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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 14, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... leaders in the north east of england put pressure on the prime minister, as they call on him to keep national rules on face coverings on public transport. it comes after the mayor of london made them mandatory on public transport in the capital. most covid rules are set to be lifted in wales on seventh august— but facemasks will still be required in most indoor public places. the government confirms its planning to end all prosecutions related to the troubles in northern ireland before 1998. victims�* groups claim it amounts to an amnesty for killers. we know that the prospect of the end of criminal prosecutions will be difficult for some to accept and this is not a position that we take lightly.
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but we have come to the view that this is the best and only way to facilitate an effective information retrieval and provision process and the best way to help northern ireland move further along the road to reconciliation. borisjohnson promises new measures to deal with racism in football — including banning from matches fans who racially abuse players. and britney spears�* battle to end the conservatorship that has controlled her life for 13 years goes back to court in los angeles. there's growing confusion about the guidance on wearing face coverings to prevent the spread of coronavirus.
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it will continue to be compulsory on public transport in london, but not in the rest of england from monday, when restrictions are lifted. london's mayor, sadiq khan, says the rule should have been retained throughout the country. the mayor of the west midlands says he is "expecting" passengers on all forms of public transport in the west midlands to wear face coverings. in scotland, masks still have to be worn for now in enclosed spaces, and in wales, face—coverings will remain mandatory on public transport and in health care settings. our transport correspondent caroline davies reports. whether a mask is a must orjust recommended when busy will depend where you are travelling on public transport from monday. in london, you will need to wear one to travel on all of transport for london's services or risk being turned away or removed. wearing a facemask indoors reduces the chances of transmission, don'tjust take my word for it, the government's own advisers sage say that, as do the world health organisation but also, speaking to transport
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workers, the trade unions, londoners, businesses, wearing a facemask gives greater public confidence. what do londoners make up their decision? for people who don't want to use it, they feel they are fine without a facemask, i think they should just carry on without it but if you don't feel safe, just use it. i think a common—sense approach is to keep it on, i think most people will do that. everybody is a bit scared still, aren't they? - if facemasks make people feel safer, we should do it. - tfl is the first operator to do this. the mayor of manchester has said he has not ruled it out for the city's tram network and in gateshead the local council had asked the government for powers to enforce it on all seven of the north—east council services too. in scotland, masks will continue to be mandated on board public transport and wales are likely to do the same. but, despite the differing attitudes, the government is keeping
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to its policy that it is personal responsibility, not a law. it is common sense, when you think about it, you will be in a crowded area and transport organisations are welcome, as i said last week, to make it a condition of carriage in the same way that other rules are done in that way. although many unions welcomed london's decision, there are concerns by some that it will leave staff in a difficult position and could lead to disputes. the majority of bus and train operators in england are expected to just encourage passengers to wear a mask when services are busy, not as a condition of travel. transport operators are also weighing up how requiring a mask to be worn on board might make people feel about travelling on public transport. the mayor of london says he thinks it will give people more confidence but other operators are not so certain. we think the trains probably don't need to be tarred with a brush that they are somehow less safe than other indoor settings, we don't think that is helpful for the long—term recovery
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of getting people back onto public transport. as restrictions lift around the uk, once again, the face of the pandemic will look different depending on where you are. caroline davies, bbc news. we arejust going we are just going from heathrow airport in fact that a spokesman there has said they are going to continue to make it mandatory to wear a face covering at the airports after the 19th ofjuly. they say airports are unique environments with an international passenger profile. that's why face coverings were mandatory at heathrow before the government may them a legal requirement, they will continue to be mandatory at the airport after the 19th ofjuly as well. that's the latest from heathrow. let's also take a look for you at the latest coronavirus figures for the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. another 42,302 new infections have been recorded — that's the highest number of new cases since 15th january. 49 people have died in the latest 24—hour period.
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that's those who've died within 28 days of a positive covid test. on to vaccinations. just over 46 million people have received their first dose of a covid vaccine. and more than 35 million people have now received two doses — that means two thirds of uk adults are fully vaccinated. the health secretary sajid javid has been speaking about this latest milestone. wow, wow, more wow, more than two and three adults across the uk have now had their second dose of the vaccine. this is a significant milestone in our vaccination programme. already the best in the world. this is building up best in the world. this is building up our vaccine while, our huge vaccine while, giving us the protection that we all want to see which has already meant, according to the latest numbers we have to do some 8 million people have not been infected because of the vaccine. it saved 30,000 lives. and i think that
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just speaks to the huge success of our programme, the strength of the union, how we can all work together on this, and we have got more to do. we want more people to come forward, but i think at this point, we can mark this milestone and really think about the huge wall of defence we've collectively built together. the government has confirmed plans to bring forward legislation to ban all prosecutions related to the troubles in northern ireland. the secretary of state brandon lewis has told parliament the decision is "the best way to help northern ireland move further along the road to reconciliation." let's take a look at the three proposals in the white paper. a statute of limitations, which is a law preventing legal proceedings being taken after a certain period of time, would end all prosecutions of ex—paramilitaries and former members of the security services in troubles—related cases. the proposals also include plans for a new independent body to focus on the recovery and provision of information about troubles—related deaths and most serious injuries. brandon lewis said another proposal included a "major oral
