Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 14, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

10:00 am
we have had a lot of feedback on th touch ect. i did ask you to get we have had a lot of feedback on th touch via. i did ask you to get we have had a lot of feedback on th touch via twitter. k you to get we have had a lot of feedback on th touch via twitter. and i to get we have had a lot of feedback on th touch via twitter. and i to have. in touch via twitter. and you have. bella ph says it will be a mask for me, because i believe in social responsibility, so i am trying to do this is bbc news. my bit to protect others as well as these are the latest headlines myself. graham says, i have used in the uk and around the world. public transport throughout the pandemic. because of exemptions, i london's mayor makes face coverings have previously felt unsafe as many mandatory on all transport for london services including buses, people have not been wearing masks tubes, trams and the overground. despite them being mandatory. i'm quite clear from the conversations i've had british transport police haven't from londoners, from businesses been enforcing the rules anyway. and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them a greater rate of confidence in using an incredibly finally, i will finish with nathan drummond, who says cases are still safe public transport system. plans for easing coronavirus restrictions in wales rising. masks minimise the will be set out later, transmission of covid from people at a slower pace than england, catching it. there should be more and with face coverings compulsory clarity on wearing masks on public on public transport. transport, as the messaging system is going to put people off. this is if you use public transport important for international in london, or outside the capital, what do you think of the plans? travellers transiting through london as well. you will need your mask. do you want similar rules where you are? you can get in touch with me @lukwesaburak or using the hashtag bbcyourquestions. thousands of foreign children,
10:01 am
including british kids, are facing a lifetime of imprisonment in camps and jails more than 70 people have now died during five days of unrest and looting in south africa in? north eastern?syria, with little following the arrest of former hope of being released. ?a bbc president jacob zuma. investigation has found that the children, whose parents the uk inflation rate hits 2.5% supported the islamic state group, in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years, are being moved?from desert camps?to secure children's homes as the unlocking of and onto adult prisons, the economy continues. in a conveyor belt of incarceration. the bbc�*s middle east correspondent quentin sommerville reports from north east syria. there have been further calls from conservative backbenchers for the party to examine its approach to taking trapped in syria, it's been the knee, following racism against england footballers the longestjourney for the children during the euro 2020 final. of foreign is fighters. this is a home for the lost boys and coming up this hour.... the former boss of the japanese car of the islamic state group. maker nissan, has told the bbc their parents, many dead about how he escaped from japan or missing, brought them here from across the globe. in a box. from the age of 12 upwards, they are kept under armed guard at this kurdish—run centre.
10:02 am
london and pakistan were once home for 13—year—old ahmed until his mum joined is. that's dragon boy again, i recognise him. his sketchbook, his imagination and a single t—shirt... one direction. hello and welcome, ..are the only reminders if you're watching in the uk or around the world. of a carefree childhood. tell me what happened to your brothers and sisters. passengers must continue to wear face coverings on london's transport network, despite the legal requirement to wear them being lifted he was fighting for the islamic state? in england from monday. they've been mandatory on public transport for the past year to help reduce the spread of the virus. the city's mayor, sadiq khan, said he was not prepared to put tube, tram and other transport users at risk by relaxing the rules and the move was aimed at keeping passengers and staff safe. in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon said the current rules what do you think about the people on facemasks in enclosed spaces who are bombing you and shooting? will remain in place for "some time" even after other restrictions
10:03 am
are eased on 19thjuly. in wales, people will still need to wear them on public transport when you get out of here, when you leave syria, and in health care settings. what's the first thing you're going to do? in northern ireland, some requirements for face coverings could be lifted on 26thjuly, it's an amazing story, and you've done really well. but no decision has been made yet. yeah. but this is no sanctuary. when he turns 18, he will go and in europe, spain, to an adult prison. some 5,000 foreign kids which recently lifted rules are trapped in syria. they didn't choose to come here. requiring people to wear face most of their countries would rather forget they exist. coverings outside, recorded another left behind, they will endure a life as bleak 43,960 new cases of coronavirus as anything the islamic state as the delta variant drove a surge of infections among unvaccinated young people. with the latest on the changes once promised them. to face coverings on london's public transport, here's our correspondent caroline davies. from monday, it is no longer the law i'm nowjoined by orlaith minogue, to wear a mask on public who is the conflict and humanitarian advocacy adviser transport in england. at save the children.
10:04 am
instead, it's about personal responsibility. but the government has said it still wants people to wear face coverings in crowded settings, just summarise the situation as you such as busy trains and buses. london's mayor, sadiq khan, has asked transport for london are aware of it? the to make it a condition of carriage, meaning if passengers travel on any of its services, including buses and tubes, just summarise the situation as you are aware of it?— are aware of it? the situation is that we have — they must wear a mask, are aware of it? the situation is that we have thousands - are aware of it? the situation is that we have thousands of - are aware of it? the situation is l that we have thousands of foreign children currently trapped in even after monday. desperate circumstances in tfl will be the first operator to do this, although manchester's mayor, north—east syria, which is of course andy burnham, hasn't ruled out doing the same on the city's tram network. an active conflict zone. these the scottish government has also children are from more than 60 said it will continue to require countries around the world. some of facemasks on public transport. them has been in syria their whole on the issue of mandating lives. some were brought to syria by mitigations like face coverings, let me just say this. their parents at a young age. the it is my view that if government majority of these children are under 12 years old, about a third are believes measures like this matter, underfive 12 years old, about a third are under five years old. the conditions and this government does, we should say so. we should do what is necessary they face, they are facing contaminated water every day and to ensure compliance and we should be prepared to take any resulting overcrowded camps and centres. it is a lack of access to basic health flak from those who disagree. we shouldn't lift important restrictions to make our lives care and education services. it is a easier and then expect the public to take responsibility for doing desperate situation and there is no solution in sight for these children
10:05 am
the right thing anyway. at the moment. in solution in sight for these children at the moment.— wales is also expected to do the same. at the moment. in terms of the different governments - at the moment. in terms of the different governments for - at the moment. in terms of the different governments for the l different governments for the unions have welcomed the news, citizens within these camps, are but some are worried about how enforceable it will be and that it there different approaches to their could lead to disputes on board. women and children? are some of them some operators are worried that allowed to come home? what is going requiring masks on public transport could make people feel like the service is less safe than other indoor places on? , ., , ., like restaurants or pubs. but the mayor has said he is doing allowed to come home? what is going on? .. ':: i: i: ., allowed to come home? what is going it to make the public on? , ':::::: ., . on? yes, about 1000 foreign children have been repatriated _ on? yes, about 1000 foreign children have been repatriated to _ feel more confident. on? yes, about 1000 foreign children have been repatriated to their - have been repatriated to their countries of origin since 2019. but caroline davies, bbc news. let's discuss this with our political correspondent ben wright. these numbers are a small proportion of the overall group of children we are looking at. some governments ben, it seems like there is also a have been very proactive about mixed message and going around. removing their citizens from this there is, and a divergence in policy environment. for example, the united now notjust between the nations of states has a policy of repatriating the uk, but within england too. it's not the first time that has happened its citizens for both humanitarian and security grounds, and it encourages other states to do so. during the pandemic. different policies have been pursued by but a number of european states various parts of the uk throughout, including the uk has been very slow to move on this. so while we have and that continues particularly in seen a small number of relation to this question of facemasks. the government at repatriations, largely orphaned or westminster, borisjohnson has said
10:06 am
that the last two or three weeks, and this will kick in on monday, unaccompanied children, the majority of european children are left in that whether to wear a mask or not these camps, struggling on a is a matter of personal day—to—day basis to survive. do responsibility, a decision for people to take themselves, although they have put guidance in place these camps, struggling on a day-to-day basis to survive. do you know why we _ day-to-day basis to survive. do you which they have hardened in the last know why we have _ day-to-day basis to survive. do you know why we have that _ day-to-day basis to survive. do you know why we have that slow - day-to-day basis to survive. do you know why we have that slow pace? | week or two advising that people day-to-day basis to survive. do you | know why we have that slow pace? it should wear them in crowded areas varies from country to country, but like public transport. the london ultimately, governments have not stepped up and accepted mayor, sadiq khan, thinks that is responsibility for these children not good enough. he has been urging the government to keep that mask mandate in place and he has used his and committed to doing whatever it powers as london mayor to say that takes to bring them home. the on public transport in london, kurdish authorities who were in people should continue to wear a charge of north—east syria have said mask. enough is enough, we need countries what would have been far better is for the national rules to continue to apply to take responsibility and bring across the country, notjust in london, but across the country. their citizens home. but a number of that would have provided clarity excuses have been given, from in relation to what the rules logistical issues to security are and avoid any confusion. issues, even going so far as to say, we don't know how many of our citizens are there. the british it would also have meant government said as recently as april we could use the met police service this year that they are not in a and british transport police to enforce the law. position to give an accurate the government, for their own reasons, estimate. but that isn't good enough have decided not to do that.
10:07 am
i'm quite clear. when we see the conditions these one of my responsibilities children are facing. the british is public safety on public transport, but also, government and many others have i'm clear from the conversations demonstrated that repatriations are logistically feasible. they have i've had with londoners, managed to bring children out. so from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue the question remains as to why they to wear a face covering will give are not doing that for all of these them greater confidence in using an incredibly safe children. it is unquestionable that public transport system. this is the only solution for foreign children in this situation. sadiq khan said these rules would be it should also be said, to be fair, in place as long as the virus was a that there are some mothers who are threat and the pandemic continued. refusing to allow their children to but for travellers, it may be confusing. you can get on a tube be repatriated. tell us more about train in london and be required to get a mask, and then get a mainland train through london and get to the that and any work to facilitate scottish border where you have to put your mask back on as you issues like that? continue to scotland. but that, in a way, has been a nature of the i think that given the current devolved nature tackling pandemic situation in the camps and the from the beginning. that was what the transport secretary grant shapps communication that these women and said this morning. children are receiving which i must we've seen lots of these say is very little. very few rules being different in different parts of the uk. that is the form of devolved governments are in direct contact government that we have. with their citizens, and so the if you are outside, you wouldn't need a mask on. information the women are receiving if you go inside, you would.
10:08 am
that has been the case is very haphazard at best. from our all the way through, so i don't think it is dramatically experiences of working in the camps differentjust because you are inside and on a and seeing these communications and london underground train. it is common sense when you think these repatriations play out it is very likely that any promise of about it, you will be in a crowded area and transport organisations are welcome, as i said last week, safety for these children in to make it a condition of carriage, exchange for separation from their in the same way as other rules mothers is likely to fail on both are done in that way. compassionate and practical grounds, so farfrom speeding up compassionate and practical grounds, so far from speeding up the process of repatriation in truth it adds ben, we are going to be finding out additional barriers, and from a save more about the situation in wales the children perspective we would later today. call on governments to repatriate children with their mothers where more about the situation in wales later today-— later today. yes. the welsh possible, both to allow for a speed government's _ later today. yes. the welsh government's plans - later today. yes. the welsh government's plans for - later today. yes. the welsh government's plans for the | later today. yes. the welsh - government's plans for the easing of of repatriation but also not to add restrictions will be set out today. mark drakeford, the welsh first further distress to these children minister, has said he will not be who have been through incredibly abandoning them wholesale, that was traumatic experiences in their short the word he used. so he has lives, andy decisions then about signalled that he will go for a what happens next should happen back different strategy to the uk in countries of origin —— and the decisions. where there are the government, with more mitigations support systems in place to make and measures in place, more in line with the scottish government's those determinations of a safe environment. but those determinations of a safe environment.— those determinations of a safe approach. he has indicated that environment. �* , . , environment. but there will be many --eole environment. but there will be many people who — environment. but there will be many people who say _ environment. but there will be many people who say that _ environment. but there will be many people who say that these _ environment. but there will be many people who say that these family -
10:09 am
facemasks will be kept on public people who say that these family will come as a security risk, and transport and in health care thatis will come as a security risk, and that is a valid point, isn't it? settings. the labour member of the certainly, the security risks welsh parliament, john griffiths, involved in this situation are very has been speaking about that. important and very valid, and as i mentioned earlier certainly well, i guess we all have our own opinions. governments like the united states what the welsh government has are saying it is for security as indicated up to now makes sense to me, that we move on to the same well as humanitarian reasons that we footing as england and scotland perhaps a little later, with the exception of need to find a sustainable solution the wearing of masks. to what is going on in north—east syria. the country still is in as you said, masks would continue to be required in health conflict and people are food and social care settings, insecure not knowing where their on taxis and public transport, meals will come from. this is not a and that makes sense. situation where we have a stable environment, where it can be dealt with there and then. so it is very clear from with there and then. so it is very clearfrom both many security with there and then. so it is very clear from both many security actors as well as humanitarian agencies john griffiths there, indicating the such as ourselves that solutions extent to which the debate around need to be found quite quickly, and mask wearing, about how best to in the case of foreign children it is clearly repatriation that is the start to ease restrictions safely as the pandemic continues to surge, and best option on both security and it is expected to take off as humanitarian grounds.— humanitarian grounds. orlaith minoaue, humanitarian grounds. orlaith minogue, thank— humanitarian grounds. orlaith minogue, thank you _ restrictions around the uk are humanitarian grounds. orlaith minogue, thank you very - humanitarian grounds. orlaith i minogue, thank you very much, speaking to us from the organisation lifted over the summer, rages on.
10:10 am
politicians and scientists have save the children. their say, and the way that mask wearing has now become central to that debate will not go away despite the announcement today by sadiq as we've been reporting, a mural of marcus rashford in manchester khan. �* ~ . ~ has been almost completely covered in messages of support after it was defaced with racist graffiti. the announcement today by sadiq and last night hundreds of people khan. �* ~ ., ,, ,., the announcement today by sadiq khan. �* ~ ., ,, y., �*, khan. ben wright, thank you. let's turn our attention _ took the knee beside the restored khan. ben wright, thank you. let's turn our attention to _ khan. ben wright, thank you. let's turn our attention to the _ khan. ben wright, thank you. let's artwork in a show of solidarity turn our attention to the african . turn our attention to the african with the striker and the other continent. the number of people killed england players who received similar in the disorder that's gripped parts abuse after sunday's euros final, of south africa has risen to 72. as graham satchell reports. police — backed by the army — have struggled to contain the looting that followed the arrest the abuse scrawled on this wall of former presidentjacob zuma. was covered up almost immediately — the main opposition party, first, with bin bags. which supports mr zuma's detention, has said it will file charges against his children and others for inciting the unrest. what happened next mark lobel has the latest. was extraordinary. as the hours passed, people brought notes, letters, messages of support. gunfire. hundreds and hundreds of them. shocking footage on social media shows open warfare amongst citizens in former by late yesterday, presidentjacob zuma's backyard. marcus rashford's mural had been completely transformed. ok, let's go.
10:11 am
pitting south african against south african, looters against armed locals. where's john with the shotgun? local militia are stepping in, as elsewhere, the police are simply overwhelmed. this woman came with her son omar. it is perhaps no surprise we decided to come and putjust very the army has been called in, but that brings its own challenges. lovely kind notes over the paint, and when we came, if they start shooting, that will be we got surprised by the community being together and that is how war, and that is the thing we are supposed to be. that we don't want here in south black and white, it does not matter what race africa. you are, we are all here for england, so, yeah. three black english players have the fire department vehicles are being escorted by the metro police... been targeted with racist abuse in affected areas, public after missing penalties at the final on sunday. everyone is like a big family round here. so to see that round transport is suspended, here, it is shocking. especially for the kids to see it as well. the messages here are simple, powerful. support and love for a man who has done so much on and off the pitch. with some roads now off—limits, he gave out free school prompting the temporary closure of south africa's meals for children. biggest oil refinery. and he got, like, a member the jobs that are being lost of the british empire. at the moment are going he is amazing, isn't he? to exacerbate the situation he has helped so many families. but, obviously, we are massive and we don't need this.
10:12 am
united fans in our house, so we all love him. it's perhaps ironic this is maya and her that the jailing of this man, former presidentjacob zuma, daughter violet. as part of the government's efforts she left a note saying, to call out billions of dollars "be kind, be loving, of alleged corruption, to clean up south africa's economy be more like rashford." we experience racism and make it attractive on a daily basis, being people to foreign investors, of colour ourselves. is now triggering further economic she gets it at school. damage, not to mention loss of life. i get it at work, get it walking down the street. get told to go back to your country on a regular basis. but i've always lived in this country. my grandparents lived but why? tweets like these from in this country. president zuma's daughter suggest a political motivation, and hint of a deep split so, yeah, i think we are like three within the ruling anc party generations deep now. of which she is a member. ifeel like it should the tweets have criticised be coming to an end, but it is clearly not. president ramaphosa's administration it hurts, does it? for her father's imprisonment. yes. you try to act like it doesn't hurt, but, yeah, it does hurt. at marcus rashford's old primary they have accused the government schooljust down the road, of propping up the interests there are posters celebrating black of minority whites and elites. history, and a pair of his boots sit proudly in a cabinet. there has also been the fanning of year 5 students, nine and ten—year—olds, so appalled angen there has also been the fanning of anger, encouraging unrest with some by what has happened, they too have written letters to their hero. of the comments she has made. fine of the comments she has made. one ruestion of the comments she has made. one question now — of the comments she has made. one question now is _ of the comments she has made. one question now is whether political grievances can be put aside while dear mr rashford, i think south africa is on fire. the man you are an amazing, legendary football player.
