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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 13, 2021 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines joe biden warns the american people there is an unfolding assault on their right to vote. in an impassioned speech in philadelphia the president said republican affect click that election result was the most significant test of us democracy since the civil war. he democracy since the civil war. no other democracy since the civil war. in? other election has ever been held under such scrutiny, such high standards. the big lie isjust lie is just that, lie isjust that, a big live. in south africa, 70 people have now died in the unrest that followed the jailing of former president jacob zuma. the uk overseas aid budget will be cut after the prime minister sees off a revolt by mps from his own
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party over the plans. the monsters of minnesota. the unwanted gold fish that grew and grew and now are causing a right old nuisance in the public lakes. there are people in america who believe the big lie. and who think that in august, somehow, donald trump will return as president to the white house. there are some, who still wants to overturn the result of the last us election. there have been 3 recounts in georgia, arizona is in the midst of another audit, and in 17 republican states, since november, state representatives have passed law after law, limiting access to the ballot. they say it is to protect the integrity of ballot, but there is no evidence of widespread electoral fraud. 80 state and federaljudges have
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dismissed every case that has been brought. and sojoe biden was in philadelphia today to warn americans not to take these freedoms for granted. this is not about republicans or democrats he said — the right to vote he said is about who were are as americans. and the whole world is watching. hear me clearly. there an unfolding assault taking place in america today, and attempt to suppress and subvert the right to vote in fair and free elections. an assault on democracy, and assault on liberty, and assault on who we are, who we are as americans. make no mistake, bullies and merchants of fair, peddlers of lies are threatening the very foundation of our country. it gives me no pleasure to say this. i
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never thought in my entire career i'd have to say it. but i swore an oath to you, to god to preserve protect and defend the constitution. and that's an oath that forms a sacred trust to defend america against all threats both foreign and domestic. good evening to you anthony. why philadelphia, why now? well philadelphia, why now? well philadelphia there has been a push in pennsylvania to do the same sort of audit to what arizona is doing so this might be an attempt to have that off at the pass. now because they are criticisms ofjoe biden from the left that he isn't doing enough to push through voting reform legislation in congress. that is it using that so—called bully pulpit to pressure politicians across to supporters. the reality is i think the calculations of the biden
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administration st is no matter what joe biden says it's not going to change the republicans who are already opposed to those in the us senate. you would have to get ten of them to support legislation and there just aren't the numbers there. but he does need to be seen in his mid administrations eyes to be doing something to be talking vociferously about this. particularly now that all those legislators from texas have come to washington, dc after the block legislation in their home state to talk about the urgency of this, that the federal government has to do something to stop all of these states that are changing their election laws. figs these states that are changing their election lave-— election laws. as you say, he has the bully pulpit. _ election laws. as you say, he has the bully pulpit, it _ election laws. as you say, he has the bully pulpit, it was _ election laws. as you say, he has the bully pulpit, it was a - election laws. as you say, he has the bully pulpit, it was a fiery - the bully pulpit, it was a fiery speech. he is limited in what he can change. talk to me further about what is currently in congress in why there is this hold up in the senate. the measure that democrats have already passed in the house of representatives before the people act is a really broad election reform package. it includes allowing mail in voting for anyone who
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wanted, early voting, set standards for the amount of times you can vote early. allows ballot harvesting that his people to gather ballots from people and turn them in on their own. it prohibits gerrymandering which is drawing congressional districts to benefit one—party or the other. it is a grab bag of a bunch of different reform ideas. the problem is that while the plea by a passing house of representatives where it only takes a simple majority there are 50 democrats and 50 republicans in the us senate and according to current procedures it takes 60 votes to pass anything. so when they brought it up last month it was blocked by the republicans. that's one of the reasons why the one thing that democrats could do, the one think they're getting a lot of pressure to do is to change their procedure so it would take a simple majority to approve this legislation. so far biden has not supported that and in fact that speech he just gave he didn't mention the filibuster at all. it doesn't look like there is even 50
