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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  July 14, 2021 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. more than 70 people are now known to have died during five days of unrest and looting in south africa. president biden accuses republican—controlled states of mounting a dangerous attack on voting rights in america. a question of consent — why sexual consent education is being made mandatory in parts of australia. and the forgotten festival being brought to the screen in a summer of soul.
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hello and welcome. the number of people killed in the disorder that's gripped parts of south africa has risen to 72. police backed by the army, have struggled to contain the looting that was sparked by the arrest of former president jacob zuma. the main opposition party — which supports mr zuma's detention — has said it will file charges against his children and others for inciting the unrest. mark lobel has the latest. gunfire. shocking footage on social media shows open warfare amongst citizens in former presidentjacob zuma's backyard. ok, let's go! pitting south african against south african. looters against armed locals. where isjohn with the shotgun?
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local militia are stepping in as elsewhere the police are simply overwhelmed. it is perhaps no surprise the army has been called in, but that brings its own challenges. if they start shooting, there will be war and that is what we don't want here in south africa. the fire department — vehicles are being escorted by the metro police. in affected areas, public transport is suspended with some roads now off limits. how volatile the situation is. that has led to this statement from south africa's biggest oil refinery, which supplies a third of the country's petrol. due to the civil unrest, they are left with no option but to complete shutdown. the jobs that are being lost at the moment are going to exacerbate the situation, and we don't need this. it's perhaps ironic that the jailing of this man, former presidentjacob zuma as part of the government's efforts to call out billions
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of dollars of alleged corruption to clean up south africa's economy and make it attractive to foreign investors, is now triggering further economic damage, not to mention loss of life, but why? tweets like these from president zuma's daughter suggest a political motivation, and hint of a deep split within the ruling anc party, of which she is a member. the tweets have criticised president ramaphosa's administration for her father's imprisonment. they've accused the government of propping up the interest of minority, white and elite, and there is also the fanning of anger and, to some extent, encouraging unrest with some of the comments she has made. there is also opposition politicianjulius malema, one question now is whether political grievances can be put aside while south africa is on fire. the man tasked with putting out the flames — it's president cyril ramaphosa, who insists that no political cause can justify
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this violence, as he must now regain control of his pandemic— and poverty—hit country. mark lobel, bbc news. president biden has warned that american democracy is facing its most significant threat since the civil war — as republican—controlled states tighten rules on voting. it follows donald trump's claims of fraud in the 2020 election. david willis reports. he said it was an assault on liberty. in america is philadelphia, the president warned of a threat to the ideals on which this nation was founded. hear emmy clearly, there is an unfolding assault taking place
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in america today, an attempt to suppress and submit the right to vote in fair and free elections. an assault on democracy, an assault on liberty, and assault on who we are, who we are as americans. we must stop this deal, and then— we must stop this deal, and then we _ we must stop this deal, and then we must ensure that such outrageous election fraud never happens — outrageous election fraud never happens again. donald trump's claims of boating irregularity have prompted more than a dozen republican lead states to pass laws restricting the right to vote. republicans say the measures will enhance election security, democrats say they will deter black and low income voters, and as sizeable part of the base from casting their votes. more than 50 democratic lawmakers from texas flew into washington, dc to delay a vote on election laws back on,
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despite the threat to be arrested they have no immediate plans to return. we are here in dc, our nation's capital, because we want to protect the civil right to vote for millions of texans. that's why we need congress to act now and pass the for the people act. �* ., _ act. but, moved by the democrats _ act. but, moved by the democrats to _ act. but, moved by the democrats to put - act. but, moved by the - democrats to put legislation in place that would expand voting rights across the country is currently stalled in the us congress, and the president has called for the passing of the for the people act, but he doesn't have the votes in a narrowly divided senate to pass it into law, so for now his only option seems to be drawing attention to what he is calling the biggest threat to american democracy since the civil war, in the hope of rallying support amongst democratic voters and lowering them to the polls. god bless you all. the control
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of congress up for grabs and next year's midterm elections is hardly the option he would have been hoping for. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. let's get some of the day's other news. the number of migrants who've died trying to cross the mediterranean sea from africa to europe has more than doubled since last year. research by the international organisation for migration suggests the increase in fatalities is due to insufficient search and rescue operations by european nations. the un world food programme says it needs to sharply increase the quantity of food aid it's started delivering to ethiopia's tigray region, where months of fighting has led to widespread hunger. a spokesperson said a hundred trucks a day would be needed to reverse what he described as catastrophic conditions. the cuban government says a man died and many people were injured during a clash between protesters and the security forces in a suburb of the capital, havana. this is the first death confirmed since demonstrations began on sunday to demand
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democratic change. it was an extraordinary escape, carlos ghosn, the former boss of the car making giant, nissan, has been describing how he fled house arrest injapan by hiding ina box. he'd been arrested in tokyo in 2018 and charged with financial misconduct, which he denies. mr ghosn has been speaking exclusively to our business editor, simonjack. i could not show my face, so i had to be hidden somewhere, and the only way i could be hidden is to be in a box, or be in a luggage. so, nobody could see me, nobody could recognise me and obviously, the plan could work. before joining the box, i needed not to be detected because i departed from an airport outside tokyo. so, we used a train and taxis, so i had to wear things that i never usually wear.