10:13 am
i'm very sorry for all the racist comments you got tasked with putting out the flames, for missing a penalty. its president, cyril ramaphosa, i want you to stop and remember insists no political cause can all the amazing things you have done justify this violence, as he must and all the challenges you have overcome already to get now regain control of his pandemic to this point in life. some people in this world and poverty hit country. are racist, but don't listen to them because you try your best mark lobel, bbc news. and that is all we can ask for. our south africa correspondent nomsa maseko is in durban, it's amazing you made where some of the worst it to the final. violence has happened. second place is still really good. she gave me the latest. just look where you came from and look at you now. the army was brought in about two we all know you and any people of colour or background - days ago after police were clearly don't deserve this. especially that paintingl overstretched in many parts of you being destroyed. because looting continued i and all of us know. unabated, even with this has gone too far. i feel very inspired that the presence of the police. i was in the same classroom as you when you were my age. but overnight, there were sporadic looting incidents which have now even though i'm italian and my family supports italy, spread to another province, that doesn't mean you're not my hero the free state, two or three and that you don't inspire me. shopping centres in the area were looted overnight but it did not keep strong, marcus, and never give up. go any further. black lives matter! all: black lives matter! so it is hoped that the presence of troops on the ground is helping to ensure that the looting and the rioting does back at the mural last night,
10:14 am
not go any further. the protest organised by stand up to racism. hundreds of people taking the knee. the uk inflation rate hit 2.5% marcus rashford has said he has been moved to tears by a community that in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years, has wrapped their arms around him. as the unlocking of the uk it is a powerful collective response economy continued. to mindless racist hate. as you can see here, the rate is higher than the bank graham satchell, bbc of england's 2% inflation target news, manchester. for a second month. well, the labour party is calling the office for national statistics for anyone convicted of racist says the rise has been driven by higher food and fuel costs. abuse online to be banned from attending football matches. eating and drinking out also cost it wants the courts to be more, while clothing and footwear, given new powers to crack usually cheaper at this time down on perpetrators like those who targeted members of the england squad of year, also went up in price. our business presenter ben thompson after the euros 2020 final. there have also been further calls from within conservative ranks is in northwest london and has more. for the party to examine its approach to taking the knee. the former minister steve baker said attitudes inflation shows how needed to be challenged. quickly prices are rising. it could mean you will get less of this stuff for your money. your pound will go less far the higher inflation goes. those are the implications, i think what i see is that gestures because for the bank are extremely powerful,
10:15 am
of england, they will be keeping and surely that is now evident a close eye on it because it then because it's dominating has a knock—on effect for things the conversation in our country. like so i think over the course interest rates because they may of political life i've possibly learned some things, decide to raise interest rates to and i would certainly say cool inflation because it encourages i've learned that this is a very powerful gesture. us to put money in the bank rather unfortunately, it's than to go out and spend. susceptible to multiple competing interpretations. but, if i may, i would say it's one thing to boo the referee when you disagree great news, of course, if you have any with a marginal decision, savings, not so good if you have a credit card or mortgage. but it's another to boo brave black so it proves how players who are saying no to racism interlinked all these things are. and bravely going out on the field but you're right, it's to take a knee and say, because the economy is trying to get "we are expressing our solidarity back to some sort of normality. lots of changes over the last year as a with those who suffer racism". result of the pandemic. of course politics is a highly the question is whether this rise in prices is contested arena, and there will be temporary or it is something some people who speak simply we need to get used to. in a spirit of good faith based on what they observe, and some people will seek to attack let me introduce you to the home secretary. dr linda yueh, an economist. the point i'm making is that so much has changed this last year. when i listen to what has been said is this rise in inflationjust a product of that as the economy by albie and others who have taken a similar line, starts to work out what is happening and get back to normality? it is a wake—up call for the conservative party that is what most economists think, but not all of them. aboutjust how powerful our words are when we navigate these issues, and we just have to get alongside those players who are taking the knee and understand that they're
10:16 am
price rises are measured not saying, "defund the police." based on what happened a they�* re not anti—capitalist. year ago. what they're doing is saying, this time last year, we were in lockdown with little ability to go out. "we suffer racism". the biggest drivers of the price that was steve baker there. increase this time is things like eating out, recreation and buying goods. so the demand is up and that is consistent with the economy opening up. but there has been a lot of supply disruption. another big driver of this price a research led by the center increase is transport costs. shipping costs and fuel for countering digital hate shows that social media platforms are comprehensively failing to act on tackling racial costs have gone up. abuse on public figures. the research found that of 105 instagram accounts who racially the reason shipping costs have gone abused england players saka, sancho and rashsford, up is because all the only six had been taken down ships are in the wrong places on wednesday, two days because of the lockdowns in after they were reported different countries. so supply—side pressure to moderators. when demand is going up is why we have this price increase, the highest in three years. why? how temporary is this? for more let's speak we know the economy with callum hood, the head of research at the center is trying to get back to normal. for countering digital hate. we are resuming some of our thank you forjoining us and bbc old shopping habits, going back to work on trying to go news, callum. what is going on? we on holiday again. so the question is how long this is here for and whether we will saw, news, callum. what is going on? - saw, following the match on sunday, start to see the money there was an outpouring of racist in our pocket go less far? abuse directed at those three
10:17 am
that is a important and difficult question but players, so what we did was we did a essentially, the bank of england thinks inflation will rise further during the rest of this year to really simple check of how platforms about 3% before it goes back to 2% were performing on acting on that next year. that is consistent with where abuse. we collected evidence of they think the rebound is coming from. growth this year could be 7%. really clear racist abuse from 105 that sounds impressive until you social media accounts on instagram realise we lost about 10% of and then we just tested whether output last year. after those posts and a accounts so you expect prices to go were reported to the platform whether the platform had acted on up when you have this them, and as you mentioned the big rebound in growth, but that rebound is not going to last. platforms failed to act on 94% of in other words, once you get back those posts. we are talking about to pre—pandemic levels at the end of 2019, we expect growth rates to come really clear racist comments here, down and price pressures will come we are talking about use of the n down. word, images of monkeys, and even so for the most part, it looks references to slavery. when these like it could be temporary but there are reported to the platform, you are some economists who worry it really should expect them to take could be more permanent because of action, and it shouldn'tjust be a lots of things. we can't work out how unusual warning, yellow card for racism. it should be a permanent ban for those a pandemic lockdown is. accounts. , ., , , , you have touched on what the economy accounts. obviously... i will 'ust readthrough�* did last year, but give us an accounts. obviously... i will 'ust
10:18 am
read through instagram's h accounts. obviously... iwilljust. read through instagram's response accounts. obviously... iwilljust- overview of where we are now. read through instagram's response to reports, because instagram is a global commit —— they say, because how long will it take for us to get back to something that is more instagram is a global community we normal, like 2019 before all this understand that people may express began? probably next year, but a lot themselves differently and monkey of this depends on what happens migs are essentially ok to be sent globally in terms of the pandemic. most countries haven't been to black players, like you said. —— vaccinated to the same extent as we luckily have. a lot of scientists think it monkey segment. his writing this, a will be two to three years robot or a human being? you're like really disappointing. they have a before we get the world vaccinated. blanket ban on hate speech so it is really disappointing for instagram the implication of that for us as an economy dependent on global not to black players, and as you say trade and importing things means we won't — we can all recognise this as racism feel completely back to normal. the other indication isjobs. even though the economy is rebounding, unemployment is going to rise to over 5% by the end of this year. -- yes, it is really disappointing. these are _ -- yes, it is really disappointing. these are companies _ -- yes, it is really disappointing. these are companies with - -- yes, it is really disappointing. these are companies with lots i that really has an impact -- yes, it is really disappointing. these are companies with lots of resources, money, technical know—how on standards of living. and it is not beyond their that plus the price increases gives a sense that it is not going to be soon capability to recognise this stuff before we get back to normal. and prevent it from being sent to for that reason, the bank of england is players. and prevent it from being sent to -la ers. . , ., . unlikely to do much except support and prevent it from being sent to ob ers. ., , players. callum, in the research you have done there _ players. callum, in the research you have done there has _ the recovery this year and probably players. callum, in the research you have done there has been... - through next year as well. players. callum, in the research you have done there has been... it - players. callum, in the research you have done there has been... it is . have done there has been... it is slowly changing but there has been that really does illustrate how this discussion that racism is
10:19 am
interlinked all of these things are. simply an opinion. it is not linda, thanks for putting illegal. you know, you're not breaking the law with racist acts. all of that into context. there is that feeling with some people. do social media companies so many different implications understand that, do they fully grasp from inflation rates. that it understand that, do they fully grasp thatitis understand that, do they fully grasp that it is against the law? timer;r there are lots of bearings also on interest rates and unemployment that it is against the law? they tell us that _ and how the economy functions. that it is against the law? they tell us that they _ that it is against the law? they tell us that they do _ that it is against the law? they it is trying, after 18 tell us that they do and - that it is against the law? they tell us that they do and they i that it is against the law? tue: tell us that they do and they have it in their community standards that months of unprecedented change, to get back to hate speech is not permitted, but some sort of normality. the unfortunate thing here is that we see time and again on hate and but until we resume all of our old habits, that misinformation that social media will take a long time companies fail to act. why is that? to come to fruition. it is because they make money every but here at the market this morning, the shoppers are out, time someone logs onto their with business in full flow. website, spend time there and sees it is busy, but it is still adverts, generating revenue for these platforms. well there is a long way from normal. usually reluctant to actually do anything that might cut down the time people spend on these platforms our business correspondent ben and they don't seem to care whether thompson. thatis and they don't seem to care whether that is going on tonight to make the headlines on bbc news... posts to your sister, or going on to london's mayor makes face coverings mandatory on all transport posts to your sister, or going on to post racist abuse. there is a cost for london services including buses, tubes, trams and the overground. associated. if they want their plans for easing coronavirus platform to be well run, to stamp
10:20 am
restrictions in wales will be set out later out racism, they need to invest in at a slower pace than england, and with face coverings compulsory moderators and actually have the staff there to actually stamp down on public transport. the uk inflation rate hits 2.5% on this and enforce standards. what in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years, as the unlocking of the economy continues. on this and enforce standards. what would work. — on this and enforce standards. what would work, callum? _ on this and enforce standards. what would work, callum? again, with your research, what has to happen for action to be taken? how do they have to be hit? do they have to be hit in let's return to the issue of masks the pocket? is that all it comes on public transport. down to, money? tt’s this morning the mayor of london, the pocket? is that all it comes down to, money?— sadiq khan, said face the pocket? is that all it comes down to, money? it's a really good ruestion. coverings will still be compulsory down to, money? it's a really good question- i — down to, money? it's a really good question. i think, _ down to, money? it's a really good question. ithink, basically, - down to, money? it's a really good question. ithink, basically, yes. i question. ithink, basically, yes. there is a precedent for this. other on the transport network in london. countries such as germany introduced financial penalties for holocaust denial and otherforms but that might not be financial penalties for holocaust denial and other forms of extremism and what we saw happen was with the the case across the uk. threat of those penalties facebook scotland will still make them compulsory and the greater manchester mayor finally invested in moderation in andy burnham has said he will not "rule out" mandating facemasks the german language, so they opened up the german language, so they opened up a moderation centre in berlin on public transport. with 1200 staff, and it is widely believed that that has caused a decline in posts containing that i'm joined now byjames hughes, a bus driver sort of extremism. so it's not in the north west of england. impossible. with the right will the government could introduce similar
10:21 am
penalties and trigger action from the social media companies. callum, what do you make of all this with ruickl and the social media companies. callum, the masks? i quickly and finally, _ the social media companies. callum, quickly and finally, the _ the social media companies. callum, quickly and finally, the football i quickly and finally, the football banning orders, can they be included what do you make of all this with the masks?— what do you make of all this with the masks? ~ . , the masks? i think at this point, we with the online safety bill? would 'ust need the masks? i think at this point, we just need to — the masks? i think at this point, we just need to stick _ the masks? i think at this point, we just need to stick to _ the masks? i think at this point, we just need to stick to common - the masks? i think at this point, we| just need to stick to common sense, that work? t’m go with the government guidelines. with the online safety bill? would that work? �* ., , that work? i'm not sure where the ri . ht that work? i'm not sure where the right place — that work? i'm not sure where the right place for— that work? i'm not sure where the right place for it _ that work? i'm not sure where the right place for it would _ that work? i'm not sure where the right place for it would be - don't put the onus on the bus driver that work? i'm not sure where the right place for it would be in i that work? i'm not sure where the | right place for it would be in terms of legislation, but we already have a convention that racism is not or the company, put the onus on the individual so it avoids conflict for allowed at the stadiums. so i don't see why we should allow it online ourselves. so either and i think it would be good, good thing to do, to establish a individual so it avoids conflict for ourselves-— ourselves. so what if your local leaders said — ourselves. so what if your local leaders said yes, _ ourselves. so what if your local leaders said yes, it _ ourselves. so what if your local leaders said yes, it will- ourselves. so what if your local leaders said yes, it will be - leaders said yes, it will be convention where if you post racist mandatory, would that help? hat abuse online you are banned from mandatory, would that help? not matches as well. it abuse online you are banned from matches as well.— abuse online you are banned from matches as well. it does seem the reall . it kids are leading _ matches as well. it does seem the mandatory, would that help? ijrrt really. it needs to come straight kids are leading the _ matches as well. it does seem the kids are leading the way, - matches as well. it does seem the kids are leading the way, aren't i kids are leading the way, aren't they? they are showing a much from the top. if we have rules from brighter future than the adult one area to another, because we population. thank you very much. cross boundaries on a few of the bus routes, it wouldn't be right because thanks. you would have one area saying no, you are watching bbc news. one area saying yes and a lot of leeds, like many cities around the uk and the world, confused passengers.— has pledged to become carbon one area saying yes and a lot of confused passengers. what has your neutral by 2030. exerience confused passengers. what has your you might not necessarily make experience been _ confused passengers. what has your experience been like _ confused passengers. what has your experience been like with _ confused passengers. what has your experience been like with mask- a connection between what you are confused passengers. what has your experience been like with mask or . experience been like with mask or non—mask wearing passengers? eating for breakfast, lunch and dinner with creating the carbon emissions which lead to climate change. generally speaking, the rule of but in fact the global food
10:22 am
thumb is, don't challenge them, production system counts for one quarter of all the avoid conflict. at the end of the day, we have all got families to get emissions we create. home to. we do occasionally have passengers who will take their well, bbc radio?5 live's chris mascot as soon as they get past the warburton is in leeds?today driver and then put it on when they talking to people?about their carbon footprints. chris, tell us more. get off. and there are passengers who don't wear them. from experience travelling on public transport as a passenger, i have seen people walk on without masks without a care in hi. die might debt market right in the world. ., ,., ., , on without masks without a care in the world. ., ,., .,, ,., on without masks without a care in the world. ., ,., .,, y., ., the world. you sound as if you are not the mask wearing _ the world. you sound as if you are not the mask wearing on - the world. you sound as if you are not the mask wearing on buses. i the centre of leeds. place, this —— the world. you sound as if you are l not the mask wearing on buses. no. i am at a market right in the centre at the moment _ not the mask wearing on buses. i157. at the moment for the government guidance about it being not mandatory but recommended in crowded settings, that is the way it should of leeds. little fact for you, it is where marks & spencer began their go. that way, it puts the onus on journey all those years ago. i have been here for five live breakfast as people to make their own decisions part of a year—long project we are and not force companies and drivers into a corner. doing called leeds, city on a and not force companies and drivers into a corner-— and not force companies and drivers into a corner. does the bus company auree into a corner. does the bus company a . ree with mission, and as you rightly say into a corner. does the bus company agree with your _ into a corner. does the bus company following their progress to see how agree with your thoughts? _ into a corner. does the bus company agree with your thoughts? i - they are taking on this challenge of into a corner. does the bus company agree with your thoughts? i can't - agree with your thoughts? i can't seak on agree with your thoughts? i can't speak on behalf _ agree with your thoughts? i can't speak on behalf of _ agree with your thoughts? i can't speak on behalf of the _ agree with your thoughts? i can't speak on behalf of the bus - agree with your thoughts? i can't - speak on behalf of the bus company, becoming a carbon neutral city by but these are my thoughts and they 2030. cities across the world having don't represent anyone else. the to try to do the same thing. we are covering different facets of city
10:23 am