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votes among the democrats to change the rules. it would be a very tricky move it they tried to pull this off. there are two senior crowds senators joe mansion of west virginia and arizona who don't want to set aside the filibuster.— the filibuster. that's exactly it. unless you _ the filibuster. that's exactly it. unless you change _ the filibuster. that's exactly it. unless you change their - the filibuster. that's exactly it. unless you change their minds | the filibuster. that's exactly it. - unless you change their minds this isn't going anywhere. with the filibuster still in effect this voting reform legislation is not getting a pass. they might be other things i can do but the big ticket, the big legislation that everyone seems to want on the left isn't going to move without changing that filibuster. i7 17 states have passed these recent voting restrictions last night 50 democratic members fled texas to washington to stop the passage of a new voting rights bill the governor says it will only delay the process but since last night has threatened to arrest those who are refusing to return to texas. i
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to arrest those who are refusing to return to texas.— return to texas. i can and i will continue _ return to texas. i can and i will continue to _ return to texas. i can and i will continue to call— return to texas. i can and i will continue to call special- return to texas. i can and i will continue to call special session j continue to call special session after the special session at a special session all the way up until eight election next year. if these people want to be hanging out wherever they are hanging out on this taxpayer paid junket they are going to have to be prepared to do it for well over a year. as soon as they come back into the state of texas they will be arrested. let’s texas they will be arrested. let's seak texas they will be arrested. let's s - eak to texas they will be arrested. let's speak to one _ texas they will be arrested. let's speak to one of _ texas they will be arrested. let's speak to one of those _ texas they will be arrested. let's speak to one of those house - texas they will be arrested. let's speak to one of those house of representatives who fled texas last night. lovely happy on the program. the governor is threatening to arrest you. are you expecting that to happen? i’m arrest you. are you expecting that to happen?— arrest you. are you expecting that to hauen? �* ., , . ., ., to happen? i'm not expecting that to ha en. to happen? i'm not expecting that to happen- first — to happen? i'm not expecting that to happen- first of _ to happen? i'm not expecting that to happen. first of all _ to happen? i'm not expecting that to happen. first of all thank _ to happen? i'm not expecting that to happen. first of all thank you - to happen? i'm not expecting that to happen. first of all thank you for- happen. first of all thank you for having me. iam happen. first of all thank you for having me. i am an attorney, that is my background. i do criminal defence as well as civil rights work. to be clear i have not committed a crime so i can't be arrested and thrown in jail. i can be detained. 0ne so i can't be arrested and thrown in jail. i can be detained. one reason that we are out of the state is simply because we know that if there
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is any authority it does not extend past the state of texas. we won't step foot back in the stent the next date so we can kill these bills the house bill as well as the sanibel in an effort to give dc an opportunity an effort to give dc an opportunity an effort to speak with persons like the senator who we didn't have an opportunity to speak with the last time they killed the bill. we basically billick but not begging at this point. why i absolutely want the for the people act, if we could get anything we will be in a better position. texas is the hardest day to vote in as it is. if we could get any type of help in any type of oversight i think that that would actually put us in a position where we could go ahead allow them to pass whatever terrible bill that they want to but we know that we would have the federal legislation to back us up and we will be able to win in court. i us up and we will be able to win in court. ., ., ., . ~ ., court. i want to go back to the president _ court. i want to go back to the president speech _ court. i want to go back to the president speech in _ court. i want to go back to the president speech in women i court. i want to go back to the i president speech in women doing court. i want to go back to the - president speech in women doing that minute. i know that you met with chuck schumer in the last hour or so. ~ ., chuck schumer in the last hour or
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so. . . , ., chuck schumer in the last hour or so. ~ ., ,, ., so. what did he tell you? i did not meet with senator _ so. what did he tell you? i did not meet with senator schumer - so. what did he tell you? i did not meet with senator schumer in - so. what did he tell you? i did not meet with senator schumer in the j meet with senator schumer in the last hour i met with editor schumer the last time were in dc. he is always been a vast advocate for us. this time we came with a majority of the delegation, a majority of the democrats of the house are here. it's a full court press wasn't what we are needing right now from the senators that are already on our side is to tell us who is it that is causing us issues because not everyone talks about mansion and cinema in the filibuster but it's my understanding that there are other democrats that are not so excited about hr one. so we may need to actually do some movement with some other senate democrats as well. we need to have these very reasonable, very real conversations and let them know things are very extreme in texas was up this idea of bipartisanship, while i want to be bipartisanship, while i want to be bipartisan as well we just have had