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and you know, the plane was scheduled to take off at ”pm that night. we were ready and i was in the box in the rear of the plane probably around 10:30. the 30 minutes waiting in the box in the plane, waiting for the plane to take off, were probably the longest period of wait i've ever experienced in my life. carlos, now, and you can hear more of that interview in our business coverage which starts around about 20 minutes time. sexual consent education is being made mandatory in some parts of australia after thousands of young women shared stories of being sexually assaulted by boys they knew at school. for some the testimonies were shocking, but for many the scale of the problems came as no surprise. shaimaa khalil spent the day
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with a group of students at a school in brisbane — and a warning — shaimaa's report contains sensitive content with sexual references. they said it was aimed towards 16—year—olds, but then didn't even use the word sexual consent. i think it was a bit embarrassing. sexual consent may not be the easiest subject for a school podcast. but at brisbane girls grammar, it's got students talking. they've been inspired by a petition demanding that children are taught more about it. i was not clear before this campaign what the term sexual harassment, sexual consent meant, and to be honest, i'm not too clear now what that means. schools have a responsibility to more explicitly teach these issues from younger ages. we need to know about them and there's no point covering| up the truth so that we have to learn about it personally. | chanel contos has become an unlikely hero among young women in australia. her social media poll asking friends if they've been raped or sexually assaulted by people they knew at school went viral. so far, more than 6,500 people have
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shared their stories. to be honest, there was nothing surprising about the testimonies. i wasjust like, yup, that's what happened to my friends. itjust happened in a different state, different school, different year group. australia prides itself on having one of the best education systems in the world, but in reality, this rape culture has gone so deep, i think that it's the norm. the scale of the problem was certainly shocking, but what also came out of these stories was a lack of clear understanding about sexual consent and how schools needed to do a lot more. the fact that students don't know that people they trust can sexually assault them, they don't think that their boyfriends can sexually assault them, it's an injustice on the students to be so vulnerable that we are sexually assaulted and not even having the tools to be able to define what that is. i think all schools are reviewing our programmes, and most would agree that that is true, but we are very, very clear that these things are dealt with holistically, in the home with parents from the earliest ages. so much of this is impacted by societal attitudes generally.
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government has a role, so it's not the sole responsibility of schools, but we do play a very important part. lucinda hoffman didn't fully understand sexual consent when she was assaulted aged 16. we were in the car and we started kissing, and then he locked the doors, pushed me down and said that i have to perform oral sex and i'm not allowed out until i do. i feel let down by the education system as a whole. we weren't taught enough and the boys weren't taught enough, �*cause there are some instances where education would've100% prevented a lot of sexual assault. hey, hey! ho, ho! sexual violence got to go! the demand for more education is part of a bigger movement. tens of thousands of women rallied across australia, protesting against abuse and harassment earlier this year. there are no quick solutions, but many agree schools are a solid place to start.
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and students here are determined to keep the issue alive, even when it's no longer in the headlines. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, brisbane. i really important story, and more news on that on our website. large cruise ships will be banned from sailing into the centre of venice from the first of august. (00v)the decision by italy's cabinet comes just days before a meeting of the un's cultural organisation unesco, which had proposed to add venice to its list of endangered heritage sites. environmentalists have been warning for years that the cruise ships risk causing irreparable damage to the lagoon city. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: giving an old barbie a new lease of life at the italian doll's hospital.
