so i think that those two issues are linked. ., ., ., , linked. you sound not to be too worried about _ linked. you sound not to be too worried about the _ linked. you sound not to be too worried about the rising - linked. you sound not to be too worried about the rising debt. l linked. you sound not to be too l worried about the rising debt. let me just show you the front page of the new york post today. inflation over 5% to my in 13 years. the fed chairjerome powell seemed reasonably relaxed about this today. how do you see it? the reasonably relaxed about this today. how do you see it?— how do you see it? the us is the most highly _ how do you see it? the us is the most highly indebted _ how do you see it? the us is the most highly indebted of - how do you see it? the us is the most highly indebted of the - how do you see it? the us is the most highly indebted of the aaa| most highly indebted of the aaa country — most highly indebted of the aaa country. if you just take federal debt, _ country. if you just take federal debt, federal debt in the hands of the public— debt, federal debt in the hands of the public and within that surpassed 100% _ the public and within that surpassed 100% of— the public and within that surpassed 100% of gdp, so the economy is 23
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triiiion _ 100% of gdp, so the economy is 23 trillion in _ 100% of gdp, so the economy is 23 trillion in debt is sort of around that as — trillion in debt is sort of around that as well. if we look at general government which is federal government plus debt at the states, it's over— government plus debt at the states, it's over 120% of gdp. so that's a jump— it's over 120% of gdp. so that's a jump before the pandemic. what we see is— jump before the pandemic. what we see is owing to the very strong growth — see is owing to the very strong growth we have seen with the us economy— growth we have seen with the us economy in the recovery relate ieading — economy in the recovery relate leading the world, than that debt at the moment is looking pretty sustainable and the debt ratio, debt to gdp_ sustainable and the debt ratio, debt to gdp looks quite sustainable in the short— to gdp looks quite sustainable in the short run. over the long run as economy— the short run. over the long run as economy settles back to a slower rate of— economy settles back to a slower rate of growth, and we still have quite _ rate of growth, and we still have quite substantial deficits within it could _ quite substantial deficits within it could start to rise. and the other part of— could start to rise. and the other part of this — could start to rise. and the other part of this equation is interest rates _ part of this equation is interest rates where the current rates are very low — rates where the current rates are very low so — rates where the current rates are very low so inflation over 5% but the ten — very low so inflation over 5% but the ten year bond is yielding i.3%. so the _ the ten year bond is yielding i.3%. so the us— the ten year bond is yielding i.3%. so the us can borrow at a real negative — so the us can borrow at a real negative interest rates and its spending actually less on debt service — spending actually less on debt service or the same as a share of
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its revenue — service or the same as a share of its revenue as it did in past decades— its revenue as it did in past decades despite the much higher debt _ decades despite the much higher debt. but we are saying is that may not last— debt. but we are saying is that may not last forever.— not last forever. very interesting. thank ou not last forever. very interesting. thank you for _ not last forever. very interesting. thank you for being _ not last forever. very interesting. thank you for being with - not last forever. very interesting. thank you for being with us. - stay with us on bbc news. still to come, the european union sets out ambitious plans to become carbon—neutral by 2050. is that realistic? we discuss it next. the welsh government has announced that most coronavirus restrictions will be lifted, but not until august the 7th. from saturday, rules around the number of people who can meet up indoors will be eased, but not scrapped. facemasks will still be required in most indoor public places. the first minister made the announcement earlier, but said despite the easing there was still a considerable risk from the virus in wales. but i want to be very clear with everybody about this. this is not a free—for—all. in wales, we will not
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abandon those simple, but effective and successful measures that have helped to keep us all safe. there will continue to be some important protections, especially important for those who are clinically vulnerable and who are perhaps the most anxious about an easing of restrictions. the european commission unveiled a mammoth package of new laws today seeking to propel the continent toward climate neutrality by 2050, and the package aims to get half of that done, 55%, by 2030, which is going to require an enormous amount of heavy lifting. it will include plans to tax jet fuel. it will effectively ban the sale of petrol and diesel—powered cars within 20 years. they'll implement a world—first carbon border tariff, targeting the import of goods that