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a crumbling of bipartisanship in this country and none of these bills are being passed in a bipartisan way. therefore we need to make sure that we've got protections even if that we've got protections even if that means that we get those protections without those protections without those protections coming in a bipartisan fashion. for protections coming in a bipartisan fashion. ., , ., ., ., fashion. for people around the world watchin: , fashion. for people around the world watching, explained _ fashion. for people around the world watching, explained to _ fashion. for people around the world watching, explained to us _ fashion. for people around the world watching, explained to us what - fashion. for people around the world watching, explained to us what is - fashion. for people around the world watching, explained to us what is in l watching, explained to us what is in this bill that would make it so difficult to vote.— this bill that would make it so difficult to vote. ~ . , ., , difficult to vote. what people need to first of all _ difficult to vote. what people need to first of all understand _ difficult to vote. what people need to first of all understand is - difficult to vote. what people need to first of all understand is that - to first of all understand is that texas has been tagged a number of times because of voting rights bills that they tried to pass. florida id was a very big sticking issue for texas before. be because of where they were on voter id were able to get them and say hey, you can'tjust it that way. we got to got to do a little bit differently, with delicate people opportunity. now they want to add voter id to mail—in ballots. they also want to make it more difficult for those who have disabilities. if you have a
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disability normally you check a box and say i got a disability now they want to limit what types of disabilities and spell it out a little bit more. they also want to make sure that if somebody is issue that they have to do an open saying that they have to do an open saying that they have to do an open saying that they know what your disability is as well. find that they know what your disability is as well. �* ., ., is as well. and what about the poll watchers? the _ is as well. and what about the poll watchers? the partisan _ is as well. and what about the poll watchers? the partisan poll- is as well. and what about the poll i watchers? the partisan poll watchers absolutel . watchers? the partisan poll watchers absolutely. basically _ watchers? the partisan poll watchers absolutely. basically they _ watchers? the partisan poll watchers absolutely. basically they want - watchers? the partisan poll watchers absolutely. basically they want to - absolutely. basically they want to empower these persons that are partisan in every single nature, i am so, so sorry. i got another interview so they're calling me. these partisan poll watchers they want to give them more powers than our actual election judges. want to give them more powers than our actual electionjudges. 0ur electionjudges would our actual electionjudges. 0ur election judges would never be able to run their elections, they would be able to get them out. because they would have more power. they wouldn't be able to call law enforcement have them removed, this language about them being able to record within the area which obviously would threaten the secrecy of the ballot as well. just a lot of intimidation.— intimidation. well done on the screensaver. _ intimidation. well done on the screensaver. thank _ intimidation. well done on the screensaver. thank you. - intimidation. well done on the screensaver. thank you. best |
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intimidation. well done on the i screensaver. thank you. best of intimidation. well done on the - screensaver. thank you. best of luck with your discussions in washington. police in south africa right now say 72 people died in the violence which is erupted since the violence last week. that includes ten people in a stampede during loop doing last week. on monday night at a shopping centre in soweto, the country's biggest township. the military has now been deployed to help the overstretched police. nomsa maseko reports. thrown by her mother to safety. cheers of relief after looting, fires and rampage because these people to flee their homes. rioters targeted on the ground floor here then set the building on fire. affecting apartments on the upper floors. this man returning again and again to help people is gay. what initially started as a protest has
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now become almost like a free—for—all. the looting spree began five days ago and it has continued unabated. the military has been deployed on the ground but even they cannot control the situation. nearly 800 people have been arrested and the leaders of the provinces affected by rioting have said 19 people have died. while the death toll sends. despite the visible criminalisty and violence here some believe this is still very much about jacob believe this is still very much aboutjacob zuma, believe this is still very much about jacob zuma, the believe this is still very much aboutjacob zuma, the jail former about jacob zuma, the jail former president. aboutjacob zuma, the jail former president. do you think this is about the president? it is president. do you think this is about the president? it is about the resident about the president? it is about the president because _ about the president? it is about the president because if _ about the president? it is about the president because if you _ about the president? it is about the president because if you notice - about the president? it is about the j president because if you notice very well this started on the day after it was people didn't want jacob zuma in the beginning. the president of