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history initiative�*. he said it would create opportunities for people from all backgrounds to share their experiences and perspectives related to the troubles, in which three ——2,500 people lost their lives. let�*s hear more of what the secretary of state has been saying in parliament ——3,500 people lost their lives. let�*s hear more of what the secretary of state has been saying in parliament if we fail to act now, to properly address, acknowledge and account for the legacy of the troubles, we will be condemning current and future generations to yet further division, preventing reconciliation of both the individual and societal level. mr speaker, that is why i am today laying before this house and publishing a paper that proposes a series of measures to address the legacy of the past in northern ireland. these proposals are being considered as part of an ongoing and an important engagement process, which i announced alongside the irish government, the british irish intergovernmental conference last month. as set out in the framework, which we publish at the same time, this engagement process is committed
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to involving notjust the uk and irish governments and the northern ireland parties but also those directly affected by the troubles and expert and members of committees in this house on the other place. the objective of this engagement is to deal with legacy issues in a way that supports information recovery and reconciliation, complies fully with international human rights obligations and responds to the needs of individual victims and survivors, as well as society as a whole. labour has accused the government of putting its own party political interests before the country in its plans for an "amnesty" on the troubles in northern ireland. society, the peace process in general, remain so fragile precisely because the pain runs so deep. it is why any proposal to deal with legacy must have victims and the communities of northern ireland at its heart. that requires real care from the secretary of state. so it is deeply regrettable
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that his approach has already seen trust among victims reach rock bottom. victims have been treated appallingly over the last 18 months. promises made, torn up, gaslighted by the secretary of state at this dispatch box. little wonder that many have greeted today�*s proposals with deep scepticism and question whether it is more an exercise in shoring up narrow party support than it is in delivering the reconciliation the communities of northern ireland crave. lord dannatt was head of the british army and now a member of the house of lords, he gave us his view on the government�*s proposals. there is this issue of unresolved decks, _ there is this issue of unresolved decks, and — there is this issue of unresolved decks, and i think the proposal to have _ decks, and i think the proposal to have a _ decks, and i think the proposal to have a statute of limitations, not ideal. _ have a statute of limitations, not ideal. i_ have a statute of limitations, not ideal, i would like the least worst option. _ ideal, i would like the least worst
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option. but— ideal, i would like the least worst option, but it does provide opportunity for families to know what _ opportunity for families to know what happened and have some degree of closure _ what happened and have some degree of closure about the loss of their loved _ of closure about the loss of their loved ones. and this inquiry process will be _ loved ones. and this inquiry process will be able — loved ones. and this inquiry process will be able to go forward in a much freer_ will be able to go forward in a much freer fashion for people who have been _ freer fashion for people who have been questioned but feel they well run the _ been questioned but feel they well run the risk of incriminating themselves are incriminating their friends _ themselves are incriminating their friends and running the risk of being — friends and running the risk of being charged and being prosecuted because _ being charged and being prosecuted because we have seen with the collapse — because we have seen with the collapse of recent trials that trying — collapse of recent trials that trying to _ collapse of recent trials that trying to get admissible evidence to follow— trying to get admissible evidence to follow a _ trying to get admissible evidence to follow a resolution through the courts — follow a resolution through the courts just follow a resolution through the courtsjust isn't follow a resolution through the courts just isn't working. follow a resolution through the courtsjust isn't working. so follow a resolution through the courts just isn't working. so the statute — courts just isn't working. so the statute of— courts just isn't working. so the statute of limitations to have an open _ statute of limitations to have an open fact—finding process i think is to be _ open fact—finding process i think is to be welcomed as a way of trying to -et to be welcomed as a way of trying to gel closure _ to be welcomed as a way of trying to get closure for many of these so far unresolved — get closure for many of these so far unresolved decks and issues arising from the _ unresolved decks and issues arising from the troubles. that was lord dan edgecomb at about half past, we will be talking to alan mcbride, his wife and father—in—law where killed in 1993 shaggy hill road bomb. we will be
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getting his reaction to those governments proposals. let�*s go back to the row over racism and football. all those racist attacks for those penalty messes for the final against italy. wejust penalty messes for the final against italy. we just had a statement and from one of the three hill next a penalty. quite a long statement. i willjust redo part of that. he said he�*s had a couple of days to reflect on sunday�*s final. still feels a mix of emotions. would like to say sorry to all of my tenets, coaching staff, most about the fans who had let down. it�*s the worst feeling i�*ve felt in a long time. it�*s hard to even put into words the real feeling, but there were so many positives to take away from the tournament, though the defeat will hurt for a long time, he says. my first thoughts before going into any football match is how can i help my team? i going to assist? how will i score? how will i create chances? and that is exactly what i wanted to do with that penalty, help the team.
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he goes on to say i was ready and confident to take it. these are the moments you dream up as a kid, it�*s why i play football. these are the pressured situations you want to be as a footballer. i�*ve squared penalties before a club level, i�*ve in countless times for club and country, i picked my corner, but it wasn�*t meant to be this time. we all have the same ambitions and objectives, we wanted to bring the chirpy home. this has been one of the most enjoyable camps i have been part of my career so far, the togetherness of the team has been unmatched, realfamily on togetherness of the team has been unmatched, real family on and off the pitch. i�*m not gonna pretend, he says, that did not see the racial abuse that to me and my brothers, marcus rash guard received after the game, but sadly it�*s nothing new. as a society, we need to do better and hold these people accountable. finally, he goes on to say, hate will never win, to all of the young
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people who have received similar abuse, hold your heads up high and keep chasing the dream. i am proud of the singling team and how we have united the whole nation in what has been a difficult i8 united the whole nation in what has been a difficult 18 months for so many people. much as they wanted to win the tournament, we will build and learn from this experience going forward. i want to say a massive thank you to all for the positive messages of love and support fire outweighing the negative. it�*s been an honour, as always, representing england and wearing the three lines shared. so that is his statement just condemning those who have racially abused him and his fellow players, but also talking about his pride in playing for the shirt and playing for england in that tournament. the prime minister has promised action to deal with racism in football.