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are produced abroad with high emissions, such as steel and cement. they are truly ambitious proposals, but can they sell it politically to all 27 members? steven erlanger is the new york times' chief diplomatic correspondent in europe. good to see you. nine years is a very short period of time to cut emissions by 55%. how are they going to get there? i’m emissions by 55%. how are they going to get there?— to get there? i'm not sure they will but they are _ to get there? i'm not sure they will but they are supposed _ to get there? i'm not sure they will but they are supposed to. - to get there? i'm not sure they will but they are supposed to. they - but they are supposed to. they passed a law that that is what they are going to do. and nine years is really going to be more like 6.5, maybe seven because they have to negotiate and it may take a year or a year and a half or even two years to get it through all the member states and through the european parliament. as you know, climate is one of these kind of slightly neurotic issues on which people have very strong views, which industry lobbies very hard about. these are
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very bold and brave measures, proposals, and they it may be examining what will fit the need, but there will be others that are very powerful lobbies that will argue that we should shave off a little more here and give us a break and are you not worried about the poor person who cannot afford a brand—new carand poor person who cannot afford a brand—new car and what about rising rates for energy and heating? and these are very powerful arguments. everyone is afraid of another surge in populism. the french so—called yellow vest proposals in 2018 were about climate inflicted heights in fuel prices and everyone is worried that this will be seen by many people as an elite project, a very bureaucratic project and one that
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they will pay for weather than the rich. so i think those are the big risks. �* . ., ., , risks. but there are going to be these carbon — risks. but there are going to be these carbon taxes _ risks. but there are going to be these carbon taxes and - risks. but there are going to be i these carbon taxes and apparently this will be channelled or funnelled into what they call a social climate fund. is that going to plug the gap for the poor people in europe? it will help. you know, again proposals are proposals and they want to raise money for that on a very controversial set of carbon taxes, including taxes on imported goods from countries that may not have such good environmental and costly environmental protections. but they are talking about something like 700 billion euros worth of social funding that governments can use to help people by electric cars or change boilers in their house or even help them retrain for newjobs.
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their heart is in the right place. thank you very much for that. bold proposals from brussels. stay with us, more to come. hello there. it's amazing, isn't it, how quickly our weather can change? if you think back to monday, we had a month's worth of rain in parts of london and some flash flooding. compare that with where we are now, and indeed looking at the forecast, with the weather turning much more settled, sunnier, drier and warmer. part of that change is being driven by this lump of warm air pushing its way northwards. what that's helping do is it's helping to build these big waves in the jet stream. now, around the uk, we've got a ridge, and that means the air�*s descending, we've got high pressure forming. but over in europe, torrential thunderstorms. we've already seen really nasty flooding across parts of switzerland and germany, and there is more of that to come. quite nasty, severe flooding in places, actually. but at the same time, here in the uk, that big wave in the jet stream builds this big
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area of high pressure. and it's that that settles our weather down. so, skies like these commonplace on wednesday, there's more of that to come as we look at the forecast for about the next week as well. here's the weather picture as we go through this evening and overnight. there will be some changes. an area of thicker cloud is working into scotland and northern ireland. that eventually will be sinking its way southwards into parts of england and wales. and quite a warm night, temperatures in liverpool dropping low to around 16 degrees celsius, that's going to be quite uncomfortable for getting off to sleep. for thursday itself, this area of cloud sinks southward into england and wales before thinning and breaking up. so, eventually, we'll get some spells of sunshine coming through, much more sunshine for scotland and across eastern areas, it's going to be a good deal warmer, with temperatures here probably reaching around 25 degrees celsius. and if we keep that sunshine across the south of wales and south west england, this is going to be another warm spot with temperatures around 26 degrees celsius or so. now, for friday, that area of high pressure is still with us. again, the north west seeing a little bit more
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in the way of cloud, but even here, there will be some bright or sunny spells coming through. for many of us, in the sunshine, again, it's going to be another warm day. 22 in belfast, 23 for aberdeen, but 26 in cardiff, london and for birmingham as well. and the weekend keeps the fine, settled spell of weather going. day by day, it'll tend to get a little bit warmer, temperatures up to 25 in manchester this weekend, but it's going to be even warmer than that across wales, the midlands, east anglia and southern england, where temperatures could get pretty close to 30 degrees during the second half of the weekend. that's your latest weather. bye for now.
