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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 14, 2021 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. facemasks will still be compulsory on public transport in london, despite the law changing on monday. united against racism. hundreds of people take the knee beside the repaired mural of marcus rashford in support of racially abused england players. meanwhile, labour mps are calling for new powers to ban anyone convicted of online racist abuse from football matches for life. the cost of living is on the up, food, energy and clothing prices all rising so i will look at what it
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could mean that the pound in your pocket. a record—breaking day for england's cricketers as they hit the highest ever run chase at edgbaston in a one—day international as they beat pakistan by three wickets to win the series 3—0. after a storming start to the week, sunshine and warmth is back. fancy a dip? i will sunshine and warmth is back. fancy a dip? iwill dip sunshine and warmth is back. fancy a dip? i will dip into the forecast to tell you the details and breakfast. it's wednesday the 14th ofjuly. face coverings will remain mandatory for passengers on london's transport network, despite the legal requirement to wear them being lifted in england from monday. the city's mayor, sadiq khan, said the move was aimed at keeping passengers and staff safe. masks will still be a requirement in scotland and in wales people will need to wear them on public transport and in health care settings. here's our transport correspondent caroline davies. from monday, it is no longer the law to wear a mask in public
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transport in england. instead, it's about personal responsibility. but the government has said it still wants people to wear face coverings in crowded settings, such as busy trains and buses. london's mayor, sadiq khan, has asked transport for london to make it a condition of carriage, meaning if passengers travel on any of its services, including buses and tubes, they must wear a mask, even after monday. tfl will be the first operator to do this, although manchester's mayor, andy burnham, hasn't ruled out doing the same on the city's tram network. the scottish government has also said it will continue to require facemasks on public transport. on the issue of mandating mitigations like face coverings, let me just say this. it is my view that if government believes measures like this matter, and this government does, we should say so. we should do what is necessary to ensure compliance and we should be prepared to take any resulting flak from those who disagree. we shouldn't lift important restrictions to make our lives easier and then expect the public
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to take responsibility for doing the right thing anyway. wales is also expected to do the same. unions have welcomed the news, but some are worried about how enforceable it will be and that it could lead to disputes on board. some operators are worried that requiring masks on public transport could make people feel like the service is less safe than other indoor places, like restaurants or pubs. but the mayor has said he is doing it to make the public feel more confident. caroline davies, bbc news. we're joined now by our political correspondent ben wright. good morning. there seems to be some differentiation at least between nations over facemasks. yes. differentiation at least between nations over facemasks. yes, and even within _ nations over facemasks. yes, and even within nations, _ nations over facemasks. yes, and even within nations, now- nations over facemasks. yes, and even within nations, now you - nations over facemasks. yes, and | even within nations, now you have london doing its own thing, as caroline was saying, from monday, if you travel on the london underground, a bus or the overground, you will have to wear a mask as a condition of travel, just as it is a condition not to drink alcohol on the london underground.
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you will have to wear a face covering unless you are exempt from the rule. there will be enforcement officers making sure you can't get on the tube or bus unless you are wearing a mask. sadiq khan had been arguing that there should be a a national mandate which continued on monday but instead he's doing his own thing, saying that tokeep hasn't discovered it and suppress the virus, he will be doing this. but that means if you travel from a london station to somewhere else in england, you won't have to wear a mask, it will be advised in crowded places but not mandatory and then as we have been hearing in scotland and wales, the rules change again and there will be a requirement to wear masks from monday. a fractured approach across the uk. we masks from monday. a fractured approach across the uk.- masks from monday. a fractured approach across the uk. we will be s-ueakin approach across the uk. we will be speaking to — approach across the uk. we will be speaking to sadiq _ approach across the uk. we will be speaking to sadiq khan _ approach across the uk. we will be speaking to sadiq khan on - approach across the uk. we will be speaking to sadiq khan on the - speaking to sadiq khan on the programme later, at 7:10am. in other news, labour mps are calling on the government to ban anyone convicted of online racial abuse from going to football matches as well. there is so much discussion around this dell. yes, there is, the fallout from the
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abuse that the trio of england footballers received, the racial abuse after the european championships final, continues and i think there is the political concern about where we should go next in terms of policy. there will be a debate in the commons later, an urgent question that labour have secured to question the government on what more can be done to clamp down on the online abuse that people receive, racialabuse, down on the online abuse that people receive, racial abuse, and what the punishment should be. labour are saying people who are found to be racially abusing players online should receive a ban from going to football matches, in the same way that at the moment, if you are caught orfound to that at the moment, if you are caught or found to be that at the moment, if you are caught orfound to be racially abusing players from the terraces, you can be banned from grounds. they want that extended to people who commit online abuse as well. that debate will be in the commons later. we will discuss that further later on the programme. thank you for joining us. coronavirus restrictions will be eased in scotland from monday as the country moves to level zero, but some measures will remain. some social distancing rules will be maintained outdoors,
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and the mandatory use of face coverings will remain in place. there will also still be limits on the number of people able to meet both indoors and outside. meanwhile plans for easing restrictions in wales will be set out by the welsh government later today. ministers have already said that face coverings will remain mandatory on public transport and in health care settings, but they will announce whether restrictions can be eased to allow more socialising indoors, including in people's homes. an outbreak of covid—i9 has been confirmed on the royal navy's flagship, hms queen elizabeth. the bbc has been told there's been around a hundred cases on the aircraft carrier, which is part—way through a world tour. defence secretary ben wallace said all crew on the deployment had received both vaccine doses and the outbreak was being managed. police in south africa say more than 70 people have died in violence that has erupted since the jailing of former presidentjacob zuma last week. ten of those who have died
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were killed in a stampede during looting at a shopping centre on monday night. the military has now been deployed to help the overstretched police. mark lobel reports. gunfire. shocking footage on social media shows open warfare amongst citizens in former presidentjacob zuma's backyard. ok, let's go. pitting south african against south african, looters against armed locals. where's john with the shot gun? local militia are stepping in, as elsewhere, the police are simply overwhelmed. it is perhaps no surprise the army has been called in, but that brings its own challenges. if they start shooting, that will be war, and that is the thing that we don't want here in south africa. the fire department vehicles are being escorted by the metro police... in affected areas, public transport is suspended, with some roads now off—limits, prompting the temporary
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closure of south africa's biggest oil refinery. the jobs that are being lost at the moment are going to exacerbate the situation and we don't need this. it is perhaps ironic that the jailing of this man, former presidentjacob zuma, as part of the government's efforts to call out billions of dollars of alleged corruption, to clean up south africa's economy and make it attractive to foreign investors, is now triggering further economic damage, not to mention loss of life. but why? tweets like these from president zuma's daughter suggest a political motivation, and hint of a deep split within the ruling anc party of which she is a member. the tweets have criticised president ramaphosa's administration for her father's imprisonment. they have accused the government of propping up the interests of minority whites and elites. but south africa's president cyril ramaphosa insists no political cause can justify this violence,
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inflaming his pandemic and poverty—hit country. mark lobel, bbc news. prince charles has warned that the uk is in danger of destroying britain's rural communities by letting small family farms "go to the wall". speaking to the bbc, he said the focus needs to move away from producing cheap and mass—produced food and to put nature back at the heart of farming. here's our chief environment correspondentjustin rowlatt. superefficient, intensive agriculture is a dead end, prince charles said today. he warns that the pursuit of cheap food has damaged our soils and water courses as well as producing emissions that have driven global warming. such has been the damage to the natural systems we depend upon, we must achieve profound and rapid change to reverse it. we must put nature back at the heart of the equation.
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the prince is adamant that small farms must be a part of that effort. he has been deeply concerned with food and the environment for most of his adult life. our current approach is forcing many small family farms to the wall. if they go, it will quite simply rip the heart out of the british countryside and break the backbone of britain's rural communities. prince charles praises the efforts of marcus rashford and jamie oliver to improve the nation's diet. he believes we need to switch from industrial farming methods and adopt more sustainable practices. only by benefiting nature can we benefit people, and that will ensure the future of our living planet. prince charles's comments come ahead
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of the publication tomorrow of the national food strategy — the first major review of britain's food system in over 70 years. justin rowlatt, bbc news. the latest inflation figures are out in about an hour's time. the cost of living has been rising over the past few months — and so has consumer spending as lockdown restrictions have eased. but are rising prices here to stay? ben is at a market in north london for us. morning, ben. if it does go up it could hit us all in our pockets.— if it does go up it could hit us all in our pockets. yes, we are looking at the cost — in our pockets. yes, we are looking at the cost of _ in our pockets. yes, we are looking at the cost of living _ in our pockets. yes, we are looking at the cost of living today _ in our pockets. yes, we are looking at the cost of living today because l at the cost of living today because we will get the latest official figures just after 7am which will show us quite how quickly prices are rising for all of the things we consume, and particularly we will be keeping a close eye on things like food and clothing prices and energy,
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whether that is the gas and electricity we use at home or the petrol and diesel we put in our cars. because it really does have the power to affect the money in our pocket. it tells us how far our money will go and crucially, it has implications for things like interest rates as well. let me explain what we know has happened so far because you touched on the pandemic. that has played havoc with the figures. in the last update we had, we found out that inflation was going up by 2.1% which means prices are going up by more than 2%. in that set of figures, it tells us it was things like petrol, which was up by nearly 18% because remember, compared to lockdown, when we were not going anywhere or driving or out on planes or going on holiday, it meant the cost of that fuel cell sharply, and now we are out of luck done —— lockdown, we have seen the same eyes and the same thing with clothing prices, starting to rise to after retailers think they don't need to cut prices to get us back in
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the shops any more so the costs are going up as well. and there is some fear that inflation could hit as high as 4% by the end of the year. that is more than double what the bank of england is aiming for. let me explain why that is important. prices consistently go up, that is a good thing, it means we go out and buy now rather than later because we expect the prices will rise. but if they are going up too quickly, it causes a huge problem for the economy, trying to keep things in check and one of the options the bank of england has to keep inflation in check is to raise interest rates because that means we are more likely to save and we will put the money in the bank and try to get a bit of a return on it, rather than going out and spending it. of course, interest rates have huge implications for savers, who would welcome interest rates coming up, but not such good news if you have a credit card or mortgage debt. equally, it means the money in your pocket does not go quite as far if
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prices are rising quickly so we're all learning the same amount of money but things this start to cost more so the money does not go as far. —— things like this. over the course of the morning, i will look at what the latest set of figures tells us about the pandemic and our spending habits and what we are buying and where we are buying it and crucially, how much we are paying for it and we will look at the implications for things like mortgages, credit cards and savings, if the bank of england was to respond with a rise in interest rates. we will get the figure at 7am. i will have all of the details for you one breakfast.— 7am. i will have all of the details for you one breakfast. thanks, ben, we look forward _ for you one breakfast. thanks, ben, we look forward to _ for you one breakfast. thanks, ben, we look forward to that. _ it looks lovely, there. let's get the weather now with matt, who is at the west reservoir water sports centre in hackney. it also looks like a glorious morning there. it is indeed, very good morning, what a lovely start to the day. hard to believe we are only about five miles away from the centre of london. the reservoir behind me
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openedin london. the reservoir behind me opened in 1833, to serve london's water needs but as dan has mentioned, it is now my watersports and open water swimming centre and the manager here said he is expecting a big boost in numbers and thatis expecting a big boost in numbers and that is all because of the weather. let's take a look at the forecast. over the next few days, after what was quite a storming start to the week, much more in the way of sunshine and a bit more in the way of warmth building as we go through the next few days. out there this morning, lots more sunshine around than we had this time yesterday. some low cloud code low is to the eastern coasts and around western coasts, some more cloud at times which will come on shore but for most, a dry and sunny start and will stay that way too much of the day, the biggest change across the far west of scotland and into northern ireland. an approaching weather front bringing more cloud and may be some patchy drizzle to the western isles later. in the sunshine, feeling pleasantly warm with temperatures in the low to mid 20s, about where we should be for the stage injuly. this evening and overnight, cloud across western
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scotland and northern ireland could push further south across the rest of scotland and northern ireland and into the north west of england and wales which will stop the temperatures from falling, quite a mild night across northern and western areas. for many, temperatures are similar to what they have been recent mornings, tempered a bit by the breeze across eastern areas which will ease down tomorrow but for tomorrow, england and wales, we will see a bit more clout than today so not quite as sunny but still some good sunny spells breaking through away from eastern coasts and across parts of scotland and northern ireland, a bit more sunshine than this afternoon and temperatures will start to rise. in fact, they will rise further as we go through the rest of the week and into the weekend. i will have more details on that as we go through the morning. it looks lovely out there. thank you, matt. it looks lovely out there. thank you. matt-— it looks lovely out there. thank ou, matt. ., ., ., �* i] you, matt. you want in, don't you? i want to do — you, matt. you want in, don't you? i want to do another _ you, matt. you want in, don't you? i want to do another six _ you, matt. you want in, don't you? i want to do another six mile - you, matt. you want in, don't you? i want to do another six mile swim - you, matt. you want in, don't you? i want to do another six mile swim in | want to do another six mile swim in there, why not? let's take a look at today's papers... "you inspire us" is the headline on the daily mirror this morning, which features
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letters written by school children to marcus rashford, after he faced racist abuse following the euro 2020 final. we will show you some very interesting pictures. we had a camera and a reporter there yesterday, graham satchell has been there and we will show you how it changed over the day. and he has been meeting some of the children who wrote the letters as well. a picture of people gathered at last night's anti—racism demonstration in front of a mural of the england star is splashed across the front page of the metro. the paper says the prime minister has warned social media firms to "up their game" and stop online abuse. the sun leads with a call by england defender harry maguire for social media companies to crack down on racist trolls. the paper also claims maguire's father was left with suspected broken ribs after being "crushed by ticketless yobs who stormed" wembley stadium for the final. and the telegraph reports that british holiday—makers are being "barred" from boarding flights to europe
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after receiving the indian—made version of the astrazeneca vaccine. it features an interview with a couple who were turned away when they tried to board a flight to malta. we will be speaking to the transport secretary grant shapps and we might ask him about that later. talking about the england footballers, lots of pictures in the paper of them coming home, luke shaw came home to a big sign saying welcome back daddy, harry kane came back to balloons with welcome home, daddy, we love you. declan rice at the bottom with his dog, very happy to see him. harry maguire came back to "our champ" in lights and then the main picture is kalvin phillips, welcome home, quite a bit of effort! that is a huge effort! do you think it will stay up? it’s that is a huge effort! do you think it will stay up?— it will stay up? it's there forever. i was it will stay up? it's there forever. i was missing _ it will stay up? it's there forever. i was missing the _ it will stay up? it's there forever. i was missing the sport _ it will stay up? it's there forever. i was missing the sport last - it will stay up? it's there forever. i was missing the sport last night but there is more sport incoming, the olympics, and cricket going on
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as well. �* , , ~ as well. and the gulf this weekend, my favourite _ as well. and the gulf this weekend, my favourite week _ as well. and the gulf this weekend, my favourite week of _ as well. and the gulf this weekend, my favourite week of the _ as well. and the gulf this weekend, my favourite week of the year, - as well. and the gulf this weekend, my favourite week of the year, the | my favourite week of the year, the open. sorry. my favourite week of the year, the open- sorry-— my favourite week of the year, the open. sorry. shall we talk about the ol mics? open. sorry. shall we talk about the olympics? this _ open. sorry. shall we talk about the olympics? this is — open. sorry. shall we talk about the olympics? this is a _ open. sorry. shall we talk about the olympics? this is a lovely _ open. sorry. shall we talk about the olympics? this is a lovely story, - olympics? this is a lovely story, team gb is going to be a family affair, from the daily mirror, with eight sets of siblings going to the games which is really wonderful. they have got pictures of them all, competing in gymnastics, and rowing. swimmers, and the maccormack brothers in boxing. jodie and hannah williams competing in athletics and adam and simon yates going for cycling glory. ijust absolutely love the fact they are all, so many of them, brothers and sisters, going to the olympics together, i think it is lovely. i to the olympics together, i think it is lovel . . , to the olympics together, i think it is lovel . ., , , ., is lovely. i was listening to christine — is lovely. i was listening to christine ohuruogu, - is lovely. i was listening to christine ohuruogu, a - is lovely. i was listening to i christine ohuruogu, a former is lovely. i was listening to _ christine ohuruogu, a former olympic champion, on the radio yesterday, doing the diamond league athletics and she said her sister used to go with her to events but was not
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allowed in the call room, she could support her but she said tiffany porter and cindy sender, she says she has seen them toe to toe and they are incredibly competitive with each other when they are racing so actually, it is not this, 0, are you 0k, let actually, it is not this, 0, are you ok, let me help you, it is more a case of, i'm going to beat you. aha, case of, i'm going to beat you. quiz question for you, i don't expect you to get it but you might, how many pairs of british savings have won olympic medals. three? seven. have won olympic medals. three? seven- i'm — have won olympic medals. three? seven. i'm afraid _ have won olympic medals. three? seven. i'm afraid i _ have won olympic medals. three? seven. i'm afraid i have _ have won olympic medals. three? seven. i'm afraid i have lost - have won olympic medals. three? seven. i'm afraid i have lost all. seven. i'm afraid i have lost all the money! _ seven. i'm afraid i have lost all the money! but— seven. i'm afraid i have lost all the money! but you _ seven. i'm afraid i have lost all the money! but you are - seven. i'm afraid i have lost all the money! but you are quick l seven. i'm afraid i have lost all. the money! but you are quick on seven. i'm afraid i have lost all- the money! but you are quick on the buzzer. from studying worms to growing nature—friendly food, thousands of young people around the uk are learning about how to solve the environmental crisis as part of an initiative led by the royal society. the children will conduct their own investigations before presenting their findings to world leaders meeting in scotland to discuss climate change this autumn. our science correspondent victoria gill reports.
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as climate change plays out, it is the next generation that has to live with the consequences. we have already seen many young people march out of school in global climate protests. but now more than 5000 young people across the uk are embarking on a mission to try to understand and help solve the environmental crises we are all facing. i want to know how clean the air is in our school. we are measuring plants to see how they are growing outside. we have been learning about worms. this is mustard powder. i am going to mix the mustard powder into the water. sprinkling mustard and water on the ground briefly irritates the worms' skin, so they come to the surface. how did you get them to come out of the ground? mayonnaise powder. mayonnaise powder? no, it isn't, it is thingy powder. no, mayonnaise powder. it isn't mayonnaise.
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yes, it is. 11... i got 28. 28?! and how many did you get? 22. they are just going to dry the worms and then they can weigh them and find out who got the biggest worm today. 2.6. so it is a little bit lighter. these are babies, ok? you can hold that, yeah. these are the scientists of tomorrow. they have to think about their future and their children's future. it is a long—term gain. this is not something for a single generation. we all have to play our part. 38 schools around the country are involved in this future climate scientists mission and they have ambitious plans, like growing nature friendly food on school grounds. it is part of an effort to make this the uk's first carbon neutral school. it is so important to me. it is a matter of our lives now. i think it should be important to everyone and this is why we have
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started the outdoor learning area, so that we can protect the environment and try to combat climate change. later this year, these young researchers plan to take what they've discovered to the politicians who are going to be representing them at the critical climate conference in glasgow, cop26. let's put it back in, shall we? ok, let's not take them out now. the hope is that every small discovery they have made will help shape the future for the environment. worms are very important because they help plants to grow. if we stop things like global warming, pesticides, and help the bees, then i think the world is going to be a better place. that's brilliant. these young scientists want their voices to be heard this year, before leaders make crucial decisions for the future of our planet. victoria gill, bbc news. there you go, you learn something
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everyday in this programme. coming up everyday in this programme. coming up this morning. i do not believe you are calling from first direct and i do actually wonder how many vulnerable or elderly people you have defrauded. with scam text messages on the rise we'll learn what to look out for to avoid falling victim to the fraudsters trying to obtain our details. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the met police says some young people in the capital have been reported missing more than 300 times, placing a huge responsibilty on officers who risk assess each case. the force says its working with care homes to try and reduce the number of calls it receives. the borough of croydon sees more missing person reports in a year than the whole of germany does. what we see is a really high
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number of care homes. so that, the number of hospitals and the number of institutions looking after people's mental health is higher here than it is in the more central areas. that leads to really high numbers of missing persons cases every year. three siblings have told the bbc how the were struck the bbc how they were struck by lightning on monday while sheltering under a tree near hampton court palace. you wouldn't know, but this was the moment it happened. rachel, isobel and andrewjobson were taking a selfie at the time and captured it on camera. they were taken to st george's hospital in tooting but later discharged. reading festival is one step closer to going ahead this summer. the local council granted an event licence, but says there needs to be detailed consideration on how to minimise the risk of covid. the festival is expected to take place during the last weekend in august. archaeologists working on the hs2 project in west london have made a once in a lifetime discovery.