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he says fans who racially abuse players online will be banned from matches — �*no if, no buts, no excuses�*. he also threatened to fine social media companies 10% of their global revenues if they fail to deal with racial abuse and hate online. but in the commons, the labour sir keir starmer accused borisjohnson of failing to condemn those who boo players when they take the knee. 0ur political correspondent ben wright has the latest. taking a stand against racism at wembley on sunday. england took the knee before every game of the european championship, but, following defeat in the final, there was a torrent of racist online abuse against three of the teen�*s black players. in withington, a mural of marcus rashford was defaced before being covered up. and, in the commons this lunchtime, borisjohnson said there would be action taken. what we are doing is today taking practical steps to ensure that the football banning order regime is changed, so that if you are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online of footballers then you will not be going to the match, no ifs, no buts, no exemptions and no excuses. but some in the england
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squad say the government should have done more to support their stand against racism. the defender tyrone mings accused the home secretary priti patel of stoking the fire after she previously called taking the knee gesture politics. some tory mps and activists have said their party has ended up on the wrong side of the issue. i think it has been difficult for many people on our side of the house to see the distinction between their very good and proper reasons as to why footballers take their knee and the supporters agree with them taking the knee and, unfortunately, some of the stranger views, as some of the black lives matter organisations, which i don�*t agree with at all. at prime minister�*s questions leader said borisjohnson had failed to condemn the fans who booed the england team. the prime minister has tried
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to stoke the culture war and they have realised they are on the wrong side and now they hope no one has noticed. why else would a conservative mp boast that he is not watching his own team? why else would another conservative mp say that marcus rashford spends too much time playing politics when he is actually trying to feed children the government won�*t? i don't want to engage in a political culture war of any kind, i want to get on with delivering for the people of this country. he simply wants to get on with dithering. the snp�*s westminster leader asked if there were systemic racism in the uk? i do think that racism is a problem in the united kingdom and i believe it needs to be tackled and it needs to be stamped out. the racial abuse that followed sunday�*s final has been met with condemnation far beyond westminster, but it has underscored the issue footballers
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have been protesting about and has kicked it right back into the centre of politics. ben wright, bbc news. labour mayors from regions across england are meeting now in a virtual press conference to discuss the wearing of face coverings on public transport. we have already heard from the mayor of london that that is going to be mandatory, even after restrictions are listed on the 19th. we are hearing we are hearing from liverpool, and the west of england as well who is speaking here, tablets and.— as well who is speaking here, tablets and. _, , . , as well who is speaking here, tablets and. , . , ., tablets and. recovery in the west of en . land tablets and. recovery in the west of england and — tablets and. recovery in the west of england and getting _ tablets and. recovery in the west of england and getting people - tablets and. recovery in the west of england and getting people here - tablets and. recovery in the west of. england and getting people here back to normal. i have written to the planets are today, because i get this is a ridiculous mismatch right across the uk. my constituents get on buses and trains for the rest of england into wales and london, every single day, and yet when they get off and the other hand, there will be completely different roles come it�*s too confusing, it�*s not safe
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because of the confusion. i will do the next best thing i can which is launch a campaign to encourage mask wearing here in the west of england, evenif wearing here in the west of england, even if the government are not prepared to take control properly and lead like they should. anything i can do to restore confidence among an anxious public where that national government is not taking ownership is to do what i can do, but i�*m afraid there are powers, and it�*s up silly and crazy that people should be made unsure and uncertain at such an important time during the pandemic. at such an important time during the andemic. ~ ., , ., at such an important time during the andemic. ~ ., ,, ~' at such an important time during the andemic. ~ ., ,, ., .,~ , pandemic. would you like to take us throu~h. .. pandemic. would you like to take us through- -- so _ pandemic. would you like to take us through... so that _ pandemic. would you like to take us through... so that is _ pandemic. would you like to take us through... so that isjust _ pandemic. would you like to take us through... so that isjust a - pandemic. would you like to take us through... so that isjust a flavour i through... so that is just a flavour of thatched press conference with some of the labour mayors around england talking about what they want to happen after restrictions are lifted in england. that�*s next mondayjuly the 19th. it can also go to cardiff now, because there is a news conference at the first
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minister, mark drakeford, who is speaking to the press. the government in wales has announced that almost all corona baris —— coronavirus restrictions and miles will be lifted next month, but it will be lifted next month, but it will remain in not to wear a facemask on public transport and most indoor settings. wales is going to move to level zero on august the 7th, so let�*s just listen and. ladle 7th, so let's 'ust listen and. we have had 7th, so let'sjust listen and. - have had room to complete the alert level one changes in indoor places, which we prized four weeks ago. on the side you see, it will show the changes we are making. from this coming saturday the 17th ofjuly come up to six people will be able to meet indoors in private homes and and holiday accommodation. 0rganised indoor events for up to 1000 people seated or 200 people standing can
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take place, provided a risk assessment has been completed and implemented. i strengths will be able to be the regulations will also change to allow up to 30 children from organisations such as the brownies and scouts to attend residential activity centres over the summer holidays. and we conclude that we can go one step further outdoors we will remove the limits on the number of people who can gather outdoor is and they air will be more flexibility around social distancing, both from the 17th of july. now, we are doing all of this because the scientific evidence continues to tell us, as it has throughout the pandemic that the risk of transmission outdoors is much lower than indoors, and at the same time, we want us all to be able
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to take advantage of the summer months. this will be wales�* first step into the new alert level zero. we will move into that alert level as we always have and a careful, phased way. 0utdoors fairest on the 17th ofjuly, and if the public health position allows, we will complete the move and the 7th of august. now, waiting until the 7th of august will allow us to continue to increase vaccination coverage, and we expect that by the 7th of august, 85% of all adults in wales will have had both doses of the vaccine, and we could do better than that. there is enough vaccine in the system. there are enough venues
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open, including walk—up venues to allow us to get beyond that 85% threshold. now, the new alert level zero has been designed to maximise our personal freedoms. there will be no legal limit on the number of people who can meet, including private homes, public places or at events. all businesses and premises including nightclubs will be open. but i want to be very clear with everybody about this. this is not a free—for—all. in wales, we will not abandon those simple but effective and successful measures that have helped to keep us all safe. they will continue to be some important protections, especially important for those who are clinically and two