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this is bbc news — i'm christian fraser. south africa has been hit by a wave of violence and looting worse than anything seen since apartheid. more than 70 people have died and hundreds have been arrested — the government has announced it will deploy 25,000 soldiers to the two worst hit provinces. we'll hear from the top tennessee health official who says she was fired, all because of her campaign to get teens vaccinated. in syria — the children of islamic state group fighters face a lifetime of imprisonment and abuse. we have a special report. and — during the cold war the us had a hot line to russia, the so called red phone, are they about to set one up with china?
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a top medical director in tennessee says she was fired from herjob this week because she was an advocate for vaccinating teenagers against covid—i9. the number of daily coronavirus cases in tennessee has doubled in the last two weeks, and the number of people vaccinated in the state, is well below the national average at 40%. dr michelle fiscus says her dismissal demonstrates just how toxic the political landscape has become. i informed the medical providers in tennessee of what's called the tennessee of what's called the tennessee metro minor doctrine which is case law from the tennessee supreme court from 198734 years ago that allows children who are age
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14-17 to that allows children who are age 14—17 to seek medical care without the consent of the parent if the physician or medical provider feels that they are mature enough to make those decisions. —— from 1987, 34 years ago. i send information to those providers because there were lots of questions about what they should do if they were to get a minor who came should do if they were to get a minorwho came and should do if they were to get a minor who came and presented themselves for a covid—19 vaccine as i reach out to our office general counsel and ask for the appropriate language which was provided to me and was told it was already posted to the website that it had been blessed by the governors office and that i could share it however i felt appropriate. that i could share it however i felt appropriate-— appropriate. clearly the laws on our appropriate. clearly the laws on your side- _ appropriate. clearly the laws on your side- why _ appropriate. clearly the laws on your side. why do _ appropriate. clearly the laws on your side. why do you - appropriate. clearly the iaws on your side. why do you think- your side. why do you think republican representatives chose to act in the way that they did? idbieiiii. act in the way that they did? well, there was some _ act in the way that they did? well, there was some pushback- act in the way that they did? well, there was some pushback from i act in the way that they did? ii there was some pushback from parents who felt that it wasn't up to their 14 or 15 or 16—year—old child to determine whether or not they should
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receive this vaccine especially while it was under e way. that is not the issue here. the issue is that it not the issue here. the issue is thatitis not the issue here. the issue is that it is the case law in tennessee for the last 34 years that if a child of that age elected to seek medical care that they have the right to do that. so that is not the debate that i'm involved in, is the interpretation of that doctrine or that that doctrine exists. myjob is to provide factual information to the people of tennessee and to the medical providers who are administering this and all of vaccines which is what i did. it vaccines which is what i did. it sounds to me like the anti—vaxxers have one in tennessee and i'm wondering given the caseload we have seenin wondering given the caseload we have seen in the last couple of weeks what your concerns are going forward. i what your concerns are going forward. ., �* . . forward. i won't concede that the 've forward. i won't concede that they've won- _ forward. i won't concede that they've won. they _ forward. i won't concede that they've won. they are i forward. i won't concede that i they've won. they are definitely well organised and they obviously have the ear of several of our legislators who have taken their