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this country should have done something to prevent this. the countries economic hub people say livelihoods have been affected. it’s livelihoods have been affected. it's sad because they are increasing unemployment and some of us are not employed _ unemployment and some of us are not employed for that yet depending with food and _ employed for that yet depending with food and everything else so this is not okax — food and everything else so this is not okay. whatever they're doing is not okay. whatever they're doing is not okax _ not okay. whatever they're doing is not okay. my sisters at home doing nothing _ not okay. my sisters at home doing nothing she — not okay. my sisters at home doing nothing she was employed. i don't nothing she was employed. idon't know— nothing she was employed. i don't know what's gonna happen from now. | know what's gonna happen from now. i feel know what's gonna happen from now. feel bad know what's gonna happen from now. i feel bad because we are using the shops, _ feel bad because we are using the shops, we — feel bad because we are using the shops, we are _ feel bad because we are using the shops, we are going _ feel bad because we are using the shops, we are going to _ feel bad because we are using the shops, we are going to be - feel bad because we are using the shops, we are going to be hungryl feel bad because we are using the - shops, we are going to be hungry and we are _ shops, we are going to be hungry and we are not— shops, we are going to be hungry and we are not going. _ shops, we are going to be hungry and we are not going, we're _ shops, we are going to be hungry and we are not going, we're going - shops, we are going to be hungry and we are not going, we're going to - shops, we are going to be hungry and we are not going, we're going to go l we are not going, we're going to go far away— we are not going, we're going to go faraway and — we are not going, we're going to go far away and they... _ we are not going, we're going to go far away and they. . ._ we are not going, we're going to go far away and they... more troops are exected far away and they... more troops are exoected to — far away and they... more troops are exoected to be _ far away and they... more troops are expected to be deployed _ far away and they... more troops are expected to be deployed overnight i far away and they... more troops are | expected to be deployed overnight to prevent the writing from spreading to other areas. serious situation developing. today
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the groups payment portal which name to shame victims who refused to pay was suddenly unavailable and off—line. it's unclear whether it's permanent or temporary comes off the back of president bidens warning to russian president putin to he must act against cyber criminals who are operating and out of his country. what to make of it? let's bring injack cable, security architect at krebs stamos group. what do you make at the time in? i do certainly think that it's clear, of course something happened and whether this is in addition to the cells down or a us government take or putin pressure to take their system down i would say that's too early to tell. what i can say is that with regards to their infrastructure, this is something we see periodically other rental where groups cells taking their own systems down maybe a few months
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later and rebranding. that's what happened a few years ago in 2019. they were previously known and came back under a new name. this could be an effort to rebrand or it could be an effort to rebrand or it could be a government take—down which again is a possibility but also in the effectiveness in the group could have been resurfaced.— effectiveness in the group could have been resurfaced. when you say it could be a — have been resurfaced. when you say it could be a government _ have been resurfaced. when you say| it could be a government take-down, it could be a government take—down, it could be a government take—down, it could be a government take—down, it could also be the americans taking it down, coded?- it could also be the americans taking it down, coded? yes. the us government — taking it down, coded? yes. the us government under _ taking it down, coded? yes. the us government under cyber _ taking it down, coded? yes. the us government under cyber command l taking it down, coded? yes. the us - government under cyber command which is a division of the us military to do operations for instance they were publicly reported operations over 2020 us election to take—down malware. that is certainly a possibility as well that the us government could have been seeing the damage it causing, want to take it into their own hands by taking down the infrastructure of the cyber
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criminals. pare down the infrastructure of the cyber criminals. �* , _, ., criminals. are we still coming to terms trying _ criminals. are we still coming to terms trying to _ criminals. are we still coming to terms trying to find _ criminals. are we still coming to terms trying to find out - criminals. are we still coming to terms trying to find out more . criminals. are we still coming to i terms trying to find out more about this latest attack last week was back to we know how widespread that was? we back to we know how widespread that was? ~ . , back to we know how widespread that was? ~ ., , ., ., was? we are beginning to get a fuller picture — was? we are beginning to get a fuller picture of— was? we are beginning to get a fuller picture of how _ was? we are beginning to get a| fuller picture of how widespread was? we are beginning to get a i fuller picture of how widespread the attack was. but i'd say it won't be for some time before we know all the details. what we do know so far is that the company involved around up to 1500 or so companies who are affected by the attack and we are still seeing the outfall of it but certainly this is the sort of thing that these attacks are nearly as fighting and we expect to see more ransom where attacks as time goes on. i ransom where attacks as time goes on. ., ., ransom where attacks as time goes on, ., ., ., " ransom where attacks as time goes on. ., ., ., ~ ., ., ., on. i want to talk to you about a new project _ on. i want to talk to you about a new project that's _ on. i want to talk to you about a new project that's been - on. i want to talk to you about a| new project that's been reported today, it's called ran somewhere, it tries to put, try to find where there's ransom money is going. i think it's tracked around $60
