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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  July 14, 2021 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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racism in football — the prime minister promises new measures to deal with it. he says fans who racially abuse players will be banned from future games and there'll be big fines for social media companies who fail to tackle online hate. if you are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online - of footballers, then you will not be going to the match. _ no ifs, no buts, no - exemptions and no excuses. we'll have the latest from westminster. also this lunchtime... growing confusion about the rules on facemasks — people in london will still have to wear them on public transport, but, elsewehere in england, they'll no longer be compulsory next week when government restrictions are lifted. speaking to transport workers, the trade unions, londoners, businesses, wearing a facemask
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gives greater confidence. the welsh government says it hopes to lift almost all covid restrictions by the august 7th, but face coverings are to remain compulsory in some indoor places. prince charles warns that letting small, family farms go to the wall will destroy the british countryside. if they go, it will quite simply rip the heart out of the british countryside and break the backbone of britain's rural communities. # with some other girl you knew before and the festival half a century ago they called the black woodstock. lost footage is made into a movie. coming up on the bbc news channel, after isolating because of a covid outbreak, england captain eoin morgan and nine others are back in the side for their t20 series against pakistan.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the prime minister has promised action to deal with racism in football. he says fans who racially abuse players online will be banned from matches — "no ifs, no buts, no excuses." he also threatened to fine social media companies 10% of their global revenues if they fail to deal with racial abuse and hate online. but, in the commons, the labour leader sir keir starmer accused borisjohnson of failing to condemn those who boo players when they take the knee. our political correspondent ben wright has the latest. taking a stand against racism at wembley on sunday. england took the knee before every game of the
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european championship, but, following defeat in the final, there was a torrent of racist online abuse against three of the teen�*s black players. in withington, a mural of marcus rashford was defaced before being covered up. and, in the commons this lunchtime, boris johnson said there would be action taken. ~ . ., ., , ., taken. what we are doing is today takin: taken. what we are doing is today taking practical— taken. what we are doing is today taking practical steps _ taken. what we are doing is today taking practical steps to _ taken. what we are doing is today taking practical steps to ensure i taking practical steps to ensure that the — taking practical steps to ensure that the football— taking practical steps to ensure that the football banning - taking practical steps to ensure that the football banning order| that the football banning order regime — that the football banning order regime is — that the football banning order regime is changed, so- that the football banning order regime is changed, so that - that the football banning order regime is changed, so that if. that the football banning order . regime is changed, so that if you are guilty, — regime is changed, so that if you are guilty, mr_ regime is changed, so that if you are guilty, mr speaker, - regime is changed, so that if you are guilty, mr speaker, of- regime is changed, so that if you are guilty, mr speaker, of racisti are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse _ are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online _ are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online of— are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online of footballers - are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online of footballers theni are guilty, mr speaker, of racist - abuse online of footballers then you will not _ abuse online of footballers then you will not be _ abuse online of footballers then you will not be going _ abuse online of footballers then you will not be going to _ abuse online of footballers then you will not be going to the _ abuse online of footballers then you will not be going to the match, - abuse online of footballers then you will not be going to the match, no. will not be going to the match, no ifs, will not be going to the match, no its no_ will not be going to the match, no its no buts. — will not be going to the match, no its no buts. no _ will not be going to the match, no ifs, no buts, no exemptions- will not be going to the match, no ifs, no buts, no exemptions and l will not be going to the match, nol ifs, no buts, no exemptions and no excuses _ ifs, no buts, no exemptions and no excuses. �* ., excuses. but some in the england su uad sa excuses. but some in the england squad say the _ excuses. but some in the england squad say the government - excuses. but some in the england squad say the government should i excuses. but some in the england - squad say the government should have done more to support their stand against racism. the defender tyrone mings accused the home secretary priti patel of stoking the fire after she previously called taking the knee gesture politics. some tory mps and activists have said their party has ended up on the wrong side