company i work for have been life, really. organisations, the extremely helpful to every driver throughout the pandemic. i can only council, individuals, what can they thank them for the support they give do as well? this morning we have been concentrating on the issue of us. ~ . food. as you say, a massive part of thank them for the support they give us, ~ ., ., , thank them for the support they give us. ~ ., ., , ., . thank them for the support they give us. . , thank them for the support they give this complex global puzzle. we have us. what has enforcement been like? you have hinted _ had a bit of fun because we have us. what has enforcement been like? you have hinted at _ us. what has enforcement been like? you have hinted at some _ us. what has enforcement been like? you have hinted at some tricky - you have hinted at some tricky situations with passengers. take us been looking at the classic english through a few examples. for example, fry up, just to see quite how green if ou do a the ingredients are. the carbon footprint, a lot of components of through a few examples. for example, if you do a school— through a few examples. for example, if you do a school run, _ the fry up, and to see if by through a few examples. for example, if you do a school run, there _ through a few examples. for example, if you do a school run, there will - if you do a school run, there will be a teacher waiting at the school replacing a few of those things you and they will remind them of their could make it a little bit more legal obligations. but as a driver, carbon friendly. let's speak to some we do not put ourselves in harm's of our guests who have been involved way. wejust in all of that. alice garvey is with we do not put ourselves in harm's way. we just allow the situation to develop stop like i said, we all us, food and climate change have families to go home to. james, researcher from us, food and climate change researcherfrom leeds university. researcher from leeds university. hello. researcherfrom leeds university. hello. and the chef anthony are ou o'shaughnessy is here as well, have families to go home to. james, are you protected — have families to go home to. james, are you protected in _ have families to go home to. james, are you protected in terms _ have families to go home to. james, are you protected in terms of- resident chef tutor at leeds cookery have families to go home to. james, are you protected in terms of face i are you protected in terms of face coverings and glass shields? do you school, a former masterchef feel safe on your bus? yes. semifinalist as well so that is why you might recognise his face. he coverings and glass shields? do you made the fry up for us earlier. just feel safe on your bus?— feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel very safe — feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel very safe on _ feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel very safe on my _ feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel very safe on my bus. _ feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel very safe on my bus. i _ feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel very safe on my bus. i have - feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel very safe on my bus. i have had l feel safe on your bus? yes, i feel. very safe on my bus. i have had both my vaccines and encourage anyone who describe there the relationship between the food we eat, a complex hasn't had the vaccine to get it. is the best thing you can do to protect yourself. yes, ifeel protected. one, and the carbon issue. what is
10:24 am
at the heart of it? it one, and the carbon issue. what is at the heart of it?— at the heart of it? it really varies from product _ at the heart of it? it really varies from product to _ at the heart of it? it really varies from product to product - at the heart of it? it really varies james hughes, a bus driver in the from product to product but i from product to product but essentially there the crop and north west of england, thank you livestock— essentially there the crop and very much. livestock production and the associated land use of that, then north west of england, thank you very much-— north west of england, thank you the supply chain impacts, ve much. ., ~' ., ., very much. thank you for having me. processing, packaging, transport, we have had — the kind _ processing, packaging, transport, very much. thank you for having me. we have had a _ very much. thank you for having me. we have had a lot _ very much. thank you for having me. we have had a lot of _ very much. thank you for having me. we have had a lot of feedback- the kind of— processing, packaging, transport, the kind of aspects of the food very much. thank you for having me. we have had a lot of feedback on - we have had a lot of feedback on 00:24:14,442 --> 4294966103:13:29,429 this subject. i did ask you to get system — the kind of aspects of the food system we often dwell upon. in the uk ahout— system we often dwell upon. in the uk about 10% of our emissions are from _ uk about 10% of our emissions are from agriculture and that is expected to grow towards 2050 is one important _ expected to grow towards 2050 is one important area to address. we expected to grow towards 2050 is one important area to address.— important area to address. we were ickin: on important area to address. we were picking on certain _ important area to address. we were picking on certain components i important area to address. we were picking on certain components you i picking on certain components you might have for breakfast and i mention some of the stuff you might have on a fry up. just explain the difference in the carbon weight of some of those. talking about tea and coffee and orangejuice, for example? coffee and orange 'uice, for exampleah coffee and orange 'uice, for examle? ~ . , , ., coffee and orange 'uice, for examle? . ., , , ., ., example? with a fry up about two thirds of the _ example? with a fry up about two thirds of the impact _ example? with a fry up about two thirds of the impact comes - example? with a fry up about two thirds of the impact comes from l example? with a fry up about two l thirds of the impact comes from the meat, _ thirds of the impact comes from the meet. the _ thirds of the impact comes from the meat, the sausages and bacon. drinks, — meat, the sausages and bacon. drinks, things like fresh orange has ahout— drinks, things like fresh orange has about twice the impact of long life because _ about twice the impact of long life because it — about twice the impact of long life because it has to be transported more _ because it has to be transported more quickly and refrigerate it was coffee, _ more quickly and refrigerate it was coffee, two thirds of the impact unfortunately comes from the milky ad which— unfortunately comes from the milky ad which contracts any effective boiling — ad which contracts any effective boiling of— ad which contracts any effective boiling of the water, the beans on the leaves — boiling of the water, the beans on the leaves. so it is the dairy, 0k
10:25 am
-- the _ the leaves. so it is the dairy, 0k -- the milk— the leaves. so it is the dairy, 0k —— the milk that you add. anthony, you have _ —— the milk that you add. anthony, you have never done -- the milk that you add. anthony, you have never done— you have never done anything like this before- _ you have never done anything like this before. what _ you have never done anything like this before. what did _ you have never done anything like this before. what did you - you have never done anything like this before. what did you have i you have never done anything like this before. what did you have to | this before. what did you have to replace to try to make a classic fry up replace to try to make a classic fry up a little more carbon friendly? basically, bacon, sausages, you meet on things. _ basically, bacon, sausages, you meet on things. we — basically, bacon, sausages, you meet on things, we replace _ basically, bacon, sausages, you meet on things, we replace them. - basically, bacon, sausages, you meet on things, we replace them. had i on things, we replace them. had vegetarian — on things, we replace them. had vegetarian sausage _ on things, we replace them. had vegetarian sausage this - on things, we replace them. had| vegetarian sausage this morning. on things, we replace them. had i vegetarian sausage this morning. we had hacou— vegetarian sausage this morning. we had bacon hut— vegetarian sausage this morning. we had bacon butjust _ vegetarian sausage this morning. we had bacon butjust less— vegetarian sausage this morning. we had bacon but just less than - vegetarian sausage this morning. we had bacon butjust less than normal, | had bacon butjust less than normal, instead _ had bacon butjust less than normal, instead of— had bacon butjust less than normal, instead of two— had bacon butjust less than normal, instead of two or _ had bacon butjust less than normal, instead of two or three _ had bacon butjust less than normal, instead of two or three rashers, i instead of two or three rashers, 'ust instead of two or three rashers, just one — instead of two or three rashers, just one rasher. _ instead of two or three rashers, just one rasher, and _ instead of two or three rashers, just one rasher, and we - instead of two or three rashers, just one rasher, and we made l instead of two or three rashers, i just one rasher, and we made use of actually— just one rasher, and we made use of actually the — just one rasher, and we made use of actually the cooking _ just one rasher, and we made use of actually the cooking method, - just one rasher, and we made use ofi actually the cooking method, cooking most things— actually the cooking method, cooking most things in— actually the cooking method, cooking most things in the _ actually the cooking method, cooking most things in the oven _ actually the cooking method, cooking most things in the oven while - actually the cooking method, cooking most things in the oven while the i most things in the oven while the oven _ most things in the oven while the oven is _ most things in the oven while the oven is on. — most things in the oven while the oven is on, using _ most things in the oven while the oven is on, using two— most things in the oven while the oven is on, using two or- most things in the oven while the oven is on, using two or three i oven is on, using two or three trays, — oven is on, using two or three trays, roasting _ oven is on, using two or three trays, roasting all— oven is on, using two or three trays, roasting all at - oven is on, using two or three trays, roasting all at once, i oven is on, using two or three trays, roasting all at once, it. trays, roasting all at once, it makes — trays, roasting all at once, it makes an— trays, roasting all at once, it makes an english _ trays, roasting all at once, it makes an english breakfast. trays, roasting all at once, it| makes an english breakfast a trays, roasting all at once, it i makes an english breakfast a lot less stressful— makes an english breakfast a lot less stressful to _ makes an english breakfast a lot less stressful to come _ makes an english breakfast a lot less stressful to come out - makes an english breakfast a lot less stressful to come out of i makes an english breakfast a lot i less stressful to come out of sight and out _ less stressful to come out of sight and out of— less stressful to come out of sight and out of mind, _ less stressful to come out of sight and out of mind, no— less stressful to come out of sight and out of mind, no grease - and out of mind, no grease splattered _ and out of mind, no grease splattered everywhere i and out of mind, no greasei splattered everywhere which and out of mind, no grease i splattered everywhere which is and out of mind, no grease - splattered everywhere which is quite nice. splattered everywhere which is quite nice i— splattered everywhere which is quite nice. . , �* , splattered everywhere which is quite nice. ., �* , ., nice. i wasn't quite sure about the chickea nice. i wasn't quite sure about the chickpea baked _ nice. i wasn't quite sure about the chickpea baked beans, _ nice. i wasn't quite sure about the chickpea baked beans, but- nice. i wasn't quite sure about the chickpea baked beans, but maybe| nice. i wasn't quite sure about the i chickpea baked beans, but maybe for another day... and another part of this whole thing, how do you deal with that at a cookery school in the kind of conversation you have with some of the peoples? that kind of conversation you have with some of the peoples?— kind of conversation you have with some of the peoples? at the cookery school we are — some of the peoples? at the cookery school we are really _ some of the peoples? at the cookery school we are really conscious i some of the peoples? at the cookery school we are really conscious of i school we are really conscious of waste _ school we are really conscious of waste and — school we are really conscious of waste and look— school we are really conscious of waste and look at _ school we are really conscious of waste and look at a _ school we are really conscious of waste and look at a lot _ school we are really conscious of waste and look at a lot of - school we are really conscious of waste and look at a lot of the i waste and look at a lot of the policy — waste and look at a lot of the policy around _
10:26 am
waste and look at a lot of the policy around the _ waste and look at a lot of the policy around the city - waste and look at a lot of the | policy around the city through waste and look at a lot of the i policy around the city through the organisation _ policy around the city through the organisation food _ policy around the city through the organisation food wise. - policy around the city through the organisation food wise. inner- organisation food wise. inner classes, _ organisation food wise. inner classes, for— organisation food wise. inner classes, for example, - organisation food wise. inner classes, for example, some i organisation food wise. inner- classes, for example, some leftover vegetables, — classes, for example, some leftover vegetables, you _ classes, for example, some leftover vegetables, you can— classes, for example, some leftover vegetables, you can roast— classes, for example, some leftover vegetables, you can roast them, i vegetables, you can roast them, puree _ vegetables, you can roast them, puree with— vegetables, you can roast them, puree with them, _ vegetables, you can roast them, puree with them, then _ vegetables, you can roast them, puree with them, then use - vegetables, you can roast them, puree with them, then use it i vegetables, you can roast them, puree with them, then use it in. vegetables, you can roast them, i puree with them, then use it in our pasta _ puree with them, then use it in our pasta class — puree with them, then use it in our pasta class filled _ puree with them, then use it in our pasta class filled ravioli. _ pasta class filled ravioli. different _ pasta class filled ravioli. different ways _ pasta class filled ravioli. different ways of - pasta class filled ravioli. different ways of raisingj pasta class filled ravioli. i different ways of raising as pasta class filled ravioli. - different ways of raising as well. freezing — different ways of raising as well. freezing is— different ways of raising as well. freezing is a _ different ways of raising as well. freezing is a really— different ways of raising as well. freezing is a really good - different ways of raising as well. freezing is a really good asset i different ways of raising as well. j freezing is a really good asset in reducing — freezing is a really good asset in reducing waste. _ freezing is a really good asset in reducing waste. don't _ freezing is a really good asset in reducing waste. don't freeze i reducing waste. don't freeze anything _ reducing waste. don't freeze anything without _ reducing waste. don't freeze anything without knowing i reducing waste. don't freeze . anything without knowing what reducing waste. don't freeze i anything without knowing what it will he _ anything without knowing what it will he used _ anything without knowing what it will be used for. _ anything without knowing what it will be used for.— will be used for. smart thinking ahead, will be used for. smart thinking ahead. the _ will be used for. smart thinking ahead, the ledger. _ will be used for. smart thinking ahead, the ledger. one - will be used for. smart thinking ahead, the ledger. one thing i will be used for. smart thinking i ahead, the ledger. one thing you have to be really careful when talking about this kind of thing, people don't want to feel they are being preached to, do they? always a danger when you start talking on some of the subjects. particularly, we were talking to some people from leeds here and they said, i want to think about this stuff, but when i go to the supermarket i am singing about what is in my wallet first of all. . . , about what is in my wallet first of all. ., . , , about what is in my wallet first of all. , , ., , about what is in my wallet first of all. , '. all. exactly. it is really difficult but there are _ all. exactly. it is really difficult but there are symbols - all. exactly. it is really difficult but there are symbols which i all. exactly. it is really difficult| but there are symbols which as all. exactly. it is really difficult i but there are symbols which as you can make _ but there are symbols which as you can make to— but there are symbols which as you can make to build low—carbon thing into your— can make to build low—carbon thing into your life. two thirds of the impact — into your life. two thirds of the impact from meat and dairy so just reducing _ impact from meat and dairy so just reducing the amount of eat the meat to eat. _ reducing the amount of eat the meat to eat. and _ reducing the amount of eat the meat to eat, and changing the type to more _ to eat, and changing the type to more pork— to eat, and changing the type to more pork and poultry —— changing to poultry _ more pork and poultry —— changing to poultry a _ more pork and poultry —— changing to poultry. a meat free monday, not
10:27 am
necessarily— poultry. a meat free monday, not necessarily about giving it up entirely _ necessarily about giving it up entirely. about 20% of the uk is flexitarians that they have reduced their red _ flexitarians that they have reduced their red meat intake. and it has benefits— their red meat intake. and it has benefits on— their red meat intake. and it has benefits on health the things you do can have _ benefits on health the things you do can have a _ benefits on health the things you do can have a big impact.— can have a big impact. alice, anthony. _ can have a big impact. alice, anthony, thank _ can have a big impact. alice, anthony, thank you - can have a big impact. alice, anthony, thank you very i can have a big impact. alice, i anthony, thank you very much can have a big impact. alice, - anthony, thank you very much indeed. we are off to scoff the rest of what anthony made for us this morning. if you want to follow the rest of what we are doing with this city on a mission in leeds you can do so for the rest of the day on radio 5 live. thank you, chris. chris warburton there. it was an extraordinary escape — carlos ghosn, the former boss of the car—making giant nissan — has been describing how he fled house arrest injapan by hiding in a box. he'd been arrested in tokyo in 2018 and charged with financial misconduct — which he denies. mr ghosn has been speaking exclusively to our business editor, simonjack. i could not show my face, so i had to be hidden somewhere. the only way i could be hidden is to be in a box or be in luggage. so nobody could see me, nobody
10:28 am
could recognise me and obviously, the plan could work. beforejoining the box, i needed... not to be detected because as you know, i departed from an airport outside from tokyo, but i have to go there. so we used a train and taxis. so i had to wear things that i never usually wear. and you know, the plane was scheduled to take off at 11pm at that night. we were ready and i was in the box in the rear of the plane, probably around 10:30pm. these 30 minutes waiting in the box in the plane, waiting for the plane to take off were probably the... longest period of waiting i've ever experienced in my life. carlos ghosn there. and you can hear more of that
10:29 am
interview in our business coverage in about 30 minutes. prince charles has warned that the uk is in danger of destroying britain's rural communities by letting small family farms "go to the wall". speaking to the bbc, he said the focus needs to move away from producing cheap and mass—produced food and to put nature back at the heart of farming. here's our chief environment correspondentjustin rowlatt. superefficient, intensive agriculture is a dead end, prince charles said today. he warns that the pursuit of cheap food has damaged our soils and water courses as well as producing emissions that have driven global warming. such has been the damage to the natural systems we depend upon, we must achieve profound and rapid change to reverse it. we must put nature back at the heart of the equation. the prince is adamant that small farms must be a part of that effort. he has been deeply concerned with food and the environment for most of his adult life.
10:30 am
our current approach is forcing many small family farms to the wall. if they go, it will quite simply ripped the heart out of the british countryside and break the backbone of britain's rural communities. prince charles praises the efforts of marcus rashford and jamie oliver to improve the nation's diet. he believes we need to switch from industrial farming methods and adopt more sustainable practices. only by benefiting nature can we benefit people, and that will ensure the future of our living planet. prince charles's comments come ahead of the publication tomorrow of the national food strategy — the first major review of britain's food system in over 70 years. justin rowlett, bbc news.
10:31 am
in the uk ministers are publishing their long—awaited plans to cut carbon emissions from all forms of transport. it's part of efforts to help the uk reach its target of net zero emissions by 2050. under the proposals, new lorries will need to be carbon—free by 2040, car—makers will also be set targets to speed up sales of electric vehicles, and there'll be a focus on improving charging. the government's also expected to say we can carry on flying because it expects the uk aviation industry to be dominated by zero emission planes. the number of migrants who've died trying to cross the mediterranean sea from africa to europe has more than doubled since last year. this is coming from research by the international organisation for
10:32 am
migrants. —— for migration. more on bbc news shortly. now let's catch up on the weather with nick miller. this high pressure marks the start of a spell of settled weather for the end of the week, the weekend, into the start of next week that will bring many of us spells of sunshine and temperatures heading up, becoming warm or indeed very warm. this is the area of high pressure moving on. not ignoring, though, these weather fronts and they are going to bring more cloud into north—west scotland today. we may see a few spots of light rain into the western isles particularly. cloud increasing in northern ireland as well. eastern and southern scotland keeping some sunshine, along with the bulk of england and wales. just a few patches of cloud towards western coasts and we could keep a bit of cloud in parts of east anglia into the afternoon. around the coast, round 17—20 degrees, inland 20—24 and a few
10:33 am
spots getting up to 25 celsius. more cloud running across scotland overnight with a few spots of drizzle, cloudy but misty into northern ireland and cloud increasing from the north—west into england and wales with temperatures need to low teens. sunny spells breaking through the early cloud in scotland and in northern ireland as we go through the day. a brighter day in north—west scotland compared with today. tomorrow for england and wales there will be more cloud around but even so there will still be a few sunny spells breaking through at times, especially later in the day. again, the temperatures in the warm spots approaching the mid—20s. so look at that for glasgow, for example, tomorrow. then on friday, whilst much of the uk will be holding onto long spells of sunshine, some cloud around in northern ireland towards the north and north—west of scotland, still close to some weak weather fronts here, even though with the cloud it will stay largely dry. this settled picture then will continue into the weekend with high pressure, and again as that sits over us and we get the sunshine temperatures will be
10:34 am
heading up as it becomes very warm over the weekend, the highest temperatures heading towards the upper 20s, particularly in parts of england and wales. though in northern scotland you are still close to those weather fronts, just into the mid—teens, for example, with cloud over the weekend. elsewhere in scotland and northern ireland temperatures seem low, approaching the mid—20s with sunny spells, and plenty of sunshine in england and wales. we are talking mid to upper 20s for that temperature over the weekend.