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million of rent rent somewhere payment so far. how does it work? i watch the ransom where earlier this week and that's ransom where w are its ounces same. but the goal is essentially to add some further transparency into their rent somewhere payment system and shed somewhere payment system and shed some light on really how much the criminals are pulling in. because right now one of the biggest challenges is that we don't really have good data publicly or privately about the extent of the ransom payments and how much money really is being lost was of hands how many victims are being affected and the damage being done. this was part of what i try to solve with rent where making these payments accessible. the way this works is the transactions are by nature public is not too difficult to track those. but i will say though is that this is one effort to shed some light on the problem but really we are not
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going to have full data without more drastic action. i think at minimum and there is been called to do this on the us government could mandate that victims are ransom somewhere actually report if they do make the payment in order to better enable the government and industry to respond and to understand the full extent of the problem. just unclear on this, basically _ extent of the problem. just unclear on this, basically what _ extent of the problem. just unclear on this, basically what you - extent of the problem. just unclear on this, basically what you are i on this, basically what you are hoping to provide to the us government is the scale of the attack and how much money generally is going in rent somewhere payments. 0nce is going in rent somewhere payments. once that money has gone through bitcoin to whoever is asking for their it's very difficult to track it from there, is in a? as i understand it is split down into other crypto currencies. so understand it is split down into other crypto currencies.- other crypto currencies. so the criminals _ other crypto currencies. so the criminals can, _ other crypto currencies. so the criminals can, there _ other crypto currencies. so the criminals can, there are - other crypto currencies. so the | criminals can, there are various money laundering services you can do
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bitcoin and other crypto currencies. with that said there are still potential avenues for governments, law enforcement to recover. we are an example of this with the colonial pipeline hack where the united states federal bureau of investigation was able to recover most of the money that colonial pipeline had paid. so areas like this i think i am optimistic that additional data here can help law enforcement and they are able to recover data is giving more resource to track these actors down a potentially recover funds. did you sa it was potentially recover funds. did you say it was ransom _ potentially recover funds. did you say it was ransom where w i potentially recover funds. did you say it was ransom where w h i potentially recover funds. did you say it was ransom where w h arl potentially recover funds. did you i say it was ransom where w h ar e? say it was ransom where w h ar e? yes the domain is ransom. if you watching they know where to go. do stay with us still to come. the uk government when the rebellion and
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its part in winning foreign cotton foreign aid. it is very huge show of support for footballer marcus rushford. he is now covered in hard on the mirror. i've been here since mid day thousands and thousands of messages of thanks and support have been posted and in the last few minutes what's actually happened is instead of local people from the community we had people come from all over the uk, some of them from london, birmingham, people as far and wide as ireland have come to say they want to show support. at the moment there is an anti—person, antiracism group which is also protesting as well with the occasional chat. everyone around here sues marcus radford as a local hero. notjust a footballer but this mirror was also because is it social enterprise work remember markers rashford successfully campaigned to have free
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school meals for primary school kids. every now and again this applause and someone telling a story about marcus rashford has helped them and given them hope. borisjohnson's government has seen off a conservative rebellion over the plans to cut the foreign aid budget. several senior tories, including his immediate predecessor theresa may, voted against the plan, which will wipe almost £4 billion off the aid budget. some of the biggest charities said the result was a disaster. here's our diplomatic correspondent james landale. britain has long given humanitarian aid like this to the world's poorest people, but the government is cutting that aid. and what was promised to be temporary has now become much longer—term — and all, the prime minister says, to save money. we are doing this in the midst of a terrible crisis, when our public finances are under greater strain than ever before in peacetime history and every pound
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we spend in aid has to be borrowed. millions less has already been spent on humanitarian crises in syria and yemen, part of a £4 billion cut this year to the aid budget, money that labour said made a real difference. it reduces conflict, it reduces disease and people fleeing from their homes. it is a false economy to pretend that this is some sort of cut that doesn't have consequences. for the first time, mps had a chance to vote on these cuts, either to restore aid spending to previous levels next year or tie any future rise to the state of the government finances — a vote the government won despite a sizeable tory rebellion. the ayes to the right 333, the noes to the left 298. the ayes have it, the ayes have it. so now two new tests will have to be