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more than 300 iron age coins, known as the hillingdon hoard, dating back to the 1st century. they have been taken to the birmingham museum and art gallery, where they have been cleaned and preserved. a quick look at the travel now. the overground's not running between euston and kilburn high road — it's due to the flood damage from monday. and tfl rail has severe delays after a freight train broke down. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there is the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out over the next couple of days. but, for the vast majority, it should stay completely dry. and it will feel very much as if summer is returning. it is a cloudy, mild start. we will keep the cloud for much of the morning for many places, particularly towards eastern home counties. but the cloud will break up. we will see bright spells, some spells of sunshine. sunny spells through the afternoon. always best the further west you are. a noticeable northerly to northwesterly breeze. top temperatures in the best
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of the sunshine will get as high as 23—24 celsius. so not a bad—looking day of whether. so not a bad—looking day of weather. overnight tonight, it is set to stay dry. there will be clear spells. cloud reforming into tomorrow morning with perhaps a few early mist patches around. temperatures staying in double figures. on thursday, we have high pressure fairly firmly established across the uk and that will continue for the rest of the week, so there will be decent spells of sunshine, but also some cloud coming and going. it should stay dry or mostly dry, and temperatures once more will get up to 23—24. those temperatures are set to rise further as we head through friday and the weekend. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address, including bbc brea kfast�*s top story on facemasks — they'll stay as mandatory on the tube. now back to dan and louise. hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. coming up on breakfast this morning.
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we'll meet the couple aiming to complete all 96 olympic events in 13 days to raise money for the mnd association. they were due to be on yesterday but we had technical issues. school's out for summer sooner than planned for some classes forced to self—isolate — we'll hear about the virtual goodbyes some teachers are planning for their pupils who are moving on to secondary school. and after opening up about his mental health struggles for his new album, tom odell will be joining us in the studio after nine o'clock. a musical marathon later because shaun ryder is coming in. there's lots of changes coming in about face
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coverings from next week. you won't be breaking the law by not wearing one in england but they'll still be mandatory for now in scotland and wales. in london, they will still be compulsory. we'rejoined now by gp, dr rachel ward. good morning, lovely to have you on. give us an idea how you feel about the removal of facemasks, coverings, in england from the 19th ofjuly. good morning. ithink in england from the 19th ofjuly. good morning. i think there has been a little back with it because initially we were told it was not going to be compulsory and a couple of days ago the prime minister urged people that if you are in an enclosed indoor space with people, the recommendation, though not the law, is you continue to wear a facemask. transport for london have said it will be mandatory on public transport in london. and also hints
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that will be the case in other cities such as manchester. there is a lot of confusing messages going around. my feeling is very much that we are able, from the 19th ofjuly, to basically do everything. wearing a facemask whilst we do certain things in crowded places is not a big thing for people to do, when we consider the protection it gives to vulnerable people. i think there are a lot of vulnerable people feeling very anxious about the 19th ofjuly, because people do not have to wear facemasks. if people choose not to, a lot of vulnerable people will suddenly become very isolated again, choose not to go out and about. i think that will be a negative thing. my think that will be a negative thing. my overall feeling is we urge people to continue to wear facemasks while we go about our day—to—day life.
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what would be the practice in your practice? public health england recommend it in care settings. we. recommend it in care settings. we, as medical — recommend it in care settings. we, as medical staff, _ recommend it in care settings. we, as medical staff, will— recommend it in care settings. , as medical staff, will continue to wearface as medical staff, will continue to wear face coverings. we will do that to protect vulnerable people in case any of us have symptomatic covid. we need to think carefully going into, at times, when we have high circulating levels of covid, that what we don't want to happen is for staff to contract covid and be off sick that will affect the services we offer. if you are going to see your gp, going into hospital, please weara your gp, going into hospital, please wear a face covering. it is to protect yourself to some extent, but think about the staff who are seeing many people every day. we want to keep them well and keep them at work during this busy time. b,
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keep them well and keep them at work during this busy time. b. 11th keep them well and keep them at work during this busy time.— during this busy time. a lot of discussion _ during this busy time. a lot of discussion around _ during this busy time. a lot of discussion around rejections l during this busy time. a lot of. discussion around rejections and modelling about how many cases and how many people in hospital with projections we could see 100,000 cases by the middle of august and 200 deaths a day by the middle of august. do you think the numbers are inevitable or could the continuation of facemasks, can that and being careful reduce the number dramatically?— careful reduce the number dramaticall ? , , . dramatically? this is a difficult one and there _ dramatically? this is a difficult one and there have _ dramatically? this is a difficult one and there have been - dramatically? this is a difficult one and there have been a - dramatically? this is a difficult one and there have been a lot| dramatically? this is a difficult l one and there have been a lot of different scientific modelling as to predicting what is going to happen in the coming weeks and months. there are different theories that say if we all approach things in a gradual manner, then the peak will be less. some models say this variant will rip through the population. we will see high rates.
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i think there are unknowns. i think we are taking a step forward where the aim is we basically let this wave burn—out in a natural way. and the thoughts behind it are there are enough people vaccinated to protect the vulnerable and to keep the nhs in a manageable way. i think there is nobody who has clear, definite answers as to how this will play out. in answers as to how this will play out. , ., ., , ., answers as to how this will play out. , ., ., i. ., out. in terms of what you are seeinu , out. in terms of what you are seeing. are — out. in terms of what you are seeing, are you _ out. in terms of what you are seeing, are you seeing - out. in terms of what you are | seeing, are you seeing people out. in terms of what you are - seeing, are you seeing people with covid symptoms a lot younger than they were? in covid symptoms a lot younger than the were? , , . ., they were? in my practice we have hiuh rates they were? in my practice we have high rates of _ they were? in my practice we have high rates of covid. _ they were? in my practice we have high rates of covid. we _ they were? in my practice we have high rates of covid. we basically i high rates of covid. we basically have one designated doctor all the time, just seeing people with fever and coughs because we are seeing so much. they are not all going to be covid. the majority of people have not been tested when we have seen
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them. there is a peak in children having respiratory illness and fever because they missed the winter of bugs and mixing. we are seeing that at the same time. we are certainly seeing a lot of fever, coughing, and it is keeping us busy. i think that is a concern in the coming weeks. 0k, is a concern in the coming weeks. ok, thank you. have a lovely wednesday. we will see you soon. is it because we had a double day on sunday that we are struggling with the days? the football is messing with my head to the entire week. i feel your pain. to the entire week. ifeel your pain. there is to the entire week. i feel your pain. there is other sport, thank goodness. a trophy in the hands of the england team. sweet caroline being belted out by fans at edgbaston. what is
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most impressive is most of the players would not have got a chance had not most of the original squad been ruled out because of covid. it was a first international century forjames vince that enabled england's men to chase down a record target at edgbaston to beat pakistan by three wickets in the final one—day international and win the series 3—nil. after being set a target of 332 to win, england were in trouble at 165 for five — but vince, stood firm to hit but vince stood firm to hit 102 balls and prove this was anything but a second—string side. and there was also an innings of 77 from lewis gregory, which helped them to victory with two overs to spare. pretty impressive since the whole squad was drafted in last minute, and yet they managed to earn their place in the history books. to be able to get out there and make a contribution like that and get a hundred in front of a pretty noisy crowd on a good day and contribute towards a win, you know, obviously i would have liked to be there at the end, but once the boys got over the line i sort
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of settled down a bit and, yeah, really enjoyed it. next to the fall—out from the behaviour of some fans at england's euros final defeat to italy, and uefa has opened disciplinary proceedings against the football association after security breaches at wembley. there are four charges in all relating to disturbances through the national anthem, also a pitch invasion, the throwing of objects and the lighting of a firework. uefa will also investigatethe events in and around the stadium, after some fans had fought with stewards and police as they attempted to break through gates for sunday's showcase event. the punishments for the offences could include fines and possibly having to play home games behind closed doors in future uefa matches. i think questions need to be asked of why it happened on sunday, because to allow ticketless fans, many of whom had had too much to drink, actually getting near wembley stadium, you know, is questionable. i think the intelligence that should have been out there,
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making sure that didn't happen, just clearly was woeful. marcus rashford might have to wait until the end of october before he can feel the love and support of manchester united fans on the pitch again. he's decided to have surgery on a shoulder injury that plagued him for the latter half of last season. this was after scans on the injury yesterday. the lay—off could mean rashford misses half of united's champions league group stage matches, and five of england's world cup qualifiers. it was a final chance last night for britain's athletes to flex their muscles against their rivals just ten days out from the olympics, but it was a disappointing showing in the long jump for heptathlon world champion katarina johnson—thompson. this was at the diamond league meeting at gateshead and johnson—thompson is on her way back from a ruptured achilles tendon injury, and jumped 6.10 metres, well short of the 6.77 metres she recorded when she won gold in doha in 2019. but it's understandable
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as before last night, she had just one previous high—jump outing this year. mentally, it is always tough. each week, it's been tough. each week has been a new challenge. like, the longjump, when you think about it, i'm running as fast as i can for 19 steps and then sticking my left leg out, so it is a challenge but i'm glad i was able to get a full five jumps out and have no reaction so itjust shows jumps out and have no reaction. british number one tennis star johanna konta will miss the olympics after testing positive for covid. she had to withdraw from this year's wimbledon after a member of her team had tested positive, and she herself developed some symptoms while in isolation, which has meant she's been unable to train for the past two and a half weeks and she won't be ready for the games. roger federer is also out of the olympics because of a knee injury. the 20—time grand slam winner says he's suffered a setback and is greatly disappointed at not being able to represent switzerland in tokyo. rory mcilroy will go in search of his second
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open championship win this week, and will be hoping to improve on his performance in 2019, when he missed the cut by one shot. the northern irishman also missed the cut at the scottish open at the weekend. he will be partnered with american patrick reed and australia's cameron smith at royal st george's in kent when play gets under way tomorrow. the british and irish lions play another warm up match tonight in johannesburg but against a pretty much full strength south african team who need match practice after a covid outbreak in their camp. so much sport to keep an eye out for. yesterday, we showed you pictures of a mural of marcus rashford in manchester that had been almost completely covered in messages of support after it was defaced with racist graffiti. last night, hundreds of people took the knee beside the restored artwork in a show of solidarity with the striker and other england players who received similar
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abuse after sunday's euros final, as graham satchell reports. the abuse scrawled on this wall was covered up almost immediately — first, with bin bags. what happened next was extraordinary. as the hours passed, people brought notes, letters, messages of support. hundreds and hundreds of them. by late yesterday, marcus rashford's mural had been completely transformed. this woman came with her son omar. we decided to come and putjust very lovely kind notes over the paint, and when we came, we got surprised by the community being together and that is how we are supposed to be. black and white, it does not matter what race you are, we are all here
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for england, so, yeah. three black english players have been targeted with racist abuse after missing penalties at the final on sunday. everyone is like a big family round here. so to see that round here, it is shocking. especially for the kids to see it, as well. the messages here are simple, powerful. support and love for a man who has done so much on and off the pitch. he gave out free school meals for children. and he got like a member of the british empire. he is amazing. he has helped so many families. but, obviously, we are massive united fans in our house, so we all love him. this is maya and her daughter violet. she left a note saying be kind, be loving, be more like rashford. we experience racism on a daily basis, being people of colour ourselves.
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she gets it at school. i get it at work, get it walking down the street. get told to go back to your country on a regular basis. but i've always lived in this country. my grandparents lived in this country. i think we are like three generations deep, now. ifeel like it should be coming to an end, but it is clearly not. it hurts, does it? yes. you try to act like it doesn't hurt but yes, it does hurt. at marcus rashford's old primary schooljust down the road, there are posters celebrating black history, and a pair of his boots sit proudly in a cabinet. year 5 students, nine and ten—year—olds, so appalled by what has happened, they too have written letters to their hero. dear mr rashford, i think you are an amazing, legendary football player. i'm very sorry for all the racist comments you got for missing a penalty. i want you to stop and remember all the amazing things you have done and all the challenges you have overcome already to get to this point in life. some people in this world are racist, but don't listen to them, because you try your best and that is all we can ask for. it's amazing you made
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it to the final. second place is still really good. just look where you came from and look at you now. we all know you and any people of colour or background - don't deserve this. especially that paintingl of you being destroyed. i and all of us know. this has gone too far. i feel very inspired that i was in the same classroom as you when you were my age. even though i'm italian and my family supports italy, that doesn't mean you're not my hero and that you don't inspire me. keep strong, marcus, and never give up. black lives matter! all: black lives matter! back at the mural last night, a protest organised by stand up to racism. hundreds of people taking the knee. marcus rashford has said he has been moved to tears by a community that has wrapped their arms around him. it is a powerful collective response to mindless racist hate. graham satchell, bbc news, manchester.
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we're joined by watford captain troy deeney, who also sits on the fa's inclusion advisory board. you are probably not able to see those pictures, but what is your reaction when you see response to that muriel and what —— to that bureau and what happened. —— mural. it is great to see people are inspired to show equality and the world is moving forward. i think we have to be very careful to understand that it is not everybody who is racist. in the current climate, you are either one or the other, at the moment. we have to be careful not to tarnish everyone with the same brush. it shows people like myself, who have been doing this for years, now, there is a lot more work to be done. years, now, there is a lot more work to be done-—
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to be done. how does that work ha--en? to be done. how does that work happen? what _ to be done. how does that work happen? what is _ to be done. how does that work happen? what is the _ to be done. how does that work happen? what is the best - to be done. how does that work happen? what is the best way l to be done. how does that work| happen? what is the best way of tackling it? the government are talking to social media companies. is that part of the answer? it is part of the answer. there is a frustration. so many people i have spoken to in the last few days. it feels like it has had to get to the main stage for government to pull theirfinger main stage for government to pull their finger out main stage for government to pull theirfinger out for want main stage for government to pull their finger out for want of the better word. we have had chats at downing street and being invited to talk about these issues. we have to be careful this does not become tokenism. that it is a pr stunt for the here and now. people might think i'm being cynical early in the morning and i do not mean to be, but we are at a place where england did very well in the euros. everybody was happy, the nation was happy. unfortunately, three men missed
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penalties and got abuses we have seen. but this has been going on a long time. there have been issues where earlier on, tyrone mings called it out, we had government saying people should have the right to boo. we have to be careful we do not get caught up in the government pr stunt and we actually see substantial change. it is moving watchinu substantial change. it is moving watching those _ substantial change. it is moving watching those pictures, - substantial change. it is moving watching those pictures, and i substantial change. it is moving i watching those pictures, and what happened. marcus rashford is clearly moved and put a message out last night to that effect. do you think this could be possibly a significant moment for change? you this could be possibly a significant moment for change?— this could be possibly a significant moment for change? you have to hope so. i have children _ moment for change? you have to hope so. i have children of— moment for change? you have to hope so. i have children of my _ moment for change? you have to hope so. i have children of my own. - moment for change? you have to hope so. i have children of my own. i - so. i have children of my own. i want them to live in a better world. that is all we can ask for as
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parents. i think marcus has done unbelievably well in the past two years, since covid kicked in. i do not think there has been a better athlete, especially from this country, to advocate for people from low—income housing, to kids, the work he has been doing on racism. and it shows how quickly and carefully you have to tread as a young black player in this country. he missed one penalty and it was undonein he missed one penalty and it was undone in a blink of an eye. it was good to see the drowning out of noise. i like the way the community has come together. i think it is massive. we have to continue pushing the message. you hope this is a positive change and we do notjust speak about this for the short—term until more news comes in and we forget about it.— forget about it. you mentioned t rone forget about it. you mentioned tyrone mings _ forget about it. you mentioned tyrone mings who _ forget about it. you mentioned tyrone mings who criticised - forget about it. you mentioned l tyrone mings who criticised priti patel the home secretary. with that
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situation would it be helpful for example if they met, would it make a difference? ~ ., example if they met, would it make a difference? . ., ., ,, ., difference? would it make a difference? _ difference? would it make a difference? no, _ difference? would it make a difference? no, because- difference? would it make a difference? no, because it. difference? would it make a i difference? no, because it has already happened. i think before priti patel would have put those comments out into the universe if she had picked up the phone or arranged a meeting, because these things can happen, but it is easy to do it after the fact. she knew the demographic she was talking to and she is a smart individual. there is no point acting now like you are completely disgusted. that you did not know what you were doing. she has been in a position of power a long time. she is a smart, shrewd individual. it should mean things happen, of course. you get consultants to ask about subjects you are not clear on. i do not think
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the national team, plus i believe, we have been doing taking the knee for such a long time, we could not be more clear in our messaging about what it is about. but what happened again was a pr stunt, trying to target a demographic who probably vote for her. and when it changes in the media, you see how people have to backtrack. the only thing is the government never get held accountable for the words they say. thanks for talking to us. we had problems with the line but we mostly heard what you had to say. apologies. it is not yourfault, it is technology! good to hear from is technology! good to hearfrom him this morning. tell is where you are in hackney.
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five miles from the centre of london at the west reservoir. early swimmers getting it behind us. and boats. a beautiful site in north london. hard to believe you are in the centre of the capital city. the reservoir was established in 1830 through —— 1833. it used to provide london's drinking water but reopened in 2003. it is placed for open water swimming. the members here love it when the sun comes out and things warm up and that is what is going to happen over the next days. if we look at the forecast. after the stormy start to the week, more sunshine and warmth are set to come our way. sunshine and warmth are set to come ourway. some sunshine and warmth are set to come our way. some cloudy moments. not blue skies all the way but an improvement from what you have seen,
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some of you. it is due to high pressure creeping closer. the weather fronts toppling around the northern edge of it will bring more cloud towards the west of scotland and parts of northern ireland later. may be some rain here. for most, dry, long spells of sunshine. cloudy towards eastern coasts. and a bit of a breeze blowing in the eastern half of the country but for most, an afternoon of sunny spells and small chance of a shower in central england. temperatures where we expect injuly. probably up to 2a, 25. this evening and overnight, cloudy in scotland and northern ireland, drizzle. pushing across scotland, northern england and wales. furthersouth
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scotland, northern england and wales. further south feeling fresher. but still temperatures in the teens as we start tomorrow. tomorrow, the biggest difference in scotland and northern ireland is more sunshine after a cloudy end to today. england and wales, more cloud tomorrow. it may linger around eastern coasts of england. sunny spells for most and temperature is fairly similarto spells for most and temperature is fairly similar to today stop if you have cloud temperatures will be down a little bit. friday, sunshine developing more widely. some cloud in the north and west of scotland. sunny spells for most on friday. temperatures starting to rise. into the mid 20s by friday. and they will climb even further through into the weekend. this weekend, we could see temperatures up to 27, 28, which is putting us back into the feeling of summer. time to get out the shorts
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and barbecue. shorts and barbecue sounds like the perfect weekend. in 1969, stevie wonder, nina simone and many more black artists played to more than 300,000 people in a music event that had been largely ignored for more than half a century — until now. forgotten footage from the harlem cultural festival has been made into a documentary looking back at what is now described as the "black woodstock", as our entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. the summer of 1969. woodstock. neil armstrong walking on the moon. and more than 300,000 people attended the harlem cultural festival. are you ready, black people, are you ready? an event almost no one has heard of until now.
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six weekends of major artists. the panthers. kids sitting in the trees. i was nervous. summer of soul is a documentary exploring why this event, which it argues could have become the black woodstock, has been ignored for more than half a century. the film is directed by questlove, who drums for hip—hop outfit the roots and is a professor at nyu, where he is an expert in black music history. but even he hadn't heard of the festival. we are talking about stevie wonder, nina simone, sly and the family stone, comedians, politicians, everybody was there. the thing is that it is preserved professionally on tape and what winds up happening is that not one producer or outlet is interested. so this film just sits in the basement for 50 years. nobody ever heard of the harlem culture festival. nobody would believe it happened.