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are perhaps the most anxious about an of restrictions. we will continue, therefore, to ensure an players protects both workers and customers. coronavirus risk assessments will continue to be a legal requirement here in wales for all businesses, and players, and events organisers. and reasonable measures will need to be put into place based on the risks identified. even at alert level zero, we expect people to continue to work from home wherever that is possible. face coverings will continue to be a legal requirement here in wales on public transport, and health and care settings and in indoor public places other than education and
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hospitality. 0uraim places other than education and hospitality. our aim will be gradually to ease these restrictions as the public health risks decreases. now, we will make two further changes to the rules both in relation to the need to self isolates if you have been fully vaccinated. i deeply regret the uk government�*s decision to remove the requirement for adults who have been fully vaccinated to the self—isolate when returning to countries on the amber last. the risk of re—importing that virus or a new variant of the virus is real, but we have no practical alternative but to follow. it would be untenable, as the chief medical officer says, for wales to adopt a different border health policy. nevertheless, everyone... ladle policy. nevertheless, everyone... we will 'ust policy. nevertheless, everyone... we willjust leave the first minister of wales who is announcing that most
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coronavirus restrictions in wales will be lifted on august the 7th. let�*s go back to andy burnham, the mayor of greater manchester, that needs conference, online news conference of mayors, he hasjust conference, online news conference of mayors, he has just been announcing that actually, facemasks will be compulsory on all metrolink tram services and greater manchester, but he doesn�*t have the power to make them mandatory on trains and buses. let�*s listen and. from the virus to the virus, you have got to think for and foremost about them when you are making policy, and as i say, i have heard their voices. policy, and as i say, i have heard theirvoices. i policy, and as i say, i have heard their voices. i thought the government was going to do a u—turn on monday and they didn�*t. so we now really have had to confront the position, and obviously, we were already thinking about going further, obviously, the male until the next mayor of london has done that last night, and now it feels the right thing to do. by doing it
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together with my fellow mayors, we are bringing much—needed clarity, so this is a very confusing situation for people. so this is an appeal of the public to greater manchester. you have supported nesta throughout the pandemic and let me put the college, we have rallied to add. we are saying, again, this is about protecting those people who are most vulnerable and whose lives will be severely impacted actually connect things carry on they are. they feel they can�*t go any more. that�*s just not right, we are not a region that accepts that kind of treatment of people who are in that position, so i do ask people, please, listen to what i am saying and why i am saying it. support those people to get out and about scale, where your mask, it�*s a minor inconvenience for all of us, but actually commit allows all of us to reopen next week and i would still want to reopen many next week, but it allows us to do that with a bit more safety and a bit more assurance that people who are most at risk. i more assurance that people who are
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most at risk-— most at risk. i will answer the second part — most at risk. i will answer the second part of _ most at risk. i will answer the second part of the _ most at risk. i will answer the second part of the question, i most at risk. i will answer the - second part of the question, which was about— second part of the question, which was about frustrating decisions on face coverings by people that we have _ face coverings by people that we have to — face coverings by people that we have to work with. i don't think people — have to work with. i don't think people fully appreciate just how difficult — people fully appreciate just how difficult the public system is in this country, the public transport system — this country, the public transport system. it's a deregulated bus system, — system. it's a deregulated bus system, and that is why city kind in london _ system, and that is why city kind in london can— system, and that is why city kind in london can do what he is doing because — london can do what he is doing because that was the only part of the country where the tories decided not to— the country where the tories decided not to deregulate, so they have a regulated — not to deregulate, so they have a regulated system, and that means that he _ regulated system, and that means that he has the powers to do those sorts _ that he has the powers to do those sorts of— that he has the powers to do those sorts of things, and we've just recently— sorts of things, and we've just recently gone through elections where _ recently gone through elections where myself and andy and other mayors _ where myself and andy and other mayors got overwhelming mandates for our areas. _ mayors got overwhelming mandates for ourareas, and mayors got overwhelming mandates for our areas, and yet, mayors got overwhelming mandates for ourareas, and yet, we mayors got overwhelming mandates for our areas, and yet, we don't have the power— our areas, and yet, we don't have the power is — our areas, and yet, we don't have
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the power is to decide on what the best interest of our local population is on public transport. he asked — population is on public transport. he asked about how difficult it was to convince our training bus operator~ _ to convince our training bus operator. it's actually proved to be very difficult, and i will continue to do— very difficult, and i will continue to do what— very difficult, and i will continue to do what i can do, so we will be asking _ to do what i can do, so we will be asking for— to do what i can do, so we will be asking for her face coverings. but my appeal— asking for her face coverings. but my appeal is to those operators come and talk— my appeal is to those operators come and talk to— my appeal is to those operators come and talk to us properly and listen to what— and talk to us properly and listen to what our concerns are and see if we can— to what our concerns are and see if we can come — to what our concerns are and see if we can come to an agreement. we will leave those mayors. _ we can come to an agreement. we will leave those mayors. the _ we can come to an agreement. we will leave those mayors. the mayors - we can come to an agreement. we will leave those mayors. the mayors of. leave those mayors. the mayors of those regions in england, and they have been issuing a joint plea to the government to make mask rang compulsory on all public transport after the 19th ofjuly next monday when restrictions in england come to an end. there is going to be a
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patchwork we heard that the mayor of london is going to keep making it mandatory on public transport in london to wear a mask, the mayor of greater manchester has as andy burnham just said, it will match you to wear a mask on metrolink train services, which he has power over those, but he doesn�*t have power over buses and trains in greater manchester. you can�*t make it mandatory, and in west yorkshire there, the mayor there has that it will be mandatory about stations but again doesn�*t have the power to make it mandatory on trains and on buses, but will be at bus stations. a bit of a patchwork wealth, slightly confusing picture starting to emerge around different parts of england and in terms of whether wearing any facemask is compulsory or not. rights, very busy afternoon. let�*s pause and catch up on the weather now.