10:35 am
this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: london's mayor makes face coverings mandatory on all transport
10:36 am
for london services — including buses, tubes, trams and the overground. quite clear from the conversation i have had with londoners, from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them greater confidence in using our incredibly safe transport system. face masks will also remain compulsory on public transport in wales — plans for easing coronavirus restrictions there will be set out later. the uk inflation rate hits 2.5% in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years — as the unlocking of the economy continues. concern from victims of the troubles over an expected government statement on how to deal with northern ireland's violent past. there have been further calls from conservative backbenchers for the party to examine its approach to taking the knee — following racism against england footballers during the euro 2020 final. and coming up this hour: britney spears' application to end her legal guardianship goes
10:37 am
back to court in los angeles later. hello, and welcome to bbc news. passengers must continue to wear face coverings on london's transport network, despite the legal requirement to wear them being lifted in england from monday. they've been mandatory on public transport for the past year to help reduce the spread of the virus. the city's mayor, sadiq khan, said he was not prepared to put tube, tram and other transport users at risk by relaxing the rules — and the move was aimed at keeping passengers and staff safe. the greater manchester mayor, andy burnham, said he would not "rule out" making face masks compulsorary on public transport. in scotland, first minister
10:38 am
nicola sturgeon said the current rules on face masks in enclosed spaces will remain in place for "some time", even after other restrictions are eased onjuly19. in wales, people will still need to wear them on public transport and in healthcare settings. and in northern ireland, some requirements for face coverings could be lifted onjuly 26, but no decision has been made yet. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. from monday, it's no longer the law to wear a mask on public transport in england. instead, it's about personal responsibility. but the government has said it still wants people to wear face coverings in crowded settings, such as busy trains or buses. london's mayor, sadiq khan, has asked transport for london to make it a condition of carriage, meaning that if passenger travel on any of its services, including the buses and tubes, they must wear a mask, even after monday. one of my responsibilites is public
10:39 am
safety on the public transport, but also i'm quite clear from the conversation i have had with londoners, from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them greater confidence in using our incredibly safe transport system. tfl will be the first operator to do this, although manchester's mayor, andy burnham, has not ruled out doing the same on the city's tram network. the scottish government has also said it will continue to require facemasks on public transport. on the issue of mandating mitigations like face coverings, let me just say this, it is my view that if government believes measures like this matter, and this government does, we should say so, we should do what is necessary to ensure compliance, and we should be prepared to take any resulting flak from those who disagree. we should not lift important restrictions to make our work lives easier, and then expect the public to take its ability for doing the right thing anyway. wales is also expected to do the same. unions have welcomed the news, but some are worried about how
10:40 am
enforceable it will be and that it could lead to disputes on board. some operators are worried that requiring masks on public transport could make people feel like the service is less safe than other indoor places, like restaurants or pubs, but the mayor has said he is doing it to make the public feel more confident. caroline davies, bbc news. our health correspondent anna collinson is with me. just anna collinson is with me. reminders of the evider the just reminders of the evidence of the impact around mask wearing. tt we go about two years, the idea of wearing a facemask which is so alien to us, and now it has become a real symbol of what the pandemic is about. no government in the uk was initially reluctant to bring in a facemask last year, they said that was not enough evidence, but last summer it became mandatory on a public transport, in shops and in health and care settings. on monday, thatis health and care settings. on monday, that is due to change in england. that has led to a real row about
10:41 am
their significance and the role that they play in any pandemic. ultimately, the evidence that we have at the moment is hazy, it is not as clear—cut as people would like it. we know that masks are effective in a lavatory settings, we know they work as personal protective equipment for any pandemic. ultimately, the evidence that we have at the moment is hazy, it is not as clear cut as people would like it. we know that masks are effective in lavatory settings, we know they work as personal protective equipment for nhs and emergency staff. when it comes to evidence in the real world, preventing the spread of covid, it is quite murky and complicated. one study by researchers in the us looked at the impact of state right —— state—wide mask required of it. they reported after taking into the accounts of various state differences that adopted mask wearing early on in the process, one ljy wearing early on in the process, one by the majority of people, had a more positive effect. the study showed that there was a positive impact of state wearing masks, but more evidence is needed. there are
10:42 am
very few randomised controlled trials that scientists would like to see in this area to stop it is mostly about protecting others rather than yourself, everybody needs to wear them to have a universal protection of a stop if everybody is not wearing them, i guess one way for people to protect themselves is to have a mask and a visor. there are obvious downsides to wearing masks. you can understand why people do not like to wear them, it can be difficult to communicate, believe, it can steam up your glasses. many scientists believe that even though the evidence is limited, the use of face coverings doesn't work if the vast majority comply that is key. that is why there are concerns about removing this mandatory mask wearing, the message that sends the people. as you say, it is a key part of the messaging. the current advice is based on evidence. if masks are used
10:43 am
correctly, they may reduce the spread of coronavirus droplets, and ljy spread of coronavirus droplets, and by waiting when you are helping to protect others. it is a similar message from the who. lets protect others. it is a similar message from the who. lets talk more about that decision _ message from the who. lets talk more about that decision by _ message from the who. lets talk more about that decision by the _ message from the who. lets talk more about that decision by the london i about that decision by the london mayor to make masquerading mandatory or not tfl transport. —— mask wearing. i'm joined now by steve garelick who represents public transport workers for the gmb union. what do you think about what the london mayor has said? t what do you think about what the london mayor has said?— what do you think about what the london mayor has said? i think this is a positive — london mayor has said? i think this is a positive step _ london mayor has said? i think this is a positive step in _ london mayor has said? i think this is a positive step in the _ london mayor has said? i think this is a positive step in the right i is a positive step in the right direction. we are not out of the pandemic. the figures we are seeing is a 15 fold increase in a month of cases that are coming up. i think stepping away from world health organization advice would be look
10:44 am
really dangerous. from our perspective, it is about protection of workers, particularly those travelling, and making sure that we are safe to see each other for another day. are safe to see each other for another day-— are safe to see each other for another da . ~ . , ., �*, another day. what is the union's osition another day. what is the union's position in _ another day. what is the union's position in terms _ another day. what is the union's position in terms of _ another day. what is the union's position in terms of trying i another day. what is the union's position in terms of trying to - position in terms of trying to protect workers with masks? i position in terms of trying to protect workers with masks? i think certainl in protect workers with masks? i think certainly in the _ protect workers with masks? i think certainly in the case _ protect workers with masks? i think certainly in the case of _ protect workers with masks? i think certainly in the case of g _ protect workers with masks? i think certainly in the case of g the, - certainly in the case of g the, we're pretty proud of the fact that... early last year i wrote to both the home secretary and department for transport requesting that masks were mandatory in all sectors, from bus, rail, to private hire taxis are anything down to curios, who theoretically could be acting as a super spreaders as they go from people's homes. this is still a modal way of getting items around. ultimately, we want to see work is protected, we want to see
10:45 am
the value of these masks in place until there is proof otherwise. you mention how _ until there is proof otherwise. you mention how you _ until there is proof otherwise. you mention how you used your union might previously to tell the government what you wanted. obviously, masks were mandatory until now, because until next week they will no longer be. miller new to using your union strength in regards that again? or will you accept that the decision is now voluntarily? unless organisations like tfl say they want passengers to wear them. i like tfl say they want passengers to wear them. ~ ., ., ., wear them. i think what the london ma or has wear them. i think what the london mayor has just _ wear them. i think what the london mayor hasjust said _ wear them. i think what the london mayor hasjust said and _ wear them. i think what the london mayor hasjust said and what - wear them. i think what the london | mayor hasjust said and what seems mayor has just said and what seems to be the case in the country, i'm sure other readers will get on—board with this, it will be mandatory public transport.— public transport. sorry to interrunt. _ public transport. sorry to interrupt, it _
10:46 am
public transport. sorry to interrupt, it won't - public transport. sorry to interrupt, it won't be - public transport. sorry to - interrupt, it won't be mandatory. public transport. sorry to _ interrupt, it won't be mandatory. in interrupt, it won't be mandatory. in the mayor's words, it will still be mandatory, there will be an expectation that it will be less of a stop grant shapps himself today said he was hoping something similar would come through. from the perspective of saying it's a choice whether you do or don't, it is a condition of carriage, that is mandatory. condition of carriage, that is mandatory-— mandatory. that is the tfl, obviously — mandatory. that is the tfl, obviously at _ mandatory. that is the tfl, obviously at your _ mandatory. that is the tfl, obviously at your workers l mandatory. that is the tfl, l obviously at your workers go mandatory. that is the tfl, - obviously at your workers go far beyond the tfl. l obviously at your workers go far beyond the tfl.— obviously at your workers go far beyond the tfl. i think you have heard in both _ beyond the tfl. i think you have heard in both scotland - beyond the tfl. i think you have heard in both scotland and - beyond the tfl. i think you have l heard in both scotland and wales beyond the tfl. i think you have i heard in both scotland and wales it is still mandatory, i imagine it was say mandatory for most health authorities. ultimately, the people who are staffing these routes, whether on bus or private taxi hire, they need protection. why would you not be a good citizen and look out for other people buy deal directing and wearing a mask?— for other people buy deal directing and wearing a mask? thank you very
10:47 am
much. plans for easing coronavirus restrictions in wales will be set out by the welsh government later today. it's expected to go at a slower pace than england. ministers have already said that face coverings will remain mandatory on public transport and in healthcare settings. john griffiths is a labour member of the welsh parliament, the senedd. he says voters in wales favour a cautious approach to lifting coronavirus restrictions. well, i guess we all have our own opinions. what the welsh government has indicated up to now seems to makes sense to me, that we move on to the same footing as england and scotland, perhaps a little later, but with the exception of the wearing of masks. so, as you said, masks would continue to be required in health and social care settings, on taxis and public transport, and i think that makes sense. let's talk to nikki small — who runs an independent craft shop, ewe felty thing —
10:48 am
in llandudno. thank you forjoining us. i like the name of the shop. tell us how you are feeling now ahead of the easing of restrictions?— of restrictions? next, really. glad that we might _ of restrictions? next, really. glad that we might be _ of restrictions? next, really. glad that we might be able _ of restrictions? next, really. glad that we might be able to - of restrictions? next, really. glad that we might be able to open - of restrictions? next, really. glad that we might be able to open a l that we might be able to open a little bit more, but also i would be quite happy to go more cautiously as well. i think we have worked really hard over the past 18 months to keep everybody safe. certainly, as a business will close a few days earlier and we had been much more cautious in hour opening, just because our demographic is quite vulnerable, i'm quite vulnerable, and so we want to make sure that nobody comes to harm through coming in andjoining in nobody comes to harm through coming in and joining in at the shop. you in and 'oining in at the shop. you have in and joining in at the shop. you have some _ in and joining in at the shop. you have some health _ in and joining in at the shop. you have some health issues, which means that you are a bit
10:49 am
immunocompromised. how vulnerable has that made you feel?— has that made you feel? quite, especially _ has that made you feel? quite, especially when _ has that made you feel? quite, especially when the _ has that made you feel? quite, especially when the details - has that made you feel? quite, l especially when the details came has that made you feel? quite, - especially when the details came out about type one diabetics and that sort of thing. i have got a couple of different conditions. certainly, last year before vaccinations, i was feeling quite nervous about leaving the house. i certainly did not want to be in the shop. it hasjust meant also i have not been able to be in the shop as much as i would like to be so we have had to employ staff to take over at my role in the shop rather than me doing it myself. [30 rather than me doing it myself. do stay with us. you're watching bbc news we now say goodbye to viewers on bbc2. prime minister's questions is coming up prime minister's questions is coming up at midday, we will have coverage of that here on the bbc news
10:50 am
channel. thank you for waiting. you were just saying they had about how you felt vulnerable. you feel about some of your customers are vulnerable as well. does that mean, going forward, you have confidence that people are going to take careful measures around protecting themselves? or how much are you concerned about things like mask wearing no longer being compulsory actually impacting on you and those who come to your shop? yes. actually impacting on you and those who come to your shop?— actually impacting on you and those who come to your shop? yes, it needs to become best _ who come to your shop? yes, it needs to become best practice, _ who come to your shop? yes, it needs to become best practice, rather- who come to your shop? yes, it needs to become best practice, rather than l to become best practice, rather than a legal requirement. i think that does make sense. but i think there is to be something in place, especially for small businesses, which are quite small premises. at the moment, we have only been able
10:51 am
to have one, maybe two bubbles in at a time. we cannot run any of our groups, clubs, classes, which are a huge part of our business just because we couldn't safely distance to do it. i think there needs to be a little bit of support, help everybody to continue with what is best practice, even once stopped being a legal requirement. i think we need to continue to put the health of everybody first as much as we possibly can. you health of everybody first as much as we possibly can-— we possibly can. you are not going to through — we possibly can. you are not going to through your— we possibly can. you are not going to through your door _ we possibly can. you are not going to through your door was - we possibly can. you are not going to through your door was open - we possibly can. you are not going| to through your door was open then as it was before? mat to through your door was open then as it was before?— as it was before? not instantly, no. we will continue _ as it was before? not instantly, no. we will continue to _ as it was before? not instantly, no. we will continue to take _ as it was before? not instantly, no. we will continue to take things - we will continue to take things quite cautiously and just make sure that we are looking after everybody is best we can do. with that in mind, we do really want to be able to get some of our interactive things going again. part of the
10:52 am
problem of the pandemic is that everybody�*s mental health has suffered quite a lot, and one of the wonderful things about crafting is that it wonderful things about crafting is thatitis wonderful things about crafting is that it is such a positive influence, things like anxiety, depression, it really keeps you going. a lot of people have very much needed that over the pandemic and we have missed being able to provide that service was that you are absolutely _ provide that service was that you are absolutely right, a good spot of knitting does wonders forjust helping to forget everything else thatis helping to forget everything else that is going on around. thank you very much. the labour party is calling for anyone convicted of racist abuse online to be banned from attending football matches. it wants the courts to be given new powers to crack down on perpetrators, like those who targeted members of the england squad after the euros 2020 final. there have also been further calls, from within conservative ranks, for the party to examine its approach to taking the knee.
10:53 am
the former minister, steve baker, said attitudes needed to be challenged. i think what i see is that gestures are extremely powerful, and surely that is now evident because it's dominating the conversation in our country. so, i think over the course of political life i've possibly learned some things, and i would certainly say i've learned that this is a very powerful gesture. unfortunately, it's susceptible to multiple competing interpretations. but, if i may, i would say it's one thing to boo the referee when you disagree with a marginal decision, but it's another to boo brave black players who are saying no to racism and bravely going out on the field to take a knee and say, "we are expressing our solidarity with those who suffer racism." of course politics is a highly contested arena, and there will be some people who speak simply in a spirit of good faith based on what they observe, and some people will seek to attack the home secretary. the point i'm making is that when i listen to what has been said by albie and others who have taken a similar line, it is a wake—up call
10:54 am
for the conservative party aboutjust how powerful our words are when we navigate these issues, and we just have to get alongside those players who are taking the knee and understand that they're not saying, "defund the police." they�* re not anti—capitalist. what they're doing is saying, "we suffer racism." let's talk to our political correspondent, iain watson. strong words there from steve baker. how powerful a position does he have within the party for those words to be listened to? he within the party for those words to be listened to?— be listened to? he is a former minister. _ be listened to? he is a former minister. of— be listened to? he is a former minister, of course, _ be listened to? he is a former minister, of course, but - be listened to? he is a former minister, of course, but also i be listened to? he is a former| minister, of course, but also a be listened to? he is a former- minister, of course, but also a very good organiser amongst fellow conservative mps, he was during brexit. he also is part of the covid recovery group which seeks to get the economy unlocked perhaps quicker than borisjohnson is doing. he is influential and within a section of the conservative party and i think he feels the party leadership has simply been in the wrong place on
10:55 am
this issue. and they have perhaps been misinterpreted by the wider public by not being more forthright in condemning those who chewed the england team. he mentioned the importance of this are taking a knee as a gesture, that is a reference to priti patel, the home secretary, because she condemned taking a knee as a gesture of politics before the tournament started and did not explicitly condemn those who had been doing players when they took a kneein been doing players when they took a knee in the warm up games ahead of euro 2020. he himself is distancing himself a bit from the home secretary. labour trying to make the government wriggle also more on this. i think this will come up at prime minister's questions, but they're also putting down what is called an urgent question, effectively a way of dragging a government minister to the house of commons to talk about the racism that england footballers have faced, and they want priti patel to answer that in the house of commons was up
10:56 am
i'm not sure if she will do it or another home office minister. certainly from steve baker's point of view he can see how the opposition is trying to make many in his own party uncomfortable. he is talking about black conservative activists uncomfortable at how the party, as he put it, misinterpreted the so—called gesture. he was saying how that is not about the more extreme demands of the black lives matter movement in america, even in the police. matter movement in america, even in the olice. ., matter movement in america, even in the olice. . , ., the police. there are calls for secific the police. there are calls for specific action _ the police. there are calls for specific action to _ the police. there are calls for specific action to tackle - the police. there are calls for specific action to tackle it. . the police. there are calls for - specific action to tackle it. labour said they want basis to be banned from attending football matches. the government is taking action on social media companies. —— they want racists to be banned. as the government listening, is it actually willing to take in some of these positions? l willing to take in some of these ositions? ~ willing to take in some of these positions?— willing to take in some of these ositions? ~ , ._ ,
10:57 am
positions? i think this may well be based at prime _ positions? i think this may well be based at prime minister's - positions? i think this may well be i based at prime minister's questions, but labor day want something which effectively is just getting a lock to catch up. at the moment, if you shout racist abuse from the football matches, you can be banned from football matches in the future. what they are saying now, anybody found guilty, prosecuted for online abuse and on social media, for example, they would then be banned from all future football matches, or england games. that is a very specific call. the government is saying that that online safety spill is basically going to try to make sure the social media companies are themselves clamped down on racism, they see that as more effective. without they moved toward the labour position on that specific demand, it remains to be seen. the uk inflation rate hit 2.5% in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years,
10:58 am
as the unlocking of the uk economy continued. as you can see here — the rate is higher than the bank of england's 2% inflation target for a second month. the office for national statistics says the rise has been driven by higher food and fuel costs. eating and drinking out also cost more, while clothing and footwear, usually cheaper at this time of year, also went up in price. our business presenter, ben thompson, is in northwest london and has more. inflation shows how quickly prices are rising. it could mean you will get less of this stuff for your money. your pound will go less far the higher inflation goes. those are the implications, because for the bank of england, they will be keeping a close eye on it because it then has a knock—on effect for things like interest rates because they may decide to raise interest rates to cool inflation because it encourages us to put money in the bank rather than to go out and spend. great news, of course, if you have any savings, not so good if you have a credit card or mortgage. so it proves how interlinked
10:59 am
all these things are. but you're right, it's because the economy is trying to get back to some sort of normality. lots of changes over the last year as a result of the pandemic. the big question is whether this rise in prices is temporary or it is something we need to get used to. let me introduce you to dr linda yueh, an economist. so much has changed this last year. is this rise in inflationjust a product of that as the economy starts to work out what is happening and get back to normality? that is what most economists think, but not all of them. price rises are measured based on what happened a year ago. this time last year, we were in lockdown with little ability to go out. the biggest drivers of the price increase this time is things like eating out, recreation and buying goods. so the demand is up and that is consistent with the economy opening up. but there has been a lot of supply disruption. another big driver of this price
11:00 am
increase is transport costs. shipping costs and fuel costs have gone up. the reason shipping costs have gone up is because all the ships are in the wrong places because of the lockdowns in different countries. so supply—side pressure when demand is going up is why we have this price increase, the highest in three years. how temporary is this? we know the economy is trying to get back to normal. we are resuming some of our old shopping habits, going back to work and trying to go on holiday again. so the question is how long this is here for and whether we will start to see the money in our pocket go less far? that is a very important and difficult question, but essentially, the bank of england thinks inflation will rise further during the rest of this year to about 3% before it goes back to 2% next year. that is consistent with where they think the rebound is coming from. growth this year could be 7%. that sounds impressive until you realise we lost about 10%
11:01 am
of output last year. so you expect prices to go up when you have this big rebound in growth, but that rebound is not going to last. in other words, once you get back to pre—pandemic levels at the end of 2019, we expect growth rates to come down and price pressures will come down. so for the most part, it looks like it could be temporary but there are some economists who worry it could be more permanent because of lots of things. we just can't work out how unusual a pandemic lockdown is. you have touched on what the economy did last year, but give us an overview of where we are now. how long will it take for us to get back to something that is more normal, like 2019 before all this began? probably next year, but a lot of this depends on what happens globally in terms of the pandemic. most countries haven't been vaccinated to the same extent as we luckily have.
11:02 am
a lot of scientists think it will be two to three years before we get the world vaccinated. the implication of that for us as an economy dependent on global trade and importing things means we won't feel completely back to normal. the other indication isjobs. even though the economy is rebounding, unemployment is going to rise to over 5% by the end of this year. that really has an impact on standards of living. that plus the price increases gives a sense that it is not going to be very soon before we get back to normal. for that reason, the bank of england is unlikely to do much except support the recovery this year and probably through next year as well. that really does illustrate how interlinked all of these things are. linda, thanks for putting all of that into context. so many different implications from inflation rates. there are lots of bearings also on interest rates and unemployment and how the economy functions.