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however, a couple of film producers heard about the a0 hours of archive, managed to secure the rights, and decided that questlove was the man to bring it to life. it took me five months ofjust constantly having these monitors in my house, in every room in my house — my kitchen, my bathroom, my bedroom. i kept it on a 24—hour loop. i kept notes on anything that gave me goose bumps. and what i wound up doing was curating it like i curate a show or dj gig. and questlove believes that the way the harlem cultural festival was forgotten is an example of what he describes as the all too common erasure of black history. common erasure of black history. how many more important events in black history are waiting to be uncovered like this? are they out there? i'm going to tell you right now.
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this last week alone, i've been made aware of 5—6 other events that are almostjust as equal to this event that the world has never heard about. this might be my new destiny and i didn't even know it yet. but, you know, iwelcome it, i welcome it. colin paterson, bbc news. amazing footage. wonderful. the headline shortly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor says londoners will have to continue to wear facemasks on the tube and buses, despite covid restrictions easing on monday. sadiq khan said he's not prepared to put passengers at risk by relaxing the rules, and masks will still be required on tfl services. he says it's also about giving travellers reassurance when visiting the capital. the met police says some young
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people in the capital have been reported missing more than 300 times, placing a huge responsibilty on officers who risk—assess each case. the force says it's working with care homes to try and reduce the number of calls it receives. the borough of croydon sees more missing person reports in a year than the whole of germany does. what we see is a really high number of care homes. so that, the number of hospitals and the number of institutions looking after people's mental health is higher here than it is in the more central areas. that leads to really high numbers of missing persons cases every year. three siblings have told the bbc how they were struck by lightning on monday while sheltering under a tree near hampton court palace. rachel, isobel and andrewjobson were taking a selfie at the time and they managed to capture it on camera. they were taken to st
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george's hospital in tooting but later discharged. archaeologists working on the hs2 project in west london have made a once in a lifetime discovery — more than 300 iron age coins, known as the hillingdon hoard, dating back to the 1st century. they've been taken to the birmingham museum and art gallery where they have been cleaned and preserved. a quick look at the travel now. the overground's not running between euston and kilburn high road. it's due to the flood damage from monday. and tfl rail has severe delays after a freight train broke down. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there is the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out over the next couple of days. but, for the vast majority, it should stay completely dry. and it will feel very much as if summer is returning. it is a cloudy, mild start. we will keep the cloud for much of the morning for many places, particularly towards eastern home counties. but the cloud will break up. we will see bright spells, some spells of sunshine. sunny spells through the afternoon. always best the further west you are.
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a noticeable northerly to northwesterly breeze. top temperatures in the best of the sunshine will get as high as 23—24 celsius. so not a bad—looking day of weather. overnight tonight, it is set to stay dry. there will be clear spells. cloud reforming into tomorrow morning with perhaps a few early mist patches around. temperatures staying in double figures. on thursday, we have high pressure fairly firmly established across the uk and that will continue for the rest of the week, so there will be decent spells of sunshine, but also some cloud coming and going. it should stay dry or mostly dry, and temperatures once more will get up to 23—24. those temperatures are set to rise further as we head through friday and the weekend. that's it for now. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website. now i'll hand you back to dan and louise. bye— bye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. facemasks will still be compulsory on public transport in london, despite the law changing on monday. we will the mayor in a moment. united against racism. hundreds of people take the knee beside the repaired mural
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of marcus rashford in support of racially abused england players. trying to stop the scammers. thousands of people have fallen victim to fraudsters during the pandemic. they have lost millions of pounds. good morning. the cost of living is on the up, food, energy and clothing prices all rising so what does it mean for the pound in your pocket and how far your cash could go? and the open water swimmers have arrived, behind me. we will take a dip into summer in the next few days as temperatures and sunshine amounts increase. the full forecast coming up. it's wednesday, the 14th ofjuly. our top story. face coverings will remain mandatory for passengers on london's transport network, despite the legal requirement to wear them being lifted in england from monday. the city's mayor, sadiq khan, said the move was aimed at keeping passengers and staff safe. masks will still be a requirement
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in scotland and in wales, people will need to wear them on public transport and in healthcare settings. we have got the mayor on the way in about ten minutes. in the meantime, here is our transport correspondent, caroline davies. from monday, it is no longer the law to wear a mask on public transport in england. instead, it's about personal responsibility. but the government has said it still wants people to wear face coverings in crowded settings, such as busy trains and buses. london's mayor, sadiq khan, has asked transport for london to make it a condition of carriage, meaning if passengers travel on any of its services, including buses and tubes, they must wear a mask, even after monday. tfl will be the first operator to do this, although manchester's mayor, andy burnham, hasn't ruled out doing the same on the city's tram network. the scottish government has also said it will continue to require facemasks on public transport. on the issue of mandating mitigations like face coverings, let me just say this. it is my view that if government believes measures like this matter, and this government does,
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we should say so. we should do what is necessary to ensure compliance and we should be prepared to take any resulting flak from those who disagree. we shouldn't lift important restrictions to make our lives easier and then expect the public to take responsibility for doing the right thing anyway. wales is also expected to do the same. unions have welcomed the news, but some are worried about how enforceable it will be and that it could lead to disputes on board. some operators are worried that requiring masks on public transport could make people feel like the service is less safe than other indoor places, like restaurants or pubs. but the mayor has said he is doing it to make the public feel more confident. caroline davies, bbc news. those are some of the issues. we're joined now by our political correspondent ben wright. good morning. speaking to our gp, dr
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rachel ward, this morning, she says it risks confusion over the mask rules and what happens on monday. good morning. there is certainly a fragmented picture now across the uk in terms of the rules for wearing masks. i think it is indicative of the fact there is a very live political and scientific argument still about their use as the country begins to move out of the pandemic but at a time where cases are set to rocket over the next few weeks, 100,000 per day, potentially, according to the government and so you have differences between the nations of the uk and now within england itself. as we have been hearing, from monday, even though the legal requirement to wear a facemask goes, if you want to travel on the london tube, the underground or overground, you will have to wear a face covering and that is a policy that will be enforced by transport for london, people will be stopped from travelling on the tube and the train if they don't have a facemask unless they have an exemption. then they could go to a london overland station, a mainline station and get a train to somewhere else in england
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where they won't have to wear a mask for their journey. where they won't have to wear a mask for theirjourney. however, where they won't have to wear a mask fortheirjourney. however, if where they won't have to wear a mask for their journey. however, if they fortheirjourney. however, if they going to scotland or wales, they will. ithink going to scotland or wales, they will. i think this is something of a rebuke by sadiq khan to the government and borisjohnson. the government's advice to the rest of england is that you can choose whether or not to wear a mask but it is advisable if you are on a busy train or in a crowded public place. sadiq khan clearly thinks that is not good enough and with case numbers surging, the requirement needs to be much tougher for travellers, not necessary to protect the person wearing the mask but to protect other people who may catch it. ., ~ , ., protect other people who may catch it. ., ~ i. ., protect other people who may catch it. thank you for “oining us. we will speakh it. thank you for “oining us. we will speak to — it. thank you for “oining us. we will speak to you]— it. thank you forjoining us. we will speak to you later. - coronavirus restrictions will be eased in scotland from monday as the country moves to level zero, but some measures will remain. some social distancing rules will be maintained outdoors, and the mandatory use of face coverings will remain in place. our reporter david shanksjoins us now from aberdeen. david, what's been the reaction to the confirmed changes?
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—— the expected changes? -- the expected changes? initially, relief that the _ -- the expected changes? initially, relief that the move _ -- the expected changes? initially, relief that the move towards - -- the expected changes? initially, relief that the move towards a - -- the expected changes? initially, | relief that the move towards a level zero next monday would be taking place. scotland has been going through a record—breaking third wave of the delta variant of coronavirus which has been putting health services, particularly here in the north—east, at risk. so in light of that, the people we spoke to yesterday after this announcement welcomed their more cautious approach being taken, particularly the maintaining of mandatory facemasks in indoor settings. the business community perhaps a little more keen to kick on, the scottish retail consortium said firms would be reassured that progress was being made. but the chambers of commerce said the modifications to what was set out in the original plan would cause some uncertainty. a bit of criticism of the variations in travel rules between scotland and england, ags airports, who own aberdeen and glasgow airports, said it was a significant and confusing caveat in advising against
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nonessential travel from analyst countries for scottish travellers when the uk government was not doing so. they have called for 84—macro approach. so. they have called for btu-macro a- roach. . ~' ,, so. they have called for btu-macro a. roach, ., ~' y., ., so. they have called for btu-macro a- roach. . ~ ., ., so. they have called for btu-macro a- roach. ., ~' ., ., , approach. thank you for “oining us. -- a four nations h approach. thank you forjoining us. -- a four nations approach. - plans for easing coronavirus restrictions in wales will be set out by the welsh government later today. ministers have already said that face coverings will remain mandatory on public transport and in health care settings but will announce whether other restrictions can be eased. we're joined now by our reporter mark hutchings. thank you forjoining us. it is always hard to pre—empt these announcements but what are we expecting to hear? i announcements but what are we expecting to hear?— announcements but what are we expecting to hear? i think we will see a gently _ expecting to hear? i think we will see a gently does _ expecting to hear? i think we will see a gently does it _ expecting to hear? i think we will see a gently does it approach. . expecting to hear? i think we will i see a gently does it approach. mark drakeford has said that the four new -- uk drakeford has said that the four new —— uk nations are moving in the same direction but at different speeds and i think it is undeniable that borisjohnson's and i think it is undeniable that boris johnson's accelerator and i think it is undeniable that borisjohnson's accelerator pedal is closer to the ground that mark drakeford's. he will give it a bit of a squeeze, i think, and if as
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expected we move to wales' delayed alert level one, that will see the introduction of the rule of six for private homes, something that has not been allowed until now in wales although i'm not sure that has been universally adhered to, and perhaps the opening of ice rinks which have perhaps rather contentiously remained closed until now. i'm facemasks, we will learn whether they remain compulsory in shops and hospitality as they will be on public transport. the welsh conservatives say there needs to be a far more detailed plan then there has been until now. we will get some more details later this lunchtime, as to what will be announced. i would wager a small bet that mark drakeford will be using the words careful and cautious, he said, cautiously. careful and cautious, he said, cautiously-— careful and cautious, he said, cautiousl. ., . ., cautiously. ok, we will watch out for that. the labour party is calling for anyone convicted of racist abuse online to be banned from attending football matches. it wants the courts to be given new powers to crack down on perpetrators, like those who targeted members of the england squad on sunday.
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it comes after hundreds of people turned out in support for striker marcus rashford after a mural of him was covered in racist graffiti. in the last few minutes, we've had the latest inflation figures from the office for national statistics. here's ben with the details. you won't have seen what happened, did you just sprint income is that because you are seriously looking at the figures while trying to do live tv? i wish we had seen that! you are not sopposed — tv? i wish we had seen that! you are not sopposed to _ tv? i wish we had seen that! you are not supposed to see _ tv? i wish we had seen that! you are not supposed to see that! _ tv? i wish we had seen that! you are not supposed to see that! we - tv? i wish we had seen that! you are not supposed to see that! we were i not supposed to see that! we were just working out where i was going to take you on myjourney through the market this morning but you are right, we have had the figures in the last few minutes and we are looking at the cost of living because it tells us a lot about how far the money in our pocket will go because the higher inflation goes, the less the money in our pocket will buy. we have come down to the market to look at all sorts of things that are going up in price and in the last few minutes, confirmation that inflation, the
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measure of the cost of living, rose to 2.5% injune, up from 2.1% in may. you might not think that is a huge difference but it has all sorts of implications forjust huge difference but it has all sorts of implications for just what our money will buy and it also has longer term implications for things like interest rates, how much we pay on our mortgage or credit card or how much we will get if we have money in the bank. what the office for national statistics do is measure a basket of goods, they call it, so a typical basket of all sorts of things that we buy and consume and the pandemic has meant our habits have changed, so suddenly, remember, in lockdown last year, we were not travelling or going out in the car and we were not really buying much in the shops because they were closed, so this time, we are starting to get a sense of shopping habits returning to normal so prices are going up for things like fuel for cars and travel, things like clothing as we get back out to the shops, and also food prices are starting to rise again. it means that our money will not go
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as far so confirmation, 2.5% and as i said, the implications are that if it gets much higher, then the bank of england may step in and decide to raise interest rates to try to cool the market a bit, to encourage us to save rather than spend. that could have implications, as i said, for the cost of mortgages and credit cards but it could be good news if you have any savings in the bank. thank you forjoining us. good sprinting, as well. very impressive. i wish the viewers had seen that! he is i wish the viewers had seen that! he: is so fast, really impressive. i wish the viewers had seen that! he is so fast, really impressive. it - is so fast, really impressive. it was like the bfg, you covered some serious ground. was like the bfg, you covered some serious ground-— serious ground. there's a lot of thins serious ground. there's a lot of things that _ serious ground. there's a lot of things that could _ serious ground. there's a lot of things that could have - serious ground. there's a lot of things that could have taken i serious ground. there's a lot of| things that could have taken my serious ground. there's a lot of - things that could have taken my head out as— things that could have taken my head out as well _ let's get the weather now with matt, who is at the west reservoir water sports centre in hackney. it looks like a glorious place for a swim this morning, good morning, matt. it is, louise, good morning, some
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hardy swimmers already in there, they swim all year round, even on christmas day and with temperatures in the water of around 2 degrees and they are certainly enjoying a bit of a boost of sunshine this morning. let's look at the forecast today and for the next few days because after that stormy start to the week where some people saw a month's worth of rain in the space of a few hours, it is not only looking dry but sunny and warm. it will be blue skies all the way, a bit of cloud at times as i will show you. certainly still some plough down eastern coasts of england, quite a breeze and eastern areas at the moment which will temper the feel of things and through the day, more in the way of cloud pushing back into parts of north—west scotland and northern ireland, with the odd patch of mist around other western coast but for the vast majority, a dry day with sunny spells. the slimmest chance of a shower down through central england later but in the sunshine, it will feel pleasantly warm with temperatures like yesterday, anywhere between 18—25 degrees. this evening and overnight, cloud in parts of scotland and northern
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ireland working southall�*s which could bring some drizzle over night, keeping the temperature is up but the cloud pushing on towards parts of northern england and north—west wales as we go into the start of tomorrow morning and tomorrow, a lot more cloud around across england and wales, certainly to begin with, the cloud will break up and some sunshine will come through. staying a bit grey across the eastern coast of england but sunny are across parts of scotland and northern ireland. it will feel warmer still because of that. as we head through the end of the week and into the weekend, temperatures climb even further, some of you possibly getting up to 28 celsius, 82 fahrenheit, as we go through the weekend. a full forecast in around half an hour. back to you. we could stay with you all day, it looks lovely. we could stay with you all day, it looks lovely-— we could stay with you all day, it looks lovel . ., , looks lovely. some mornings, when ou are looks lovely. some mornings, when you are out — looks lovely. some mornings, when you are out and _ looks lovely. some mornings, when you are out and about _ looks lovely. some mornings, when you are out and about with - looks lovely. some mornings, when you are out and about with a - looks lovely. some mornings, when. you are out and about with a camera, itjust makes you think that you want to be there. aha, it just makes you think that you want to be there.— want to be there. a lovely day! let's want to be there. a lovely day! let's talk _ want to be there. a lovely day! let's talk about _ want to be there. a lovely day! let's talk about face _ want to be there. a lovely day! j let's talk about face coverings. they must be worn on london's transport network despite restrictions being lifted in england on monday — that's the message
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from the city's mayor, sadiq khan. the practice will remain mandatory on buses, the tube, trams and overground rail services across the capital for passengers who are not exempt. so, how many haven't followed the rules? in the 12 months to february this year, just over 4,000 fixed penalty notices were issued for passengers not wearing a face covering on london's transport network. in the same period, around 111,000 people were prevented from boarding for the same reason. and just over 3,000 passengers were removed from the service for failing to comply with the rules. those are the figures from the past it and now let's speak about the future. we're joined now by the mayor of london, sadiq khan. good morning. thank you forjoining us. there has been a huge reaction to you saying you are going to keep face coverings on london transport from monday. i suppose the biggest issueis from monday. i suppose the biggest issue is how do you enforce that? good morning. we know from the evidence from the government's own
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advisers, stage, from the world health organization, that we —— are wearing a face covering, particularly indoors where you can't keep your distance, reduces transmission so it leads notjust to greater public safety but greater public confidence as well. what we are doing in the absence of national legislation is using what is called the conditions of carriage, basically, the contract you have when you want to use tfl services, one of the conditions you have got to abide by is the requirement to wear a face covering and by and large, the great news is the vast majority of people in the last 12 months have used a face covering without the need for enforcement. i am confident both londoners and those visiting our city will continue to wear a face covering when they are using tfl services. i am sure the majority probably well but what about those, and there were thousands of them last year, who refused to do it? how does that work practically? british transport police say they can't enforce it. what will happen?—
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police say they can't enforce it. what will happen? well, the good news is, what will happen? well, the good news is. we _ what will happen? well, the good news is, we employ _ what will happen? well, the good news is, we employ a _ what will happen? well, the good news is, we employ a number - what will happen? well, the good news is, we employ a number of i news is, we employ a number of enforcement officers, more than 400 so they will be working across the tfl network, the tube, tram, buses and overground and dlr, as you suggest and they will make sure if anyone is not wearing a facemask it could be because they have forgotten to take it out or they are not covering their nose, they will be reminded of the importance of doing so and some people are exempt and we will recognise that some people for good reasons will not be wearing a facemask but i am confident from monday, you will carry on seeing high levels of the rules being followed, just as they have been since lastjune when they first came in. i since last june when they first came in. ., ., , ., ., since last june when they first came in. i hear that you are confident it will happen _ in. i hear that you are confident it will happen but — in. i hear that you are confident it will happen but i _ in. i hear that you are confident it will happen but i am _ in. i hear that you are confident it will happen but i am still- in. i hear that you are confident it| will happen but i am still intrigued as to what happens when, let's say the conversation goes, you are not wearing a facemask and that person says, they don't need to, it is not the law, but is the next ep? what the law, but is the next ep? what ha--ens the law, but is the next ep? what happens now _ the law, but is the next ep? what happens now is — the law, but is the next ep? what happens now is that _ the law, but is the next ep? twat happens now is that conversation takes place between an enforcement officer and a member of the public using tfl services and if it is at the entry of the bus or a station, and the person has not got a good
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reason and is not exempt from wearing a facemask, they are refused entry. if they are on one of our services and they are not exempt and they don't have a good reason, they are asked to leave, if they don't put on their face covering. you gave the figures and i think the good news is, we have had more than 212,000 conversations over the last 12 months with public transport users and by and large, commuters do the right thing. often they have just forgotten to put it on or they are not wearing it properly. the good news is, the evidence we have from the last year gives us confidence going forward but actually, there are other rules that are enforce the same way, for example, you can't drink on any of our services and actually, you don't see that need to be enforced because people do the right thing. ok. see that need to be enforced because people do the right thing.— people do the right thing. ok, so ou are people do the right thing. ok, so you are pretty — people do the right thing. ok, so you are pretty confident, - people do the right thing. ok, so you are pretty confident, let's - people do the right thing. ok, so| you are pretty confident, let's say for example summary comes on and you say you can't come in this station, dlr stop, whatever it might be or if someone is on a train and they are not wearing a facemask you can remove them from the train, you think that will happen? it
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remove them from the train, you think that will happen?— remove them from the train, you think that will happen? it will but let me be clear, _ think that will happen? it will but let me be clear, it _ think that will happen? it will but let me be clear, it is _ think that will happen? it will but let me be clear, it is not - think that will happen? it will but let me be clear, it is not perfect. | let me be clear, it is not perfect. what would have been far better is for the national rules to continue to apply across the country, not just in london but across the country. that would have provided clarity in relation to what the rules are, and avoid any confusion but it also would have meant we could have used the met police and british transport police to enforce the law. the government, for their own reasons, have decided not to do that. i am quite clear, one of my responsibilities is public safety on the public transport network but i am also quite clear from the conversations i have had with londoners, from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them greater confidence in using our incredibly safe public transport system. i using our incredibly safe public transport system.— using our incredibly safe public transport system. i am not trying to create a problem _ transport system. i am not trying to create a problem but _ transport system. i am not trying to create a problem but i _ transport system. i am not trying to create a problem but i am _ transport system. i am not trying to create a problem but i am just - create a problem but i am just interested in the practicalities of it. what about those passengers, i know you are well aware this happens a lot, who are passing through london, would they be expected to not wear a face must, then when they are in london put one on and then
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take it off, if they want to do that when they are travelling? you have liven a when they are travelling? you have given a really _ when they are travelling? you have given a really good _ when they are travelling? you have given a really good example - when they are travelling? you have given a really good example of - when they are travelling? you have given a really good example of whyj when they are travelling? you have . given a really good example of why i was keen to have national rules. actually, the number of services that come into london, in london, are not my responsibility and what we are saying is that when you are in london, you have got to follow our rules, just like if you are on a train going to scotland, you have got to follow the rules in scotland andindeedin got to follow the rules in scotland and indeed in wales, where wearing a facemask is still compulsory. what we're doing is making sure we are using communications both on the network but also radio, social media, e—mailing customers and so forth, we will make sure people know that in london, the rules are still here, and the two main reasons they are still here is public and public confidence. that are still here is public and public confidence-— confidence. at one point do you think, i'm _ confidence. at one point do you think, i'm not _ confidence. at one point do you think, i'm not expecting - confidence. at one point do you think, i'm not expecting you - confidence. at one point do you think, i'm not expecting you to | confidence. at one point do you i think, i'm not expecting you to say monday the whatever of whichever month, but at what point do you think that you will introduce the element of choice as the government is more broadly in england from monday? taste is more broadly in england from monda ? ~ ., ., ., ~ , monday? we are going to keep it sub'ect to monday? we are going to keep it subject to review, _ monday? we are going to keep it subject to review, we _ monday? we are going to keep it subject to review, we will- monday? we are going to keep it subject to review, we will keep i monday? we are going to keep it subject to review, we will keep a |
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subject to review, we will keep a close eye on this. i want to remind our view is that when we look at not just wales and scotland but france, italy, spain, portugal, indeed new zealand, used as an exemplar, it would still be compulsory to wear a face covering going forward. we are keen to make sure that actually, whilst the virus is still with us and while we still have people in the society who may be vulnerable, clinically vulnerable, who may have their immune systems are pressed, what we don't want is for them to feel they can't use public transport. for many people, public transport. for many people, public transport is an essential service to get to work, appointments, to go to couege get to work, appointments, to go to college or university and so forth. as long as the virus is still with us and we are concerned about the virus being transmitted, i think for the time being, we will continue to haveit the time being, we will continue to have it compulsory. i make this point, though, one out of three people who have the virus may not realise they have got it, because the symptoms are not showing. wearing a facemask keeps other people safe and others wearing a facemask keeps you safe.- people safe and others wearing a facemask keeps you safe. where else will ou be
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facemask keeps you safe. where else will you be wearing _ facemask keeps you safe. where else will you be wearing a _ facemask keeps you safe. where else will you be wearing a mask— facemask keeps you safe. where else will you be wearing a mask from - will you be wearing a mask from monday outside of public transport? if i am in a busy place, indoors in a shop and it is busy, i will probably put on my mask because it is the most unselfish thing i can do, knowing i'm pretty healthy myself at the other thing i would say to people watching this is now there is new research from america, from the centre for disease control, which shows that wearing a facemask does notjust keep others safe, actually, it could well keep you safe as well. so my advice to those watching, of course, on public transport in london, you have to wear a facemask but if you are indoors somewhere and you can't keep a social distance, but the facemask on and keep it with you at all times, just like when you leave home, you have your wallet, keys, your handbag, always have a facemask with you, and are on the side of caution and put it on if you are in doubt. ., ., ,, caution and put it on if you are in doubt. ., ., ~ , ., ., doubt. sadiq khan, thank you for talkin: to doubt. sadiq khan, thank you for talking to us _ doubt. sadiq khan, thank you for talking to us this _ doubt. sadiq khan, thank you for talking to us this morning. - doubt. sadiq khan, thank you for talking to us this morning. just i doubt. sadiq khan, thank you for| talking to us this morning. just to let you know we will be speaking to grant shapps about that and other things as well in about ten minutes. texts that trick people into sharing personal data have
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become increasingly common during the pandemic and research by which? suggests three out of five people have received scam messages in the past year. the bbc�*sjon ironmonger isjust one of the many people who has recently been taken in by this type of fraud and he shared his experience in this report. if you do not stop, if you do not stop... i know you have got some of my details, richard. that was me a few weeks ago. i had fallen for a really common parcel delivery text scam and handed over some of my details. days later, i got called by a man claiming to be from my bank's fraud department and he said people had been trying to use my card up in bradford and he needed to protect my online bank account but minutes into the call, i began to think, am i being scammed again? so i made excuses, got him off the line and checked with my bank and sure enough, he was indeed a scammer, so when he called me back later that evening, i recorded our conversation. tell me your name again. i didn't catch it.