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hello, there. well, for most of us with the weather is going to be fine and dry through the rest of the day today. it is across england and wales that we have the best of the day�*s sunshine. the exception, parts of east anglia, but even here it will eventually turn a bit brighter. quite a lot of cloud across most areas of scotland, and certainly cloudier through the afternoon in northern ireland and the odd patch of rain working into the scottish islands, but nothing heavy. the highest temperatures reaching a high up to 25 in both london and cardiff, as well. it will feel warm in thejuly sunshine. 0vernight tonight, cloud will tend to spread in from the north—west, and as that cloud works its way in, it will trap the day�*s heat in, so it�*s going to be quite a warm night. these are the lowest temperatures we will see by the end of the night, about 12 to even 16 there in liverpool. now, tomorrow, there will be more cloud in the sky across england and wales, but it should thin and break as we go through the afternoon, with some sunshine. much more in the way of sunshine for most of the day in scotland, and here it is going to be a good deal warmer, with temperatures locally reaching a high of around 25. that�*s your weather.
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hello this is bbc news . the headlines. leaders in the north east of england put pressure on the prime minister, as they call on him to keep national rules on face coverings on public transport. it comes after the mayor of london made them mandatory on public transport in the capital. most covid rules are set to be lifted in wales on 7th august— but face masks will still be required in most indoor public places. the government plans to end all prosecutions related to violence in northern ireland before the good friday peace deal more than two decades ago. the good friday peace deal more have been widely condemned. the good friday peace deal more victims�* groups claim it amounts to an amnesty for killers. borisjohnson promises new measures to deal with racism in football — including banning from matches fans who racially abuse players.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good evening. the british and irish lions have had a major boost before their first test against south africa next week. tour captain alun wynjones will return to the squad, despite dislocating his shoulder just over two weeks ago. he is flying out to south africa tomorrow to join the team. they face the biggest challenge yet. they take on cape town at seven p:m.. no doubt the news aboutjones will be a huge boost. it�*sjust 18 days since he suffered that dislocation and that warm up match with japan. many artists war was over. tess kept her name to this on his resume training with wales in the last week and following that return to training only this morning medical staff have passed him to return. we
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understand is going out on thursday and this is going to create a huge buzz around the lions. no doubt will really increase pressure on the test side. that first task will be under way a week on saturday. in the last few minutes the man in the yellow jersey, the man you see in the yellowjersey first to the summit. on the hardest, steepest stage of the race means the defending champion has extended his lead to five minutes and 39 seconds. for stages to go. the ineos grenadiers team finished behind to move up to second and third in the overall stages. rafael benitez says he�*s been "accepted" by the majority raphael bonita says he�*s been excepted after taking over as manager despite his previous links with rivals liverpool. the spaniard held his first press conference earlier after signing as manager this summer. we spent almost six
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years with liverpool guiding them to champions league and fa cup titles but now he says he�*s determined to fight for everton, a club that is getting bigger and bigger. the evertonians around my place, they are quite happy and they are very supportive, even the liverpudlians were accepting that it is a chance and an opportunity for me to come back to the premier league, to compete for something. so it was quite good, we can talk about one or two people, we never know, so then i think it is better to talk about being positive, how a lot of people were encouraging me to do well and i am happy with that. elsewhere nine of the cricketers forced to isolate after the return on on 20 on packets on that starts friday. morgan will lead decide. that does mean a lot of the
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makeshift team that sealed a three — zero miss out. however a mood is one of the few that keeps his place. mood is one of the few that keeps his place. it has been a special week. to put in consistent performances has been great. after that was to keep backing up performances and keep putting in those performances and show some consistency and i am glad i did that in the end. a week ago no one was talking about me, i was not part of the squad. everything has happened very quickly and i am just trying to take it in my stride a little bit. final preparations are under way at royal st george�*s ahead of the start of golf�*s open championship tomorrow. and englishman lee westwood will be hoping not to create his own bit of history at royal st george�*s this week. the former world number one would overtake jay haas�* record for the most major appearances without a victory should he be unable to lift
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the claretjug on sunday. and although the course has got the better of him before, he�*s feeling pretty confident. before we go in the last half an hour england made failure to enact midfielderjadon sancho has posted in social media that hate will never win. afterfinding himself a target of online abuse following his penalty shoot—out minutes on sunday zero 2020 final. there is lots more on that story on the bbc sports website and of course we will have more for you on sports day at half past six. it is intending to bring forward legislation to ban all prosecutions related to the troubles, related to incidents before 1998, the good friday agreement. speaking of prime minister�*s questions borisjohnson minister�*s questions boris johnson said minister�*s questions borisjohnson said the legacy proposals would allow northern island to draw a line