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of the issue. i party has ended up on the wrong side of the issue-— of the issue. i think it has been difficult for _ of the issue. i think it has been difficult for many _ of the issue. i think it has been difficult for many people - of the issue. i think it has been difficult for many people on - of the issue. i think it has been i difficult for many people on our side of— difficult for many people on our side of the house to see the distinction between their very good and proper reasons as to why footballers take their knee and the supporters agree with them taking the knee _ supporters agree with them taking the knee and, unfortunately, some of the knee and, unfortunately, some of the stranger— the knee and, unfortunately, some of the stranger views, as some of the black— the stranger views, as some of the black lives — the stranger views, as some of the black lives matter organisations, which _ black lives matter organisations, which i _ black lives matter organisations, which i don't agree with at all. at prime which i don't agree with at all. git prime minister's questions,'s leader prime minister's questions,�*s leader said borisjohnson had failed to condemn the fans who booed the england team. the condemn the fans who booed the england team-— condemn the fans who booed the england team. condemn the fans who booed the encland team. ~ , .,, england team. the prime minister has tried to stoke — england team. the prime minister has tried to stoke the _ england team. the prime minister has tried to stoke the culture _ england team. the prime minister has tried to stoke the culture war- england team. the prime minister has tried to stoke the culture war and - tried to stoke the culture war and they have realised they are on the wrong side and now they hope no one has noticed. why else would a conservative mp boast that he is not watching his own team? why else would another conservative mp say that marcus rashford spends too much time is playing politics when he is actually trying to feed children the government won't? i actually trying to feed children the
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government won't?— actually trying to feed children the government won't? i don't want to encuae government won't? i don't want to enauae in government won't? i don't want to engage in a — government won't? i don't want to engage in a political— government won't? i don't want to engage in a political culture - government won't? i don't want to engage in a political culture war. government won't? i don't want to engage in a political culture war of| engage in a political culture war of any kind, — engage in a political culture war of any kind, i— engage in a political culture war of any kind. iwant— engage in a political culture war of any kind, i want to _ engage in a political culture war of any kind, i want to get _ engage in a political culture war of any kind, i want to get on - engage in a political culture war of any kind, i want to get on with- any kind, i want to get on with delivering _ any kind, i want to get on with delivering for— any kind, i want to get on with delivering for the _ any kind, i want to get on with delivering for the people - any kind, i want to get on with delivering for the people of. any kind, i want to get on withl delivering for the people of this country — delivering for the people of this country he _ delivering for the people of this country. he simply— delivering for the people of this country. he simply wants - delivering for the people of this country. he simply wants to - delivering for the people of this| country. he simply wants to get delivering for the people of this . country. he simply wants to get on with dithering~ _ country. he simply wants to get on with dithering. the— country. he simply wants to get on with dithering.— with dithering. the snp's westminster _ with dithering. the snp's westminster leader - with dithering. the snp'sl westminster leader asked with dithering. the snp's i westminster leader asked if with dithering. the snp's - westminster leader asked if there were systemic racism in the uk? n westminster leader asked if there were systemic racism in the uk? i do were systemic racism in the uk? i do think that racism _ were systemic racism in the uk? i do think that racism is a problem in the united — think that racism is a problem in the united kingdom _ think that racism is a problem in the united kingdom and - think that racism is a problem in the united kingdom and i- think that racism is a problem ml the united kingdom and i believe think that racism is a problem in i the united kingdom and i believe it needs— the united kingdom and i believe it needs to _ the united kingdom and i believe it needs to be — the united kingdom and i believe it needs to be tackled _ the united kingdom and i believe it needs to be tackled and _ the united kingdom and i believe it needs to be tackled and it - the united kingdom and i believe it needs to be tackled and it needs i the united kingdom and i believe it needs to be tackled and it needs toi needs to be tackled and it needs to be stamped — needs to be tackled and it needs to be stamped out _ needs to be tackled and it needs to be stamped out. the— needs to be tackled and it needs to be stamped out.