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hold music. 0k, 0k. so what do you need from me? richard, richard... look... i'm not taken in by this. i think other people might be, though, and that does worry me. scammers have been cashing in since the pandemic. according to which, three in five people have received fake delivery texts in the past year. we are all working from home and using technology so much more. even people who were not shopping online or banking online have been forced into that and we are seeing a lot of scams coming through. i do not believe you are calling from first direct and i do actually wonder how many vulnerable
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or elderly people you have defrauded like this. it can cause serious psychological harm, you know, this can. richard, you are not... you are not convincing me, richard, i know you are a scammer, if that is even your name. action fraud received reports of 138,000 suspicious texts and calls in the 12 months to april. that is up 80% on 2019—20. this dedicated card and payment crime unit is leading a police crackdown on so—called smishing scammers like richard. go on, yeah, sure, shoot. yes, richard, i know that you have got... i know you have got some of my details, richard, because you have scammed me already with a phishing scam. i will harm you at your home address. wow.
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wow, ok. dial tone. so there we go. i can't believe he swore at you. he turned. he turned right at the last minute, and that is how committed these scammers are. jon ironmonger, bbc news. imean, i mean, that is a lesson on how it all happens. we'rejoined now in the studio by the bbc�*s cybersecurity reporter, joe tidy. it is so fascinating watching that because any of us can be taken in, can't wait, and their scammers just get more sophisticated. john can't wait, and their scammers 'ust get more sophisticatedi get more sophisticated. john did reall well get more sophisticated. john did really well there _ get more sophisticated. john did really well there to _ get more sophisticated. john did really well there to spot - get more sophisticated. john did really well there to spot it - get more sophisticated. john did really well there to spot it quite | really well there to spot it quite early but only people don't and we have had stories of people losing thousands of pounds being taken out of their account because of course, it starts off with text messages, we have all got them, i have had loads and you think it looks pretty legitimate, like i've got an outstanding bit of money i need to pay to royal mail or hermes, so you pay to royal mail or hermes, so you pay the money and then quite often, they will take some money out of your account that way or do what
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happen tojohn and call you up and say, that was a scam, you need to put your money into a safe account. a lot of people are taken in. you can imagine if you are elderly or perhaps isolating because of the pandemic and you don't have friends and colleagues to bounce off, to ask if it is right, you can see how more people are being taken in. it is if it is right, you can see how more people are being taken in.- people are being taken in. it is a hue people are being taken in. it is a huge trust _ people are being taken in. it is a huge trust issue _ people are being taken in. it is a huge trust issue and _ people are being taken in. it is a huge trust issue and you - people are being taken in. it is a huge trust issue and you have i people are being taken in. it is a . huge trust issue and you have had people are being taken in. it is a i huge trust issue and you have had a look at some pretty clear examples of some of the scanned text messages and messages that people have been sent and this shows you how sophisticated these things are getting at the moment. where are we starting? getting at the moment. where are we startin: ? , , _ starting? these were sent in by the viewers and — starting? these were sent in by the viewers and you _ starting? these were sent in by the viewers and you say _ starting? these were sent in by the viewers and you say they _ starting? these were sent in by the viewers and you say they are - starting? these were sent in by the viewers and you say they are pretty j viewers and you say they are pretty clear but some of them are so good. this amazon one, if that is the one that the gallery has got lined up, and e—mail that he would have got sent, and it looks really good. you have got the logo, very plausible e—mail being sent to you but the things thatjump out for me are the e—mail address, so if you look at the front, it says amazon.com but
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it's actually not, it is from germany so i would put that in the bin straightaway. 50 germany so i would put that in the bin straightaway.— bin straightaway. so the e-mail address on _ bin straightaway. so the e-mail address on that _ bin straightaway. so the e-mail address on that one _ bin straightaway. so the e-mail address on that one is - bin straightaway. so the e-mail address on that one is the - bin straightaway. so the e-mail- address on that one is the giveaway. and also the fact that they are choosing to give away —— to give you a free gift. choosing to give away -- to give you a free rift. , , ., ., ., ., a free gift. yes, if it is too good to be true. _ a free gift. yes, if it is too good to be true, often, _ a free gift. yes, if it is too good to be true, often, it _ a free gift. yes, if it is too good to be true, often, it is. - a free gift. yes, if it is too good to be true, often, it is. the - a free gift. yes, if it is too good. to be true, often, it is. the other thing is, you can see the link down there at the bottom, if you are not sure of whether or not a link is going to take you to where it says it is, hover your mouse over a link and it will come up with the actual address where you are going to be taken. if it looks like garbage and it is not amazon, then don't do it. are looking at it closely, there is a mix of languages, i can see some spanish and french in there. once you start looking, you begin to see the mistakes. but you could easily not. at}! the mistakes. but you could easily not. .., , this the mistakes. but you could easily not._ this next - the mistakes. but you could easily not._ this next one - the mistakes. but you could easily not._ this next one is i the mistakes. but you could easily not._ this next one is a | not. of course. this next one is a text message _ not. of course. this next one is a text message which _ not. of course. this next one is a text message which i'm - not. of course. this next one is a text message which i'm sure - not. of course. this next one is a text message which i'm sure lots| not. of course. this next one is a i text message which i'm sure lots of people have received, coming from a bank and again it looks really plausible. bank and again it looks really lausible. , . bank and again it looks really plausible-— bank and again it looks really lausible. plausible. yes, and you can easily fake a number— plausible. yes, and you can easily fake a number or— plausible. yes, and you can easily fake a number or an _ plausible. yes, and you can easily fake a number or an e-mail- plausible. yes, and you can easily fake a number or an e-mail as i plausible. yes, and you can easily. fake a number or an e-mail as well fake a number or an e—mail as well but this looks good. it is really
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hard to spot. but this looks good. it is really hard to spot-— but this looks good. it is really hard to spot. but this looks good. it is really hard to sot. ~ . ., ., ~ ., hard to spot. which we looking at now? is hard to spot. which we looking at now? is this _ hard to spot. which we looking at now? is this the _ hard to spot. which we looking at now? is this the one _ hard to spot. which we looking at now? is this the one supposedly. hard to spot. which we looking at - now? is this the one supposedly from llo ds now? is this the one supposedly from lloyds bank. — now? is this the one supposedly from lloyds bank. it _ now? is this the one supposedly from lloyds bank, it says _ now? is this the one supposedly from lloyds bank, it says a _ now? is this the one supposedly from lloyds bank, it says a payment - now? is this the one supposedly from lloyds bank, it says a payment was i lloyds bank, it says a payment was attempted from a new device and gives you the date and time, if it is not you, please visit so it is the standard thing you would get and it is a security check so you are thinking it has got to be legitimate but of course, it is not. the only thing i would say, here, is that i would use the golden rule of, use these types of messages from banks or shops as notifications, don't click on anything, use it as a call to action for you to log into your internet bank to check whether this is legitimate. i internet bank to check whether this is legitimate-— internet bank to check whether this is legitimate. i get ones supposedly from... is legitimate. i get ones supposedly from- -- i'm — is legitimate. i get ones supposedly from... i'm not _ is legitimate. i get ones supposedly from... i'm not even _ is legitimate. i get ones supposedly from... i'm not even going - is legitimate. i get ones supposedly from... i'm not even going to - is legitimate. i get ones supposedly from... i'm not even going to say i from... i'm not even going to say who, a telephone provider and i have phoned them up often going, have you been sending me e—mails and text messages? no, we haven't. you been sending me e-mails and text messages? no, we haven't. you have done the right — messages? no, we haven't. you have done the right things. _ messages? no, we haven't. you have done the right things. it _ messages? no, we haven't. you have done the right things. it is _ messages? no, we haven't. you have done the right things. it is so - done the right things. it is so time-consuming, _ done the right things. it is so time-consuming, for - done the right things. it is so . time-consuming, for starters. done the right things. it is so i time-consuming, for starters. it done the right things. it is so - time-consuming, for starters. it is and they know _ time-consuming, for starters. it is and they know we _ time—consuming, for starters. it 3 and they know we are rushed and have not got time. it is notjust, we always say vulnerable elderly people would be taken in but also busy
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people because of that reason. i think we have got another one, can we pop up the next one? shall we look at the royal mail, one, supposedly by mail because that is very familiar to lots of people in the last few weeks and it is quite tiny but we will make sure we have got this on our social media so you can go to it but tell us about these particular one. can go to it but tell us about these particular one-— particular one. this is the big one, one of the — particular one. this is the big one, one of the similar _ particular one. this is the big one, one of the similar ones _ particular one. this is the big one, one of the similar ones that - particular one. this is the big one, one of the similar ones that got i particular one. this is the big one, | one of the similar ones that got our colleague, john and i have had this one lots of times as well, this is the one that is causing probably the most problems at the moment. it says our most problems at the moment. it says your package — most problems at the moment. it says your package has _ most problems at the moment. it says your package has an — most problems at the moment. it says your package has an unpaid _ most problems at the moment. it says your package has an unpaid delivery i your package has an unpaid delivery fee, and to pay it, visit, and there is the url. fee, and to pay it, visit, and there is the url-— fee, and to pay it, visit, and there is the url. ., ., is the url. that url looks not write to me because _ is the url. that url looks not write to me because if— is the url. that url looks not write to me because if it _ is the url. that url looks not write to me because if it is _ is the url. that url looks not write to me because if it is royal- is the url. that url looks not write to me because if it is royal mail, i to me because if it is royal mail, you would imagine they would have their own website. but again, you can't trust links because they can be faked. again, it is a case of going straight to the horse's mouse, log into the royal mail at all the account website. —— horse's mouth. if for example you had clicked on that link, what can happen to you
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and how do you stop them getting your money? tim and how do you stop them getting your money?— your money? two things, if it is a really bad — your money? two things, if it is a really bad website, _ your money? two things, if it is a really bad website, it _ your money? two things, if it is a really bad website, it can - your money? two things, if it is a i really bad website, it can download viruses to your computer or your phone. what is more likely is that they will take you to a website that looks like royal mail and ask you to enter your details in your name, your address, your bank details as well, and that is when you are in trouble because if you give them those, they can take money out of your account. those, they can take money out of youraccount. in those, they can take money out of your account. in lots of cases, you can get the money back, that is the good news but you have to be quick, contact your bank as soon as you feel like something is wrong, contact your bank and royal mail to try to begin the process of clawing the money back. i try to begin the process of clawing the money back.— the money back. i think louise is really good _ the money back. i think louise is really good at — the money back. i think louise is really good at this _ the money back. i think louise is really good at this because - the money back. i think louise is really good at this because you i the money back. i think louise is| really good at this because you in the company and say you are going to check and ring royal mail and bring whoever come and say, have you been doing this? it is time—consuming it saves you a lot of hassle. and saves you a lot of hassle. and potentially — saves you a lot of hassle. and potentially a _ saves you a lot of hassle. and potentially a lot _ saves you a lot of hassle. and potentially a lot of _ saves you a lot of hassle. fific potentially a lot of money. saves you a lot of hassle. and potentially a lot of money. it. saves you a lot of hassle. and . potentially a lot of money. it is really interesting _ potentially a lot of money. it is really interesting and we will make sure those are on social media as well so you can have a good look at what to look out for but caution,
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thank you so much. the transport secretary grant shapps is coming up shortly. right now, time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor says londoners will have to continue to wear face masks on the tube and buses, despite covid restrictions easing on monday. sadiq khan said he's not prepared to put passengers at risk by relaxing the rules, and masks will still be required on tfl services. he says it's also about giving travellers reassurance when visiting the capital. the met police says some young people in london have been reported missing more than 300 times, placing a huge responsibilty on officers who risk—assess each case. the force says its working with care homes to try and reduce the number of calls it receives. the borough of croydon sees more missing person reports in a year than the whole of germany does.
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what we see is a really high number of care homes. so that, the number of hospitals and the number of institutions looking after people's mental health is higher here than it is in the more central areas. that leads to really high numbers of missing persons cases every year. three siblings have told the bbc how they were struck by lightning on monday while sheltering under a tree near hampton court palace. rachel, isobel and andrewjobson were taking a selfie at the time and they managed to capture it on camera. they were taken to st george's hospital in tooting but later discharged. archaeologists working on the hs2 project in west london have made a once in a lifetime discovery. more than 300 iron age coins, known as the hillingdon hoard, dating back to the 1st century. they've been taken to the birmingham museum and art gallery where they have been cleaned and preserved. a quick look at the travel. the overground's not running between euston and kilburn high road.