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messaging from the anti—vaccine playbook rather than seeking the opinions of the experts that they have in their own backyard. even vanderbilt university is world renowned in its vaccine research and has contributed greatly to the development of these covid—19 vaccines and yet we have legislators who are repeating things from the anti—vaccine playbook publicly. so they haven't won but they've definitely gain some strength as a result of this. what i hope is that the platform that i've been given here now to talk about how politics has interfered with the delivery of public health services in the state of tennessee and to talk about the impact of the decisions of politicians who put themselves ahead of public health and how that's going to impact our community,
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especially our people of colour. hopefully will raise a lot of awareness and cause a groundswell of pro—vaccine messaging and outrage so that we can be back again what has organise itself as disinformation and misinformation rent the importance of immunisations. dr michelle fiscus there, and extra ordinary case. but she is not alone. farfrom it. since april 2020 just as the covid—19 pandemic began to take hold across the world — at least 181 state and local public health leaders in 38 states have either resigned or been fired. an amazing rate of turnover. as she says has something to do with the politics in the country. the authorities in haiti say they are seeking a former senator, a fired government official and a convicted cocaine smuggler in connection with the assassination of the late presidentjovenel moise. it is now a sprawling investigation which has dragged in all manner of alleged actors, including colombian mercenaries,
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a us—based haitian pastor and a florida—based security company. there've even been claims that some of those arrested may have been tricked into their involvement. npr's jason beaubien is in port—au—prince for us. so just sojust bring us up to so just bring us up to speed first evolved with the man the centre of all this, a 63—year—old forwarded doctor, he is accused of being the mastermind of this entire plot. has he been charged? —— a florida doctor. he been charged? -- a florida doctor. ., . he been charged? -- a florida doctor. . , ., , ., . , doctor. he has not been formally charted doctor. he has not been formally charged and _ doctor. he has not been formally charged and there _ doctor. he has not been formally charged and there are _ doctor. he has not been formally charged and there are some i doctor. he has not been formally i charged and there are some people who think he is not the mastermind of this entire pot but in terms of the police investigation, the police are saying he organised the colombians to come and they believe that he was the one running that part of the operation. but there's still a lot of scepticism about what the colombians were doing here, but they were told and what that they
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were even the ones that actually carried out if the actual killing. so there's still a lot of open questions and it seems to get more complicated by the day. our additional people not being sought, as you mentioned one of them is a former senator, as you mentioned one of them is a formersenator, people as you mentioned one of them is a former senator, people well known inside of port—au—prince and haiti and it is interesting, the doctor working in florida was not well known in haiti, people were very surprised to see his name pop up as the alleged mastermind of this brutal assassination of president jovenel moise.— jovenel moise. one of them is a former senator, _ jovenel moise. one of them is a former senator, another - jovenel moise. one of them is a former senator, another is i jovenel moise. one of them is a former senator, another is a i jovenel moise. one of them is a i former senator, another is a fired government official who would be well known in port—au—prince. why can't they find them and does that tend to suggest that they might be involved? it is tend to suggest that they might be involved? , . . , , involved? it is unclear why they can't find them _ involved? it is unclear why they can't find them and _ involved? it is unclear why they can't find them and it _ involved? it is unclear why they can't find them and it was i can't find them and it was interesting to see that they have put out these arrest warrants for them saying that they were both armed and dangerous and want to for attempted murder and murder and robbery. there is a lot of movement