— be stamped out. the racial abuse that followed _ be stamped out. the racial abuse that followed sunday's _ be stamped out. the racial abuse that followed sunday's final i be stamped out. the racial abuse that followed sunday's final has l that followed sunday's final has been met with condemnation far beyond westminster, but it has underscored the issue footballers have been protesting about and has kicked it right back into the centre of politics. ben wright, bbc news. our political correspondent iain watson is in westminster. the issue of racism in football really dominating prime minister's questions today.— really dominating prime minister's questions today. absolutely and it is interesting _ questions today. absolutely and it is interesting that _ questions today. absolutely and it is interesting that it _ questions today. absolutely and it is interesting that it has _ questions today. absolutely and it is interesting that it has been i is interesting that it has been labour back foot on the so—called culture was, if you cast your mind back to last summer, keir starmer was asked consistently to condemn
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the pulling down of statues and he did condemn it but the reason ministers kept pushing is they knew it would make labourfeel uncomfortable, because some of the party's activists didn't quite share the leader's abuse, so keir starmer today saw an opportunity in the way that the england footballers have been treated to try to make the prime minister feel uneasy and uncomfortable, because some of his mps, including the home secretary initially, had not condemned the jeering the english footballers had faced. in return, he managed to elicit quite a few things from the prime minister. first of all, a declaration that he was not pursuing a political culture what any kind, something that may well be quoted back to boris johnson something that may well be quoted back to borisjohnson in the future, but also what boris johnson back to borisjohnson in the future, but also what borisjohnson is intending to do, he knew they would get a lot of emotional language from the labour benches, he wanted to put forward very clearly there would be practical steps to be taken, which, of course, goes way beyond what has been done so far. for example, banning people from football matches if they are guilty of online abuse,
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potentially finding social media companies were not taking their hate filled tweets, so it did dominate prime minister's questions, the of racism, but it did feel like a bit of a turning point that, in the end, there will be practical solutions to the problem is the england players have highlighted.— have highlighted. thank you very much, have highlighted. thank you very much. lain _ have highlighted. thank you very much, iain watson _ have highlighted. thank you very much, iain watson at _ have highlighted. thank you very i much, iain watson at westminster. there's growing confusion about the guidance on wearing facemasks to prevent the spread of coronavirus. it will continue to be compulsory on public transport in london, but not in the rest of england from monday, when restrictions are lifted. london's mayor, sadiq khan, says the rule should have been retained throughout the country. in scotland, masks still have to be worn for now in enclosed spaces, and in wales, face—coverings will remain mandatory on public transport and in health care settings. our transport correspondent caroline davies reports. whether a mask is a must orjust recommended when busy will depend where you are travelling on public
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transport from monday. in london, you will need to wear one to travel on all of transport for london's services or risk being turned away or removed. services or risk being turned away or removed-— or removed. wearing a facemask indoors reduces _ or removed. wearing a facemask indoors reduces the _ or removed. wearing a facemask indoors reduces the chances i or removed. wearing a facemask indoors reduces the chances of. indoors reduces the chances of transmission, don'tjust take my word for it, the government's own advisers sage say that, as to the world health organisation but also, speaking to transport workers, the trade unions, londoners, businesses, wearing a facemask gives greater public confidence.— wearing a facemask gives greater public confidence. what do londoners make u- public confidence. what do londoners make up their — public confidence. what do londoners make up their decision? _ public confidence. what do londoners make up their decision? for - public confidence. what do londoners make up their decision? for people i make up their decision? for people who don't want _ make up their decision? for people who don't want to _ make up their decision? for people who don't want to use _ make up their decision? for people who don't want to use it, _ make up their decision? for people who don't want to use it, they i make up their decision? for people who don't want to use it, they feel| who don't want to use it, they feel they are _ who don't want to use it, they feel they are fine without a facemask, i think— they are fine without a facemask, i think they— they are fine without a facemask, i think they should just carry on without— think they should just carry on without it _ think they should just carry on without it but if you don't feel safe, — without it but if you don't feel safe, just _ without it but if you don't feel safe, just use it. | without it but if you don't feel safe, just use it.