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it's due to the flood damage from monday. and tfl rail has minor delays after a freight train broke down. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there is the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out over the next couple of days. but, for the vast majority, it should stay completely dry. and it will feel very much as if summer is returning. it is a cloudy, mild start. we will keep the cloud for much of the morning for many places, particularly towards eastern home counties. but the cloud will break up. we will see bright spells, some spells of sunshine. sunny spells through the afternoon. always best the further west you are. a noticeable northerly to northwesterly breeze. top temperatures in the best of the sunshine will get as high as 23—24 celsius. so not a bad—looking day of weather. overnight tonight, it is set to stay dry. there will be clear spells. cloud reforming into tomorrow morning with perhaps a few early mist patches around. temperatures staying in double figures. on thursday, we have high pressure
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fairly firmly established across the uk and that will continue for the rest of the week, so there will be decent spells of sunshine, but also some cloud coming and going. it should stay dry or mostly dry, and temperatures once more will get up to 23—24. those temperatures are set to rise further as we head through friday and the weekend. that's it for now. i'm back in an hour. i'll hand you back to dan and louise. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we can speak to the transport secretary grant shapps. there is so much to talk about today. we will start with what is going on with face coverings. there are differences in different parts of the uk with face coverings mandatory
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in scotland for some time and continuing to be required by law on public transport and health and social care settings in wales, and on public transport in london. who has made the right decision? everybody. we have moved away from the legal, everything being stated in law. i think i said last week that as we do that we expect individuals will make the right judgments in the right circumstances and for example, transport organisations will make it a condition of carriage where appropriate. in london, isuggested at the time london underground can be a busy environment. they may want to keep the requirement to wear a face covering in that situation. if you are on a long distance train and the only person in the carriage it would not make sense to have that organisation require you to wear a mask. we are in situations where we
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have moved beyond stage four. you say everyone _ have moved beyond stage four. you say everyone has made the right decision and the way it happens, for example, you might catch a train in scotland down to london and in scotland down to london and in scotland you have to wear your face covering on the train until the border, then you can take it off and did london put it on again. it is confusing- _ did london put it on again. it is confusing- i— did london put it on again. it is confusing. i think _ did london put it on again. it 3 confusing. i think that is underestimating people's ability to carry a mask which everybody is used to. if you are on a crowded piece of infrastructure you need to wear a mask. ., ., , mask. on one train there is potentially _ mask. on one train there is potentially two, _ mask. on one train there is potentially two, three - mask. on one train there is| potentially two, three rules. mask. on one train there is - potentially two, three rules. not reall . potentially two, three rules. not really- that _ potentially two, three rules. not really. that train _ potentially two, three rules. iirrt really. that train would either be in scotland or england. i accept there are two macro rules if you cross the border. we have seen these rules being different in different parts of the uk which is the form of devolved government we have. if you are outside, you would not need a mask, inside you would. i do not
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think it is dramatically different because you are inside on a london underground train. it is common sense. people in a crowded area and transport organisations are welcome to make it a condition of carriage in the same way as other rules are donein in the same way as other rules are done in that way. you cannot drink alcohol on the london underground as alcohol on the london underground as a condition of carriage but you can on some long—distance journeys. there have always been these differences and i think people will navigate them easily. you differences and i think people will navigate them easily.— navigate them easily. you think someone- -- _ navigate them easily. you think someone... let's _ navigate them easily. you think someone... let's take - navigate them easily. you think someone... let's take the - navigate them easily. you think- someone... let's take the example of a train. london you have made your point about that, but there will be a point on that train where one place legally you have to wear a mask and a moment later you will not have to. taste mask and a moment later you will not have to. ~ ., ., , ., have to. we have had this all the way through. _ have to. we have had this all the way through. it _ have to. we have had this all the way through, it is _ have to. we have had this all the way through, it is not _ have to. we have had this all the way through, it is not new. - have to. we have had this all the way through, it is not new. we i have to. we have had this all the i way through, it is not new. we have had it through coronavirus where people travelling have experienced different rules as they cross the boundary. pretty much i think it
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will be fairly straightforward. i doubt there will be an announcement reminding people. we have taken the view in england if you are on an empty carriage, perhaps a late night service. the only person around, clearly wearing a face covering when it will not benefit anyone is of no benefit and we are moving away from everything set in law as we come through the fourth stage of unlocking, to ask people to be sensible and use what we know about coronavirus, everyone is used to practising social distancing and the rest. and relying on individuals and organisations to set the appropriate rules. we organisations to set the appropriate rules. ~ , ,., ~' organisations to set the appropriate rules. ~ , ., organisations to set the appropriate rules. ~ ., ., ., , rules. we spoke to sadiq khan who is said the reason _ rules. we spoke to sadiq khan who is said the reason he _ rules. we spoke to sadiq khan who is said the reason he wants _ rules. we spoke to sadiq khan who is said the reason he wants it _ rules. we spoke to sadiq khan who is said the reason he wants it to - rules. we spoke to sadiq khan who is said the reason he wants it to be - said the reason he wants it to be mandatory on public transport in london is to do with public safety and confidence. i point you to a comment by a chairman of a sage subgroup who says he understands the
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government reluctance to mandate it but it if —— if it is not mandated, it probably will not do any good. can you address that point? to be clear, a condition of carriage, which means in order to buy a ticket you must agree to these rules, it is something people need to adhere to. in the same way as by and large you do not see people taking alcohol onto the underground. the condition of carriage was introduced while borisjohnson was london mayor and people said no one will take notice but that was not the case. immediately, it took effect and most people, apart from those willingly trying to break the law, took notice. i expect the same thing will happen here and it will be perfectly normal and natural on the london underground to wear a mask. we will still need to carry masks around for the time being. if you find yourself
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in busy situations. we said that about any crowded situation. it is applying common sense. that is the right way to go at this particular part of the unlock.— right way to go at this particular part of the unlock. moving on to a different kind _ part of the unlock. moving on to a different kind of _ part of the unlock. moving on to a different kind of travel, _ part of the unlock. moving on to a different kind of travel, with - part of the unlock. moving on to a different kind of travel, with your| different kind of travel, with your role of transport secretary, going abroad and the amber list. there are reports that country is on the green—ellis might be moved to amber. what is your response? == green-ellis might be moved to amber. what is your response?— what is your response? -- on the ureen what is your response? -- on the green list- — what is your response? -- on the green list- we _ what is your response? -- on the green list. we are _ what is your response? -- on the green list. we are reviewing - what is your response? -- on the . green list. we are reviewing these. i ho -e we green list. we are reviewing these. i hope we have _ green list. we are reviewing these. i hope we have made _ green list. we are reviewing these. i hope we have made clear - green list. we are reviewing these. i hope we have made clear to - i hope we have made clear to everybody when booking trips, there is of course always the chance countries will move around. some countries will move around. some countries may go to the red list and some to the green but some might move the other way to the amber list. it is a fact of life they will
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move around as the virus continues to develop and change globally in most of the world where they have not got to our levels of vaccination, as well, there are factors including their ability to vaccinate their own populations. share vaccinate their own populations. are ou vaccinate their own populations. are you considering, the example is some balearic islands could go back onto the amber list and some might have booked to go there already. i do the amber list and some might have booked to go there already.- booked to go there already. i do not have the information _ booked to go there already. i do not have the information and _ booked to go there already. i do not have the information and we - booked to go there already. i do not have the information and we will. have the information and we will make that decision when we look at the latest data.— make that decision when we look at the latest data. when will you make the latest data. when will you make the decision? _ the latest data. when will you make the decision? the _ the latest data. when will you make the decision? the review _ the latest data. when will you make the decision? the review is - the latest data. when will you make the decision? the review is due - the latest data. when will you make the decision? the review is due this| the decision? the review is due this week so in the _ the decision? the review is due this week so in the next _ the decision? the review is due this week so in the next couple - the decision? the review is due this week so in the next couple of- the decision? the review is due this week so in the next couple of days. week so in the next couple of days week so in the next couple of days we will be able to say more about that. i do not have the information yet because we have not reviewed the data yet and made those decisions. but your question points out that it is true to say we do expect
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countries will move from one category to another and i hope we have been clear, including introducing the watchlist that when you book you must make sure your flight can be refunded and hotel booking can be amended because we are still living in a world where things change quite quickly. some --eole things change quite quickly. some people have _ things change quite quickly. some people have been _ things change quite quickly. some people have been banned - things change quite quickly. some people have been banned on getting flights. for example, this is about malta, because they had the indian made version of the astrazeneca vaccine. ~ . , made version of the astrazeneca vaccine. ~ ., , , ., made version of the astrazeneca vaccine. ., , vaccine. what is your response? it is not right — vaccine. what is your response? it is not right and _ vaccine. what is your response? it is not right and it _ vaccine. what is your response? it is not right and it should _ vaccine. what is your response? it is not right and it should not - is not right and it should not happen. the medicines agency, mhra, have been clear it does not matter whether the astrazeneca you have is made here or in india, it is absolutely the same product. it provides exactly the same certification and level of protection from the virus. we will
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speak to maltese colleagues to point this out. obviously it is up to them what they do, but we will make the scientific point in the strongest terms that there is no difference and we do not recognise any difference. there could be confusion because the institute in india also manufactures a version that is not mhra approved. and it is not distributed in this country so no vaccinated person has received that version and i think that may clear it up. version and i think that may clear it u. ~ version and i think that may clear it u . _ . ., ., version and i think that may clear it u -. ~ ., ., , version and i think that may clear itu.~ ., ., ., it up. we will follow up on that. can i it up. we will follow up on that. can i talk— it up. we will follow up on that. can i talk to _ it up. we will follow up on that. can i talk to you _ it up. we will follow up on that. can i talk to you about - it up. we will follow up on that. can i talk to you about what - it up. we will follow up on that. can i talk to you about what we | it up. we will follow up on that. - can i talk to you about what we have been following this morning, for example, the reaction to what happened to england players and racist abuse they received. there is so much discussion and one of your mps calling for the government to have a rethink on its attitude
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towards black lives matter and taking the knee. are you on the wrong side of this?— taking the knee. are you on the wrong side of this? something we can auree on wrong side of this? something we can aaree on is wrong side of this? something we can agree on is that _ wrong side of this? something we can agree on is that we _ wrong side of this? something we can agree on is that we are _ wrong side of this? something we can agree on is that we are poor - wrong side of this? something we can agree on is that we are poor racism i agree on is that we are poor racism and nobody wants to see it in football. it is a great shame because it detracts from a phenomenal performance by the england team. and it is right to clamp down on all forms of discrimination. i am clamp down on all forms of discrimination. iam not clamp down on all forms of discrimination. i am not sure there is much more we can say then we do not want to see discrimination in football or society at large. grant sha s, football or society at large. grant shapps. transport _ football or society at large. grant shapps, transport secretary, - football or society at large. grant shapps, transport secretary, thank you. ido i do not know if you have looked outside already, it is very nice in all parts of the country. matt is in hackney at a reservoir and can give us the weather. quick question. you are a keen open water swimmer, what
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temperature would tempt you in the water? any temperature, now, above four. you are hardy. i would probably manage it today. 20 degrees in the reservoir behind me, we are at west reservoir in hackney, five miles from the centre of london, open water swimmers in already and have been swimming here the past eight years. i have been chatting to the manager and he expects a boost in numbers over the next days. warm weather will tempt people out. for some, temperatures above 20 degrees in the water puts them off. it is to warn for them. things will warm up and swimmers will be out. it is cloudy here but there will be sunshine to come. across the uk there will be cloudy moments but overall, compared to how we started
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the week, more sunshine. feeling warmer. due to high pressure to the south—west that will push in over the next days. today, weatherfronts around the top end of it which will push into parts of scotland and northern ireland, bringing cloud and rain or drizzle. not much at all. here there will be sunny spells this morning. low cloud in eastern coastal counties of england and as far west as london. a breeze is blowing but away from that as the cloud breaks up, sunshine across the country and feeling warm. temperatures widely into the 20s. feeling cooler along the eastern coast in england. tonight, cloud in the east will depart but become more abundant elsewhere. like recent nights we will see temperatures for
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the majority sitting in the teens. tomorrow, cloud breaking up in scotland and northern ireland. sunny spells here. england and wales, cloudy during the day compared to what we will see this afternoon but that will break up to allow sunny spells. tomorrow might be feeling cooler if you have cloud. friday, high pressure starts to move in and a lot more sunshine across the country. blue skies for the majority. cloud to the north—west of scotland. with sunshine and light wind, temperatures rise, into the mid 20s by this stage. and as we head into the weekend, not only staying dry, we will see temperatures reach up to 28 celsius, 82 fahrenheit for one or two of you.
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we will leave you with a shot of the reservoir here in hackney. may be grey but still looking appealing out there. talking about what temperature louise would need to get in there. do you have your costume, in case? i accidentally forgot it. a bit of a rush out the house. i was looking forward to a big finish with you diving off the pontoon. you have let me down. maybe next time. it does not matter, if you are swimming, if it is raining. that is true. for many young children, coming to the end of primary school can be both exciting and bittersweet — but many pupils will miss out on saying goodbye to their friends and teachers because they are self—isolating at home. but one school in cheshire has found a unique way to include everyone in their end of year celebrations, as our education corresponent elaine dunkley reports.
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it is the final performance and the end of primary school for year 6 at hartford manor in cheshire. but some of the cast are missing, isolating as a precaution after a child in their bubble tested positive for covid. the initial response from everybody is the show is cancelled. how can we make the show happen, what can we do? we can't let these children down. so we've got six children on zoom who are being cued in by a member of staff, when to speak, when to turn their cameras on and off. it's been a bit of a technical learning curve for everybody this morning. as the children get ready backstage and parents arrive, grace gets ready for her leading role at home. i have a little pin that says "votes for women" on it. it's the last week of primary school and i was never going to see anyone again, because i'm the only one going to the high school that i'm going to out of the whole year,
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so i'm leaving everyone. i thought it was quite annoying that people could go to football matches and i couldn't go to school. last week, over 800,000 pupils in england missed school due to covid—related absences. the pupils who are currently isolating have to miss out. on thursday, we have the year six levers' disco. so they have to miss out on that. we were going to go to london, but that has been cancelled because of covid—19. and it is really upsetting we have not been able to do a lot of stuff. from next week, bubbles can be scrapped. the government has also lifted restrictions such as social distancing, staggered starts, and facemasks where they are used, for the return to school in september. but, for this head teacher, the measures have come too late. we knew this was happening back in bolton in may and there was massive disruption there.
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we could have had a plan earlier. these children have been with us for seven, and if they came to our nursery, eight years. and that last few weeks are so precious and so important and they have missed out on so much over the past 18 months. with limited numbers in the theatre, the show was livestreamed to parents and it all went smoothly. well, almost. it is such an emotional week for them and us parents, as well. it has meant so much for them to finish and do the normal things they would do for the end of year 6. despite the challenges, there have been successes, with teachers and pupils determined to create special moments to celebrate. what a clever way of trying to get round things. if you are watching yesterday, louise was disappointed because she was looking forward to
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speaking to our next guests. i am crossing my fingers. if you're an olympics superfan, then you might know that there are a whopping 96 events to get through once the games begin next week. and one couple has decided to do them all in just 17 days. stuart bates and charlotte nichols are taking on the challenge to mark ten years since the death of stuart's brother spencer from motor neurone disease. we were due to speak to them yesterday until technical gremlins got in the way. but first let's see them in action. cheering yeah, lovely. come on.
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whoo! triple back. whoa! that was amazing. yay. and stuart and charlotte are back with us now. hopefully lovely to speak to you. this is an amazing thing to do. who came up with this idea and tell us about... 96 events is extraordinary. it is ridiculous is what it is. an idea _ it is ridiculous is what it is. an idea i— it is ridiculous is what it is. an idea i had _ it is ridiculous is what it is. an idea i had in— it is ridiculous is what it is. an idea i had in my head for some time. i idea i had in my head for some time. i was _ idea i had in my head for some time. i was scared — idea i had in my head for some time. i was scared to say it out loud because — i was scared to say it out loud because it _ i was scared to say it out loud because it sounded so out there. the second _ because it sounded so out there. the second i_ because it sounded so out there. the second i mentioned it to charlotte, she was— second i mentioned it to charlotte, she was like, that is the best thing i she was like, that is the best thing i have _ she was like, that is the best thing i have heard, we have to do it,
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lets— i have heard, we have to do it, lets get— i have heard, we have to do it, lets get on— i have heard, we have to do it, let's get on and raise money and awareness — let's get on and raise money and awareness and here we are. we have to do— awareness and here we are. we have to do it _ awareness and here we are. we have to do it now — awareness and here we are. we have to do it now. too awareness and here we are. we have to do it now-— to do it now. too many people know. charlotte, to do it now. too many people know. charlotte. i— to do it now. too many people know. charlotte. i am _ to do it now. too many people know. charlotte, i am intrigued _ to do it now. too many people know. charlotte, i am intrigued about - to do it now. too many people know. charlotte, i am intrigued about how i charlotte, i am intrigued about how it works. the planning process must have been incredible. hoof it works. the planning process must have been incredible.— have been incredible. how are you dividin: have been incredible. how are you dividing things _ have been incredible. how are you dividing things up? _ have been incredible. how are you dividing things up? there - have been incredible. how are you dividing things up? there has - have been incredible. how are you| dividing things up? there has been have been incredible. how are you i dividing things up? there has been a lot of admin and we have a lot of impressive spreadsheets. we have a schedule for 17 days starting with the 240 kilometre cycle. we will do all the events and we are sharing social media and admin. a busy few weeks but we are excited. i social media and admin. a busy few weeks but we are excited.— weeks but we are excited. i love that ou weeks but we are excited. i love that you start — weeks but we are excited. i love that you start with _ weeks but we are excited. i love that you start with the _ weeks but we are excited. i love that you start with the most - that you start with the most difficult at the beginning. which is your most complicated day? you have to fit in the athletics events in one day, how does it happen? some da s we one day, how does it happen? some days we have _ one day, how does it happen? some days we have 10-15 _ one day, how does it happen? some days we have 10-15 sports _ one day, how does it happen? some days we have 10-15 sports but - one day, how does it happen? fine days we have 10—15 sports but we are trying to spread out the energy zapping things. starting with the
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cycle, finishing with the marathon. we have days where we do all of the throwing and jumping and some of the sprint. we have come back fighting, boxing, wrestling, judo, on the same day. and on that day we have windsurfing, water polo and showjumping. windsurfing, water polo and showjumping— windsurfing, water polo and showjumping. you mentioned showjumping- _ showjumping. you mentioned showjumping. there - showjumping. you mentioned showjumping. there are - showjumping. you mentioned. showjumping. there are sports showjumping. you mentioned - showjumping. there are sports you have not done before. had you done showjumping? lode have not done before. had you done showjumping?— have not done before. had you done show'um-tin ? . ., ., ., show'umping? we have not done most of showjumping? we have not done most of these things- _ showjumping? we have not done most of these things. we _ showjumping? we have not done most of these things. we are _ showjumping? we have not done most of these things. we are starting - of these things. we are starting from _ of these things. we are starting from scratch and because of lockdown we started _ from scratch and because of lockdown we started in april trying to learn probably— we started in april trying to learn probably 70 new things. we have had holly bradshaw the british number one teaching us to pole vault. we have _ one teaching us to pole vault. we have learned to horse ride. and we are jumping — have learned to horse ride. and we arejumping on the have learned to horse ride. and we are jumping on the first lesson. kate _ are jumping on the first lesson. kate and — are jumping on the first lesson. kate and lizzie representing gb in synchronised swimming teaching us routines _ synchronised swimming teaching us routines. we have thrown ourselves at everything. we are not elite
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athletes — at everything. we are not elite athletes but armchair experts. we are doing — athletes but armchair experts. we are doing it for everybody who looks at the _ are doing it for everybody who looks at the olympics and is an instant expert — at the olympics and is an instant expert we — at the olympics and is an instant expert. we are doing it so you do not have — expert. we are doing it so you do not have to _ expert. we are doing it so you do not have to. watch us do it. we will tell you _ not have to. watch us do it. we will tell you how — not have to. watch us do it. we will tell you how mad it is and how much it hurts _ tell you how mad it is and how much it hurts and — tell you how mad it is and how much it hurts and sit in the comfort of your— it hurts and sit in the comfort of your chain _ it hurts and sit in the comfort of your chair. an it hurts and sit in the comfort of your chair-— it hurts and sit in the comfort of our chair. �* . , . ., your chair. an incredible challenge. you need to — your chair. an incredible challenge. you need to tell _ your chair. an incredible challenge. you need to tell us _ your chair. an incredible challenge. you need to tell us about _ your chair. an incredible challenge. you need to tell us about your - you need to tell us about your brother spencer. this is inspired by him. you lost him ten years ago. absolutely. it is the ten year anniversary and we wanted to market in a big _ anniversary and we wanted to market in a big weight. he passed away from motor— in a big weight. he passed away from motor neurone disease and in that time, _ motor neurone disease and in that time, they— motor neurone disease and in that time, they understand more about the disease _ time, they understand more about the disease but _ time, they understand more about the disease but there is still no cure and no — disease but there is still no cure and no brilliantly effective treatment. if we can raise the profile — treatment. if we can raise the profile and raise as much as we can to help _ profile and raise as much as we can to help towards a cure for this