11:03 am
it is trying, after 18 months of unprecedented change, to get back to some sort of normality. but until we resume all of our old habits, that will take a long time to come to fruition. but here at the market this morning, the shoppers are out, with business in full flow. it is busy, but it is still a long way from normal. proposals on how to deal with issues around the legacy of the troubles, in northern ireland, are expected to be published by the government later today. it is believed the plans will involve a statute of limitations ending all prosecutions related to the troubles prior to 1998, and would apply to former soldiers as well as ex—paramilitaries. the idea has been met with opposition from victims' groups and the irish government. here's an update from our correspondent, danjohnson. we are waiting for brandon lewis, the secretary of state for northern ireland, to outline his plans, his preferred options
11:04 am
for the british government's way ahead on what is called legacy. that is everything that is left over from northern ireland's troubled past. what that means to a lot of people, justice in the case of murders, attacks, crimes that are unsolved after so many years. there are survivors, victims, waiting for that justice, there are bereaved families who want answers about what happened to their loved ones. so, as you say, if the british government is looking to go ahead with some form of amnesty, in effect, as it's being described, for anybody who committed crimes prior to the good friday agreement of 1998, that will be met by huge opposition, notjust from political parties here in northern ireland, but from groups representing those families and as you say, from the irish government as well. i can read you a tweet this morning from simon coveney, the irish foreign minister, who says, "this is not a fait accompli, it is the uk government outlining its position." he says, "the irish government has a very different view, as do northern ireland political parties, and victims' groups. the secretary of state and i have committed to an inclusive dialogue to try to agree a consensus."
11:05 am
so even if the british government outlined its position today, i think there is going to be a lot of wrangling, a lot of talking to be done before we are anywhere close to an agreement, because there are so many complicated issues to resolve, they go back so far and there is so much deep feeling about this. this doesn'tjust apply in northern ireland, because of course there were attacks, there were bombings, there were killings in the rest of the united kingdom. there are victims' families there, who also want answers. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. a spell of largely fine, settled weather is under way. plenty of sunny spells for much of the uk today, although cloudy in northwest scotland. a bit of light rain or drizzle is possible later. brightness for a time in northern ireland, though cloud increasing again from the west later. some patches of cloud around western coastal parts of england and wales and some areas of cloud lingering towards north sea coasts and into east anglia. from the thicker cloud moving across scotland overnight,
11:06 am
you could see some light rain and drizzle. cloudy overnight in northern ireland. cloud increasing towards northern and western parts of england and wales, temperatures into the mid to low teens. tomorrow, sunny spells breaking through in scotland and eventually northern ireland. a bit more cloud around in england and wales compared with today, but still some sunny spells at times, especially later in the day. and it will feel pleasantly warm where you get to see some of that sunshine. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... london's mayor makes face coverings mandatory on all transport for london services, including buses, tubes, trams and the overground. i'm quite clear from the conversation i have had with londoners, from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them greater confidence
11:07 am
in using our incredibly safe transport system. face masks will also remain compulsory on public transport in wales. plans for easing coronavirus restrictions there will be set out later. there have been further calls from conservative backbenchers for the party to examine its approach to taking the knee, following racism against england footballers during the euro 2020 final. the uk inflation rate hits 2.5% in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years, as the unlocking of the economy continues. sport now, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. it may have been a record—breaking run chase at edgbaston yesterday, from those one—day england players called up when the first team were forced to isolate due to a covid outbreak, but it seems it's not enough to keep their places in the team. this morning, the squad for the t20 series against pakistan has been announced, and regular captain
11:08 am
eoin morgan and 9 of the players that were isolating are back in the fold for the first match on friday. so it means that the likes ofjames vince, who hit his first international century, in england's record breaking win, is now dropped. he helped england chase a target at edgbaston of 332, and thanks to his partnership with lewis gregory, they managed to do it, with 2 overs to spare. it meant they won the series 3—0 to show much strength in depth england have, in the shorter formats of the game. and for vince, starring in front of 19,000 fans meant a lot. to get out there and make a contribution like that and get 100 in front of a pretty noisy crowd and a good day and contribute towards a win, obviously would have liked to be there at the end, but once the boys got over the line, and settled
11:09 am
down a bit, really enjoyed it. manchester united fans might have to wait until the end of october to welcome back marcus rashford to old trafford. the england forward has decided to have surgery on a shoulder injury that plagued him for the latter half of last season, after a scan yesterday. the lay—off could mean rashford misses half of united's champions league, group stage matches, and 5 of england's world cup qualifiers. it was a final chance last night for britain's athletes to hone their skills ahead of the olympics, that start injust 10 days' time. but it was a disappointing showing in the long jump, for heptathlon world champion, katarina johnson—thompson. this was at the diamond league meeting at gateshead and johnson—thompson, is on her way back from a ruptured achilles tendon. shejumped 6.10 metres, well short of the 6.77 she recorded when she won gold in doha in 2019. but before last night she only had one previous,
11:10 am
high—jump outing, this year. when you have an kelly is problem it affects your speed and you can see that she looks strong but she is missing that zip that you need in order to take off. you can do that, you can do that in the time that she has. obviously it'sjust you can do that in the time that she has. obviously it's just a reaction which she is going to have to do if she wants to get a medal. now, golf�*s open championship is less than 2a hours away and rory mciroy says he won't repeat the mistakes he made at the tournament last time in 2019. a quadruple bogey on the first hole meant he ended up missing the cut at royal portrush. his form recently hasn't been great either. he also missed the cut at the scottish open this weekend. well, he'll be partnered with american patrick reed, and australia's cameron smith, at royal st george's, in kent, when play gets under way tomorrow. and it's the british grand prix at silverstone this weekend. last yea r�*s two races there were held behind closed doors,
11:11 am
but this time, fans will be returning with a capacity crowd of 140,000 expected, as it's one of the government's test events. and hoping to impress his home fans, on their return will be williams driver george russell. i think we all took it for granted prior to the pandemic and as soon as we didn't have any, the atmosphere wasn't there, it wasn't as exciting and you just didn't get that buzz and you just didn't get that buzz and fans have slowly started to come back during the season of formula 1 but 140,000 people at silverstone, home race is going to be electric and so exciting for us and driving around seeing everybody, cheering and supporting, got to bring a bit of lap time as well, overalljust so excited to go back to a bit of normality. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. ministers are publishing
11:12 am
their long—awaited plans to cut carbon emissions from all forms of transport. it's part of efforts to help the uk reach its target of net zero emissions by 2050. under the proposals, new lorries will need to be carbon free by 2040, car—makers will be set targets to speed up sales of electric vehicles, and there'll be a focus on improving charging. the government's also expected to say we can carry on flying, because it expects the uk aviation industry to be dominated by zero emission planes. the proposal is being criticised by environmentalists. the european union is unveiling an ambitious package of proposals and legal changes today, to help reduce carbon emissions by 55% compared to 1990 levels by the end of the decade, and to reach net zero emissions by 2050. one of the new proposals, a world first, is for a carbon border tax. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here to explain how it might work.
11:13 am
the carbon border tax is an idea whose time appears to have come. it's potentially a hugely significant move, which will be watched closely around the world, not least here in the uk, where the government is thinking about doing something similar to help meet its carbon emissions targets, and to protect local industry. so, how does it work? officially, it's known as a carbon border adjustment mechanism or cbam. and what the eu scheme will do is establish a carbon price for the import of certain goods from outside the eu. the aim, to avoid what's known as carbon leakage, or bringing in dirtier, cheaper products from abroad. both the eu and the uk run emissions trading schemes. which means some domestic manufacturers or energy companies are charged for each tonne of carbon dioxide they emit when they produce things. the idea is to create a financial incentive for companies to bring those emissions down.
11:14 am
by, for example, using renewable energy sources, such as wind or solar power. here's what happening to the price of carbon in the eu at the moment, it'sjust over 50 euros per tonne. since the uk's own post—brexit scheme opened in may, it has been about the same, but slightly higher. the uk has its own carbon levy of £18/tonne, giving it the highest overall carbon price in the world. so, companies based in europe are paying for their carbon. and the border tax is designed to level the playing field, and make sure pollution doesn't get imported. the eu scheme may focus first on importers of electricity, iron and steel, cement, aluminium, and some fertilisers. in other words, not all imports. these are the sectors which are
11:15 am
exposed to carbon pricing in the eu, so the idea is to make sure that the same price that producers are paying domestically is in fact the price exporters have to pay when they want to trade with the eu. but there are still several issues surrounding carbon border taxes which cause concern. could they create trade disputes? china and india, along with russia in particular, are among several countries worried about trade protectionism. could a new layer of bureaucracy make it more difficult for smaller companies to import goods? if the system for calculating carbon input is really complicated, then potentially yes. and should the very poorest countries around the world be exempt? they don't export that much anyway, and they probably can't afford to compete with an extra carbon tax on their products. this is a new area of policy, and the debate about it isn't only happening in europe, the united states is also looking at how to put a price on carbon.
11:16 am
but the bottom line, its supporters say there's no point in having carbon pricing at home unless you also tax carbon at your borders as well. britney spears's battle to end a controversial conservatorship that has controlled her life for 13 years goes back to court today. the legal arrangement has given the singer's father and others authority over her career and personal life. during a hearing last month, britney spears made a passionate case for that to end, describing it "abusive". she claimed the arrangement has forced her to work and take medication against her will and has stoppped herfrom getting married or having a baby. it's unclear whether she will appear in court in los angeles for today's hearing. joining me now is megan radford, co—manager of free britney la's social media accounts. thank you forjoining us. how important is today's case going to be in terms of securing what britney
11:17 am
spears herself now says she wants, which is to get her life that? it’s which is to get her life that? it's unfortunate _ which is to get her life that? it�*s unfortunate that she said all of those things in court and no action has really been taken. but we're hopeful that today i think the biggest thing on the docket today the fact that her attorney, her court—appointed attorney has asked to resign and the debate now is if britney will be approved by the court to hire a private attorney instead of being assigned another court—appointed attorney and so we're hopeful that today the new attorney that we have heard that she has already consulted with shows up in court and makes a case for him to come on as britney's attorney. what come on as britney's attorney. what was it like for— come on as britney's attorney. what was it like for you _ come on as britney's attorney. what was it like for you hearing _ come on as britney's attorney. what was it like for you hearing her speak publicly in court when she did? because you and others have been, you set yourselves up as her voice publicly for a long time when
11:18 am
she was not saying anything and anything she did indicate was that she was ok? it anything she did indicate was that she was ok?— she was ok? it was really hard because we — she was ok? it was really hard because we felt _ she was ok? it was really hard because we felt like _ she was ok? it was really hard because we felt like she - she was ok? it was really hard because we felt like she was . she was ok? it was really hard - because we felt like she was being silenced and we knew that we knew the truth, but without having her confirm some things, it would definitely be difficult and so i was on an emotional roller—coaster on june the 23rd. when i realised that she was actually speaking her truth, ijust she was actually speaking her truth, i just was bawling she was actually speaking her truth, ijust was bawling and it was so emotional and also really vindicating that everything we had been saying for years and years was in fact true and in some cases even worse than we thought. what in fact true and in some cases even worse than we thought.— in fact true and in some cases even worse than we thought. what was it that made you _ worse than we thought. what was it that made you decide _ worse than we thought. what was it that made you decide to _ worse than we thought. what was it that made you decide to set - worse than we thought. what was it| that made you decide to set yourself up that made you decide to set yourself up as a champion to free britney spears? i know you have been a fan for a very long time, since 1998. tell us a bit more about how you feel about her. it’s tell us a bit more about how you feel about her.— tell us a bit more about how you feel about her. it's interesting, of course i love _ feel about her. it's interesting, of course i love her _ feel about her. it's interesting, of course i love her music, -
11:19 am
feel about her. it's interesting, of course i love her music, but - feel about her. it's interesting, ofj course i love her music, but when feel about her. it's interesting, of. course i love her music, but when i really started feeling a connection to her was when i was struggling in my own life as you do when you come of age into your early 20s and i was having a hard time kind of finding myself and britney was also going through hard times at the same time. she wasjust so through hard times at the same time. she was just so authentic and genuine and ijust she was just so authentic and genuine and i just felt this connection to her and so ever since then, i havejust really loved her as a person. i also love britney the performer but britney the person was someone i felt like i could relate to, so when free britney erupted, it made sense that i had to advocate for this person i have loved for so long. it for this person i have loved for so lonu. . , for this person i have loved for so lon. _ ., , , for this person i have loved for so lonu. . , , ,., for this person i have loved for so lon.. , ., ., long. it has been sort of almost farcical, long. it has been sort of almost farcical. the _ long. it has been sort of almost farcical, the way _ long. it has been sort of almost farcical, the way the _ long. it has been sort of almost| farcical, the way the descriptions have been made about how people believed she was communicating. for instance, someone might suggest in a comment she wear a yellow shirt if she wanted to communicate a particular message and her next
11:20 am
post, she would be winning a yellow shirt. a member of her team says aside from 1% of her post, she has pretty much control of her social media. tell us more about what you felt was going on in terms of that almost silent communication? it’s almost silent communication? it's really hard — almost silent communication? it�*s really hard to know for sure. i think social media is a mystery. i think social media is a mystery. i think with the level of control that they clearly have over her, as exhibited onjune the 23rd, it's a little bit hard for me to believe she has almost total control of her instagram but we really don't know. what we do know is founded in court documents and a lot of research and so, we have so many facts on our side in this case that i feel like the social media aspect is just not as relevant as the rest of it. the social media aspect isjust not as relevant as the rest of it. going forward, as relevant as the rest of it. going forward. it — as relevant as the rest of it. going forward. it is— as relevant as the rest of it. going forward, it is not _ as relevant as the rest of it. going forward, it is not necessarily - as relevant as the rest of it. going forward, it is not necessarily going to be a straightforward path to her getting control of her own affairs.
11:21 am
there have been suggestions that if and when she does, she actually wants to retire. what would you like to happen? hf wants to retire. what would you like to ha en? ,. wants to retire. what would you like to ha en? y., ., wants to retire. what would you like to ha en? ,. ., ., to happen? if you want to retire, then she sure _ to happen? if you want to retire, then she sure as _ to happen? if you want to retire, then she sure as heck _ to happen? if you want to retire, then she sure as heck deserves l to happen? if you want to retire, l then she sure as heck deserves to retire. she has worked so hard her entire life. i have full confidence that this conservatorship will end and when it does, my hope is that britney gets to do whatever she wants, for as long as she wants and of course i would like to see her perform again, but at the end of the day, the free britney movement is here to free britney and nothing else. it here to free britney and nothing else. . . ~ here to free britney and nothing else. , . ~ ., here to free britney and nothing else. , ., ~' ., ~' here to free britney and nothing else. , ., ~' ., 4' ., else. it is taking quite a trunk of our life, else. it is taking quite a trunk of your life. i _ else. it is taking quite a trunk of your life, i know— else. it is taking quite a trunk of your life, i know you _ else. it is taking quite a trunk of your life, i know you dedicate i else. it is taking quite a trunk of| your life, i know you dedicate 20 hours a week, you have a full—time job, you are a mum, you are married, when this ends, how would you feel about it? i when this ends, how would you feel about it? ~ . , about it? i think that it will be incredible _ about it? i think that it will be incredible to _ about it? i think that it will be incredible to see _ about it? i think that it will be incredible to see something i about it? | think that it will be - incredible to see something come full circle. ifirst said incredible to see something come full circle. i first said free britney into thousand and nine and
11:22 am
so although not obviously as actively involved as i have been the last couple of years but when this ends, it's going to be an incredible thing for britney and for all of us and friendships i have made within the movement, i'm going to be friends with those people for the rest of my life. we were brought together for a rest of my life. we were brought togetherfor a reason rest of my life. we were brought together for a reason and rest of my life. we were brought togetherfor a reason and i rest of my life. we were brought together for a reason and i will also continue advocating for probate reform and to end conservatorship abuse because this affects far more than just britney spears.— than 'ust britney spears. thank you ve than just britney spears. thank you ve much than just britney spears. thank you very much for— than just britney spears. thank you very much forjoining _ than just britney spears. thank you very much forjoining us _ than just britney spears. thank you very much forjoining us and - than just britney spears. thank you very much forjoining us and we - very much forjoining us and we don't know if she will be in court, have you heard anything on that? media reports say she will be on the phone so i'm hopeful she will, because she is her best advocate so i hope she will be there.— i hope she will be there. thank you very much — i hope she will be there. thank you very much indeed _ i hope she will be there. thank you very much indeed for— i hope she will be there. thank you very much indeed for talking - i hope she will be there. thank you very much indeed for talking to - i hope she will be there. thank you very much indeed for talking to us| very much indeed for talking to us and we will cover the outcome of that hearing later. thank you. thank ou. former us president george w bush has criticised the withdrawal of nato troops from afghanistan, describing it as a "mistake".
11:23 am
he said civilians were being left to be "slaughtered" by the taliban. us and nato forces began withdrawing from afghanistan in early may and are due to completely pull out by september the 11th , some 20 years after they arrived in the war—torn country. he said... i'm nowjoined by nick reynolds who is a research analyst for land warfare at the royal united services institute. thank you forjoining us. thank you thank you for 'oining us. thank you for havinr thank you for 'oining us. thank you for having me’— thank you forjoining us. thank you for having me here. _ thank you forjoining us. thank you for having me here. how— thank you forjoining us. thank you for having me here. how much - thank you forjoining us. thank you for having me here. how much of l thank you forjoining us. thank you l for having me here. how much of the country has — for having me here. how much of the country has fallen _ for having me here. how much of the country has fallen to _ for having me here. how much of the country has fallen to the _ for having me here. how much of the country has fallen to the taliban - country has fallen to the taliban and how quickly since the drawdown of the allied troops? the and how quickly since the drawdown of the allied troops?— of the allied troops? the taliban are currently _ of the allied troops? the taliban are currently making _ of the allied troops? the taliban are currently making claims - of the allied troops? the taliban are currently making claims the l are currently making claims the control about 85% of the country. the afghan government dispute this and unfortunately it's not really clear exactly how much of afghanistan they control but they have been making significant gains in rural areas have been making significant gains in ruralareas in have been making significant gains in rural areas in the past few weeks. . , , ., , , weeks. there are suggestions they could actually _ weeks. there are suggestions they could actually take _ weeks. there are suggestions they could actually take a _ weeks. there are suggestions they could actually take a bull _ weeks. there are suggestions they could actually take a bull within - could actually take a bull within months. how likely do you think that
11:24 am
is? —— months. how likely do you think that is? -- , ., ., ~ months. how likely do you think that is? -- , . ., ~ ., , is? -- they are making gains in the north and west, _ is? -- they are making gains in the north and west, the _ is? -- they are making gains in the north and west, the taliban - is? -- they are making gains in the north and west, the taliban have . north and west, the taliban have been weaker. i think kabul will take longer. before we are likely to see a physicalfighting over the city, there are likely to be negotiations and the outcome will dictate whether they try to take it militarily. the government _ they try to take it militarily. the government is _ they try to take it militarily. the government is now asking warlords and others who have influence around the country to try to set up militias to take on the taliban. what is your fault on that? it’s what is your fault on that? it's rational on _ what is your fault on that? it's rational on the _ what is your fault on that? it�*s rational on the part of the afghan government and that is why we are seeing such a strong taliban push so early in the north of the country. the north has not been the traditional homeland of the alliance
11:25 am
is where the taliban are trying to destroy their enemies and any tribal groups that may oppose them to destroy them early on before they conform to a new alliance. the afr han conform to a new alliance. the afghan forces _ conform to a new alliance. the afghan forces have _ conform to a new alliance. the afghan forces have had a lot of support from the allied troops financially and in terms of expertise. how strong are the official afghan security forces? they have a numerical advantage over the taliban, but unfortunately, despite a concerted effort from the native seats to focus on an institution building in the last four years before the biden administration came in, unfortunately that has been a very, very slow and difficult process so the afghan military has been slowly developing and reforming and becoming more effective but it still is a deeply problematic institution. it has a lot of difficulty,
11:26 am
particularly in terms of coordinating formations between different parts of the countries and remote parts of the country away from kabul supplied. the fact the taliban are making gains should be no surprise to anyone. in two when george w bush says afghan women and girls are going to— girls are going to suffer, what is our girls are going to suffer, what is your thought — girls are going to suffer, what is your thought of _ girls are going to suffer, what is your thought of that _ girls are going to suffer, what is l your thought of that assessment? girls are going to suffer, what is i your thought of that assessment? i think slaughter is not necessarily inevitable. i would say it's unfortunately highly likely. coming back to the point about negotiations, this will determine whether that takes place. the taliban want to negotiate a settlement, to bring themselves into the afghan government and from their position now it's likely if they do come to a settlement, they are negotiating for a significant position of strength and effectively will move into government institutions and take them over from the inside of such an agreement is come to. however, due to the
11:27 am
complexity of negotiations and the demands of the sides, may be incompatible, i think it highly likely that such negotiations will fail if they even get to going in the first place. at which point, the taliban would be likely to move in and be quite aggressive in terms of reasserting control of the country and under that scenario we would likely see massacres, if they came in under negotiated settlement it would be less likely but still in that k scenario we would see a rollback of human rights, particularly women's rights in the taliban will be targeting people they saw as pillars of the government or who had opposed them and i think at that point the united states and former members of the coalition and international community would be presented with a choice of whether to reinvest in afghanistan or provide support. thank you very much indeed.