— safe, just use it. i think a common-sense - safe, just use it. i think a common-sense approachj safe, just use it. i think a l common-sense approach is safe, just use it. i think a i common-sense approach is to safe, just use it. i think a _ common-sense approach is to keep it common—sense approach is to keep it on, i think most people will do that. , , , ., on, i think most people will do that. , , that. everybody is a bit scared still, that. everybody is a bit scared still. aren't — that. everybody is a bit scared still, aren't they? _ that. everybody is a bit scared still, aren't they? if— that. everybody is a bit scared| still, aren't they? if facemasks make — still, aren't they? if facemasks make people _ still, aren't they? if facemasks make people feel— still, aren't they? if facemasks make people feel safer, - still, aren't they? if facemasks make people feel safer, we i still, aren't they? if facemasks i make people feel safer, we should still, aren't they? if facemasks - make people feel safer, we should do it. make people feel safer, we should do it itit— make people feel safer, we should do it. , , ., , ., ., make people feel safer, we should do it. tfl is the first operator to do this. it. tfl is the first operator to do this- there _ it. tfl is the first operator to do this. there may _ it. tfl is the first operator to do this. there may of _ it. tfl is the first operator to do this. there may of manchesterl it. tfl is the first operator to do i this. there may of manchester has said he has not ruled it out for the
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city's tram network and, in gateshead, the local council had asked the government for powers to enforce it on all seven of the north—east council services. in scotland, masks will continue to be mandated on public transport and wales are likely to do the same. but, despite the differing attitudes, the government is keeping to its policy that it is personal responsibility, not a law. it is responsibility, not a law. it is common _ responsibility, not a law. it is common sense, _ responsibility, not a law. it is common sense, when - responsibility, not a law. it 3 common sense, when you think about it, you will be in a crowded area and transport organisations are welcome, as i said last week, to make it a condition of carriage in the same way that other rules are donein the same way that other rules are done in that way.— done in that way. although many unions welcomed _ done in that way. although many unions welcomed london's i done in that way. although many i unions welcomed london's decision, there are concerns by some that it will leave staff in a difficult position and could lead to disputes. the majority of bus and train operators in england are expected to just encourage passengers to wear a mask when services are busy, not as a condition of travel. transport operators are also weighing up how requiring a mask to be worn on board
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might make people feel about travelling on public transport. the mayor of london says he thinks it will give people more confidence and other operators are not so certain. we think the trains probably don't need _ we think the trains probably don't need to— we think the trains probably don't need to be tarred with a brush that they are _ need to be tarred with a brush that they are somehow less safe than other— they are somehow less safe than other indoor settings, we don't think— other indoor settings, we don't think that — other indoor settings, we don't think that is helpful for the long—term recovery of getting people back onto _ long—term recovery of getting people back onto public transport. as back onto public transport. restrictions back onto public transport. gis restrictions lift around the uk, once again, the face of the pandemic will look different depending on where you are. caroline davies, bbc news. we have just had the latest on restrictions in wales announced by the first minister there, mark drakeford. let's get more on that from mark hutchings in cardiff, what has he said?— has he said? well, we have 'ust had the announcement i has he said? well, we have 'ust had the announcement from i has he said? well, we have just had the announcement from the - has he said? well, we have just had the announcement from the welsh | the announcement from the welsh government, mark drakeford himself will be laying out the details of the latest easing of restrictions at the latest easing of restrictions at the senate this afternoon but quite a significant announcement has come through from the welsh government subject to heavy caveat. they say if
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covid roads —— covid rates are low, by august to seven, most restrictions would go, not all. they will be no legal limits on the number of people who can meet, night clubs will reopen, social distancing would be replaced by risk assessment but crucially, facemasks would still be compulsory in most indoor places accept hospitality, such as pubs, for instance. that is subject to approval. from saturday, it has been approved that the rule of six will be allowed in private homes and accommodation and ice rinks could be reopened and there is no need for social distancing outdoors, so quite a significant announcement certainly for the 7th of august but it is subject to plenty of ifs and buts and the odd may be. {lita subject to plenty of ifs and buts and the odd may be. ok, mark, thanks ve much. there's growing concern about a rise in coronavirus cases in the north—east of england and the number of young, unvaccinated people in hospital there. our health editor hugh pym hasjust been to middlesborough. hugh, what is the situation there?