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terrible — to help towards a cure for this terrible disease, every cut, bump, brews, _ terrible disease, every cut, bump, brews, break, whatever happens to us, well— brews, break, whatever happens to us, we'll be — brews, break, whatever happens to us, we'll be worth it. he was a legend — us, we'll be worth it. he was a legend. everybody who knew him loved him. legend. everybody who knew him loved him it— legend. everybody who knew him loved him it is— legend. everybody who knew him loved him. it is special to be able to honour— him. it is special to be able to honour him in this way.- him. it is special to be able to honour him in this way. what would he have made _ honour him in this way. what would he have made of— honour him in this way. what would he have made of what _ honour him in this way. what would he have made of what you're - honour him in this way. what would | he have made of what you're doing? he would have loved it. we were the most _ he would have loved it. we were the most annoying kind of sports fans. we would — most annoying kind of sports fans. we would sit and watch a sport and critique _ we would sit and watch a sport and critique every performance as though we know _ critique every performance as though we know what we are doing. he would be laughing _ we know what we are doing. he would be laughing his socks offjust how bad his— be laughing his socks offjust how bad his brother is at these things. we are _ bad his brother is at these things. we are throwing ourselves at it. we are hopeless at so many of these things— are hopeless at so many of these things but— are hopeless at so many of these things but we do not care, we will -et things but we do not care, we will get through it. there are so many hard _ get through it. there are so many hard things, fun things, but together— hard things, fun things, but together we will get there. you are a window cleaner _ together we will get there. you are a window cleaner by _ together we will get there. you are a window cleaner by trade, - together we will get there. you are a window cleaner by trade, and, i a window cleaner by trade, and, charlotte, a student doctor. so if
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something goes wrong medically, charlotte, you can help out. is it that there is an event you are particularly worried about? definitely skateboard. we are terrible and when you fall off a skateboard you land on concrete and it hurts. a lot of things where you fall on water or grass, it is fine but skateboarding hurts. you are clearl a but skateboarding hurts. you are clearly a great — but skateboarding hurts. you are clearly a great team. _ but skateboarding hurts. you are clearly a great team. will - but skateboarding hurts. you are clearly a great team. will you i but skateboarding hurts. you are clearly a great team. will you be| clearly a great team. will you be keeping score of who wins what? yes. definitel . keeping score of who wins what? yes. definitely- we — keeping score of who wins what? yes. definitely. we describe ourselves at each other— definitely. we describe ourselves at each other —— as each other's biggest — each other —— as each other's biggest cheerleaders to a point. until— biggest cheerleaders to a point. until we — biggest cheerleaders to a point. until we are against each other and then we both want to destroy the other. , ., . ., . ., ., ,, other. there is no chance of taking it easy anywhere — other. there is no chance of taking it easy anywhere along _ other. there is no chance of taking it easy anywhere along the - other. there is no chance of taking it easy anywhere along the line. i other. there is no chance of taking| it easy anywhere along the line. we are doing _ it easy anywhere along the line. we are doing 95 events against or with each other— are doing 95 events against or with each other and then we drew the line at boxing, _ each other and then we drew the line at boxing, so we are not boxing each other, _
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at boxing, so we are not boxing each other, we _ at boxing, so we are not boxing each other, we have different opponents for that _ other, we have different opponents for that. ~ ., ., other, we have different opponents forthat. ~ ., ., , ,, for that. what about the bike ride, will ou for that. what about the bike ride, will you stick _ for that. what about the bike ride, will you stick together? _ for that. what about the bike ride, will you stick together? yes. - will you stick together? yes. massive things _ will you stick together? yes. massive things like - will you stick together? yes. massive things like that - will you stick together? yes. massive things like that we i will you stick together? i'ezs massive things like that we will need to support each other because it will be hard. the marathon on the last day, we will be fatigued already so we need to be there for each other so we will definitely support each other on those. fiur support each other on those. our viewers have _ support each other on those. our viewers have just watched you on the trampoline. wonderfulfootage. trampoline. wonderful footage. stuart, your vault looks trampoline. wonderfulfootage. stuart, your vault looks impressive. were you a gymnast in your youth? no, it is one of these things i found — no, it is one of these things i found i— no, it is one of these things i found i had a talent for. who knew? we both— found i had a talent for. who knew? we both come from sporty —ish backgrounds but we are not elite athletes — backgrounds but we are not elite athletes. a year ago i was a to say smoking — athletes. a year ago i was a to say smoking. both eating takeaway, drinking — smoking. both eating takeaway, drinking too much. we were not living _ drinking too much. we were not living the —
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drinking too much. we were not living the best life but we have turned — living the best life but we have turned that around and show what you can do— turned that around and show what you can do if— turned that around and show what you can do if you _ turned that around and show what you can do if you put your mind to it. we love — can do if you put your mind to it. we love it. — can do if you put your mind to it. we love it, we are having the time of our— we love it, we are having the time of our lives — we love it, we are having the time of our lives i_ we love it, we are having the time of our lives-— of our lives. i will watch as much of our lives. i will watch as much of our lives. i will watch as much of you as — of our lives. i will watch as much of you as i _ of our lives. i will watch as much of you as i do — of our lives. i will watch as much of you as i do the _ of our lives. i will watch as much of you as i do the olympics. - of our lives. i will watch as much | of you as i do the olympics. well done. you are raising awareness and money. best of luck. go out there. i can see you will enjoy it. but do not hurt yourselves. thank you for having us on. take care. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. facemasks will still be compulsory on public transport in london, despite the law changing on monday. united against racism. hundreds of people take the knee beside the repaired mural of marcus rashford in support of racially abused england players. meanwhile, labour mps are calling for new powers to ban anyone convicted of online racist abuse from football matches for life. good morning. cost of living is on the up, food and energy prices are rising so what does it mean for the poundin rising so what does it mean for the pound in your pocket and how far your cash will go? it's go, go, go, for a full capacity crowd at the british grand prix at silverstone this weekend, and to find out how much this means to the formula 1 drivers, we will be speaking to the rising
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british star george russell of the williams team, just after 8.30am. and after that stormy start to the week, it is going to feel more like summer during the rest of the week as sunshine is about and temperatures increase. i will take a dip into the forecast on breakfast. it's wednesday the 14th ofjuly. our top story. the transport secretary grant shapps has denied that the government's guidance over the use of face coverings is confusing. from monday, it will no longer be a legal requirement to wear a mask in england. however, they will remain mandatory for passengers on london's transport network. we're joined now by our political correspondent ben wright. good morning. take us through the reaction to what is changing? good mornint. reaction to what is changing? good morning- the _ reaction to what is changing? (limp. morning. the government, as you say, have said in england from monday, the wearing of a mask will not be legally enforceable and mandatory, it will be a matter of personal choice across england, but for the
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last few weeks, sadiq khan, the mayor of london, has said that is the wrong policy and that with the virus spreading as fast as it is, he thinks the mandate should have remained in place and now he has acted to ensure people travelling on the underground, the london overground and london buses from monday will have to wear a mask. it will be a condition of travel, a requirement, and it will be enforceable in terms of staff from tfl telling people as they get into stations they should be wearing a mask otherwise they won't be able to travel. when he spoke to breakfast earlier, he explained why he felt the move was necessary. brute earlier, he explained why he felt the move was necessary. we are keen to make sure — the move was necessary. we are keen to make sure that _ the move was necessary. we are keen to make sure that whilst _ the move was necessary. we are keen to make sure that whilst the _ the move was necessary. we are keen to make sure that whilst the virus - to make sure that whilst the virus is still— to make sure that whilst the virus is still with — to make sure that whilst the virus is still with us and while we still have _ is still with us and while we still have people in society who may be vulnerable, clinically vulnerable, or have — vulnerable, clinically vulnerable, or have their immune system are pressed, — or have their immune system are pressed, what we don't want is for them _ pressed, what we don't want is for them to— pressed, what we don't want is for them to feel they can't use public transport — them to feel they can't use public transport. for many people, public transport _ transport. for many people, public transport is — transport. for many people, public transport is an essential service to -et transport is an essential service to get to— transport is an essential service to get to work, their appointments, to id get to work, their appointments, to go to— get to work, their appointments, to go to college or university and so forth— go to college or university and so forth so— go to college or university and so forth so as — go to college or university and so forth so as long as the virus is still—
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forth so as long as the virus is still with— forth so as long as the virus is still with us and we are concerned about— still with us and we are concerned about the — still with us and we are concerned about the virus being transmitted, i think— about the virus being transmitted, i think for— about the virus being transmitted, i think for the time being, to continue _ think for the time being, to continue to have it compulsory. so from continue to have it compulsory. sr from monday, continue to have it compulsory. 5r from monday, where a mask if you are travelling on public transport in london but then you find yourself in a situation, if you go to a mainline station in london and get a train to somewhere, ora station in london and get a train to somewhere, or a bus to somewhere else in england, you won't have to wear a mask because at the moment, rail operators and bus operators are not introducing their own policies, mandating masks. it is a different situation if you get public transport in scotland or wales, where they are maintaining the mandate, the legal requirement to wear a mask. so i think many people throughout the uk may start to feel this is getting to be a rather confusing situation. the government maintains their policy is that they are going —— that they have issued advice, telling people they might want to think about wearing a mask in certain circumstances, if in england for existence you find yourself on a busy train or in a public area like a busy shopping centre, you might choose to wear one
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but their onus remains on personal responsibility, not rules, and the transport secretary grant shapps said that was generally the right approach. brute said that was generally the right a- roach. ~ ., , said that was generally the right auroach. ~ . , ., , ., , approach. we have seen lots of these rules bein: approach. we have seen lots of these rules being different _ approach. we have seen lots of these rules being different in _ approach. we have seen lots of these rules being different in different - rules being different in different parts _ rules being different in different parts of— rules being different in different parts of the uk. that is the form of devolved _ parts of the uk. that is the form of devolved government we have. if you are outside. — devolved government we have. if you are outside, you wouldn't need a mask— are outside, you wouldn't need a mask on — are outside, you wouldn't need a mask on if— are outside, you wouldn't need a mask on. if you go inside, you would — mask on. if you go inside, you would that _ mask on. if you go inside, you would. that has been the case all the way— would. that has been the case all the way through so i don't think it is dramatically different just because you are inside on a london underground train. it is common sense _ underground train. it is common sense when you think about it, you will be _ sense when you think about it, you will be in _ sense when you think about it, you will be in a — sense when you think about it, you will be in a crowded area and transport _ will be in a crowded area and transport organisations are welcome, as i transport organisations are welcome, as i said _ transport organisations are welcome, as i said last— transport organisations are welcome, as i said last week, to make it a condition— as i said last week, to make it a condition of— as i said last week, to make it a condition of carriage, in the same way as— condition of carriage, in the same way as other rules are done in that way _ way as other rules are done in that wa . , . way as other rules are done in that wa. ,, way as other rules are done in that way. grant shapps and i think it is clear in the _ way. grant shapps and i think it is clear in the last _ way. grant shapps and i think it is clear in the last couple _ way. grant shapps and i think it is clear in the last couple of - way. grant shapps and i think it is clear in the last couple of weeks, | clear in the last couple of weeks, that the government's own guidance around the wearing of masks has hardened a bit. i think they have been stung by some of the criticism from scientists and other national and city politicians like sadik khan around the question of mask wearing, but the central westminster
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government's policy at the moment remains to issue guidance, not to go for the sort of rules that sadiq khan has decided to adopt. thank you for “oinint khan has decided to adopt. thank you forjoining us- — plans for easing coronavirus restrictions in wales will be set out by the welsh government later today. ministers have already said that face coverings will remain mandatory on public transport and in health care settings, but what other measures will be announced? let's find out from our reporter mark hutchings. good morning. give us an idea of what might be said of it later today. what might be said of it later toda . ~ ~ . today. well, i think if we have learned one _ today. well, i think if we have learned one thing _ today. well, i think if we have learned one thing during - today. well, i think if we have learned one thing during the l today. well, i think if we have - learned one thing during the course of the pandemic, it is that the style and the tone of the uk and welsh governments in making these announcements is a bit like chalk and cheese, really. the first minister has said, though, that the four uk nations are moving in the same direction but at different speeds and i think we will see more of a steady as she goes rather than a full steam ahead approach from the welsh government. if as expected
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wales moves to its delayed alert level one, that would see the introduction of the rule of six in private homes which has not technically at least been allowed until now, and perhaps the opening of ice rinks, which have rather contentiously stayed closed throughout the pandemic. on facemasks, we know they will stay compulsory on public transport and in health and care settings. what about shops and hospitality? well, we should learn more about that at lunchtime. the welsh conservatives have been fiercely critical, saying there has been not enough detail from the welsh government but we will get more later and i am told it is all going to be about collective, not personal responsibility. ok. not personal responsibility. ok, thank you. _ not personal responsibility. ok, thank you. we _ not personal responsibility. ok, thank you, we will— not personal responsibility. 0k, thank you, we will keep an eye on that. the labour party is calling for anyone convicted of racist abuse online to be banned from attending football matches. it wants the courts to be given new powers to crack down on perpetrators, like those who targeted members of the england squad after the euros 2020 final. it comes after hundreds of people turned out in support for striker marcus rashford after a mural of him was covered in racist
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graffiti on sunday. in the last hour, we've had the latest inflation figures from the office for national statistics. here's ben with the details. he will be able to tell us what it means. he is any market, as you can see. means. he is any market, as you can see, , ., ., ., means. he is any market, as you can see. ., ., see. good morning, we are in north-west — see. good morning, we are in north-west london, - see. good morning, we are in north-west london, in - see. good morning, we are in north-west london, in wilton| see. good morning, we are in - north-west london, in wilton market, north—west london, in wilton market, the trade is getting set up for a busy day ahead but whilst they might be keeping a close eye on what they are charging, the inflation figures this morning give us a sense of how much things will cost in future. inflation of coarse measures the rising cost of living. it is a particularly key indicator to tell us how far our will go. in the last set of figures we had in the last hour, telling us that inflation hit 2.5% last month, that is up from 2.1% in may, and it might not sound a lot but remember, inflation gives us a sense of how far our money will
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90, us a sense of how far our money will go, so maybe we will get fewer of this fruit and veg or less of this fruit and veg, for the same amount of money, as prices go up and it is things like energy, clothing and food that have seen the biggest increase. why does it matter? the bank of england will be spun —— i will respond and keep a close eye on it, and one of the tools they have got at their discretion to keep inflation in check, remember the target is 2% so we are significantly above that, is to raid interest rates, and by raising interest rates, and by raising interest rates, it means we are more encouraged to put our money in a bank and save rather than just going out and spending it so if you have a mortgage or credit card, rising interest rates are not good news and if you are a saver, it is a little better because we have had terrible returns on our savings for so long. but they will be keeping a close eye on this because the economy has been anything but normal in the past 18 months. some of our shopping habits have changed and therefore, some of the things we have been buying have changed. for example, we were not
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travelling, we were not on planes or out driving or in the shops because many of them were shut, and so what we are getting a sense of now is that the economy is starting to recover. we are recovering our normal shopping habits and therefore, the price of things like food and clothing and energy are starting to rise again as we get used to being a bit more normal in what we buy and consume. so the inflation rate hitting 2.5%, which is above the bank of england target of 2%. we will keep a close eye on what they do as far as interest rate is concerned and i'm going to get out of the way because it is very busy this morning! you out of the way because it is very busy this morning!— busy this morning! you do that. thank you _ busy this morning! you do that. thank you for— busy this morning! you do that. thank you forjoining _ busy this morning! you do that. thank you forjoining us. - busy this morning! you do that. thank you forjoining us. i - busy this morning! you do that. thank you forjoining us. i love | busy this morning! you do that. | thank you forjoining us. i love it when ben is doing a brilliantjob, and people ijust completely ignoring him and getting on which is how it should be stoppe that they have got things to do, life goes on! prince charles has warned that the uk is in danger of destroying britain's rural communities by letting small family farms "go to the wall". he said the focus needs to move away from producing cheap and mass—produced food and to put nature back at the heart of farming. here's our chief environment
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correspondentjustin rowlatt. superefficient, intensive agriculture is a dead end, prince charles said today. he warns that the pursuit of cheap food has damaged our soils and water courses as well as producing emissions that have driven global warming. such has been the damage to the natural systems we depend upon, we must achieve profound and rapid change to reverse it. we must put nature back at the heart of the equation. the prince is adamant that small farms must be a part of that effort. he has been deeply concerned with food and the environment for most of his adult life. our current approach is forcing many small family farms to the wall. if they go, it will quite simply rip the heart out of the british countryside and break the backbone of britain's rural communities. prince charles praises the efforts of marcus rashford and jamie oliver
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to improve the nation's diet. he believes we need to switch from industrial farming methods and adopt more sustainable practices. only by benefiting nature can we benefit people, and that will ensure the future of our living planet. prince charles's comments come ahead of the publication tomorrow of the national food strategy — the first major review of britain's food system in over 70 years. justin rowlatt, bbc news. it has been lovely out and about this morning but i think it is a bit more cloudy where matt is. he has
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been watching the open water swimmers in hackney and join a temperature. indeed, after the sunny start to the cloud has rolled in but still a pleasant enough warm —— morning for many, the open water swimmers are in, they swim all year round, it has been an open water swimming venue for the last eight years, and we are only a stone's throw away from central london, trafalgar square just five miles away from where i am standing. but we are expecting more in the way of open water swimmers to piling here and in venues across the country over the coming days and thatis country over the coming days and that is because the weather is set to switch to summer mode. let's look at the forecast because it is turning sunnier and warmer across most parts of the uk as we head through the next few days. it is going to be a case of some cloud at times but sunshine beginning to dominate more and more and that is what some of you will notice today. a bit of cloud across eastern parts of england at the moment and quite a breeze blowing and more cloud pushing into the north and west of scotland and northern ireland later but in between, blue skies for the vast majority and an outside chance of a shower in the midlands but most
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places staying dry. in the sunshine, feeling warm, temperatures between 18-25 feeling warm, temperatures between 18—25 degrees. this evening and overnight, cloud and some patchy rain or drizzle pushing through scotland and northern ireland. clearer skies for england and wales, where temperatures across the uk will stay in the teens for the vast majority. heading into tomorrow, it looks like scotland and northern ireland, after a cloudy start, will brighten to sunny skies, a sunny start for the south and east of england and wales but tomorrow, a bit more cloud around compared with today for the vast majority but with a subtle change of wind direction, it will feel quite chilly across eastern coast of england, and overall, temperatures similar to today but as we go through the weekend and into next week, temperatures will rise further. this weekend, they could peak at 28 celsius, 82 fahrenheit. back to you. sounds lovely, thank you very much.
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yesterday we showed you pictures of the mural of marcus rashford in manchester, that had been almost completely covered in messages of support after it was defaced on sunday with racist graffiti. and last night hundreds of people took the knee beside the restored artwork in a show of solidarity with the striker and the other england players who received similar abuse after sunday's euros final, as graham satchell reports. the abuse scrawled on this wall was covered up almost immediately — first, with bin bags. what happened next was extraordinary. as the hours passed, people brought notes, letters, messages of support. hundreds and hundreds of them. by late yesterday, marcus rashford's mural had been completely transformed. this woman came with her son omar.
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we decided to come and put just very lovely, kind notes over the paint, and when we came, we got surprised by the community being together and that is how we are supposed to be. black and white, it does not matter what race you are, we are all here for england, so, yeah. three black english players have been targeted with racist abuse after missing penalties at the final on sunday. everyone is like a big family round here. so to see that round here, it is shocking. especially for the kids to see it, as well. the messages here are simple, powerful. support and love for a man who has done so much on and off the pitch. he gave out free school meals for children. and he got like a member of the british empire. he is amazing. he has helped so many families. but, obviously, we are massive united fans in our house, so we all love him. this is maya and her daughter violet. she left a note saying be kind,
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be loving, be more like rashford. we experience racism on a daily basis, being people of colour ourselves. she gets it at school. i get it at work, get it walking down the street. get told to go back to your country on a regular basis. but i've always lived in this country. my grandparents lived in this country. i think we are like three generations deep, now. ifeel like it should be coming to an end, but it is clearly not. it hurts, does it? yes. you try to act like it doesn't hurt but yes, it does hurt. at marcus rashford's old primary schooljust down the road, there are posters celebrating black history, and a pair of his boots sit proudly in a cabinet. year 5 students, nine and ten—year—olds, so appalled by what has happened, they too have written letters to their hero. dear mr rashford, i think you are an amazing, legendary football player. i'm very sorry for all the racist comments you got for missing a penalty.