11:28 am
some breaking news about the green party. you may remember at the beginning of the month, jonathan bartley announced he is stepping down as co—leader. we are hearing sian berry has announced she is also standing down. she has put a letter on her twitter account saying, dear green party members, i have been considering my position since the decision was made to announce our new front bench spokespeople and although i will stay on through the leadership by—election i will not stand as a candidate in that by—election. working withjohnson bartley for the last three years has been incredibly rewarding. she says that... i am just strolling quickly to see exactly why she says she is going. she is proud of the progress the party has made, notjust recently but also through the past decade with the early leadership of caroline lucas. she says leaders do not exert control over all our
11:29 am
parties actions and democracy is important to me, accepting decisions can be made by governing bodies that leaders do not agree with but which we are bound to represent. i must also stand by our policies and my pledges made to londoners in the recent election and there is no inconsistency between the sincere promise to fight for trans— rights and inclusion in my work and the message sent by the party's choice of front bench representatives. this inconsistency has left her in a very difficult position, she says i can no longer make the claim the party speaks unequivocally with one voice on this issue and my conscience simply cannot agree with the argument there is anything positive in sending these messages, especially when the inclusive attitude of our membership and wider society are clear. that's the crux of why she is going. let's bring our political correspondence. is this a shot? it political correspondence. is this a shot? . .
11:30 am
political correspondence. is this a shot? , ., , ~ shot? it is quite a shock. it was not expected- _ shot? it is quite a shock. it was not expected. we _ shot? it is quite a shock. it was not expected. we knew - shot? it is quite a shock. it was. not expected. we knew jonathan not expected. we knewjonathan bartley was standing down because they have got a call leadership but we expected that half of the team to change, now the whole team will change, now the whole team will change and it seems to be this issue which has caused a lot of divisions, especially on the left, the progressive end of british politics on trans— rights if you look at sian berry's twitter feed, she on trans— rights if you look at sian berry's twitterfeed, she has on trans— rights if you look at sian berry's twitter feed, she has a pained tweet saying that berry�*s twitter feed, she has a pained tweet saying that trans— berry's twitter feed, she has a pained tweet saying that trans— men are men, trans— women are women and she has been very un—equivalent to speaking out about that issue but she does not feel the entirety of the front bench arts speaking with one voice. that seems to have persuaded her. she will be continuing as a london assembly members. she will not be in a leadership role in the future. prime minister's question time is just about to start in the commons. what do you expect? labour will go with the row — what do you expect? labour will go with the row that _
11:31 am
what do you expect? labour will go with the row that has _ what do you expect? labour will go with the row that has dominated i with the row that has dominated politics as well as general conversation, the racist abuse some of the england players have suffered. i think keir starmer will talk about that, talking about labour's position which would be that anyone convicted of online abuse as well as any abuse directed from inside football stadiums, that these people would be banned from all future football matches. specific demand from labour but you will also try and make borisjohnson as uncomfortable as he can on the issue because we know of course that before the tournament began, priti patel did not explicitly denounce people booing the players when they took aimee, and we also know she denounced that as gesture politics. took their need. we had steve baker, conservative backbencher effectively say his colleagues should be standing alongside the players who take the knee. given that, keir
11:32 am
starmer will not sum to have boris johnson condemn racism but actually criticise some of his own mps in the way they have handled the issue. deputy political editor has been tweeting about controversy around the selection of mps to us, questions in the debate about racism. it looked like it was all white mps but there is one non—white mp, zarah sultana who has selected to ask questions, following from one mp saying she was very disappointed, marsha de cordova, she was not selected to speak in parliament today. tell us more about what has been happening with that. this today. tell us more about what has been happening with that.- been happening with that. this is what labour _ been happening with that. this is what labour is _ been happening with that. this is what labour is trying _ been happening with that. this is what labour is trying to - been happening with that. this is what labour is trying to do i been happening with that. this is| what labour is trying to do again, to push on this point, they have an urgent question, something where you try to bring a government minister to answer an issue of the day, even if they are reluctant to do so and
11:33 am
immediately following pmqs, there will be the urgent question on the racist abuse online, that very issue and they were hoping to use this certainly as a way of bringing priti patel to the house of commons and try to perhaps embarrass her over her lack of condemnation for those supporters who had been booing the england team month ago. i don't know if priti patel will speak for the government, probably more likely to be a junior minister, but perhaps if you will pardon the pun, a bit of an own goal possibly from labour, because although mps are selected randomly to take part in this debate, it's a ballot, it's not something which is predetermined or any particular rationale added to it, but nonetheless, it has turned out only one person from an ethnic minority background, zarah sultana, has been chosen to speak. marsha de cordova is also labour's shadow women and equalities minister, it could have been possible for labour to have her lead the debate instead,
11:34 am
it will be the shadow home secretary, who will do so. that would have been one way of ensuring that we had somebody from an ethnic minority background talking about this issue in the house of commons and of i think frankly it's not going to be a great look. around 30 mp5, all no doubt condemning racism, mps, all no doubt condemning racism, but almost all of them white. thahk but almost all of them white. thank ou, but almost all of them white. thank you. prime — but almost all of them white. thank you, prime minister's _ but almost all of them white. thank you, prime minister's questions i you, prime minister's questions coming up. let's look at the weather. hello. a spell of largely fine, settled weather is under way. plenty of sunny spells for much of the uk today, though cloudy in northwest scotland. a bit of light rain or drizzle is possible later. brightening up for a time in northern ireland, though cloud increasing again from the west later. some patches of cloud around western coastal parts of england and wales and some areas of cloud lingering towards north sea coasts and into east anglia. from the thicker cloud moving across scotland overnight, you could see some light rain and drizzle. cloudy overnight in northern ireland.
11:35 am
cloud increasing towards northern and western parts of england and wales, temperatures into the mid to low teens. tomorrow, sunny spells breaking through in scotland and eventually northern ireland. a bit more cloud around in england and wales compared with today, but still some sunny spells at times, especially later in the day. and it will feel pleasantly warm where you get to see some of that sunshine. the warm spots approaching the mid 20s. this is bbc news — the headlines: london's mayor makes face coverings mandatory on all transport for london services — including buses, tubes,
11:36 am
trams and the overground. i'm quite clear from the conversation i've had with londoners, from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them greater confidence in using our incredibly safe transport system. face masks will also remain compulsory on public transport in wales — plans for easing coronavirus restrictions there will be set out later. pmqs is about to begin — we'll bring that to you live as soon as it does. the uk inflation rate hits 2.5% in the yeartojune, the highest for nearly three years — as the unlocking of the economy continues. concern from victims of the troubles over an expected government statement on how to deal with northern ireland's violent past. prime minister's questions
11:37 am
is due immiently. sunday's result may not have been the one we were all hoping for. i know the whole house will want to congratulate gareth southgate and the england squad for their fantastic achievements. the nation is proud of each and every of you. this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others in addition to my duties in this house, i will have further such meetings later this day. flan i will have further such meetings later this day-— later this day. can i second that the prime _ later this day. can i second that the prime minister _ later this day. can i second that the prime minister and's - later this day. can i second that | the prime minister and's support later this day. can i second that i the prime minister and's support for our outstanding team and players? but perhaps i it is a pity i did not come sooner. we all know the importance of double vaccination, especially against the delta variant of the virus. but how this is informed despite the hard work of our nhs and volunteers, only 36% of
11:38 am
adults have been double—jabbed. will the premise that think again before recklessly removing all barriers to infection and transmission on january 19 race will he keep the regulations on mask wearing? and like the mayor of london, keep fighting on the virus until it is beat? mr fighting on the virus until it is beat? ~ ,,, ., ~ fighting on the virus until it is beat? ~ ,, , ., ~ ., fighting on the virus until it is beat? ~ ., ., ., beat? mr speaker, if we had followed the honourable _ beat? mr speaker, if we had followed the honourable gentleman's - beat? mr speaker, if we had followed| the honourable gentleman's precepts, i remember he campaigned vehemently to stay in at the eu, we will not have achieved the fast fast this vaccine a roll—out of any european country and vaccinated the highest proportion of any european population. that is the reality. as for his criticism of the road map, i respectfully point out to the honourable gentleman, the one for july. honourable gentleman, the one for july, notjanuary. mr honourable gentleman, the one for july. notjanuary.— july, notjanuary. mr speaker, it
11:39 am
should be _ july, notjanuary. mr speaker, it should be obvious _ july, notjanuary. mr speaker, it should be obvious the _ july, notjanuary. mr speaker, it should be obvious the cabinet i july, notjanuary. mr speaker, it should be obvious the cabinet isj july, not january. mr speaker, it i should be obvious the cabinet is as inclusive as the english footfall team. some of these criticisms i think is misplaced. can i welcome your words, think is misplaced. can i welcome yourwords, mr speaker, think is misplaced. can i welcome your words, mr speaker, at the beginning of tuesday's debate? can we agree that a vote in this house is not an end that two parliament passed by both houses. can i suggest to the prime minister that instead of leaping from .5 to .7 at some stage in the future, he stepped towards it, because a 40% increase in one year is ludicrous. i towards it, because a 40% increase in one year is ludicrous.— in one year is ludicrous. i think the rirht in one year is ludicrous. i think the right honourable _ in one year is ludicrous. i think| the right honourable gentleman in one year is ludicrous. i think- the right honourable gentleman very much for his opening point. ican give i can give him this reassurance, we will consume to follow the law. we
11:40 am
want to return to 0.7 as fast as we can when fiscal conditions allow. leader of the opposition keir starmen _ leader of the opposition keir starmer. . . . leader of the opposition keir starmer. . , ., _ ., ~ starmer. can i start by thanking the enrland starmer. can i start by thanking the england footfall _ starmer. can i start by thanking the england footfall team _ starmer. can i start by thanking the england footfall team for _ starmer. can i start by thanking the | england footfall team for everything they have given in this country over they have given in this country over the last six weeks? i am so proud of this young, diverse and humble team and everything it represents. they are at the very best of modern britain, everything that i know this country can be. does the prime minister think that it was wrong to criticise the england team's decision to oppose racism by taking the knee as a gesture politics? i agree very much with what the right honourable gentleman said about the england team. i want to thank each and every one of them for what they
11:41 am
did, the incredible campaign they ran in the euro 2020 championships. they do represent the very best of our country. i repeat that i utterly condemn and abhor the racist outpourings that we saw on sunday night. what we are doing is today taking practical steps to ensure that the footfall banning order regime is changed, so that if you are guilty of racist abuse online against footballers, then you will not be given to the match. now ifs, not be given to the match. now ifs, no buts, no exemptions and no excuses. �* y no buts, no exemptions and no excuses. �* , ., , excuses. i'm sorry, that 'ust will not wash and h excuses. i'm sorry, that 'ust will not wash and it i excuses. i'm sorry, that 'ust will not wash and it rings i excuses. i'm sorry, thatjust will not wash and it rings hollow. i excuses. i'm sorry, thatjust will not wash and it rings hollow. onj not wash and it rings hollow. on june 7, the prime minister spokesperson said this," on and taking the knee, the prime minister is more focus on actions rather than
11:42 am
gestures. on during the 14, the home secretary said," ijust gestures. on during the 14, the home secretary said," i just do gestures. on during the 14, the home secretary said," ijust do not support people participating in that type of gesture politics.". a conservative mp called it a ridiculous empty gesture. there is no point in pretending that these things were not saved. the england footballer tyrone mings. .. things were not saved. the england footballer tyrone mings... tyrone mings said," labelling antiracism messages as a gesture politics served to stoke the racism and hatred." mac power frauds from someone who himself has been subjected to racist abuse. he is right, is he he? i subjected to racist abuse. he is right, is he he?—
11:43 am
subjected to racist abuse. he is right, is he he? i want to reiterate our total support _ right, is he he? i want to reiterate our total support for _ right, is he he? i want to reiterate our total support for our _ right, is he he? i want to reiterate our total support for our fantastic | our total support for our fantastic england team. i support them in the way that they show solidarity with their friends who face racism. but when he talks about the home secretary, let mejust when he talks about the home secretary, let me just remind when he talks about the home secretary, let mejust remind him that my right honourable friend the home secretary has face racism and prejudice all her career and the kind that he can never imagine, and she has taking practical steps to get black and minority officers into the police in record numbers... sorry to interrupt, i want to hear the prime — sorry to interrupt, i want to hear the prime minister. if his own side do not _ the prime minister. if his own side do not want — the prime minister. if his own side do not want to hear him, i'm sure that the_ do not want to hear him, i'm sure that the tea — do not want to hear him, i'm sure that the tea room will accommodate them _ that the tea room will accommodate them. have you finished, prime minister? — them. have you finished, prime minister? let them. have you finished, prime minister? . them. have you finished, prime minister? , . ., ., ., , minister? let me be clear, i totally condemn all— minister? let me be clear, i totally condemn all racism, _ minister? let me be clear, i totally condemn all racism, including i minister? let me be clear, i totally condemn all racism, including that| condemn all racism, including that directed at the home secretary. but she has got this wrong, at the whole country knows it, his own mps knows it. in the last few days everybody
11:44 am
has seen the england's about plays have been the targets of disgusting abuse following sunday's match. this is abuse following sunday�*s match. this is simple— abuse following sunday's match. this is simple— either no payment is that if the england players in the stand against racism, or he can defend his own record, those of his ministers and some of his mps. but he cannot haveit and some of his mps. but he cannot have it both ways. so can he tell the house does he now regret failing to condemn those who booed england players for standing up to racism? or no? we made it absolutely clear that no one should boo the england team. what we are doing now is, following the racist abuse of our players sadly suffered on sunday night and then after, we are taking practical action. night and then after, we are taking practicalaction. in night and then after, we are taking practical action. in addition to changing the footfall banning order regime, last night i read, group met representatives of facebook,
11:45 am
twitter, snapchat, instagram, tiktok, and i made it absolutely clear to them that we will legislate to address this problem, mr speaker, in the online harms bill. unless they get hate and racism of their platforms, they will face fines amounting to 10% of their global revenues, and we all know that they have the technology to do it. mr have the technology to do it. ii speaker, the online have the technology to do it. i speaker, the online harms have the technology to do it. ii speaker, the online harms bill has been promised for three years, i'm not sure a 15 minute chat at a garden party knows that forward significantly. what the prime minister said about being absolutely clear. here i have the headline, borisjohnson clear. here i have the headline, boris johnson refuses clear. here i have the headline, borisjohnson refuses to condemn fans booing england taking the knee. that is the story, the headline on june 6. that is absolutely clear. it is not quite what the primaries that is not quite what the primaries that is implying today. it goes on to quote the primary minister's
11:46 am
spokesperson, saying that the premise that fully respects the rights of those who choose to make their feelings known. rights of those who choose to make theirfeelings known. this is about viewing, fully respects their rights. the home secretary said it was a choice for them. no condemnation there, no absolute clarity. when a senior government ministers and conservative mps defend the booing of an antiracist message, who do they think they are defending and why are they defending it? mr defending and why are they defending it? ~ ,, , ., ~ defending and why are they defending it? ~ .,,._ , it? mr speaker, nobody defends booinr of it? mr speaker, nobody defends booing of the — it? mr speaker, nobody defends booing of the england _ it? mr speaker, nobody defends booing of the england side. if. it? mr speaker, nobody defends| booing of the england side. if he continues to attack the home secretary... continues to attack the home secretary- - -— continues to attack the home secreta ., ., ., secretary... look, i want to hear the prime _ secretary... look, i want to hear the prime minister, _ secretary... look, i want to hear the prime minister, i _ secretary... look, i want to hear the prime minister, i want i secretary... look, i want to hear the prime minister, i want to i secretary... look, i want to hear. the prime minister, i want to know the prime minister, i want to know the answer. — the prime minister, i want to know the answer, and i expect the opposition is to listen to the answer~ _ opposition is to listen to the answer. ., ~' opposition is to listen to the answer. ., ~ , ., opposition is to listen to the answer. ., «i y ., ~ opposition is to listen to the answer. ., ~ . answer. thank you, mr speaker. we love and admire _ answer. thank you, mr speaker. we love and admire the _ answer. thank you, mr speaker. we love and admire the england - answer. thank you, mr speaker. we love and admire the england side i answer. thank you, mr speaker. we l love and admire the england side and what they did, they represent the
11:47 am
very best of our country. nobody defends booing the england side. what the home secretary has been trying to do all her life is not just to fight racism, but to take practical steps to advance the cause of black and minority ethnic groups, which she has done successfully, notably in the police. since he is chucking this kind of thing around, could i ask am now to retract this leaflet produced by the labour party during the batley and spen by—election which was condemned by his own mps as a dog whistle racism? the prime minister is not letting anyone in this house, he is not getting the public and he's not even getting the public and he's not even getting his own mps. let me quote the conservative mp for plymouth moor view." open? the painful truth is that tyrone mings is completely
11:48 am
right. i am very uncomfortable with the position that we conservatives are needlessly forcing ourselves into. prime minister, behind you they do not believe you and neither do we. we can all see what has happened here. the government has been trying to stoke a culture war, and that they have realised that they are on the wrong side. now they hope that nobody has noticed. why else would a conservative mp boast that he is not watching his own team? why else would another conservative mp say that marcus rashford spends too much time playing politics? when he is actually trying to feed children that the government will not. and by what the premise that refuse time and time again, even now, to condemn those who blew our players for standing up against racism? —— who boo. what is it the england team symbolises that this conservative
11:49 am
party are so afraid of? i symbolises that this conservative party are so afraid of?— party are so afraid of? i think the house will _ party are so afraid of? i think the house willjudge _ party are so afraid of? i think the house willjudge for— party are so afraid of? i think the house willjudge for themselves l party are so afraid of? i think the i house willjudge for themselves the question the right honourable gentleman has just picked. question the right honourable gentleman hasjust picked. i think the whole house is united, including our distinguished members from scotland, in admiration of the england team, and every single member of that squad and what they did. we stick up for them, mr speaker. we are taking practical steps to fight racism, changing the footfall banning order regime, finding the online companies. by the way, we will use more legislation if we have to do to stop the european super league. we will get on with delivering for the people of this country. we will get on with vaccinating the people of this country while they continue to vacillate. we will continue to immunise the people of this country while they improvise and dart around. mr speaker, ido
11:50 am
while they improvise and dart around. mr speaker, i do not want to engage in a political culture war of any kind. i want to get on with delivering for the people of this country. he simply wants to get on with gathering. he country. he simply wants to get on with gathering-— country. he simply wants to get on with gathering. he does not want to enrrae in with gathering. he does not want to engage in a — with gathering. he does not want to engage in a culture _ with gathering. he does not want to engage in a culture war— with gathering. he does not want to engage in a culture war and - with gathering. he does not want to engage in a culture war and point i engage in a culture war and point scoring, give me a break. footfall is a game, racism is not. that is why many of us have been involved in antiracism charities for years. far from giving racism the red card, the premise that give it the green light. putting an england shirt on over a shirt and tie, whilst not condemning those booing is the worst kind of gesture. mr speaker, i want to ask the premise about the reported amnesty for crimes committed during the troubles in northern ireland. i worked in northern ireland. i worked in northern ireland. i worked in northern ireland for six years with
11:51 am
the police, i have also prosecuted territories as the director of public prosecutions, so i know how difficult and sensitive this is. but a blanket amnesty, including four terrorists is plain wrong. i was in northern ireland last week, and it is absolutely clear that the government? was mike amnesty is not supported by the political parties in northern ireland and it is not supported by victims groups. last thursday i spoke to victims of terrorism in north belfast. mr speaker, they have not even been properly consulted on this proposal. if things out forward in northern ireland, any discussion has to start with the victims. politicians in london cannot simply draw a line under terrorism and other crimes and then force it on those most affected. the prime minister looks up, let him look up and let him here, because i want to quotejulie
11:52 am
hamilton, prime minister. hersister maxine was a monthly 21 people killed by the ira in the birmingham pub bombings. she says," and tell me, prime minister, if one of your loved ones was blown up beyond recognition, where you were only able to identify your son or your daughter or bite their fingernails, would you be so quick to grant that murderers and amnesty and propose such obscene legislation." what does the payments they have to say to julie and other victims like thorugh? —— what does the prime minister have to say. i thorugh? -- what does the prime minister have to say.— minister have to say. i think the whole house — minister have to say. i think the whole house will _ minister have to say. i think the whole house will acknowledge l minister have to say. i think the i whole house will acknowledge the suffering of victims like julie whole house will acknowledge the suffering of victims likejulie and theirfamilies. of course nothing i say or do now can in any way mitigate her loss, that is clear.