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under the troubles. let�*s talk about this now let�*s talk about i�*m joined now by alan mcbride — alan lost his wife and father—in—law in the shankill bombing and is the coordinator of the wave trauma centre in belfast. alan thank you forjoining me. the government is saying this will draw a line under the troubles, is that how you see a? hat draw a line under the troubles, is that how you see a?— that how you see a? not at all. i think the only _ that how you see a? not at all. i think the only thing _ that how you see a? not at all. i think the only thing that - that how you see a? not at all. i think the only thing that will - that how you see a? not at all. i l think the only thing that will draw a line under the troubles would be the investigation into what happened in the past so the families can get the answers to questions that they will have. this notion that we can somehow come up media and go away and forget about it is simply not acceptable. the government have a huge mandate at west ministers of the probably going to be able to carry these measures through. but i know from talking with survivors here all the political parties, i don�*t know of anybody, very few that support these current proposals
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being suggested by the british government. the being suggested by the british government-— being suggested by the british covernment. ., ,._ being suggested by the british covernment. ., , government. the government say this won't stop victims _ government. the government say this won't stop victims families _ government. the government say this won't stop victims families getting - won�*t stop victims families getting answers but they also say that northern ireland secretary saying a mystery in the commons that prosecutions under the criminal justice system, theyjust don�*t work because these cases are too old, the evidence is too inadmissible, it�*s just not really practical to bring prosecutions. i just not really practical to bring prosecutions.— just not really practical to bring rosecutions. , ., ., prosecutions. i accept some of that. i think prosecutions. i accept some of that. i think that — prosecutions. i accept some of that. i think that prosecutions _ prosecutions. i accept some of that. i think that prosecutions are - i think that prosecutions are difficult and i don�*t know ofjute many survivors that actually hold out that much hope for getting a prosecution and even if they do so the amount of time that people will spend will only be a couple years. that doesn�*t mean to say these crimes should not be investigated because i think he is seriously deluded. but if he is serious that by taking prosecutions off the table that all of a sudden everybody�*s gonna engage in this huge love in
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around northern ireland and the gonna come forward and fess up to things that happened in the ghetto tell the truth at all that, i think he�*s living in a fools paradise. the only thing that�*s going to get to the truth is a proper and thorough investigation. 0peration canova has borne testimony to that. john is going through the process in his statements which in ira operatives. he has 30 cases is presented to the prosecution. those cases may or may not end up in a court of law but i do know that the families that have engaged with that operation have got answers to questions that they never thought that they would get. that is certainly not going to be the case if brandon lewis and borisjohnson, the british governments suddenly take away the very hope of an investigation ofjustice off the table. personally speaking, it�*s not acceptable and i don�*t think it�*s going to work. tell
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acceptable and i don't think it's going to work-— acceptable and i don't think it's going to work. tell us a bit about our own going to work. tell us a bit about your own experience _ going to work. tell us a bit about your own experience was - going to work. tell us a bit about your own experience was of - going to work. tell us a bit about your own experience was of you | your own experience was of you suffered so previously when you lost your wife and your father—in—law. and the shaky 0bama attack was one of the most horrendous atrocity —— shane hill. i think nine people died in the bombing. do you think that a proper and rigorous investigative and judicial investigation into what happened? it and judicial investigation into what ha - ened? . , , and judicial investigation into what hauened? , ., happened? it was extremely important the are happened? it was extremely important they are actually _ happened? it was extremely important they are actually ten _ happened? it was extremely important they are actually ten people _ happened? it was extremely important they are actually ten people killed. - they are actually ten people killed. 0f they are actually ten people killed. of course the person that carried the bomb into the shop, his accomplice a guy called sean kelly was caught in jail. whenever the driver, we never got the people. i think it�*s a well—known fact that the two young people that carried out the bombing were very vulnerable. they were young people who were very manipulated by the movement to carry out the atrocity. i don�*t think they were ever meant to walk away with from it. at least
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we got some justice in seven years for telling all of those people. what i got for myself i would like for others. it�*s very, very hard to be with other victim survivors as i am very every day. and many of them have never had justice and to certainly say well that�*s it, the government are just closing shop, they are pulling down these investigations and just dry your eyes and go away. it�*s a very very hard message to deliver. i did with the government are really saying to each other as the death of your loved ones doesn�*t matter. but the people that carried out these horrendous crimes against your family that what they did doesn�*t matter. can you imagine any scenario where the british government would be telling the victims of the islamic terrorism that bombings or whatever and 30 years time to just forget about the things, pretend they never happen just go away and shut up? itjust will not be acceptable i suspected the majority of people on the british and is unacceptable here either. thank you for talkinu unacceptable here either. thank you
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for talking to — unacceptable here either. thank you for talking to us. _ unacceptable here either. thank you for talking to us. i _ unacceptable here either. thank you for talking to us. i know _ unacceptable here either. thank you for talking to us. i know it _ unacceptable here either. thank you for talking to us. i know it must - for talking to us. i know it must always be difficult to relive the horrors of what happened. alan mcbride whose wife and father—in—law were killed in the 1993 shane killed 0bama attack. —— shane killed. kent mccallum says we must be alert to the possibility that terrorists would exploit the absence of nato forces in the country. a security correspondent reports. afg ha n afghan government forces largely on their own or struggling to hold back their own or struggling to hold back the intelligence two taliban insurgents. that�*s prompting the resurgence of al-qaeda training he has. it�*s possible that the mi five security services acutely aware of as its director general delivered his speech today. afghanistan is re—emerging as a potential source of international terrorist threats.