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i want you to stop and remember all the amazing things you have done and all the challenges you have overcome already to get to this point in life. some people in this world are racist, but don't listen to them, because you try your best and that is all we can ask for. it's amazing you made it to the final. second place is still really good. just look where you came from and look at you now. we all know you and any people of colour or background - don't deserve this. especially that paintingl of you being destroyed. i and all of us know. this has gone too far. i feel very inspired that i was in the same classroom as you when you were my age. even though i'm italian and my family supports italy, that doesn't mean you're not my hero and that you don't inspire me. keep strong, marcus, and never give up. black lives matter! all: black lives matter! back at the mural last night, a protest organised by stand up to racism. hundreds of people taking the knee. marcus rashford has said he has been
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moved to tears by a community that has wrapped their arms around him. it is a powerful collective response to mindless racist hate. graham satchell, bbc news, manchester. that you gives you a really clear idea of what was taking place yesterday. we're joined now by former england goalkeeper david james, and the ex—manchester city player nedum onuoha. thank you forjoining us. you have obviously been following very closely what has happened in the last few days, ndeum —— nedum, i wonder if it has given you comfort, seeing the way the local community responded to the defacing of the mural in manchester? i responded to the defacing of the mural in manchester?— responded to the defacing of the mural in manchester? i do, ithink watchin: mural in manchester? i do, ithink watching the _ mural in manchester? i do, ithink watching the piece _ mural in manchester? i do, ithink watching the piece was _ mural in manchester? i do, ithink watching the piece was very - mural in manchester? i do, i think. watching the piece was very moving and also hearing how rashford has said he was touched by it all. this is incredible but for me, the reality of the situation is, after
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the year where we have had where racism has been a talking point almost the entirety, i think to be able to get to the point where england where on sunday and to almost expect what was coming afterwards, i think it shows that obviously, there is support but the reality of the situation is there and this is why people... you know, the stuff that happened on sunday, in my opinion, it removed the grey area for a lot of people because whether we are talking about the racist abuse or the things which were happening at the stadium, it is almost like a reckoning in terms of, does this represent who you are and is this ok? i think lots of people in the community have decided, no, this isn't good or acceptable and as i say, it is good to see them coming out and showing support for him because marcus rashford is my hero as well for the stuff he's done over the last year. as well for the stuff he's done over the last year-— the last year. david, i want to exand the last year. david, i want to expand that — the last year. david, i want to expand that thought - the last year. david, i want to expand that thought of - the last year. david, i want to expand that thought of it - the last year. david, i want to expand that thought of it with the last year. david, i want to - expand that thought of it with you as well because we can see the pictures now of all of the people by the mural, offering their support. could this be a moment where actually, things do change? are you
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optimistic about it?— optimistic about it? good morning. otimism, optimistic about it? good morning. optimism. i— optimistic about it? good morning. optimism, i mean, _ optimistic about it? good morning. optimism, i mean, i— optimistic about it? good morning. optimism, i mean, i have - optimistic about it? good morning. optimism, i mean, i have to - optimistic about it? good morning. optimism, i mean, i have to say, l optimistic about it? good morning. optimism, i mean, i have to say, i| optimism, i mean, i have to say, i don't _ optimism, i mean, i have to say, i don't think. — optimism, i mean, i have to say, i don't think, as much as we would love it _ don't think, as much as we would love it to— don't think, as much as we would love it to happen, that we are going to eradicate — love it to happen, that we are going to eradicate racism, for many different— to eradicate racism, for many different reasons. the show of support — different reasons. the show of support for marcus is wonderful to see. obviously, nedum said, the amount— see. obviously, nedum said, the amount of— see. obviously, nedum said, the amount of stuff he has done for his community, — amount of stuff he has done for his community, it is great to see them getting _ community, it is great to see them getting behind him. unfortunately, we are _ getting behind him. unfortunately, we are talking about an issue which spreads— we are talking about an issue which spreads that, as some of the people there _ spreads that, as some of the people there commented on. racism is in society, _ there commented on. racism is in society, it — there commented on. racism is in society, it is — there commented on. racism is in society, it is notjust in football, but people — society, it is notjust in football, but people can use a football platform to express their disgusting views _ platform to express their disgusting views. hopefully this is a shift, but it— views. hopefully this is a shift, but it has— views. hopefully this is a shift, but it has to go further thanjust supporting marcus rashford because there were three players involved, as reports— there were three players involved, as reports say, it will be interesting to see what communities have done _ interesting to see what communities have done for the other two but as i say, there _ have done for the other two but as i say, there are people in the community getting racial abuse on a
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daily basis— community getting racial abuse on a daily basis who don't play football and they— daily basis who don't play football and they need help and support, to. david _ and they need help and support, to. david we _ and they need help and support, to. david, we spoke to the government yesterday, particularly on this issue and they were pointing to what they are trying to do with social media companies. we understand the prime minister met with some social media companies yesterday. is that where things need to start to change for you? what other measures might you put in place? do you support, for example, what many people are saying, removing the cloak of anonymity that people can have on social media?— social media? well, i think, first of all, social media? well, i think, first of all. we _ social media? well, i think, first of all, we have _ social media? well, i think, first of all, we have to _ social media? well, i think, first of all, we have to look _ social media? well, i think, first of all, we have to look at - social media? well, i think, first of all, we have to look at social. of all, we have to look at social media — of all, we have to look at social media as — of all, we have to look at social media as a _ of all, we have to look at social media as a separate entity because again, _ media as a separate entity because again, those reports we have just seen _ again, those reports we have just seen are — again, those reports we have just seen are from people in the street, which _ seen are from people in the street, which don't — seen are from people in the street, which don't have social media influences but with regards to social— influences but with regards to social media companies, i don't social media companies, idon't think— social media companies, i don't think it — social media companies, i don't think it is — social media companies, i don't think it is a _ social media companies, i don't think it is a dichotomy where you have _ think it is a dichotomy where you have to _ think it is a dichotomy where you have to show id or not. i think there — have to show id or not. i think there is— have to show id or not. i think there is a _ have to show id or not. i think there is a middle ground. i think social— there is a middle ground. i think social media companies can introduce an opt— social media companies can introduce an opt in_ social media companies can introduce an opt in ii) _ social media companies can introduce an opt in id requirement and therefore, if you have opted into user— therefore, if you have opted into user id. — therefore, if you have opted into user id, then clubs like manchester
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united _ user id, then clubs like manchester united and — user id, then clubs like manchester united and individuals like people on the _ united and individuals like people on the street can only see comments written _ on the street can only see comments written by— on the street can only see comments written by people who have opted in and shown _ written by people who have opted in and shown id. that way we can find out who _ and shown id. that way we can find out who these people are making comments and deal with them directly and if— comments and deal with them directly and if you _ comments and deal with them directly and if you have not opted in, then obviously. — and if you have not opted in, then obviously, nobody, orfewer people, ishould— obviously, nobody, orfewer people, i should say, — obviously, nobody, orfewer people, i should say, would see your comments. in that way, we would talk about— comments. in that way, we would talk about a _ comments. in that way, we would talk about a new_ comments. in that way, we would talk about a new normal, i think a lot of especially— about a new normal, i think a lot of especially football clubs would lose a lot of _ especially football clubs would lose a lot of followers but then, the followers — a lot of followers but then, the followers they do have would be genuine — followers they do have would be genuine and again, traceable. that is reall genuine and again, traceable. t'isgt is really interesting. nedum, another thing under discussion, as there are lots of things, is labour raising an urgent question in the comments saying races money internet should be treated the same as on the terraces, for example, by extending football banning orders to cover online offences. would that help? i think as david has alluded to, there, some of these elements do help the situation itself, but it is
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greater than football and i think as we saw with the piece earlier, people are being abused on the street and people like this so there needs to be a greater sense of accountability but my only concern with it, and this has been my only concern in terms of banning people from stadiums, if you do, it does not make their views any different, it just not make their views any different, itjust means they can't hold them in a particular place and that is the reality of the situation, i think, for so many people. as i say, you create an environment like a football stadium in theory but that environment in some ways is artificial because it does not truly represent how lots of people feel. they are just choosing to not say certain things which is why a lot of people who may behold racist or other discriminatory views are in workplaces up and down the country and most people don't really know about it because they know they can't express views in that environment but sadly, as soon as something negative, in their opinion, happens, then the justification is there to be able to say how they actually feel because lots of these people, they didn't become racists because marcus rashford or whoever missed a
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penalty, they were racist but they were saying nothing because in that moment, there was success, raheem sterling has had a years worth of abuse as a player but he has had a good tournament and didn't miss a penalty so the abuse he got is less than the abuse of the three players who missed penalties. you know, yeah, i think little things do help but ultimately, itjust shows the dire situation we are in because we can say things are positive and so on and so forth but the reality of the situation is, after that game, most people who thought about it deeply expected the abuse to come so what does that say about world, or the country we live in? i what does that say about world, or the country we live in?— what does that say about world, or the country we live in? i have been really interested _ the country we live in? i have been really interested to _ the country we live in? i have been really interested to see _ the country we live in? i have been really interested to see the - really interested to see the response from all sorts of different people from all walks of life to what happened on sunday and the abuse. i don't know if you saw but leanne pinnock from little mix tweeted on behalf of the band and said, "you can speak at the table but not too loud, you can play for us but you can't lose". she said,
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"ladies and gentlemen, i give you the black british experience". she is honestly the partner of andre gray, who is a professional footballer as well. does that speak for you as well? is that the black british experience? you can play for us but you can't lose? i british experience? you can play for us but you can't lose?— us but you can't lose? i would say to some extent, _ us but you can't lose? i would say to some extent, yes, _ us but you can't lose? i would say to some extent, yes, that - us but you can't lose? i would say to some extent, yes, that is - us but you can't lose? i would say to some extent, yes, that is true. it is a tough thing to admit but we are in that position, and myself included, where, as soon as those penalties were missed, i looked at who missed the penalties and i knew what would happen next. there is no sugar—coating that situation and for it to happen in the manner that it has i think explains it all because we look back at the team, the run that the team has just had at the european championships, we have this false perception of how successful england have been but in my lifetime, that is the furthest england have ever got in any tournament so this is a huge occasion but suddenly, it is a failure, as if we have not —— as if we have won loads of stuff in the past and we can come out and say this and it is ok. as i say, in some
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ways, that has to be the reality because as i said, in the last year, we have spoken about race more than at any other point in my life yet it is still very easy for people to come out and say what they say because somebody missed a penalty and as a consequence, they are no longer one of us. they are only one of us when we are successful but when we are not, you go back to your country and i've heard that myself and it's embarrassing, to be honest. david, to come back to you as well, nedum says we have spoken about race a lot this year and lots of measures have been taken, the social media blackout by the premier league and lots of footballers and do these things make a difference? fits lots of footballers and do these things make a difference? says i lots of footballers and do these things make a difference? as i said, dan, things make a difference? as i said, dan. social— things make a difference? as i said, dan, social media _ things make a difference? as i said, dan, social media has _ things make a difference? as i said, dan, social media has to _ things make a difference? as i said, dan, social media has to be - things make a difference? as i said, j dan, social media has to be isolated from society issues in the sense that there — from society issues in the sense that there is a control that social media _ that there is a control that social media can — that there is a control that social media can have but these issues are in everyday— media can have but these issues are in everyday life and i think the sad thing _ in everyday life and i think the sad thing is, _ in everyday life and i think the sad thing is, what nedum is saying there is very— thing is, what nedum is saying there is very true _ thing is, what nedum is saying there is very true but had marcus scored his penalty, — is very true but had marcus scored his penalty, had all the guys scored their penalties, then the online abuse — their penalties, then the online abuse would still have happened, as
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gareth— abuse would still have happened, as gareth mentioned, possibly from other— gareth mentioned, possibly from other countries. but this is something we have to deal within society— something we have to deal within society and where i think about the stadium _ society and where i think about the stadium and the fans, nedum i was not old _ stadium and the fans, nedum i was not old enough, he wasn't born when racism _ not old enough, he wasn't born when racism was _ not old enough, he wasn't born when racism was ubiquitous in stadiums across— racism was ubiquitous in stadiums across the — racism was ubiquitous in stadiums across the country for players, they eradicated — across the country for players, they eradicated that to a large extent with some great efforts from kick it out and _ with some great efforts from kick it out and show racism the red card and ithink— out and show racism the red card and i think it _ out and show racism the red card and i think it is _ out and show racism the red card and i think it is important to have environs— i think it is important to have environs where you can perform without — environs where you can perform without having abuse and hopefully by being _ without having abuse and hopefully by being able to spread a message on a large _ by being able to spread a message on a large platform, i say educate but ithink— a large platform, i say educate but i think it _ a large platform, i say educate but i think it will lessen the opportunities for young people especially to be drawn into something which they otherwise wouldn't — something which they otherwise wouldn't be. so yeah, this is a societal— wouldn't be. so yeah, this is a societal problem, notjust wouldn't be. so yeah, this is a societal problem, not just a social media _ societal problem, not just a social media problem. societal problem, not 'ust a social media problemh societal problem, not 'ust a social media problem. really interesting to hear from you _ media problem. really interesting to hear from you both _ media problem. really interesting to hear from you both this _ media problem. really interesting to hear from you both this morning. - hearfrom you both this morning. thank you forjoining us. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. as ever, thank you for sending in your questions and comments from the gas we have had today. we will try to read as many as we can. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. the mayor says londoners will have to continue to wear face masks on the tube and buses, despite covid restrictions easing from monday. british transport police says its officers can't enforce it, but sadiq khan says tfl staff will be making sure passengers keep their masks on. i'm quite clear one of my responsibilities is public safety on public transport. but also i'm quite clear from the conversations i've had with londoners, from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them greater confidence in using our incredibly safe transport system. the met police says some young people in london have been
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reported missing more than 300 times — placing a huge responsibilty on officers who risk—assess each case. the force says its working with care homes to try and reduce the number of calls it receives. the borough of croydon sees more missing person reports in a year than the whole of germany does. what we see is a really high number of care homes. so that, the number of hospitals, and the number of institutions looking after people's mental health is higher here than it is in the more central areas. that leads to really high numbers of missing persons cases every year. three siblings have told the bbc how they were struck by lightning on monday while sheltering under a tree near hampton court palace. rachel, isobel and andrewjobson were taking a selfie at the time and they managed to capture the moment on camera. they were taken to st george's hospital in tooting but later discharged. the district line isn't running between between richmond and turnham green due to signalfailure. there's no dlr from
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bank to tower gateway, and there's no overground between euston and kilburn high road due to flood damage. minor due to flood damage. delays on the circle line. time for the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. there is the small chance of one or two isolated showers breaking out over the next couple of days. but, for the vast majority, it should stay completely dry. and it will feel very much as if summer is returning. it is a cloudy, mild start. we will keep the cloud for much of the morning for many places, particularly towards eastern home counties. but the cloud will break up. we will see bright spells, some spells of sunshine. sunny spells through the afternoon. always best the further west you are. a noticeable northerly to northwesterly breeze. top temperatures in the best of the sunshine will get as high as 23—24 celsius. so not a bad—looking day of weather. overnight tonight, it is set to stay dry. there will be clear spells. cloud reforming into tomorrow morning with perhaps a few early mist patches around. temperatures staying in double figures.
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on thursday, we have high pressure fairly firmly established across the uk and that will continue for the rest of the week, so there will be decent spells of sunshine, but also some cloud coming and going. it should stay dry or mostly dry, and temperatures once more will get up to 23—24. those temperatures are set to rise further as we head through friday and the weekend. that's it for now. i'm back in half an hour now i'll hand you back to dan and louise. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. let's find out what's on today's programme with gethin and jacqui. thanks, both. coming up on morning live. with a third of homes now selling for over their asking price, you can see why the idea of winning one in a house raffle might seem
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a tempting way to get on the property ladder. but can you really get your dream home for as little as a fiver, or are these raffles simply too good to be true? we'll find out later. and multiple sclerosis is a condition that can make everyday things like walking and talking become harder and harder to do. but today radio 1 dj scott mills is helping to launch a campaign that could stop symptoms from getting worse. he shares the personal reason why this matters to him. also coming up. almost half of us have downloaded the nhs covid app, but with 350,000 alerts going off each week, more people than ever are being pinged. janette manrara went to find out how it's affecting your day—to—day life. and with news that some covid restrictions are set to ease in scotland from monday, but facemasks are to remain for some time, dr rupy has the latest. plus, with a heatwave forecast, it could mean an invasion of wasps. vet drjames greenwood will be telling us why we should love them as much as bees.
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but if you don't want them buzzing around your garden get—togethers, he'll also reveal why you'll need some ground coffee. and luba mushtuk strengthens our core with a stritcly fitness workout. iam i am getting my core ready. i am glad to hear it. see you at 9:15. as we have been discussing this morning, scotland is to move to level zero of its covid restrictions from monday. unlike across the border in england, facemasks will remain a necessity, while limits on the number of people allowed to gather indoors and outdoors will remain. professorjason leitch, the national clinical director for scotland, joins us now. good morning. can you explain first of all why the scottish government have gone for a slightly more cautious approach?— have gone for a slightly more cautious approach? good morning. good to be — cautious approach? good morning.
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good to be with _ cautious approach? good morning. good to be with you. _ cautious approach? good morning. good to be with you. it _ cautious approach? good morning. good to be with you. it is - cautious approach? good morning. good to be with you. it is forward i good to be with you. it is forward momentum, let's be clear. we are moving in the right direction, but we have had a tough couple of weeks in scotland. you have probably covered it. i have been on to talk about it. we had a spike in cases, 4000 in a day about three weeks ago. that has caused a knock on effect to hospitals with 500 in hospital with covid and hospitals are recovering, rebalancing over the past months to try to deal with postponed care. on advice, notjust public health advice, notjust public health advice, but economic advice earned from those who look at care homes, loneliness, the government yesterday, they chose that on the 19th ofjuly, we will move to level zero in scotland but do it gradually and carefully. i think that is the right response. who said that is what you should do, move out of this wave slowly and gradually. i do
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what you should do, move out of this wave slowly and gradually.— wave slowly and gradually. i do not know if you — wave slowly and gradually. i do not know if you saw — wave slowly and gradually. i do not know if you saw the _ wave slowly and gradually. i do not know if you saw the transport - know if you saw the transport secretary talking about the different methods used with regards to face coverings in particular. louise asked him who was making the right decision and he said everybody was making the right decision. yet things are different, for example between scotland and england on the face coverings. i between scotland and england on the face coverings-— face coverings. i think his answer is probably _ face coverings. i think his answer is probably right _ face coverings. i think his answer is probably right but _ face coverings. i think his answer is probably right but a _ face coverings. i think his answer is probably right but a little - face coverings. i think his answer is probably right but a little hard | is probably right but a little hard for us to get over. i would never criticise the estonian response, the french response, and i would hope they would not criticise us and the same applies in the uk countries. i know the advice across the four countries comes from a good place, people trying to do their best. face coverings have become iconic, the image of the pandemic. what we are saying, in all countries, is that the pandemic is not done, the virus is still with us and might come back
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to bite us again. therefore, keeping baseline mitigations is the public health advice. the bbc will have sanitising gel at your front door. but thejudgment the sanitising gel at your front door. but the judgment the government makes about how much should be rules on how much should be guidance is different. that is not a matterfor public health officials but government.— public health officials but government. public health officials but covernment. ,, , ., ,, ., .., government. speaking with a medical head on, government. speaking with a medical head on. we — government. speaking with a medical head on, we spoke _ government. speaking with a medical head on, we spoke to _ government. speaking with a medical head on, we spoke to a _ government. speaking with a medical head on, we spoke to a professor- head on, we spoke to a professor yesterday who we have spoken to through the pandemic on their ology, all sorts of issues, and we asked him to talk through how he feels about taking the foot off the brakes and allowing things to return to normal. are you concerned when things go back to normal there may be trouble ahead?— things go back to normal there may be trouble ahead? yes, of course. i did not hear— be trouble ahead? yes, of course. i did not hear that _ be trouble ahead? yes, of course. i did not hear that interview - be trouble ahead? yes, of course. i did not hear that interview but - be trouble ahead? yes, of course. i did not hear that interview but i - did not hear that interview but i bet it is what he said. of course.