11:53 am
but it is also true that the people of northern ireland must, if we possibly can allow them to, they must move forwards now. he will now that the proposals that have been brought forward and at the house will hear about them in more detail later on, they are measured, they are balanced and they have a wide degree of support. from former labour prime ministers and former labour prime ministers and former labour leaders, who are of considerably more distinction, if i may say, of the right honourable gentleman opposite. he will recall it was under that labour administration that many terrorists were unfortunately given, effectively, and amnesty. they were allowed to escape the full consequences of their crimes, as he knows very well. that is the reality of a stop whilst the sad fact remains, this is of course no consolation to people likejulie,
11:54 am
but the sad fact remains that there aren't many members of the armed services who continue to face the threat of vexatious prosecutions well into their 70s and 80s and later. we are finally bringing forward a solution to this problem, to enable the problem in northern ireland to draw a line under the troubles. to enable the people of northern ireland to move forward. i think someone with greater statesmanship and clarity of vision would have seen that and given these proposals a fair wind. mr would have seen that and given these proposals a fair wind.— proposals a fair wind. mr speaker, the scandalous _ proposals a fair wind. mr speaker, the scandalous situation _ proposals a fair wind. mr speaker, the scandalous situation at - proposals a fair wind. mr speaker, the scandalous situation at a i the scandalous situation at a landfill in my constituency with the noxious gas emissions is unafraid containing. today, there has been no apology from the operator and no credible explanation for the odour thatis credible explanation for the odour that is blighting the lives and health of my constituents. what assurance can the prime minister committed a that every effort is being made to speed up the work
11:55 am
being made to speed up the work being mandated by the environment agency and when we can get this awful situation resolved and those responsible are held fully to account? i responsible are held fully to account? , ., ., ., , account? i yield to no one in my admiration _ account? i yield to no one in my admiration for— account? i yield to no one in my admiration for the _ account? i yield to no one in my admiration for the environment | admiration for the environment agency. in this case, i think my honourable friend, because in my view that they are not sorting this problem out fast enough. i am fed up with this being raised with me. we must stop the stink, and i want the air to be of alpine freshness there before too long. let air to be of alpine freshness there before too long.— before too long. let me begin by congratulating — before too long. let me begin by congratulating the _ before too long. let me begin by congratulating the england i before too long. let me begin by congratulating the england team| before too long. let me begin by i congratulating the england team for reaching the final, an incredible achievement. but the tragedy of the tournament was at the undercurrent of racism that was ultimately targeted at three young men, marcus rashford, trading challenge ——jadon sancho, the kyocera car. when it comes to racism, it falls on all of
11:56 am
us to visit down and call it out. it is shameful that it took until last night for the premise that you meet with the main social media companies and finally up to the fact that those who publish and promote vile racist online abuse need to be faced down and sanctioned. so can the prime minister tell us what sanctions he thinks would be appropriate for someone who publishes racist content? it is shocking to even have to say this out lied. describing africans as flag waving, with watermelon smiles. mr speaker, i commented many times about the words that i have said in the past and i think the house understands how you can take things out of context, mr speaker. i think people do understand that. what they
11:57 am
also understand is that there is a chance now to hold these internet companies to account and to make sure that they face fines running to 10% of their global income if they fail to take hate and racism off their platforms. i hope these scottish national party will support it. ., ,, ., , ., scottish national party will support it. you know, still no contrition, still no apology. _ it. you know, still no contrition, still no apology. mr— it. you know, still no contrition, still no apology. mr speaker, i it. you know, still no contrition,| still no apology. mr speaker, the truth is that the tory party does not sanction those who publish that kind of racist content, they promote them to be prime minister. the legacy of this prime minister a's dog whistling has followed him into 10 downing street and it is now at the heart of this tory government. as the england international tyrone mings has so powerfully stated, this government does not get to stoke the fires of racism and pretend to be disgusted when it happens. they do
11:58 am
not get to condemn the racism of others but denied that the racism that they have even provoked. in march, the uk government's own report on racism set at there was no systemic problem in the uk. i think the england's men footfall team would beg to differ. after the shocking racism on show over the last week, does the prime minister to still stand by his government's belief that systemic racism is not a problem that exists in the uk? i do think that racism _ problem that exists in the uk? i do think that racism is a problem in the uk, and i believe it needs to be tackled and stamped out with some of the means that i have described this morning. when he attacks my party, i'm afraid he has got the wrong target. this is a party that has not only ever had the first ever muslim secretary of state for health, but
11:59 am
of course has had two female prime minister is, the most diverse cabinet in the history of this country, they mistake diverse government in the history of this country. we are the party, if you are a young patient growing up in a black or ethnic minority group in this country, that represent hope and opportunity. that is the reality about the conservative party today. the uk is packed full of incredible innovation led business is capable of leading entire industries, not least in hertford and stortford, where we're at the heart of the innovation corridor. i know this government wants to ensure the best possible access to venture funding over multiple rounds to catapult, scale up business is full of potential, enter world beating companies. with the prime minister meet with me to discuss how we can best make venture work for the scale up best make venture work for the scale up community and transform some of our best ideas into some of the world's biggest businesses? the
12:00 pm
honourable _ world's biggest businesses? the honourable lady and a lot about the subject that she mentions. this is a fantastic opportunity for this country because we do indeed produce a great many tech breakthroughs. we are of looking at how we can escape up are of looking at how we can escape up fast. as i speak, there are three countries in the world that have scaled up tech breakthroughs to unicorns what more than £1 billion, 100 unicorns. only three countries have that, the us, china and the uk. four sevenths years, plaid cymru, has been calling for the gargantuan hsz has been calling for the gargantuan hs2 railway to be treated as an england only project so that wales get our fair england only project so that wales get ourfair share. not england only project so that wales get our fair share. not a single inch of track will be in wales, but we are footing the bill. today at the welsh affairs committee backed our call, calling the uk government was like a catheterisation of h52 in relation to wales as unfair and
12:01 pm
biased. —— characterisation. all the premise that a day like this wrong and ensured that wales, like scotland, receives our fair share from hs2? i scotland, receives our fair share from hs2?— scotland, receives our fair share from h52? ., ., , ., ., ., from h52? i normally have a great deal of respect — from h52? i normally have a great deal of respect and _ from h52? i normally have a great deal of respect and interest i from h52? i normally have a great deal of respect and interest in i from h52? i normally have a great| deal of respect and interest in what the honourable lady says, but in this case she has missed what the government is doing for transport connectivity in wales and to wales, something which i know she is as passionate about about as i am a. look at what we're doing with the a55, with the north wales railway corridor into liverpool. look at the m4. let it never be forgotten that there was the welsh labour government, not herfault there was the welsh labour government, not her fault because she is plaid cymru, that spent £144 million on a study and then did not even do the diversions.
12:02 pm
the circumstances of jewish the circumstances ofjewish the world is a sensitive and important issue to my constituents, and as such to me. injanuary 1942 issue to my constituents, and as such to me. injanuary1942 of the nazis built to concentration on british soil on the island of alderney. conditions were appalling with multiple desktop however, there were only 98 reported greys in alderney. in 1961, a british delegation undertook an inquiry into these atrocities that occurred on alderney were stopped today i asked the premise to authorise the release of all documents and information residing in the archives into this investigation so that we know what happened to thousands of people on the island of alderney during world war ii. to forget the dead it would be akin to killing them again. we
12:03 pm
must never forget the suffering of those on the channel islands who suffered under occupation between 1940 and 1945. i am told that the documents in question have been transferred to the national archives, but i will make sure that the relevant minister meets my honourable friend to discuss the matter further.— honourable friend to discuss the matter further. there are currently 800,000 student _ matter further. there are currently 800,000 student self-isolating, l matter further. there are currently i 800,000 student self-isolating, and 800,000 student self—isolating, and even after the reforms to the bubbling system, the government's failed to get the delta variant under control means that infections raising over the summer and will mean that the autumn term will be very severely affected in our schools. if the jcvi says very severely affected in our schools. if thejcvi says it is safe and appropriate for adolescents to receive the vaccine, will the prime minister promised that every single adolescent will be offered the vaccine over the summer and parents given all the information i need to make an informed decision so that
12:04 pm
schools can return a not continue to be affected by the bad of this government and in the field to gut the delta variant under control? the honourable gentleman seems to want us to relax our rules on the protecting people from coronavirus. i do not think that is the right thing to do at this time. he also calls for us to go against thejcvi. that is a matter, mr speaker, for thejcvi. that is a matter, mr speaker, for the jcvi. ~ ., , the jcvi. with the economy rebounding _ the jcvi. with the economy rebounding and _ the jcvi. with the economy rebounding and a _ the jcvi. with the economy rebounding and a great i the jcvi. with the economy i rebounding and a great many job rebounding and a great manyjob vacancies currently available, does my right honourable friend agree that there is a tremendous opportunity and edging out about a stronger british labour market post—brexit and post—covid? we need to help employers with better pay,
12:05 pm
more opportunities and skills and career progression. is that not one of the keys of levelling up and ending on the plight of in work poverty? l ending on the plight of in work ove ? ., ~ , ending on the plight of in work ove ? . ~ , ., ., poverty? i thank my right honourable friend and i know _ poverty? i thank my right honourable friend and i know how— poverty? i thank my right honourable friend and i know how much - poverty? i thank my right honourable friend and i know how much he - poverty? i thank my right honourable | friend and i know how much he cares. that is why we are not only rolling out our massive plan forjobs, but while i'm proud under this government we have increased the national living wage to a record amount of £8 91 per hour. the communities _ amount of £8 91 per hour. the communities of— amount of £8 91 per hour. the communities of my _ amount of £8 91 per hour. tue communities of my constituency amount of £8 91 per hour. tte communities of my constituency are all either losing or have already lost their post offices since 2019 to addition, constituents in other communities have all had the obstruction of closure of post offices. given that a post office is 100% owned by his government, what
12:06 pm
exactly does it take for him to admit that the current trading models for the post office is not working for the people that rely on its services? the treatment of the post office, the masters and sub—postmasters in the masters and sub—postmasters in the recent computer malfunction was i'm afraid appalling and i have made that clear. when it comes to protecting and supporting post offices, particularly rural post offices, particularly rural post offices which i think is what he was driving at, this government will do everything it can to protect them. too noisy, too much pollution, and too much time wasted sitting in traffic, impacting productivity. the a3, as it narrows through guildford, has been the cause of frustration for decades, according to highways england, there are no more sticking plasters which is why i am asking
12:07 pm
for the a3 to be tunnelled under guildford. does he agree with me that as we build back better after the pandemic, investment into major road infrastructure solutions will be an important part of delivering on the levelling up agenda across the country? t on the levelling up agenda across the country?— on the levelling up agenda across the country? i know the stretch of the country? i know the stretch of the road she _ the country? i know the stretch of the road she refers _ the country? i know the stretch of the road she refers to _ the country? i know the stretch of the road she refers to very - the country? i know the stretch of the road she refers to very well. the country? i know the stretch ofj the road she refers to very well as i'm sure many members across the house do as well. i cannot click my fingers and say we can tunnel under guildford, but i can see we will certainly look at it, she should be in no doubt we're spending record sums, £27 billion on improving anger and's strategic roads, part of her 460 billion pounds being spent. many --eole are 460 billion pounds being spent. many peeple are aghast _ 460 billion pounds being spent. many people are aghast at _ 460 billion pounds being spent. tjta�*ty people are aghast at the potential consequences of thrashing england
12:08 pm
covid regulations. wales's regulations are expected to take a cautious and measured approach. will the prime minister make it clear that there was visiting wales this summer must stick to welsh law and that our covid regulations, he can only speak for england! ? that our covid regulations, he can only speakfor england! ? t that our covid regulations, he can only speak for england! ?- only speak for england! ? i think --eole only speak for england! ? i think peeple should — only speak for england! ? i think people should stick _ only speak for england! ? i think people should stick to _ only speak for england! ? i think people should stick to the - only speak for england! ? i think people should stick to the rules| only speak for england! ? i think. people should stick to the rules and the guidance whenever they are and i think he is absolutely right to talk about a cautious and measured approach. about a cautious and measured a- roach. ~ , approach. the prime minister will have seen that _ approach. the prime minister will have seen that two _ approach. the prime minister will have seen that two recently - have seen that two recently published reports into competition policy and the task force on regulatory reform make the same recommendations to inject fresh energy into the regime so it can deliver ever brexit ambition of
12:09 pm
replacing ponderous eu... will he take this opportunity to unleash a big post—brexit better regulation dividend by declaring his enthusiastic support for a strong new one in, to out regime with no loopholes or exceptions right here today? loopholes or exceptions right here toda ? . ~ loopholes or exceptions right here toda ? , ~ ~ loopholes or exceptions right here toda? , ~ ~ �*, today? yes, mr speaker. i think it's obvious that — today? yes, mr speaker. i think it's obvious that the _ today? yes, mr speaker. i think it's obvious that the uk _ today? yes, mr speaker. i think it's obvious that the uk has _ today? yes, mr speaker. i think it's obvious that the uk has a _ today? yes, mr speaker. i think it's obvious that the uk has a massive i obvious that the uk has a massive amount to gain, notjust from his report which i much enjoyed as i told him i thought it was excellent, but also from the task force on reducing regulation and i thank them for that, they will see a lot more in the next few weeks. yesterday, at the prime minister's _ in the next few weeks. yesterday, at the prime minister's instigation, - the prime minister's instigation, 333 conservative members of this house, including some of its wealthiest, voted to deprive some of the poorest children in the world of
12:10 pm
clean water. education for girls programme is being guaranteed will be, polio eradication schemes too. most people go into politics to make the world a better place, but the prime minister seems to be an exception. as he reads of the anguish his decision has caused, and as the father of a young child, doesn't he feel the merest hint of shame? t doesn't he feel the merest hint of shame? ~ , ., , ., doesn't he feel the merest hint of shame? ~ , .,, ., , shame? i think the people of this entire country — shame? i think the people of this entire country should _ shame? i think the people of this entire country should be - shame? i think the people of this i entire country should be immensely proud of what the uk is doing abroad. whether it is educating millions of girls, with an increase to support forfemale millions of girls, with an increase to support for female education, helping the countries around the world tackle climate change with £11.6 billion of investment, or helping refugees in yemen or syria or ethiopia with £900 million. we are spending £10 billion a year on overseas aid alone, to say nothing of what we're doing with vaccines, the whole country should be immensely proud of what the uk is
12:11 pm
doing in spite of this pandemic. t’m doing in spite of this pandemic. i'm sure ou doing in spite of this pandemic. t“n sure you will know the green man festival which is an incredibly popular international music event which takes place in my constituency. the festival organisers have gone to great lengths to ensure the event is covid—secure but the welsh government refuses to give them the green light to go ahead as a test event, unlike similar events in england. will he help us by giving the green man festival his full support and encourage the welsh government to get behind the festival at long last? t government to get behind the festival at long last?— government to get behind the festival at long last? i have not been invited _ festival at long last? i have not been invited to _ festival at long last? i have not been invited to attend - festival at long last? i have not been invited to attend the - festival at long last? i have not i been invited to attend the festival but it sounds great. she is obviously a big fan. i will do what i can to pass her message along, i thank herfor i can to pass her message along, i thank her for campaigning for wales and the green man festival. my
12:12 pm
and the green man festival. tjt constituent was and the green man festival. m1: constituent was diagnosed and the green man festival. m1 constituent was diagnosed with the type of lung cancer in april which prevents her immune system from developing antibodies against covid. she wants to live as normal a life as possible and do everyday things like going shopping but she is terrified and thinks that the rapid lifting of restrictions on monday is putting her at risk. with the delta variant about to spike due to the government's decision to lift restrictions, particularly the requirement to wear a mask in public places, what is his message to people in my constituent�*s situation? will he rethink his reckless gamble of rule juicing these restrictions? and yes, jackie did support staying in the eu. t’m did support staying in the eu. i'm sor for did support staying in the eu. i'm sorry for the _ did support staying in the eu. i'm sorry for the condition that jackie suffers and i think that the labour party obviously needs to work out whether it is in favour of going ahead with step four or not because
12:13 pm
it's not at all clear from what he has said or what to right honourable gentleman, the leader of the opposition, they don't have a clue, but what i can see to him is that we expect and recommend everybody, and i say this to jack, we expect and recommend everyone to wear a face covering in a confined space where you're meeting people you don't normally meet and that is quite right. normally meet and that is quite ri . ht. ., . ~ right. last week, i met with the readin: right. last week, i met with the reading agency _ right. last week, i met with the reading agency that _ right. last week, i met with the reading agency that is - right. last week, i met with the reading agency that is about - right. last week, i met with the reading agency that is about to | reading agency that is about to launch its annual summer reading challenge and hopes to reach 1 million children, primary schoolchildren, this year. a great excuse to go to one of our brilliant libraries and take part in the covid education catch up. with this in mind, would hejoin me in encouraging every child across the nation to take part in this summer reading challenge, pick up a book and read back better? she
12:14 pm