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well, there is increasing concern in a north east of england because of this surge in cases and, in fact, if you look at the uk's top ten hot spots, eight of them are in that region. at the university hospital of north tees, which i visited, a consultant told me they are absolutely gutted at what was happening. they have been through the first and second wave and now this third wave is under way, cases are relatively low but they have increased a lot in the last week and she said there was real distress amongst staff at having to open up another covid ward because of demand for it and put on a full ppe again because of the stress of doing all that. meanwhile, the elected mayor of middlesbrough and depressed and today has spelt out his concerns to us. —— andy preston. rates are ballooning. this thing is spreading like wildfire across the whole region. and we are not saying to panic, we are not saying for people to be terrified.
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we are saying to people, be really careful. and this is now about schools, it's about businesses, it's about jobs and it's about mental well—being. that was andy preston, elected mayor of middlesbrough. health chiefs in —— health chiefs in south tyneside and sunderland are urging people to take real care, to get vaccinated as soon as possible if they haven't already been so and they are having to suspend visits at a couple of local health sites from today. case numbers are still a lot lower than where they were back injanuary, but it is where they go from here into august and all of the other pressures on a&e and staff having to self—isolate which is really worrying people. self-isolate which is really worrying people.— self-isolate which is really worrying people. self-isolate which is really wor in: --eole. . , worrying people. thank you very much, worrying people. thank you very much. hugh _ worrying people. thank you very much. hugh pym. _ worrying people. thank you very much, hugh pym, our— worrying people. thank you very much, hugh pym, our health i worrying people. thank you very i much, hugh pym, our health editor. the government is publishing a strategy for radically cutting carbon emissions from transport in the united kingdom. it's the latest move to banish almost entirely emissions from every sector of the british economy by 2050. roger harrabin reports. transport is central
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to all of our lives. we can't do without it. it is also the biggest source of the uk's planet—heating carbon emissions. so what to do? the government's biggest decision so far to phase in electric cars has already been taken. now ministers want to speed up the process by imposing targets on manufacturers to sell more clean vehicles. lorries are next in line. dirty diesel will be banished for new trucks by 2040. manufacturers are working to improve electric lorries. batteries or hydrogen look likely solutions. then there is aviation, the most controversial. climate experts say ministers must curb the projected growth in people flying on holiday as well as seeking new technologies for aviation. electric planes and hydrogen planes are already operating, but at a tiny scale. there will be expected to be a zero carbon for domestic flights by 2040. and internationalflights by 2050.
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any residual emissions will be offset by, say, planting trees. the answer in the future is to get to guilt—free flying and this country is committed to becoming the first in the world to fly transatlantic, within our generation, carbon free. it is all to do with the technology that we are starting to see developed now. and that is the way forward. not to think that we have to suddenly stop being able to move around. but critics say the government's policies don't add up. they complain that the uk's £27 billion road programme will increase traffic when ministers want to decrease traffic. the high—speed rail project, hs2, with all its steel and concrete may not be zero emissions until the end of the century. we welcome the fact that the government has a strategy. but its technology heavily relies on developments that have not yet occurred. the idea of zero emission aviation is, frankly, pie in the sky. what the government should be doing now to deal with carbon is to move
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people away from planes and private cars onto buses and trains which are much less carbon intensive. experts say tackling the climate crisis will require some degree of behaviour change. like getting me or perhaps you getting out of our car you out of our car onto a bike or our feet. either way, it won't be solved, they say, by technology alone. roger harrabin, bbc news. our top story this lunchtime. the prime minister says football fans who racially abuse players online will be banned from matches. if you are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online - of footballers, then you will not be going to the match. _ no ifs, no buts, no - exemptions and no excuses. coming up on the bbc news channel. rory mcilroy feels like he's got a "head start on the rest of the field" after travelling early to royal st george's — ahead of tomorrow's first round of the open championship.