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there is no risk—free path. everywhere we look, there are risks. what we try to do as advisers is guide governments in the right direction and we do that with learning we have had and we have learned loads. we have learned that one third of people do not know they have the virus because they are asymptomatic carriers. they can pass it on, hence face coverings became important. we did not know that this time last year, or march last year. we have had to adapt information. we know what it does when you open schools or ask people to work from home. we have more knowledge but whatever we do in terms of bringing people together is potentially a risk. the balance to that is an astonishing vaccination programme, probably the fastest in the world, just about, perhaps apart from israel. that is an astonishing outcome for the national health
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service to do that. that has started to push the virus in the other direction. if we can keep away from further variants, surprises, iam confident we can continue with the forward momentum whether in england next monday, or in scotland next monday and the 9th of august. tbs, monday and the 9th of august. a practical question. when you decide, when it is decided as in scotland that weddings and funeral numbers can go up to 200, what makes it 200 are not 150, oran can go up to 200, what makes it 200 are not 150, or an unlimited number? who decides on that and how does it work? , , who decides on that and how does it work? , work? judgment. it is probably the most common _ work? judgment. it is probably the most common question. _ work? judgment. it is probably the most common question. why - work? judgment. it is probably the most common question. why can l work? judgment. it is probably the i most common question. why can you work? judgment. it is probably the - most common question. why can you do this and not this? it is like face coverings. if you ask me how many lives does 200 at a wedding save compared to 250, i cannot tell you. it is the whole package. the whole
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response, including self—isolation, testing, wedding numbers, hospitality numbers. governments have a toughjob. i do not expect you to feel sorry for public health advisers and least of all governments but you have to look at that package. scotland makes the choices for 5 million people. and try to make it as fair as we can. we makea try to make it as fair as we can. we make a lot of people unhappy, the event industry, sport, hospitality may be unhappy. others think they are moving forward. if i have everybody equally unhappy, may be my advice has not been too terrible. laughter. one of my favourite phrases of the whole thing. if you can keep everybody not too unhappy. you know that feeling. as long as they are not shouting, you are ok. now look at different things going
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on. an exciting summer of sport. and things returning to normal, 140,000 at the british grand prix over the weekend. a test event in this nonstop summer of sport. one of the highlights they are gearing up for this week is the british grand prix at silverstone. last yea r�*s two races there were held behind closed doors, but this time fans will be returning with a capacity crowd of 140,000 expected as it's one of the government's test events. williams driver george russell will be hoping to entertain fans on their return. good morning. you are in yourflat. the return. good morning. you are in your flat. the wednesday before a grand prix. how different and special is the feeling ahead of a home grand prix, home comforts, things you are used to? is it home grand prix, home comforts, things you are used to?— things you are used to? is it a secial things you are used to? is it a special feeling? _ things you are used to? is it a special feeling? it _ things you are used to? is it a special feeling? it is - things you are used to? is it a special feeling? it is great. i special feeling? it is great. ordinarily i would be on the way to the airport getting ready for flight instead. now i am sitting at the
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table, just had breakfast and chilling out. from that side it makes life easier. the schedule will be hectic from this afternoon onwards. ,, be hectic from this afternoon onwards-— onwards. you tweeted that silverstone, _ onwards. you tweeted that silverstone, we _ onwards. you tweeted that silverstone, we are - onwards. you tweeted that j silverstone, we are coming onwards. you tweeted that. silverstone, we are coming for onwards. you tweeted that - silverstone, we are coming for you. it shows what it means. especially with 140,000 fans back. what with 140,000 fans back. what difference _ with 140,000 fans back. what difference do _ with 140,000 fans back. what difference do they _ with 140,000 fans back. what difference do they make? - with 140,000 fans back. mat difference do they make? massive. with 140,000 fans back. m"isgt difference do they make? massive. we all took it for granted prior to the pandemic. as soon as we did not have any, the atmosphere was not there and it was not as exciting and you did not get the buzz. fans have slowly started to come back in the season but 140,000 at silverstone, home race, it will be electric and exciting, driving around seeing people cheering and supporting. it has to bring a better lap time. overall excited to go back to a bit of normality. for
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overall excited to go back to a bit of normality-— of normality. for the first time almost two — of normality. for the first time almost two races _ of normality. for the first time almost two races because - of normality. for the first time almost two races because you | of normality. for the first time - almost two races because you have the sprint qualifying race. that is on the saturday afternoon, to decide grid positions on sunday. more action. i grid positions on sunday. more action- i do _ grid positions on sunday. more action. i do not _ grid positions on sunday. more action. i do not know— grid positions on sunday. more action. i do not know how - grid positions on sunday. more action. i do not know how it. grid positions on sunday. more | action. i do not know how it will pan out. a new experience. the good thing is it will be three days of action. forthe140,000 thing is it will be three days of action. for the 140,000 coming, they will get action on all the days. it is exciting because we are notjust here to drive around in circles, we want to race and go for it. this format gives us that option. you are 23 and you — format gives us that option. you are 23 and you were _ format gives us that option. you are 23 and you were assigned _ format gives us that option. you are 23 and you were assigned to - format gives us that option. you are 23 and you were assigned to the - 23 and you were assigned to the mercedes young driver development programme. we spoke to you back in 2017 on breakfast.— 2017 on breakfast. obviously, there are no seats — 2017 on breakfast. obviously, there are no seats in _ 2017 on breakfast. obviously, there are no seats in formula _ 2017 on breakfast. obviously, there are no seats in formula 1 _ 2017 on breakfast. obviously, there are no seats in formula1 here - 2017 on breakfast. obviously, there are no seats in formula1 here but l are no seats in formula 1 here but all i can do is keep on wading and knocking on the door and hopefully,
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one day, when lewis decides to retire, i will be ready to step in. you have not aged a bit! despite all the races. you spoke there about the potential for mercedes and you have stood in for lewis hamilton when he was unwell and there are rumours you might have a seat may be next season. , ,, , y might have a seat may be next season. , ., , , ., , might have a seat may be next season. , ., _ ., , ., might have a seat may be next season. , ., , , ., , ., ., , season. obviously, lots of rumours but for now — season. obviously, lots of rumours but for now fully _ season. obviously, lots of rumours but for now fully focused _ season. obviously, lots of rumours but for now fully focused on - season. obviously, lots of rumours but for now fully focused on my - season. obviously, lots of rumours| but for now fully focused on my job. it is funny to hear that clip back. it is funny to hear that clip back. i remember that like yesterday. the past years have flown by since i got into formula 1. it is a great opportunity for us, and doing something i love is fantastic. yes, you took me by surprise. you something i love is fantastic. yes, you took me by surprise.— you took me by surprise. you can handle it- — you took me by surprise. you can handle it. there _ you took me by surprise. you can handle it. there has _ you took me by surprise. you can handle it. there has been - you took me by surprise. you can handle it. there has been focus l you took me by surprise. you can. handle it. there has been focus on the respect and recognition of pressure on young british stars. how do you cope with the expectations and pressure? it is
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do you cope with the expectations and pressure?— and pressure? it is difficult. when ou have and pressure? it is difficult. when you have expectation _ and pressure? it is difficult. when you have expectation of _ and pressure? it is difficult. when i you have expectation of supporters, fans, yourteam, you have expectation of supporters, fans, your team, family, you have expectation of supporters, fans, yourteam, family, it is difficult. you need to find your own way. for me, on race day i like to keep myself occupied. i do not try to give myself too much time to overthink it. making sure i have a relaxed morning, doing what is necessary, not too much and not too little. do what you do. there is no need to do anything different. this weekend, because it is a home race, i want to do extremely well but i always want to do extremely well. it is incredibly difficult but it is part of the job.— is incredibly difficult but it is part of the job. is incredibly difficult but it is art of the 'ob. ., , ., , , part of the 'ob. fabulous. we will let ou part of the 'ob. fabulous. we will let you go — part of the job. fabulous. we will let you go to _ part of the job. fabulous. we will let you go to enjoy _ part of the job. fabulous. we will let you go to enjoy more - part of the job. fabulous. we will let you go to enjoy more time - part of the job. fabulous. we will let you go to enjoy more time in. let you go to enjoy more time in yourflat before you let you go to enjoy more time in your flat before you head off to join the team. interesting for the first time ever the sprint racing
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qualifying on saturday afternoon. what a sunday it will be. there is too much to watch. i need eight televisions! absolutely. let's get the weather now with matt, who is at the west reservoir water sports centre in hackney. where it was very calm this morning but not so much now. the breeze has got up and it is a bit grey but a pleasant start with open water swimmers going in and out behind us. the temperature in there 21, which is tasty for some open water swimming but out of the water over the coming days temperatures could get up to 28 by the weekend. the forecast is one in which summer is back for many with temperatures rising and sunshine amounts rising. for the majority, it will be dry and
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if not completely dry, it will be dry the bulk of the time. cloud in eastern counties. this is where the breeze is blowing. cloud in parts of scotland and northern ireland will break up and we will see more cloud later bringing rain and drizzle. the majority have sunny spells. that will lift temperatures to levels seen yesterday around 18—25. this evening and overnight, cloud dominant. that is scotland and northern ireland. cloud pushing into north—west england in north—west wales later. temperatures for most holding in their teens, which means a mile start tomorrow. not as windy in eastern england. after cloudy starts in scotland and northern ireland, it will feel warmer. england and wales, more cloud pushing southwards but that will break up to allow sunny spells.
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temperatures into the mid 20s. we will see sunshine becoming more abundant through friday and into the weekend and temperatures into the upper 20s. weekend and temperatures into the upper20s. from weekend and temperatures into the upper 20s. from these glorious surroundings. you can see the view. it is back to you. thank you very much. we will look forward to warmer temperatures. we have a musical entered the programme with shaun ryder and tom o'dell, who will be here separately, talking to us. but before that... in 1969, stevie wonder, nina simone and many more black artists played to more than 300,000 people in a music event that had been largely ignored for more than half a century — until now. forgotten footage from the harlem cultural festival has been made into a documentary looking back at what is now described as the black woodstock, as entertainment correspondent colin paterson reports. the summer of 1969. woodstock.
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neil armstrong walking on the moon. and more than 300,000 people attended the harlem cultural festival. are you ready, black people, are you ready? an event almost no one has heard of until now. six weekends of major artists. the panthers, kids sitting in the trees. i was nervous. summer of soul is a documentary exploring why this event, which it argues could have become the black woodstock, has been ignored for more than half a century. the film is directed by questlove, who drums for hip—hop outfit the roots and is a professor at nyu, where he is an expert in black music history. but even he hadn't heard of the festival. we are talking about stevie wonder, nina simone, sly and the family stone, comedians, politicians, everybody was there.
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the thing is that it is preserved professionally on tape and what winds up happening is that not one producer or outlet is interested. so this film just sits in the basement for 50 years. nobody ever heard of the harlem culture festival. nobody would believe it happened. however, a couple of film producers heard about the 40 hours of archive, managed to secure the rights, and decided that questlove was the man to bring it to life. it took me five months ofjust constantly having these monitors in my house, in every room in my house — my kitchen, my bathroom, my bedroom. i kept it on a 24—hour loop. i kept notes on anything that gave me goose bumps. and what i wound up doing was curating it like i curate a show or dj gig.
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and questlove believes that the way the harlem cultural festival was forgotten is an example of what he describes as the all too common erasure of black history. how many more important events in black history are waiting to be uncovered like this? are they out there? i'm going to tell you right now. this last week alone, i've been made aware of five to six other events that are almostjust as equal to this event that the world has never heard about. this might be my new destiny and i didn't even know it yet. but, you know, iwelcome it, i welcome it. colin paterson, bbc news. we have a musical theme. the harlem cultural festival and straight into the scene in manchester in the 1990s.
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anyone who followed the madchester scene of the early �*90s will be familiar with the melon—twistin' frontman of the happy mondays and black grape. but now shaun ryder has gone solo, and is releasing a long—forgotten album that was first recorded more than 10 years ago. let's have a listen to his new single pop star's daughters. # don't marry pop stars' daughters. # dad's going to send a car. # dad's going to pay the bill. # dad's going to send a car. # dad is going to pay the bill. we'rejoined now in the studio by shaun ryder.
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good morning. is it right you have four daughters? and this is called, while the lyrics are don't marry pop stars' daughters.— stars' daughters. anyone who can mana . e stars' daughters. anyone who can manage one _ stars' daughters. anyone who can manage one of — stars' daughters. anyone who can manage one of my _ stars' daughters. anyone who can manage one of my goals, - stars' daughters. anyone who can manage one of my goals, they i stars' daughters. anyone who can | manage one of my goals, they will need a lot of therapy and help. i imagine you would make a good speech at the wedding. imagine you would make a good speech at the wedding-— at the wedding. would you sing at the wedding? _ the wedding? they would not want me to, i don't think. , , ., ., ., , . think. this is from an album. we said it was _ think. this is from an album. we said it was long _ think. this is from an album. we said it was long forgotten. - think. this is from an album. we said it was long forgotten. when j think. this is from an album. we i said it was long forgotten. when did ou write said it was long forgotten. when did you write it? — said it was long forgotten. when did you write it? it _ said it was long forgotten. when did you write it? it was _ said it was long forgotten. when did you write it? it was recorded - said it was long forgotten. when did you write it? it was recorded in - you write it? it was recorded in 2010, on venice beach in california. i came back and went straight into thejungle. when i came out of the jungle, i had different management. that management did not want me to put the album out. they wanted me to
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build up my profile doing tv. so it was forgotten about. we brought out a black grape album, as well. when we were in lockdown, doing things from home in the studio, alan mcgee said why not get that album out? it was knocked down the back of the sofa. that is artisticjournalism! we got it out and messed about with it and it was remastered. alan mcgee said let's get it out so here we are. is said let's get it out so here we are. , , said let's get it out so here we are. , . ., ., , are. is it nice, to find it, to be able to get — are. is it nice, to find it, to be able to get it _ are. is it nice, to find it, to be able to get it back— are. is it nice, to find it, to be able to get it back again? - are. is it nice, to find it, to be| able to get it back again? yes. are. is it nice, to find it, to be i able to get it back again? yes. i are. is it nice, to find it, to be - able to get it back again? yes. i am made u- able to get it back again? yes. i am made up it — able to get it back again? yes. i am made up it is _ able to get it back again? yes. i am made up it is out. _ able to get it back again? yes. i am made up it is out. really. _ able to get it back again? yes. i am made up it is out. really. what - able to get it back again? yes. i am| made up it is out. really. what else is on there? — made up it is out. really. what else is on there? we _ made up it is out. really. what else is on there? we have _ made up it is out. really. what else is on there? we have seen - made up it is out. really. what else is on there? we have seen a - made up it is out. really. what else| is on there? we have seen a snippet of one song. is on there? we have seen a snippet of one song-— is on there? we have seen a snippet ofonesont. ~ ., ., of one song. mumbo jumbo. that video we did about — of one song. mumbo jumbo. that video we did about two _ of one song. mumbo jumbo. that video we did about two years _ of one song. mumbo jumbo. that video
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we did about two years ago. _ of one song. mumbo jumbo. that video we did about two years ago. as - of one song. mumbo jumbo. that video we did about two years ago. as you - we did about two years ago. as you know, i still had hair. stand we did about two years ago. as you know, i still had hair.— know, i still had hair. and a beard. i think know, i still had hair. and a beard. i think that — know, i still had hair. and a beard. i think that was _ know, i still had hair. and a beard. i think that was just _ know, i still had hair. and a beard. i think that was just put _ know, i still had hair. and a beard. i think that was just put together i i think that was just put together from all sorts of stuff, that video. i like the fact you are wearing sunglasses in a nightclub. as you do. mumbojumbo, it is about mumbo jumbo? do. mumbo “umbo, it is about mumbo “umbo? , ., jumbo? yes, the way i write, i throw all sorts in — jumbo? yes, the way i write, i throw all sorts in and _ jumbo? yes, the way i write, i throw all sorts in and try _ jumbo? yes, the way i write, i throw all sorts in and try to _ jumbo? yes, the way i write, i throw all sorts in and try to make - jumbo? yes, the way i write, i throw all sorts in and try to make some - all sorts in and try to make some sort of sense out of it. so that is mumbojumbo. i can never stay on one subject. i am adhd and all over the place. when i am writing songs, i have about 15 ideas going on at the same time. i end up piecing them together. same time. i end up piecing them totether. ~ ,,
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same time. i end up piecing them totether. ~ ., ., ., together. what about the general exerience together. what about the general experience of— together. what about the general experience of lockdown? - together. what about the general experience of lockdown? many i together. what about the general- experience of lockdown? many people know you had actually had covid. have you fully recovered? every now and then, i wake up with no energy and then, i wake up with no energy and i will spend that day falling asleep. ido and i will spend that day falling aslee. ,. and i will spend that day falling aslee -. ,. ~' and i will spend that day falling aslee-. ~' and i will spend that day falling aslee. ~ ., ., asleep. do you think you have long covid? i asleep. do you think you have long covid? i have _ asleep. do you think you have long covid? i have not— asleep. do you think you have long covid? i have not been _ asleep. do you think you have long covid? i have not been told - asleep. do you think you have long covid? i have not been told that, l covid? i have not been told that, but it comes _ covid? i have not been told that, but it comes out _ covid? i have not been told that, but it comes out of _ covid? i have not been told that, but it comes out of nowhere. - covid? i have not been told that, but it comes out of nowhere. i i covid? i have not been told that, | but it comes out of nowhere. i am fine and then i get up one day and i am like that all day, gone. i fine and then i get up one day and i am like that all day, gone.- am like that all day, gone. i don't know why- _ am like that all day, gone. i don't know why- you — am like that all day, gone. i don't know why. you got _ am like that all day, gone. i don't know why. you got it _ am like that all day, gone. i don't know why. you got it from - am like that all day, gone. i don't know why. you got it from your i know why. you got it from your daughters? brute know why. you got it from your daughters?— daughters? we were out doing stand-up for— daughters? we were out doing stand-up for cancer. - daughters? we were out doing stand-up for cancer. i - daughters? we were out doing stand-up for cancer. i had - daughters? we were out doing i stand-up for cancer. i had been stand—up for cancer. i had been mixing with people but having covid test every day of filming. when i got home, my girls had got it and had no symptoms. then i got it and ended up in bed for two, three weeks. ,, , ,, , ended up in bed for two, three weeks. ., , ., , ., ., weeks. lots of things you have done but one thing _ weeks. lots of things you have done but one thing people _ weeks. lots of things you have done but one thing people love _ weeks. lots of things you have done but one thing people love to - weeks. lots of things you have done but one thing people love to watch | but one thing people love to watch is you and bez on gogglebox. you
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have been watching this programme on it. with charlie stayt - and naga munchetty. charlie loves his hair, doesn't he, charlie? i actually heard charlie once, on air, say that he used to have a mullet. you know, what, i could feel it. he looks like... yeah, yeah,. he's giving mullet vibes off, isn't he? he looks like a dude that, in the �*80s, had a mullet. he has very impressive hair, charlie. he walked in here and said he thought louise had gone already, so you are a viewer. she is here for while, you will be pleased to hear. i thought you had gone off around the world on a yacht or something. tbs, the world on a yacht or something. a lovely idea. you _ the world on a yacht or something. a lovely idea. you are _ the world on a yacht or something. a lovely idea. you are going _ the world on a yacht or something. a lovely idea. you are going on - the world on a yacht or something. a lovely idea. you are going on tour. i lovely idea. you are going on tour. all the stuff _ lovely idea. you are going on tour. all the stuff we _ lovely idea. you are going on tour. all the stuff we should _ lovely idea. you are going on tour. all the stuff we should have - lovely idea. you are going on tour. all the stuff we should have done. lovely idea. you are going on tour. . all the stuff we should have done in lockdown, we have now got to do. and the wife can't wait, she cannot wait to get me out of the house. it must be the longest _
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to get me out of the house. it must be the longest you _ to get me out of the house. it must be the longest you have _ to get me out of the house. it must be the longest you have been - to get me out of the house. it must be the longest you have been at - to get me out of the house. it must i be the longest you have been at home for some time. in be the longest you have been at home for some time-— for some time. in 25, maybe 30 ears, for some time. in 25, maybe 30 years. yes- _ for some time. in 25, maybe 30 years. yes- it— for some time. in 25, maybe 30 years, yes. it has— for some time. in 25, maybe 30 years, yes. it has been - for some time. in 25, maybe 30 years, yes. it has been a - for some time. in 25, maybe 30 years, yes. it has been a hard i for some time. in 25, maybe 30 i years, yes. it has been a hard time and really nasty for a lot of people. but i enjoyed spending time. as a proud mancunian. i am people. but i enjoyed spending time. as a proud mancunian.— as a proud mancunian. i am from salford, me- _ as a proud mancunian. i am from salford, me. apologies, - as a proud mancunian. i am from salford, me. apologies, thank. as a proud mancunian. i am from. salford, me. apologies, thank you for correcting _ salford, me. apologies, thank you for correcting me. _ salford, me. apologies, thank you for correcting me. from _ salford, me. apologies, thank you for correcting me. from this - salford, me. apologies, thank you for correcting me. from this area, | for correcting me. from this area, then. what have you made of the response from some people of manchester and withington in particular to the defacing of marcus rashford's mural? i particular to the defacing of marcus rashford's mural?— particular to the defacing of marcus rashford's mural? i cannot swear on this programme _ rashford's mural? i cannot swear on this programme but _ rashford's mural? i cannot swear on this programme but sick. _ rashford's mural? i cannot swear on this programme but sick. and - rashford's mural? i cannot swear on this programme but sick. and i - rashford's mural? i cannot swear on this programme but sick. and i do i this programme but sick. and i do not mean sick in a good way. that is it. the internet is the real world in a way. you are out on the street and someone will let you pass and
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you say good morning. but that comes out on the net. it is you say good morning. but that comes out on the net-— out on the net. it is nasty. thank out on the net. it is nasty. thank ou ve out on the net. it is nasty. thank you very much- _ out on the net. it is nasty. thank you very much. lovely _ out on the net. it is nasty. thank you very much. lovely to - out on the net. it is nasty. thank you very much. lovely to see - out on the net. it is nasty. thank. you very much. lovely to see you. good luck. thank you. shaun's new album is called visits from future technology. you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. london's mayor makes face coverings mandatory on all transport for london services including buses, tubes, trams and the overground. i'm quite clear from the conversations i've had from londoners, from businesses and others, that requiring people to continue to wear a face covering will give them a greater rate of confidence in using an incredibly safe public transport system. if you travel on tfl services in london, will you keep wearing a mask? or if you live outside the capital, do you want similar rules for public transport where you are? you can get in touch with me @lukwesaburak or using the hashtag bbcyourquestions

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