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that�*s according to the director of general of mi five here. he says the last 20 years that fred has been largely suppressed. with western forces withdrawing there is a risk of terrorist training camps reestablishing themselves posing a direct threat to the west. has reestablishing themselves posing a direct threat to the west.— direct threat to the west. as nato and us forces _ direct threat to the west. as nato and us forces now _ direct threat to the west. as nato and us forces now withdraw - direct threat to the west. as nato i and us forces now withdraw terrorist will seek to take advantage of opportunities including propaganda opportunities including propaganda opportunities to rebuild. for the s and for ourselves the counter terrorist attack will transition. countering terrorist attacks like they want a fish mongers hall in 2019 is still a top priority for mi five. but as well as his limit inspired plots the security service is tracking a rise in far right extremism. much of the activity is online and the director made a plea to the internet tech giant to allow mi five access to suspect individuals encrypted communications. racism at football matches he said is something that
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can feed into that extremism. mi five was acutely aware of it. but the biggest change comes with the growth in circles state—sponsored threats. russia, china and iran are all mentioned with activities ranging from cyber attacks to interference in elections to plots to kill like the 2018 nerve agent attack on a former kgb officer in salisbury. state espionage said the director general also extended to stealing britain�*s cutting—edge scientific research this wasn�*tjust a threat to government he said it was something that affected everyone in britain. frank is with me now. let�*s talk about afghanistan for as well. in a sense that�*s why american troops went in there after 9/11 because of al-qaeda training camps there when the taliban were in power. are we going full circle back to that potentially?— to that potentially? there is at risk. the decision _
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to that potentially? there is at risk. the decision was - to that potentially? there is at| risk. the decision was triggered to that potentially? there is at - risk. the decision was triggered by president biden who said enough is enough, we can stay there forever, were pulling out. once america pulled out his forces there was no way the brain and other native forces could say. they are all going or have gone. and this is posing a huge intelligence headache for western agencies like mi five, mi six, the cia and so on. they do worry that as the taliban takes more territory that will create a benign environment for al-qaeda, territory that will create a benign environment foral-qaeda, isis territory that will create a benign environment for al-qaeda, isis and other extreme is to rebuild terrorist training camps where they can attract foreign recruits, train them up and send them back to attack targets around the west in the world. ., ., . ., ., world. you touched on some of the other issues _ world. you touched on some of the other issues that _ world. you touched on some of the other issues that are _ world. you touched on some of the other issues that are keeping - world. you touched on some of the other issues that are keeping the i other issues that are keeping the boss of mi five awake at night, just run us through them. fine boss of mi five awake at night, 'ust run us through themi run us through them. one was the football actually _ run us through them. one was the football actually where _ run us through them. one was the football actually where he - run us through them. one was the | football actually where he admitted that he did support scotland, being a scotsman. that was the only match he did support them on that he didn�*t sport england on. counterespionage, state threat is the big emerging thing. they are very concerned about interference of
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russia, china and iran. they are aiming to double their budget, the resources on this. and this is really ranging, everything from internet cyber attacks to interference particularly stealing intellectual property, something they are really concerned about. far right extremism is a big worry, that�*s a big growth area as they learn more about it. one of the really troubling things there is the high prevalence of teenagers expressing really violent views on online forums. most of this is an amount to this, it�*s just aspiration and showing off. but some of it tends to actually prove become real plots and that�*s a way for them. let�*s get more fu now on that welsh government announcement today that is going to lift most covid restrictions on august the 7th but facemasks will still be required on public transport and in most indoor public transport and in most indoor public places. we can get some analysis of that decision with
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doctor sawyer williams. thank you for being with us. do you think the welsh government have got the balance on this about right? i welsh government have got the balance on this about right? i think the have, balance on this about right? i think they have. i _ balance on this about right? i think they have, i think— balance on this about right? i think they have, i think they _ balance on this about right? i think they have, i think they have. - balance on this about right? i think they have, i think they have. i - they have, i think they have. i think they are striking a balance between individual responsibility and choices were seeing with the uk government and their decision in england not shared responsibility with government in terms of government taking some responsibility. i think we will also see the majority of welsh public will actually prefer this genuinely cautious data led approach. certainly that something we see reflected over time in the pandemic where a majority of the welsh public have felt that the welsh public have felt that the welsh government have gotten it about right. up to two thirds or three quarters trust the government much higher in wales than the uk government. the much higher in wales than the uk government-— much higher in wales than the uk government. , , ., ., government. the issue of facemasks is auoin to government. the issue of facemasks is going to cause _ government. the issue of facemasks is going to cause even _ government. the issue of facemasks is going to cause even more - is going to cause even more confusion. we�*ve had different rules and regulations and restrictions throughout the pandemic of course. because of the default administration but now we are
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getting different rules within england, in manchester and west york shire and places. you�*re getting on a train to scotland or wales you don�*t have to wear a face covering in england but as soon as you cross the border potentially you do. it�*s getting rather confusing, isn�*t it? what needs to be done about that? i what needs to be done about that? i think it's getting, and been think it�*s getting, and been confusing for many months in the pandemic. this is almost taking it to a new level of confusion. i think we are seeing regional differences in opinion and england as well. my concern is when we have these different more to voices and mixed messages people don�*t know the best thing to do, they don�*t have a act, no consensual scientific or political voice. this can harm not just the adherence to the measurers where they exist but also potentially for the future it measures where for example when we do have trusted government and the ability for governments to make the right choices at the right time because they do think that what we see in wales is really about timing
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as much as it is about taking the right measures. i think of course people want individual freedom, they want to get their lives back and make individual choices over their behaviors. many do feel that it�*s not the right time. i think facemasks is the example they are. we start a recent survey that 70% were in favour of keeping facemasks at least for the time being. it seems to many people counterintuitive that in the middle of a third wave when we see cases urging that we need more measures. just briefly what do you think the viruses doing in wales in particular at that moment in terms of case rates? ~ ., , , , ., , at that moment in terms of case rates? , , ., , ., rates? we do see very sharp growth in case rates- _ rates? we do see very sharp growth in case rates. of— rates? we do see very sharp growth in case rates. of course _ rates? we do see very sharp growth in case rates. of course people - rates? we do see very sharp growth in case rates. of course people will| in case rates. of course people will perhaps point to the fact that rates in wales and northern ireland and england, the rationale, the point is that they don�*t spread so with all this uncertainty we do see of course the link to hospitalisation being weekend. and so with the uncertainty