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passed before aid spending rises. the amount of long—term debt the government owes must be falling and day—to—day government spending must no longer be reliant on borrowing. the prime minister believes these cuts reflect the priorities of voters, even if not all his backbenchers, who said these tests would not be passed for years. we made a promise to the poorest people in the world. the government has broken that promise. this motion means that promise may be broken for years to come. there is an unpleasant odour wafting out from under my party's front door. this is not who we are. this is not what global britain is. when i come to choose i between money and lives, i always choose lives. 0nly rarely does the house of commons debate matters of life and death, but today's vote means that the government's cut in aid spending is no longer temporary but locked in for a number of years. and that will have a direct impact on the lives of millions of people around the world. this vote is going to mean children not getting vaccinations around the world, half a million children whose lives
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could have been saved through uk aid who will now die. we are going to see three million children no longer in schools. the government will still spend £10 billion on aid this year, but its costs are now entrenched and backed by a majority of mps. james landale, bbc news. what do you with your goldfish if you're no longer able to look after it? you'd be forgiven for thinking the kind thing to do would be release it into the wild and set it loose. born free? think again. the city of burnsville in minnesota is urging residents not to release unwanted pet fish into the wild because they don't always remain as tiddlers. the common household pet can grow far bigger in the wild and cause major disruption to ecosystems. the city says goldfish contribute to poor water quality because they dig around in the sediment and they uproot plants.
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they're not very good eating either. anybody remember this book? this looks promising, doesn't it? in fact, over the next few days we're expecting the temperatures to rise and the weekend looks promising. this unsettled pattern with the jet stream very close up. this low pressure with the showers in the rain storms in the last 2a hours, all of that is shifting now and high pressure at this moment is heading in our direction and is going to settle things down. so, so far this month, we really have not had a prolonged spell of warm summer weather but that's exactly what is heading our way now and the fine weather certainly is going to last into the weekend. so the here and the now, it is looking quite across many parts
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of the country and to the night clear spells for many western and central areas most of it will probably turn a bit cloudy out towards the east of london and anywhere from northern scotland down to the kent coast. not cold in the morning. 15 degrees in liverpool. here is the high pressure that's nosing its way in our direction but notice the north of it, there is a weak weather front coming in and that is going to bring thicker cloud and maybe a few spots of rain out towards the northwest of the uk, the western isles of scotland but the vast majority of us should have a fine day. 0n the immediate coast it may be on the fresh side in order to spots and norwich they're a bit further england they are at 19 but for london and cardiff talking about 2a or 25 degrees in the low 20s expected in northern ireland as well. here is our low—pressure really starting to take charge of the weather. shifting the weather fronts in the direction of iceland, so away from us. so a fine day on the way for thursday. probably a little bit of cloud building up during the course of the afternoon. fair waether cloud but some areas
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could have clear blue skies and portable some parts of scotland and even in the lowlands of scotland i wouldn't be a surprised or temperatures hit the mid—20s and certainly mid—20s expected in the south as well once again in cardiff. the high—pressure is with us on friday. it is with us on saturday and sunday as well. the light went and the clear skies and averages can only do one thing they will continue to rise, a gradual rise as we go through the week into the weekend. that cardiff sunshine all around with temperatures up to 27 degrees and the fine weather probably lasting into next week as well. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. joe biden refuses to mince words — the us president calls state efforts to restrict voting access the "biggest threat to american democracy since the civil war". an assault on democracy, an assault on liberty, an assault on who we are. the asylum seekers crossing the mediterranean sea claim greek authorities are intercepting them, abandoning them in turkish waters. greece says it's acting within the law. the nasal swab test — one part of this pandemic we really won't miss. but what if we could replace that long cotton bud with a breath test instead? we'll be speaking to one engineer who's developing a covid breathalyser promising just that. seaweed — so much more thanjust a slimy nuisance for beach swimmers.
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i'll be speaking to the welsh seaweed farmer who thinks eating —— who thinks we should all be eating more of it. intercepted at sea and forcibly abandoned in nearby waters — the shocking end of a perilous journey for thousands of migrants trying to reach europe. a bbc investigation has spoken to some who experienced what they said were illegal deportations from greek territory in so—called "pushback" operations. a top eu official described the moves as "violations of fundamental european values." greece denies the allegations. the bbc�*s fergal keane reports now from the island of lesbos. 0n europe's southern frontier, the guardians of the law are accused of breaking it. wailing please!