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that happens between haiti and other parts of the caribbean, obviously with the united states is well going back and forth. they simply don't know where they are at the moment but they have implied they are part of this broader investigation into the assassination. the of this broader investigation into the assassination.— of this broader investigation into the assassination. the accused has said that the _ the assassination. the accused has said that the us _ the assassination. the accused has said that the us supported - the assassination. the accused has said that the us supported his i the assassination. the accused has said that the us supported his plot| said that the us supported his plot to take a tour of the country, given joe biden pots at previous statements on the country, i don't believe that to be true. —— i doubt that to be true but what does the state departments a? the that to be true but what does the state departments a?— state departments a? the state department _ state departments a? the state department says _ state departments a? the state department says they _ state departments a? the state department says they are i state departments a? the state i department says they are helping the haitian authorities in any way they can and have put forward investigators from the fbi and other people to help with logistics and investigative techniques. they are saying very clearly that they were not involved in this plot to assassinate the president. they have however said that they are supporting the prime minister who actually had been fired and was
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about to be replaced on the day that jovenel moise was killed. he basically stepped forward into a power vacuum and the us has recognised him in that position. there is a fair amount of concern here about whether or not he should be the head of state in the interim until elections are called but it's just part of the overall chaos that this assassination has thrown haiti into. . .,, , this assassination has thrown haiti into. . , ., this assassination has thrown haiti into-— jason - into. chaos is the word. jason beaubien. _ into. chaos is the word. jason beaubien, thank _ into. chaos is the word. jason beaubien, thank you. - into. chaos is the word. jason beaubien, thank you. you're. into. chaos is the word. jason - beaubien, thank you. you're welcome. thousands of foreign children are facing a lifetime of imprisonment in camps and jails in?syria with little hope of being released. a bbc investigation has found that the children, whose parents supported the islamic state group, are being moved?from desert camps?to secure children's homes and onto adult prisons in a conveyor belt of incarceration. the bbc�*s middle east correspondent quentin sommerville reports from north—east syria. from the smiles and the giggles, you wouldn't know that these children are prisoners.
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this is home for the last children of the islamic state group. it's the same camp where shamima begum is held. inside, i meet two brothers. they're british, but their mum has been stripped of her citizenship. because it's in the past, you know? some countries are taking children back, but only without their mums. there are nearly a dozen british children in this camp. if you've noticed, this is syria. it's not so easy to leave. she travelled here when her first husband joined is. she claimed she was tricked into coming. people have their passports taken away. on a walk around the camp, she explains that when he died, she married another is fighter. if you said to the british government, "my kids are british, "i can send them home, i'll stay here." my children are my everything. i cannot. it would break my heart,
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especially their hearts. but it's their safety. yes, i know, but they have been separated from everything. their whole life is always on the run. like, we're just trying to survive. don't you worry that if you don't recognise that you're a part of this, then the kids will never escape it. then the kids will never escape it? i'm sorry, but how can i separate the children from their mother? this is very, very wrong, very cruel. after all that's happened. in the shadow of the islamic state group's destruction, the ruins of a childhood. a home for orphans and the unruly. it, too, is a prison. there's dragon boy again. i recognise him there. london and pakistan were once home for 13—year—old ahmed, until his mum joined is. his sketchbook, his imagination
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and a single t—shirt are the only reminders of a carefree childhood. one direction? yeah. tell me what happened to your brothers and sisters. he was fighting for the islamic state? mm—hm. what do you think about the people who are bombing you and shooting? when you get out of here, when you leave syria, what's the first thing you're going to do?