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after months of talks and missed deadlines, a deal has been struck to keep greece within the eurozone. the immediate prospect of greece going bust in the worst crisis to hit the eurozone has been averted. emergency services across central europe are stepping up their efforts to contain the worst floods this century. nearly 100 people have been killed. broadway is traditionally. called the great white way by americans but tonight. — it's completely blacked out. it's a timely reminder to all americans - of the problems that the energy crisisj has brought to them. leaders meet in paris for a summit on pollution, inflation and third world debt. this morning, theyjoined the revolution celebrations for a show of military might on the champs—elysees. wildlife officials in australia have been coping with a penguin problem. fairy penguins have been staggering ashore and collapsing after gorging themselves on a huge shoal of their favourite food, pilchards. some had eaten so much, they could barely stand.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines: more than 70 people are now known to have died in south africa in violent unrest and looting sparked by the jailing of former presidentjacob zuma. us president biden has accused republican—controlled states of mounting a dangerous attack on voting rights following donald trump's defeat in the 2020 election. the toy industry is one of the most polluting in the world — most of them are made from plastic, which is difficult to recycle. now, a small idea in italy to give old dolls a new lease of life has become a huge success. it's down to the vision and creativity of one woman, who wanted to spread some
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happiness during the pandemic. sofia bettiza reports from milan. we all have toys that we cannot bring ourselves to throw away. during lockdown, rebecca had an idea. she posted an ad on facebook asking people to send her their old goals. the resnonse _ her their old goals. the response was _ her their old goals. the response was amazing, unexpected amazing. that she turned her _ unexpected amazing. that she turned her home _ unexpected amazing. that she turned her home into - unexpected amazing. that she turned her home into a - unexpected amazing. that she turned her home into a doll i turned her home into a doll hospital. you have so many dolls! how many do you have? almost 200 at the moment. some of these dolls _ almost 200 at the moment. some of these dolls are _ almost 200 at the moment. some of these dolls are in _ almost 200 at the moment. some of these dolls are in really - of these dolls are in really bad condition but when they get here, they go through an incredible makeover, so from this... they become this. they are basically as good as new. people send her their old doll in the mail.— people send her their old doll in the mail.- she - people send her their old doll| in the mail.- she washes in the mail. hello! she washes them, in the mail. hello! she washes them. and _ in the mail. hello! she washes them, and then _ in the mail. hello! she washes them, and then she _ in the mail. hello! she washes| them, and then she transforms them. sometimes she attaches
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new hair, one strand at a time. it is a really meticulous process. she sews most of the clothes herself, using old materials. i clothes herself, using old materials.— clothes herself, using old materials. ., ., , materials. i learnt doing this, startin: materials. i learnt doing this, starting by — materials. i learnt doing this, starting by myself, _ materials. i learnt doing this, starting by myself, watching. starting by myself, watching videos, reading blogs because of lockdown. i had the time to do what i really like. to of lockdown. i had the time to do what i really like.— do what i really like. to put their own — do what i really like. to put their own twist _ do what i really like. to put their own twist on - do what i really like. to put their own twist on them, i do what i really like. to put. their own twist on them, there is freddie mercury, the 80s rock star and the ken doll, with piercings and tattoos. what she does is great for the environment. the toy industry is one of the most polluting in the world. about 90% of toys are made of plastic and very difficult to recycle. rebecca is not making money.
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why donate them? why not resell them? �* .., , why donate them? why not resell them? �* , ., . them? because for the pandemic situation, them? because for the pandemic situation. i— them? because for the pandemic situation, i think— them? because for the pandemic situation, i think it _ them? because for the pandemic situation, i think it is _ them? because for the pandemic situation, i think it is not - situation, i think it is not the right time to ask for something. it is the time to give something when people need it. , m, give something when people need it. , ..., ., , give something when people need it. , , give something when people need it. rebecca has been so successful— it. rebecca has been so successful that - it. rebecca has been so successful that people i it. rebecca has been so i successful that people are it. rebecca has been so - successful that people are now sending her dolls from all over italy. she has decided to start a workshop where she teaches autistic people what she does. for me, autism is an important thing. i have got my mother and brother, they are autistic. this kind of activity is very good for autistic people because it keeps them busy with something positive, creative and in a good structure for them. , . . . and in a good structure for them. , , ., ,, them. rebecca hopes to inspire others across _
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them. rebecca hopes to inspire others across italy _ them. rebecca hopes to inspire others across italy to _ them. rebecca hopes to inspire others across italy to recycle i others across italy to recycle and rediscover things we may have forgotten. sofia bettiza, bbc, milan. what an inspiration! now it's time to catch up with the latest sports news. hello, i'm tulsen tollett and this is your sports news, where after dealing with the racism fallout from england's defeat to italy in the european championship final, marcus rashford could be out of action until the end of october. the manchester united player has opted to have surgery on a shoulder injury that caused him problems at the end of last season. he underwent scans on the injury on tuesday and the damage was so bad that surgery was recommended. england's cricketers pulled off a record run chase to beat pakistan in the final 0ne—day international in birmingham and to sweep the series 3—0. pakistan batted first after england won the toss and their captain, babar azam, hit a superb 158 as they made 331—9 from their 50 overs.