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thousands of foreign children, some of them british, are facing a lifetime of imprisonment in camps and jails in? north eastern?syria, with little hope of being released. ?a bbc investigation has found that the children, whose parents supported the islamic state group, are being moved?from camps,?to secure children s homes, and then onto adult prisons, in a conveyor belt of incarceration.?the bbc�*s middle east correspondent quentin sommerville reports from north east syria. trapped in syria, it's been the longestjourney for the children of foreign is fighters. this is a home for the lost boys of the islamic state group. their parents, many dead or missing, brought them here from across the globe. from the age of 12 upwards, they are kept under armed guard at this kurdish—run centre.
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london and pakistan were once home for 13—year—old ahmed until his mum joined is. that's dragon boy again, i recognise him. his sketchbook, his imagination and a single t—shirt... one direction. ..are the only reminders of a carefree childhood. tell me what happened to your brothers and sisters. he was fighting for the islamic state? what do you think about the people who are bombing you and shooting?
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when you get out of here, when you leave syria, what's the first thing you're going to do? i'm going to see my family and these kinds of things and tell them my story. it's an amazing story, and you've done really well. yeah. but this is no sanctuary. when he turns 18, he will go to an adult prison. some 5,000 foreign kids are trapped in syria. they didn't choose to come here. most of their countries would rather forget they exist. left behind, they will endure a life as bleak as anything the islamic state once promised them. the government is expected to announce plans to introduce legislation to stop all prosecutions related to crimes committed during the troubles
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in northern ireland. a statute of limitations, extending to offences before 1998, would apply to both former soldiers and paramilitary groups. chris page, reports. explosion. in northern ireland, the past is always present. such is the legacy of the conflict known as the troubles. the violence lasted for three decades. most of the deaths remain unsolved and investigating them is mainly the responsibility of police. it is understood the government is now to propose ending all prosecutions for killings which happened before 1998. victims groups are strongly opposed to the idea. kate nash's brother william was killed by the army on bloody sunday in 1972. somebody has decided at 19 or 20 that they're going to kill two, three, four people, god knows. no, you can't get away with that. there cannot be an amnesty for murder. of more than 3500 deaths
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during the conflict, 52% were civilians. 32% were police officers or soldiers, and 16% were in paramilitary organisations. about 60% of the killings were carried out by republicans. 30% by loyalists. and 10% by the security forces. the government is proposing to move to a process where families would be provided with information about their relatives' deaths. military veterans are in favour of that. this isn't the solution to everyone's problems. i have called it the least worst solution. but it does provide a mechanism so that families who lost loved ones during the troubles get to know what happened, but without the fear of prosecution being held above the heads of military veterans. however the five main parties in northern ireland are against the plans and they all have different perspectives on the troubles. the
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government is to hold talks with them but nothing here is more divisive than history. the number of internal reviews held when a person claiming benefits dies or comes to serious harm has risen in the past two years, new figures show. the department for work and pensions has begun 121i reviews since july 2019. 97 of those concerned people who died. it follows a bbc investigation into the scale of deaths earlier this year. the labour party is now calling for an "urgent independent investigation. our social affair correspondent michael buchanan has more. philip spent the last year of his life fighting benefit officials, trying to overturn their errors. one of the things was phil is a healthy pink colour. phil was mixed race, he had never been pink in his life. the 49—year—old had several mental health conditions, including schizophrenia, as well as a serious heart problem. but his records show
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he was made to undergo various assessments to ensure he was eligible for disability and sickness benefits, telling him he would lose money if he couldn't attend. he was paranoid, he was suicidal. and, eventually, late christmas night, early boxing day, he died. you are firmly of the belief that it was distress of these benefits assessments that killed him. he was absolutely inconsolable. his schizophrenia was playing up, he was feeling depressed, he kept bursting into tears. there was nothing i could do. philip's death last year may or may not have been the subject of an internal review by the department for work and pensions. his family don't know. charities and campaigners say the whole system of learning from incidents is shrouded in secrecy.