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but this is no sanctuary. when he turns 18, he'll go to an adult prison. more than 100 young men have already been transferred from here. this is the biggest camp, al—hawl. it's also the worst. some 5000 foreign children are held here. with no prospect of freedom, they're being driven further into is's grip. the foreign section of al—hawl camp has called a mini—caliphate, has been called a mini—caliphate, and it's filthy, it's chaotic, but it isn't lawless. the islamic state group is the law here. in the last year, there've
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been about 45 murders. in the last month, eight murders alone. and we're told that as long as these foreign women remain here, is will continue to thrive. this is the mass incarceration of children. from infancy to adulthood, they will remain here. left behind, they will endure a life as bleak as anything the islamic state once promised them. quentin sommerville, bbc news, north—eastern syria. stay with us on bbc news, still to come... the sorry plight of the children of islamic state soldiers. still to come... the famous red phone of the cold war might be making a come back, but this time the us wants to speak to china. ibiza, mallorca and menorca will be added to the amber travel list due to a surge in coronavirus cases —
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meaning many passengers will now have to quarantine on return, a little over a fortnight after they went green. the change for those returning to england, scotland and wales from spain's balearic islands will take place at 4am of monday, potentially sparking a rush for holiday—makers to return to avoid the need to quarantine. younger adults will mainly be impacted because the alteration coincides with the end of the need to quarantine for fully—vaccinated uk residents and under—18s when returning from amber list nations. i've been speaking to travel journalist lisa minot. we've seen yet again we had a first with portugal and now we've got with the balearic islands, both of which were the main areas that british people would love to go to on holiday and traditionally do holiday to. so yet more chaos for people having to try to work out if it affects them, what they're going to be able to do, and even booking a holiday at the very last minute now doesn't seem to give you the ability to actually avoid any of this kind of stress. suddenly, there will be
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people just turning the global a little bit from the balearic islands to croatia. that's right. so, i mean, there's two bits of good news in this. we have got bulgaria that's gone on to the green list and we've got croatia going on the green watchlist which is where the balearics were. i think the only issue i would say is that these are not destinations that traditionally have huge numbers of brits going to. they are popular but they're not as popular as the balearics. so it could be a case that people manage to switch their holidays to these destinations if they are not yet jabbed. but again it's a real bitter blow for the youngsters. they're the ones that really have suffered, i think, the most in the pandemic in terms of not being at risk of the coronavirus in the same way but actually having the most restrictions put on them. and for them, the island of ibiza, obviously a hugely popular island for the young. and they are now going to struggle if they want to go to those resorts because most of them won't be fully vaccinated until later on in august.
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the biden administration is looking for improved ways to communicate with china. there are reports the white house might initiate a red phone system, much like the one used to communicate with the soviet union at the height of the cold war. a hotline to beijing would mean presidentjoe biden, or top officials on his national security team, could immediately send encrypted phone calls or messages to president xi or those around him. a bit like this — from the hit comedy dr strangelove. well now, what happened is one of our base commanders, he had a sort of... well, he went a little funny in the head. you know, just a little...funny. and, er... he went and did a silly thing. well, i'll tell you what he did. he ordered his planes... ..to attack your country. let's hope that real
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life never imitates art. but seriously what does this signify? are we that close to confrontation that a red phone is now required. chris painter is the former state department coordinator for cyber issues under president barack obama and joins me now. good to have you with us on the programme. how does washington communicate with moscow today and is that the framework for how they might communicate with beijing? there is something that is not really a phone, it is in the nuclear risk reduction centre. it is really a computer that allows to send messages, preprogrammed messages back and forth and even during the worst time in us soviet or even us russian relations, at that hotline always got answered. so we could send a message, it would avoid a misperception, the whole idea of having a hot line, it is a class confidence building measure to avoid misperceptions and avoid escalations. for instance you might