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the home side made a stuttering start to their reply but james vince helped turn that around with his maiden century for england. brydon carse hit the winning runs as england won by 3 wickets, with 2 overs to spare. the two sides begin a three—match t20 series on friday. to be able to get out there and make a contribution like that and get 100 in front of a pretty noisy crowd and a good day and contribute towards the win, obviously, iwould have liked to have been there at the end but once the boys got over the line, and settle down a bit, yeah, really enjoyed it. while, in dublin, the hosts picked up theirfirst ever win over south africa in a one day international. ireland were sent in to bat with captain andrew balbirnie notching a century as his side posted a score of 290—5, while in response the proteas
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slumped to 2a7 all out. it means ireland lead the three match series i—0 with the first match washed out and the final game to be played at the same venue on friday. heptathlon world champion katarina johnson—thompson continued her build—up to the tokyo 0lympics with a disappointing showing in the long jump at the british grand prix in gateshead. the brtish athletejumped 6.10 metres which was well short of the 6.77 metres she recorded en route to gold in doha in 2019. johnson—thompson is on her way back from a ruptured achilles tendon injury and had just one previous high—jump outing this year before tonight. the fastest man in the world this year, trayvon bromell, comfortably won the 100 metres. the american clocked a time of 9.98 seconds with britain's cj ujah and zharnel hughes in second and third respectively. bromell is one of the favourites to win at the olympics and ran an impressive 9.77 seconds in june.
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you can get all the latest sports news at our website including the build up — that's but from me and the rest of the team that's your sports news for now. emmy nominations have been announced, with the amanda lorren and there have been nominations for 0livia coleman and it is also up for best drama series. the amanda lorren is recognised in the best category. staying with show business now. in 1969 stevie wonder, nina simone, gladys knight, and many more black music legends, played to a combined audience of 300,000 at the harlem cultural festival. it was all filmed, but no one
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wanted to show it at the time. now, dj and drummer questlove has turned the footage into an award—winning movie. colin paterson has the full story. the summer of 1969, woodstock. you'll armstrong landed on the moon. and more than 300,000 people attended the harlem cultural festival. pare people attended the harlem cultural festival.— cultural festival. are you read , cultural festival. are you ready, black _ cultural festival. are you ready, black people, i cultural festival. are you ready, black people, are| cultural festival. are you i ready, black people, are you ready? ready, black people, are you read ? �* ., ., ., ready? an event almost no-one has heard _ ready? an event almost no-one has heard off — ready? an event almost no-one has heard off until— ready? an event almost no-one has heard off until now. - ready? an event almost no-one has heard off until now. it's i has heard off until now. it's weekends of major artists. —— six weekends. i weekends of ma'or artists. -- six weekends.— weekends of ma'or artists. -- six weekends. i did not expect a crowd like — six weekends. i did not expect a crowd like this. _ six weekends. i did not expect a crowd like this. something l six weekends. i did not expect| a crowd like this. something is very— a crowd like this. something is very important is happening. summer— very important is happening. summer of soul is a documentary exploring why this event which
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it argues has become the black woodstock has been ignored by half a century. it is directed by questlove drums for the band roots and a professor at nyu where he is a professor of black history but even he had not heard of the festival. we're talking about stevie wonder, nina simone, comedians, politicians, was there.— politicians, was there. thing is it is preserved _ is it is preserved professionally on tape and what wind up happening that not one producer or outlet is interested, so this film just sits in the basement for 50 years. nobody had ever heard of the harlem cultural festival. nobody would believe it happened. however, a couple of producers heard about the a0 hours of archive, secured the rights and