reading challenge, pick up a book and read back better?— reading challenge, pick up a book and read back better? she is quite riaht, and read back better? she is quite right. there _ and read back better? she is quite right, there could _ and read back better? she is quite right, there could not _ and read back better? she is quite right, there could not be - and read back better? she is quite right, there could not be a - and read back better? she is quite right, there could not be a better| right, there could not be a better campaign for the summer. we put 1.9 million of support into the reading scheme she mentions but of course there is 200 million going to the holiday activities fund and there could not be a better more useful happier way of occupying your time on holiday than by reading a good book. ., , _ on holiday than by reading a good book. ., , ., ., book. could i gently say to all leaders that _ book. could i gently say to all leaders that in _ book. could i gently say to all leaders that in the _ book. could i gently say to all leaders that in the end, - book. could i gently say to all leaders that in the end, i - book. could i gently say to all leaders that in the end, i had | book. could i gently say to all l leaders that in the end, i had to cut off— leaders that in the end, i had to cut off quite a few backbenchers because — cut off quite a few backbenchers because of the amount of time being taken _ because of the amount of time being taken up _ because of the amount of time being taken up at _ because of the amount of time being taken up at the beginning. can we think_ taken up at the beginning. can we think about those as well? it's so important — think about those as well? it's so important to get their questions. no points— important to get their questions. no points of— important to get their questions. no points of order. i suspend the house for three _ points of order. i suspend the house for three minutes to enable necessary arrangements. we will be back in— necessary arrangements. we will be back in three minutes because there will he _ back in three minutes because there will he that— back in three minutes because there will be that urgent question on racism — will be that urgent question on racism. ., , , . . racism. there were two specific oli racism. there were two specific policy announcements, - racism. there were two specific policy announcements, the - racism. there were two specific l policy announcements, the prime
12:15 pm
minister said that there are now going to be football bands will be amended to include people who are racist online, they will ban from attending football matches. he also said the government would legislate for fines for social media companies that do not take racism off their platform. he said the technology is there for them to do it and if they do not sort it out there will be fines amounting to 10% of their global revenues. keir starmer accused the prime minister, the government, of trying to stoke a culture war. he says they have now realised they are wrong alongside. ian blackford asked what penalty someone should face fa publish words about flag—waving pickaninny with watermelon smiles. previously published by borisjohnson, he said they have been taken out of context. that was a heated prime minister's questions and there were those specific announcements? t questions and there were those specific announcements? i think what boris
12:16 pm
specific announcements? i think what ltoris johnson — specific announcements? i think what boris johnson was _ specific announcements? i think what boris johnson was trying _ specific announcements? i think what boris johnson was trying to _ specific announcements? i think what boris johnson was trying to say - specific announcements? i think what boris johnson was trying to say was . borisjohnson was trying to say was to say look, labour will emoticon theissue to say look, labour will emoticon the issue and he was going to come armed with practical steps to tackle racism. you try to steal labour�*s thunder by saying the people guilty of online abuse will not be attending football matches in future. this was a demand they were making, he anticipated keir starmer would ask that so he got his retaliation and announced in his first answer. secondly, retaliation and announced in his firstanswer. secondly, he retaliation and announced in his first answer. secondly, he said he had met social media companies last night and they would be facing fines unless they took eight and racism of their platform. i think his attack was to try to make borisjohnson feel uncomfortable about where his party is. some people including the former minister steve baker saying actually they had misunderstood the gesture of taking the knee and should now be standing alongside the england players and indeed one of those england players who criticised
12:17 pm
the home secretary, tyrone mings, a conservative mp shouted out at pmqs that he was a labour supporter. it was that kind of division or on easiness in the conservative ranks which keir starmer was trying to exploit at prime minister questions. he elicited quite an admission from the prime minister that he was not engaging in political culture war of any kind. i think that was interesting because quite often it is labour on the back foot on these issues, asked to condemn for example the pulling down of statues of slave traders and so on. borisjohnson knows that it's uncomfortable for labour because some of their own activists are equivocal on those kind of to say the least. best thing, keir starmerwas kind of to say the least. best thing, keir starmer was trying to turnit thing, keir starmer was trying to turn it around and see some of your own mps are equivocal in taking the knee. that's what he was trying to do and in a few minutes, labour having another go this, trying to
12:18 pm
get priti patel to talk about online racial abuse and drag her to the house of commons, ask an urgent question but as i understand it will be difficult, minister. the question but as i understand it will be difficult, minister.— question but as i understand it will be difficult, minister. we should be back any moment _ be difficult, minister. we should be back any moment but _ be difficult, minister. we should be back any moment but no _ be difficult, minister. we should be| back any moment but no movement be difficult, minister. we should be - back any moment but no movementjust now. in terms of those measures announced by the government, and the prime minister saying that i don't want to engage in a political culture war, do you get a sense that there is a shift in how the government sees this and what its approach might be going forward? that approach might be going forward? et the beginning orjust before the beginning of the euro 2020 tournament, there was a kind of feeling that perhaps some of the people voting for conservatives were very uncomfortable about what this taking the knee gesture might mean. was it aligned with some of the more extremist elements, black lives matter movement in america? calling for defunding the police and the
12:19 pm
rest of it. i think now people have come to see perhaps the response of some of the people in the party was not quite chiming with the response of the country. there will be practical measures to deal with this but i think also likely to be a change of tone for some conservative mps, something steve baker has been urging colleagues, as has another former minister, johnny mercer. i think this will be a watershed moment. i think labour saw it as such and were trying to make political capital from it and the government feels it has to react in terms of practicalities and rhetoric. ., terms of practicalities and rhetoric— terms of practicalities and rhetoric. ., ., �* , ., rhetoric. you mentioned it's not ex - ected rhetoric. you mentioned it's not exoeeted it _ rhetoric. you mentioned it's not expected it will _ rhetoric. you mentioned it's not expected it will be _ rhetoric. you mentioned it's not expected it will be priti - rhetoric. you mentioned it's not expected it will be priti patel. expected it will be priti patel answering the question. those comments from the footballers about her stoking the flames with what she said about refusing to condemn the booing, the speaker is in, we are still watching, not there yet, about refusing to condemn the booing. she will not be able to not address this
12:20 pm
for much longer, although i guess the recess is coming up. what would you expect? t the recess is coming up. what would you exam?— you expect? i will expect she has to do that at some _ you expect? i will expect she has to do that at some point. _ you expect? i will expect she has to do that at some point. i _ you expect? i will expect she has to do that at some point. i think - you expect? i will expect she has to do that at some point. i think she . do that at some point. i think she will say she has not only condemned racism that appeared after inking's defeat at the weekend, but she herself has spoken in the house of commons about racist abuse she herself had suffered. another conservative mp pointing out the cabinet is more diverse... taste conservative mp pointing out the cabinet is more diverse... we were listeninu. cabinet is more diverse. .. we were listening- i— cabinet is more diverse. .. we were listening. iwill— cabinet is more diverse... we were listening. i will take _ cabinet is more diverse... we were listening. i will take a _ cabinet is more diverse... we were listening. i will take a moment - cabinet is more diverse... we were listening. i will take a moment to l listening. i will take a moment to reflect on the _ listening. i will take a moment to reflect on the extraordinary - listening. i will take a moment to i reflect on the extraordinary success of the england football team in this tournament. knowing as we do that the background to the urgent question. that team played their hearts out for us and took us through to the first international final 455 years with enormous skill, sportsmanship and dignity. they brought our country together and
12:21 pm
united us enjoy. it's therefore a great shame that the success and achievements of every member of that team has been overshadowed by the racism of online trolls. the prime minister has just reinforced our collective condemnation of racism and off—line. individuals who commit racist offences should face the full force of the law and we already have robust legislation in place to deal with all my but governments around the world are grappling with how we collectively team the wild west of the internet. we are leaving the world in tackling online harms in the introduction of the online safety bill. it will put in place, measures to tackle illegal and legal but harmful abuse including racist abuse. if major platforms do not
12:22 pm
meet their own standards to keep people safe and address abuse quickly and effectively, they could face enforcement action. let one message ring loud and clear to those companies. there is no reason for companies. there is no reason for companies to wait until the regime is fully running to take action against this apparent abuse. indeed, such delays i suspect will serve to stiffen the resolve of the government and this house. in addition, we have asked the commission to conduct a wide—ranging review into hate crime, including offensive online communications. let's put this in context. in 2019-20, the let's put this in context. in 2019—20, the police recorded more than 76,000 race hate crimes. increases in police recorded crime in recent years have been driven by improvements in crime recording and better identification of what
12:23 pm
constitutes a hate crime. while statistics help us track trends, we must have course always remember that behind the numbers are real people who are often left traumatised and shaken by their experiences. there is nothing so damaging or corrosive about the impact that racism has on victims and our communities more widely. i would like to conclude the statement with the words of our england captain, gareth southgate. we have been a beacon of light in bringing people together. the national team stands for everybody and so that togetherness has to continue. we have shown the power our country has when it does come together. let us all live up to those words. t’m all live up to those words. i'm crateful all live up to those words. i'm grateful for — all live up to those words. i'm grateful for that _ all live up to those words. i'm grateful for that response, but the reaction of this government has
12:24 pm
lacked urgency and completely failed to understand the scale of the revulsion that exists as a result of the events of recent days. the england men's football players have been a credit to the country on and off the pitch and when the took the knee to stand against racism, this was not gesture politics. they spoke courageously to a desire for change across our country. the failure of the prime minister and home secretary to condemn those taking the knee was shameful and it frankly makes their later protestations of support for the team no more empty words. the home secretary has not even bother to turn up to answer this question today. the racist abuse to which marcus rashford, jadon sancho and kyle sacco have been subjected is disgraceful. such behaviour —— but kyo social media platforms have had long enough to react. the home secretary said on monday legislation would be
12:25 pm
absolutely pivotal, the government has dragged its feet on bringing the online harms bill forward. worse still, the bill currently proposed will not address what we have seen in the last couple of days, allowing social media companies to set their terms and conditions will not be enough. will the government commit to including criminal sanctions for senior executives in that bill? in addition, will the minister tell us exactly when the government will be exceeding to the demands on these benches to extend football banning orders to offences that take place online as was promised by the prime minister in prime minister's questions and finally, when the prime minister and the home secretary show some leadership and apologise for siding with those who were booing and not with the brave england players? t will]! were booing and not with the brave england players?— england players? i will 'ust explain to the house * england players? i will 'ust explain
12:26 pm
to the house where — england players? i willjust explain to the house where the _ england players? i willjust explain to the house where the home - to the house where the home secretary is today. she's at this very moment hosting a long—standing meeting with charities on the front line of tackling victims, violence against women and girls and survivors of those crimes, so i hope house will instead put up with me in order to answer urgent question. i know the home secretary would reject many of the indeed, all of the allegations made about her conduct. she has been relentless, she has been relentless in pursuing social media companies to ensure that they take much tougher stance is, as we all expect, notjust in relation to racism online, but also child sexual spoke to and terrorism and other offences. i do not accept his accusations across the dispatch box. in times of the online safety bill, this is a landmark piece of
12:27 pm
legislation. the government has been careful to ensure the bill receives the scrutiny of the house, that is why we are taking the confident step of opening the draft bill up to a pre—legislative scrutiny. we don't do that for every bill but we want to get it right. the house will remember we did exactly the same with the domestic abuse bill and it was made all the betterfor with the domestic abuse bill and it was made all the better for it. with the domestic abuse bill and it was made all the betterfor it. i'm delighted that labour have provided i understand the names for their committee members so that legislative scrutiny can take place at pace. i underline the message that this house and the public are watching the online company behaviours very carefully and any company would be very wise to set out what it plans to do in relation to meeting the expectations of this place and the public when it comes to conducting their systems in a way
12:28 pm
thatis to conducting their systems in a way that is clear and prevents the sort of abuse we have seen this weekend. in terms of football banning orders, again, the right honourable gentleman would have heard the prime minister say very clearly at pmqs about the work the government is conducting in relation to football banning orders. it's complex because we know for example some of the trolls that have targeted some members of the team over the weekend are overseas, but we want very much to work with football clubs and others to ensure these orders have the powers that we all want them to have and as i have said throughout, and this is the golden thread throughout our work on tackling online cranes, what is a legal off—line is a legal online. and that is the principle we will be adopting throughout the online safety bill. t
12:29 pm
throughout the online safety bill. i thank her for her statement and calling out some of the vile racist abuse our brilliant players had to face. on sunday night, the centre for countering digital heat identified and reported 105 instagram accounts which racially abused members of the england football team. this morning, only six have been taken down. whilst we are getting warm words from the social media companies, that's all we're getting at present. can my honourable friend therefore confirm the online safety bill will be for what forward with speed and those will be held to proper account? tie will be held to proper account? the: highlights some of the very practical responses social media companies can take right now. they do not need to wait for the online safety bill. i read with some dismay and anger of a report today about how instagram applied its own rules, community rules in relation to
12:30 pm
offensive emojis sent to players and highly offensive words. the social media companies have to explain how exactly their community rules accord with the expectations and lore of our country, but may i make this point again, we are not alone in this. it's a challenge facing every deck democratic society, as we do with terrorism and child sexual. that's how we can make real progress against these companies and hatred. companies and against this hatred. we now go to snp spokesperson. thank ou, mr we now go to snp spokesperson. thank you. mr speaker- _ we now go to snp spokesperson. thank you, mr speaker. the _ we now go to snp spokesperson. ’t�*ta�*taz you, mr speaker. the disgusting online racism faced by england players is unfortunately overshadowing a fantastic tournament and fantastic performance by an england team that has rightly attracted admiration and perhaps even a little bit of envy. so yes we are do need stronger online
12:31 pm
regulation and content must be taken down faster, platforms can no longer be allowed to support this content through a shamefully lax rules. disagree that social media regulation is not a silver bullet? online racism reflects off—line racism and the government needs to take tackling studio: we will leave proceedings there, victoria adkins answering that urgent question on racism for the government confirming those measures that there will be fines of “p measures that there will be fines of up to 10% of global revenue for social media companies that do not take racism of their platforms. there will also be an extension of football banning order so anyone posting anything racist online will be banned from going to football matches. we will have all the latest news and reaction in a few moments,
12:32 pm
first time for a look at the weather. this high pressure marks the start of a spell of settled weather for the end of the week, the weekend, into the start of next week. there will be spells of sunshine and temperatures heading up, becoming warm or indeed very warm. this is the area of high pressure moving on. not ignoring, though, these weather fronts and they are going to bring more cloud into north—west scotland today. we may see a few spots of light rain into the western isles particularly. cloud increasing in northern ireland as well. eastern and southern scotland keeping some sunshine, along with the bulk of england and wales. a few patches of cloud towards western coast and we could keep a bit of cloud in parts of east anglia into the afternoon. around the coast, round 17—20 , inland 20—24 and a few spots getting up to 25 celsius. more cloud running across scotland overnight with a few spots of drizzle, cloudy but misty into northern ireland and cloud
12:33 pm
increasing from the north into england and wales with temperatures need to low teens. sunny spells breaking through the early cloud in scotland and northern ireland as we go through the day. a brighter day in north—west scotland compared with today. tomorrow for england and wales there will be more cloud around but even so there will still be a few sunny spells breaking through at times, especially later in the day. again, the temperatures in the warm spots approaching the mid—20s. look at that for glasgow, for example, tomorrow. on friday, whilst much of the uk will be holding onto long spells of sunshine, some cloud around northern ireland towards the north and north—west of scotland, still close to some weak weather fronts here, even though with the cloud it will stay largely dry. this settled picture then will continue into the weekend with high pressure, and again is that sits over us and we get the sunshine temperature limit will be heading up as it becomes very warm over the weekend, the highest temperatures heading towards the upper 20s, particularly in parts of england and wales.
12:34 pm
in northern scotland you are still close to those weather fronts, just into the mid teens for example a cloud over the weekend. elsewhere in scotland and northern ireland temperatures seem low, approaching the mid—20s with sunny spells, and plenty of sunshine in england and wales. we are talking mid to upper 20s and that temperature over the weekend.
12:35 pm
racism in football — the prime minister promises new measures to deal with it. he says fans who racially abuse
12:36 pm
players will be banned from future games and there'll be big fines for social media companies who fail to tackle online hate. if you are guilty, mr speaker, of racist abuse online - of footballers, then you will not be going to the match. _ no ifs, no buts, no - exemptions and no excuses. we'll have the latest from westminster. also this lunchtime... growing confusion about the rules on facemasks — people in london will still have to wear them on public transport, but, elsewehere in england, they'll no longer be compulsory next week when government restrictions are lifted. speaking to transport workers, the trade unions, londoners, businesses, wearing a facemask gives greater confidence.
12:37 pm
12:38 pm
12:39 pm
12:40 pm
12:41 pm
12:42 pm
12:43 pm
12:44 pm
12:45 pm
12:46 pm
12:47 pm
12:48 pm
12:49 pm
12:50 pm
12:51 pm
12:52 pm
12:53 pm
12:54 pm
12:55 pm
12:56 pm
12:57 pm
12:58 pm
12:59 pm
1:00 pm

35 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on