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and the growing rates are truly precautionary and cautious approach in policy taking responsibility as the welsh government have done for some measures but you�*re giving back the important things they think people have been craving it like the rule of six and the ability to meet people indoors is an important balance. ,., ., people indoors is an important balance. ., ., ,, ., ., ,, balance. good to talk to you. thank ou ve balance. good to talk to you. thank you very much _ balance. good to talk to you. thank you very much for _ balance. good to talk to you. thank you very much for being _ balance. good to talk to you. thank you very much for being with - balance. good to talk to you. thank you very much for being with us. i you very much for being with us. breaking news on the travel system, the traffic light system in terms of which countries you can do it go too. we�*rejust which countries you can do it go too. we�*re just seeing which countries you can do it go too. we�*rejust seeing now which countries you can do it go too. we�*re just seeing now that the balearic islands old now your current, i�*ll be there in minorca again to be taken off the green list. they are going back to the amber list. as monday at for clock in the morning. british virgin islands also going to the amber list. bulgaria and hong kong moving to the green list and croatia and
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taiwan also going to the green list. several countries going to the red list cuba, indonesia, miramarand sierra leone moving to the red list. which means hotel quarantine for arrivals from those countries. these changes are currently england only. the government is waiting to hear what you kate nations decide on that. you can see on those tweets from the transport secretary we are moving the balearic islands and the virgin islands to the amber list. that is of crucial importance to british taurus. i that is of crucial importance to british taurus.— that is of crucial importance to british taurus. i think we all know b now british taurus. i think we all know by now that _ british taurus. i think we all know by now that travelling _ british taurus. i think we all know by now that travelling at - british taurus. i think we all know by now that travelling at the - british taurus. i think we all know. by now that travelling at the moment is not the same as was before there was a global pandemic. it does mean that people, particularly if your book into a green watchlist country make sure you get the money back and make sure you get the money back and make sure you can rebut your accommodation whenever required. that is really what this demonstrates more than anything else. 0f demonstrates more than anything else. of course hopefully for some
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people children, those under 18 plus people children, those under 18 plus people have been fully vaccinated you won�*t have to quarantine, you can treat it as it is. it will mean i�*m afraid for some people that they will have to come home and they will have to do those ten days of quarantine. four orfive have to do those ten days of quarantine. four or five days to test and release which is still available to everybody. the test and release which is still available to everybody. the 18 euros and those in — available to everybody. the 18 euros and those in our _ available to everybody. the 18 euros and those in our early _ available to everybody. the 18 euros and those in our early twenties? - available to everybody. the 18 euros and those in our early twenties? it l and those in our early twenties? it is clearly more tricky it travelling, they�*ll need to have the flexibility and they�*ll be aware that they might need that flexibility. green list is likely to be a better bet than a green watchlist but again there�*s no guarantees, that�*s true. it�*s a really important reminder to everyone to come forward for the vaccinations. we�*ve seen rates amongst younger people coming forward for the vaccines a bit lower you can and needed to be able to travel for the foreseeable future. you may as well come forward now, get a vaccination done and it will give you one more piece of security
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when you go traveling. britney spears�*s battle to end a controversial conservatorship that has controlled her life for thirteen years goes back to court today. the legal arrangement has given the singer�*s father and others authority over her career and personal life. during a hearing last month britney spears made a passionate case for that to end, describing it �*abusive�*. she claimed the arrangement has forced her to work and take medication against her will and has stoppped herfrom getting married or having a baby. it�*s unclear whether she will appear in court in los angeles for today�*s hearing. 0ur reporter steve holden has been explaining how we got here. three weeks ago, britney spears herself gave evidence to the court, saying she found this conservatorship abusive, stupid and embarrassing, her words. she says she just wants her life back. one thing she does want
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is her own lawyer because the lawyer she has had all this time was court appointed, a guy called samuel ingham, he says he does not want the role any more and she wants new lawyer. reminders, 12 years this has been in place and it controls what? remind us of what she is trying to eradicate. the conservatorship has been placed in 2008 over concerns about her mental health. it is a court order, legal process which means her personal affairs, business affairs, finances, are controlled by largely her father, jamie, and she wants out of that. the only problem is she can�*t do that herself, she has to have a lawyer to argue on her behalf. she has approached this high—profile lawyer in hollywood who will argue today to the court that he should represent her.
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the owness for britney to get out of this conservatorship herself is to say that she can manage herfinances, she can manage her business herself. more legal argument. this is a very long legal process and this is another marker today. you pre—empted me because i was about to say there is still a long way to go. a really long way. the conservatorship is in place until september at least and then again once the lawyer gets involved, that she wants, if she gets appointed it, it is another legal row to go down. but her fans, who are so integral to this, they will be out in force again at the courtroom in la, cheering her on, the free britney movement, which she has seen so much of over the last year, back out in force. it will be interesting to hear what goes on today, another chapter in this long—running, legalsaga for britney spears. steve holden. now it�*s time for a look at the weather. 0ur weather is getting drier, sunnier and warmer over the next few days as pressure rises.
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a fine spell of summer weather just around the corner. the reason it is changing to become much more settled is down to this area of warm air pushing northwards across the atlantic. it has been changing the jet stream pattern. these waves have been getting much bigger. that will build an area of high pressure, but across in europe they get stuck with some low pressure which will bring some nasty storms into western areas of germany and some flash flooding over the next few days. but for us pressure will continue to rise and it is this that will continue to bring us sunny weather. it is all down to those big waves in the jet stream. today from northern england southwards we have got thin cloud that will break up. lots of sunshine for most areas. the cloud across east anglia is slow to thin and break. in east anglia the cloud will build, particularly
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in western areas later today. might even see a few patches of light rain moving in. temperatures at the highest of 25 in london. warm in the dry sunshine. 0vernight that cloudy weather pushes into scotland and northern ireland and sinks southwards. quite a warm night for sleeping. these are the lowest temperatures towards the end of the night. a mild start to the day on thursday, more in the way of cloud moving southwards across england and wales. that will thin and break with sunshine coming out later. in scotland a lot warmer here with temperatures pushing into the mid 20s. we ended the week with the high pressure still dominating the weather picture. more in the way of sunshine across england and wales, but fine for scotland and northern ireland and day by day we will see those temperatures rise. looking at highs of 26 in birmingham, london and cardiff. it will get hotter than that as we head into the weekend. temperatures into the mid
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20s in manchester. the highest temperatures further southwards could reach the very high 20s this weekend.
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at six — summer holiday hopes dashed for thousands as the government moves popular spanish islands to amber. just two weeks after ibiza, majorca and menorca went green, a sharp spike in cases means anyone not fully vaccinated will have to quarantine on return home. a lot of people might say, is it worth the hassle? i think it is causing way too much uncertainty at the moment with too many changes and swapping of the rules. also tonight — with just days to go until england�*s covid restrictions are lifted, another sharp rise in new cases. more than 42,000 recorded in a day as england�*s mayors urge the government to think again about making masks mandatory on public transport. england�*s jadon sancho says hate will never win as he makes his first public comments after racist abuse following the euro 2020 final.

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