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thought that questlove the person was the one to bring it to life. , ., ., ., person was the one to bring it to life. , ., , to life. every room of my house. — to life. every room of my house, the _ to life. every room of my house, the kitchen, i to life. every room of my i house, the kitchen, bathroom, bedroom, i kept it on 2a—hour loot, keeping the notes on anything that kept me goosebumps and what i wound up doing was curating it like i did a show or dj gig.- doing was curating it like i did a show or dj gig. 1969 with the shades _ did a show or dj gig. 1969 with the shades of— did a show or dj gig. 1969 with the shades of europe - did a show or dj gig. 1969 with the shades of europe in i did a show or dj gig. 1969 with the shades of europe in the i the shades of europe in the black— the shades of europe in the black community.— the shades of europe in the black community. styles were changing- _ black community. styles were changing. revolution - black community. styles were changing. revolution was i black community. styles were i changing. revolution was coming to . ether. changing. revolution was coming together- itut _ changing. revolution was coming together. but as _ changing. revolution was coming together. but as well— changing. revolution was coming together. but as well as - together. but as well as highlighting _ together. but as well as highlighting the - together. but as well as i highlighting the sensational performances, questlove wanted to put the event in a cultural context. , . , ~ to put the event in a cultural context. , ., , ,, ., ., context. this last week alone, i have context. this last week alone, i have been — context. this last week alone, i have been made _ context. this last week alone, i have been made aware i context. this last week alone, i have been made aware of. context. this last week alone, i have been made aware of 5-| i have been made aware of 5— six other events that are almost just as six other events that are almostjust as equal to this event, that the world has ever heard about. it might be my new destiny and i do not know when yet, but i welcome it. i
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welcome it. colin paterson, bbc news. all the business stories coming up all the business stories coming up next. hello there. summer weather is increasingly set to take hold over the next few days. it is looking largely dry. we'll see increasing amounts of sunshine and increasing temperatures as well, and it is all because of high pressure. now, currently, this area of high pressure is sitting to the south—west of us, but it is going to build towards the uk over the next few days, hence the increasing amounts of sunshine and those higher temperatures as well. but actually, through wednesday, many spots will see a decent amount of sunshine. we will have quite a lot of cloud through the morning across some eastern parts of scotland and eastern england, tending to retreat towards the coast through the day, and also, more cloud into northern ireland and western scotland. and actually, as that cloud thickens up through the afternoon, it could even produce the odd
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spot of drizzle. but elsewhere, some good spells of sunshine. temperatures in the sunniest spots up to 2a or 25 degrees. a bit breezy for north—western areas and also for some eastern coasts. now, as we head through wednesday night into thursday, we will see more cloud rolling down across northern ireland and scotland, getting into northern england and wales by the end of the night. clear spells further south, a pretty mild night — 11—15 degrees in most places. into thursday, we are going to see more in the way of cloud pushing southwards down into england and wales. there'll be some spells of sunshine and certainly, some brighter conditions developing for northern ireland and for scotland, and in the best of the sunshine, temperatures again getting up to around 2a or 25 degrees. and for friday, many spots can expect to see plenty of blue sky and sunshine. a bit more cloud at this stage across north—western parts of scotland, northern ireland, but certainly more cloud across the northern isles. the sunnier skies further south lifting those temperatures up
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to 25—26, maybe at this stage, up to 27 degrees. and that sets us up for the weekend because our area of high pressure is going to become firmly established across the uk, bringing lots of dry weather, lots of sunshine. you can see frontal systems close to the far north perhaps giving a bit more cloud at times, but with our high pressure in place, we can expect some pretty warm weather through both saturday and sunday. so, let's look at some city forecasts. you can see across shetland, it'll stay cloudy and a bit cooler, 15 or 16 degrees. but most other places, fine, dry, some spells of sunshine and temperatures easily up to 27, maybe 28 degrees.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the plan for a greenerfuture. the eu is set to unveil its carbon initiatives which aim to reduce emissions by 55 percent by 2030. we hear from the former boss of nissan, carlos ghosn, who exclusively tells the bbc about his daring escape from japan last year when under house arrest. and us inflation hits its highest level since 2008, as used cars and the cost of food drive consumer prices higher.

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