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say we are having a troop exercise or during a test of some kind of weapon. so the other side doesn't misperceive what is going on or if one country things the other country is responsible for something, have some communication like that. so it's something that we have done with the soviet union and russia for a long time but haven't had that same relationship and understanding with china. i same relationship and understanding with china. ., . same relationship and understanding with china. . , ., same relationship and understanding with china. . , . ., same relationship and understanding with china. . ., . with china. i was reading today that durin: the with china. i was reading today that during the 1962 _ with china. i was reading today that during the 1962 cuban _ with china. i was reading today that during the 1962 cuban missile i during the 1962 cuban missile crisis, khrushchev sent a message to kennedy which was 3000 words long and it took the americans 12 hours to translate it and decipher it, such that khrushchev thought they were ignoring him and in that period of time had told them to move their nukes from turkey. so there is the risk isn't there if communication takes too long, bad things could happen? takes too long, bad things could ha..en?,,, , takes too long, bad things could hauen? �* ,~ takes too long, bad things could ha. een? �* , ., ., happen? absolutely and i love the fact that you _ happen? absolutely and i love the fact that you played _ happen? absolutely and i love the fact that you played that - happen? absolutely and i love the fact that you played that doctor i fact that you played that doctor strangelove clip, one of my favourite movies but it is not like
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that in real life and the whole idea of these hotlines, these teletype systems are they have preprogram short messages, pre—transmitted short messages, pre—tra nsmitted messages short messages, pre—transmitted messages so there is no chance that you will send a message that the other side won't understand what it is. that's what you are trying to avoid. you don't want someone to think you said bomb and set of bob for instance. you are very careful and make sure you have these templates and place in advance. that is a something that has been par for the course notjust for the nuclear field in russia but we had that in the cyber area as well. but it's something we have not had that same practice with china in the past and one of the important things there is you need to make sure that call is in fact answered or that teletype is answered and you are getting the right person. when you look at with the tensions might be, there is the south china sea.— south china sea. there is taiwan, there is north _ south china sea. there is taiwan, there is north korea. _ south china sea. there is taiwan, there is north korea. do - south china sea. there is taiwan, there is north korea. do you i south china sea. there is taiwan, | there is north korea. do you think this reflects washington's growing
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concern that something sudden and untoward might happen that they might need this point of communication? it might need this point of communication?- might need this point of communication? it is a tense international _ communication? it is a tense international situation i communication? it is a tense i international situation generally and we talked to china years ago when i was in the state department about having a cyber hotline and it turns out there are some quote unquote hotlines with china that never get answered and that is not a hotline, that is a cold line, you need to have something with reliable communications. but you don't want us misperceptions to happen, you do not want something innocent to be misperceived and ratchet up the extensions. the tensions are there and you have to try to deal with them but at the same time you can use this to segments of the other side to say that to you... i think it does also represent an understanding that increased tension but also underlies the understanding of what the reality is that we need these channels. one problem with china is xi is the one running all
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of china and the rest of the system is so it doesn't make sense to have a hotline with the department or agency, you need to have a hotline the top. agency, you need to have a hotline the to. a“ . agency, you need to have a hotline theto. . ., agency, you need to have a hotline theto. , ., , ., , the top. make sure that the phone is on his desk- — the top. make sure that the phone is on his desk. chris _ the top. make sure that the phone is on his desk. chris painter, _ the top. make sure that the phone is on his desk. chris painter, thank- on his desk. chris painter, thank you very much indeed. large cruise ships are to be banned from sailing into the centre of venice from the beginning of august. the decision comes days before a meeting of the un's cultural organisation unesco, which had proposed to make venice an endangered heritage site. tanya dendrinos reports. it's one of the most iconic cities in the world, where roads are swapped for canals and cars for gondolas. steeped in history and stunningly unique, it's no surprise that venice has long been a jewel in the crown of the cruise industry. but it's come at a cost to the world heritage site, threatening the fragile ecosystem. now after years of hesitation, a landmark decision — the venetian lagoon deemed
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a national monument with an end date placed on these towering cruise liners and their sails through the floating city. translation: it is not going too far to define this day as historic - because after years of waiting from the 1st of august, the big ships will no longer pass in front of st mark's or the giudecca canal. it's a decision awaited by unesco by all the people who've been to venice at least once in their lives who were shocked to see these ships passing through one of the most fragile and beautiful places in the world. it's a big win for locals and environmental activists who've long campaign for the move and puts heritage and environmental interests above the economic interests of the cruise industry and mass tourism. at the government says