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these internal reviews are controlled entirely by government, they decide which cases to review, they decide how they are going to look into them. they have reached the conclusions they see fit and they never publicise what has been learned. in essence, they are based on the principle that government knows best. ministers have revealed that 124 internal reviews have been carried out over the past two years, including examining 97 deaths. labour say the enquiries need external scrutiny. this is not an independent review of where the department might be going wrong in terms of its policies and the impact on people, that's why i am calling for an independent investigation into why we have seen the number of cases increase as it has done. for those families who feel harmed by the benefits system, they say their concerns are ignored. ministers say they have significantly strengthened their review team and are committed to improving services. michael buchanan, bbc news. prince charles has warned that the uk is in danger of "ripping the heart out of the british countryside" by letting small family farms go to the wall.
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he says that the focus on producing cheap and plentiful food threatens their survival as well as undermining nature itself. the prince of wales has made his concern for the future of both farming and the environment clear over many years as our chief environment correspondent justin rowlatt reports. superefficient, intensive agriculture is a dead—end, prince charles said today. he warns that the pursuit of cheap food has damaged our soils and watercourses, as well as producing emissions that have driven global warming. such has been the damage to the natural systems we depend upon, we must achieve profound and rapid change to reverse it. we must put nature back at the heart of the equation. the prince is adamant that small farms must be a part of that effort. he has been deeply concerned with food and the environment for most of his adult life.
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our current approach is forcing many small family farms to the wall. if they go, it will quite simply rip the heart out of the british countryside and break the backbone of britain's rural communities. prince charles praises the efforts of marcus rashford and jamie oliver to improve the nation's diet. i think sometimes just the smell of the fruit and vegetables... he believes we need to switch from industrial farming methods and adopt more sustainable practices. only by benefiting nature can we benefit people. and that will ensure the future of our living planet. prince charles�*s comments come ahead of the publication tomorrow of the national food strategy, the first major review of britain's food system in over 70 years. justin rowlatt, bbc news.
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the uk inflation rate hit 2.5% in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years, as the unlocking of the uk economy continued. as you can see here, the rate is higher than the bank of england's 2% inflation target for a second month. the office for national statistics says the rise has been driven by higher food and fuel costs. eating and drinking out also cost more, while clothing and footwear, usually cheaper at this time of year, also went up in price. there's been a coronavirus outbreak among staff at a japanese hotel that's hosting a number of brazilian olympic athletes. seven staff members at the hotel in the coastal city of hamamatsu have tested positive for the virus. olympic officials say that those infected have not been in contact with the brazilian delegation, which includes judo athletes. the olympics are set to begin in tokyo in ten days' time.
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it was called the black woodstock. in 1969 stevie wonder, nina simone and gladys knight were some of the stars who played at the harlem cultural festival in new york. it was all filmed, but the footage was left to gather dust in a basement. now, the archives have been turned into an award winning movie. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. the summer of 1969. woodstock. neil armstrong walking on the moon. and more than 300,000 people attended the harlem cultural festival. are you ready, black people, are you ready? an event almost no one has heard of until now. six weekends of major artists.
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the panthers were the security and kids sitting in the trees. i was nervous. i didn't expect a crowd like that. something very important was happening. summer of soul is a documentary exploring why this event, which it argues could have become the black woodstock, has been ignored for more than half a century. the film is directed by questlove, who drums for hip—hop outfit the roots and is a professor at nyu, where he is an expert in black music history. but even he hadn't heard of the festival. we're talking about stevie wonder, nina simone, sly and the family stone, comedians, politicians, everybody was there. the thing is that it is preserved professionally on tape and what winds up happening is that not one producer or outlet is interested. so this film just sits in the basement for 50 years. nobody ever heard of the harlem culture festival. nobody would believe it happened.
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however, a couple of film producers heard about the a0 hours of archive, managed to secure the rights, and decided that questlove was the man to bring it to life. it took me five months ofjust constantly having these monitors in my house, in every room in my house — my kitchen, my bathroom, my bedroom. i kept it on a 24—hour loop. i kept notes on anything that gave me goose bumps. 1969 was a change of era in the black community. the styles were changing. music was changing. a revolution was coming together. but as well as highlighting sensational performances, questlove also wanted to put the event into a cultural context. this might be my new destiny and i didn't even know it yet. but, you know, iwelcome it, i welcome it. colin paterson, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes.

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