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compensation will be provided to affected businesses. a compromise for those setting sail — visiting venice on a different course. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. it is the 14th ofjuly, which means it is bastille day, colourful celebrations taking place today in paris, with the traditional military parade down the champs—elysees. this was the scene a little earlier — some 4,000 soldiers marching past the arc de triomphe, 70 planes and 25 helicopters also took part in the event. of course extra safety measure were in place, measures were in place, but a return to what we have come to expect after the scaled back ceremony last year. the oldest and the largest regular military parade in europe. it was the envy of the former american president donald trump who wanted to create something similar. they will be fireworks tonight in paris. there is the eiffel tower resplendent with the laser going
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around on top. bastille day in paris. hello there. it's funny how quickly weather fortunes can change. if you think about the flash flooding that hit parts of london, kew getting a month's worth of rain on monday, bringing those flooding problems. but really the weather is getting a lot more settled, and the big change in fortunes is partly caused by this lump of warm air pushing its way northwards. what that has helped do is it's helped make thejet stream much more wavy. now, underneath this ridge over the uk, air descends and we get pressure building. but over in europe, we've got a cut—off low that's formed, and that's going to be bringing some torrential thunderstorms. indeed we've already seen some flooding problems and further flash flooding is likely across parts of west germany. but that jet stream configuration, those big waves in the jet stream will increasingly be building this area of high pressure here in the uk. and that becomes a slow—moving feature, hence the weather becoming
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a lot drier and sunnier and warmer over the next few days. so, skies like these much more commonplace. now, for thursday, we will start off with a bit more cloud in the sky across england and wales. the cloud slowly thinning and breaking, but further north, northern ireland and scotland, more in the way of sunshine. and here, it's going to start to feel a good deal warmer given those sunnier conditions. so, temperatures across the eastern side of scotland probably peaking at around 25 degrees celsius. further south, generally low 20s, but if we keep the sunshine across south wales, south west england, again that will be one of the warmest spots with temperatures into the mid—20s. what will follow thursday night is another warm night. now, i'll show you the lowest minimum temperatures, and you can see 15 degrees there for belfast. and for liverpool, it will feel quite a warm night for sleeping for sure. on into friday, that area of high pressure going nowhere very far very fast. for most of england and wales, lots more sunshine to come. for most of england and wales, lots more sunshine to come. a little bit of patchy cloud
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to start the day in the north west. that, again, thinning and breaking with time. and so we'll those temperatures begin to rise further. now friday's highs, 26 degrees in birmingham, in london and in cardiff. 23 in aberdeen, also feeling warm in thatjuly sunshine. the weekend, in many respects, it's more of the same. and then we've got long daytimes at this time of year, of course, and that means we build up the amount of solar radiation building in our atmosphere. and so, those temperatures continue to rise day by day. that's something that we tend to see with these settled spells of weather. so, we're looking at highs of 27 for cardiff and london, 25 at this stage in aberdeen, 22 in belfast. we'll all get some of that warm sunshine. now, there may be a little bit of rain just skirting into the far north west of the uk on sunday, but for most of the country, high pressure's still with us, it's another fine day with prolonged spells of sunshine and it's getting hotter. temperatures could reach 29, perhaps even 30 degrees in the very hottest air across the south of the uk. with that cloudier air in the north west, we've got temperatures here into the low 20s. now, the big question is how long this area of high pressure holds
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on before low pressure starts to come in off the atlantic. it is a question because quite often what we see with these areas of high pressure is the models think that change is going to happen a bit quicker than it is. and what i would say at the moment is that the forecast reliability is pretty good until wednesday next week. after that, ok, the forecast starts to get a little bit more uncertain. so, it's not dead sure that we'll see rain arriving. we could see the area of high pressure holding on that bit longer and the dry weather lasting that bit longer as well. it's something we'll just have to keep an eye on over the next few days, but you canjoine me at the same time tomorrow and we'll have another look. that's the latest.
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the stop—start summer for english holiday—makers continues, as three of spain's most popular holiday islands go on the amber list. anyone over 18 not fully vaccinated will now have to quarantine on return from ibiza, majorca and menorca, throwing some people's plans into turmoil. people want a holiday but they want a holiday with confidence and they need clarity. i think that's what they are not getting at the minute. it comes as doctors here warn of a steep rise in covid cases in some areas, with new daily infections topping 40,000 for the first time since mid—january. also tonight... jadon sancho speaks out, saying hate will never win, after receiving online racist abuse over his missed penalty in the euros final.
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in south africa, a mother's desperate action to save her baby,

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