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pushing asylum—seekers across an international border, time and again. loud speaker: greek coast guard, greek coast guard, _ this is turkish coast guard. you are now pushing back the migrants to turkish i territorial waters. quite aggressive how this operation took place, it's violent. in some cases, shots fired in the air and into the water, all to intimidate. we've been investigating the stories of some of those who allege they've been victims of push backs. 0njune 10th last year, migrants filmed part of their encounter with greek coastguards. using the footage, we verified the date and location of the incident. translation: they asked us why we didn't get i a visa before entering. we explained that we fled the country, that there was no way to get a visa when you flee like that.
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with the war at home, the multiple problems, our exit is illegal. they insulted us, they made the sign of the cross, they told us to go screw ourselves and if we came back, they would kill us. some do manage to land in greece, but that doesn't end the danger of being pushed back. we've heard evidence of people who've gotten ashore and been discovered by the greek authorities, only to be taken back out to sea and pushed in the direction of turkey without any due process. translation: then they put us on the bus and _ took us to a military port, then put us in boats. i it was around 8pm. there were police wearingj dark blue and commandos covering their faces with masks. i could only see the eyes. they were armed with weapons. then we arrived at a location i at around quarter past midnight. they put us all in one boat.
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after that, we realised _ we were in regional turkish waters. woman yells out najma says were then transferred to dinghies with no engines and allowed to drift, before being eventually picked up by the turkish coastguard. greece already hosts thousands of refugees who are applying for asylum in the eu, but campaigners say it's breaking international law by forcing others back. all of these are international obligations. they have to be kept by greece. but also, it's eu law that is not... ..that is violated. because the right to asylum, to seek asylum, is also in the eu charter of fundamental rights. since these scenes six years ago, sentiment has hardened against migrants in europe. and the eu is accused of turning a blind eye to abuses because greece is keeping migrants out.
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some boats from the eu's own border agency are even accused of helping with push backs. but now a top eu official has told the bbc push backs defy its core values and must stop. i think these are violations of our fundamental european values, and when we are protecting our borders, we are protecting our values. it's because of our values, because we are defending fundamental rights, and that's why we can't see violations of fundamental rights going on without having a proper response to that. we asked for an interview, but the greek migration and asylum ministry declined. it has repeatedly denied that push backs take place. that denial will be challenged if the eu is serious about ending abuses on its borders. fergal keane, bbc news, lesbos.
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sticking a cotton bud deep into your throat and then up your nostrils is not the most relaxing of experiences. but 18 months into this global pandemic, the pcr swab remains the gold standard test for whether or not you've got coronavirus. but what if swab tests could be replaced by something less invasive — like a covid breathalyser? scientists say sensory technology and machine learning is now advanced enough to create a disease—detecting breath test. by analysing the gases and aerosols you exhale, sensors can detect subtle chemical changes in your breath — and with the results, it's possible to identify unique "breathprints" for different diseases, including covid. let's speak to one of the scientists behind that effort. assistant professor edward demauro is an engineer at rutgers university in newjersey, where he's working to develop this rapid breathalyser test
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for coronavirus. professor, very good to have you on the programme. it must say, i am not going to miss shoving one of these big cotton swabs of my nose to my eyeballs! please tell me this is right around the corner, that this will soon be upon us.— right around the corner, that this will soon be upon us. thank you for havin: will soon be upon us. thank you for having me- — will soon be upon us. thank you for having me- as _ will soon be upon us. thank you for having me. as you _ will soon be upon us. thank you for having me. as you said, _ will soon be upon us. thank you for having me. as you said, i'm - will soon be upon us. thank you for having me. as you said, i'm from i having me. as you said, i'm from records university, the school of engineering, and myself, my colleagues, we are about six month into a two—year effort to develop a breathalyser test where, essentially, with only about minimal effort on the part of the user, you would be able to blow into the device and it would register within about ten minutes whether or not you have covid—19. —— rutgers university. we are actively develop and of this project and we are currently at the level where we are demonstrating that we can achieve these results on a unified platform.
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so ten minutes is a long time, isn't it? because i was gone to ask you whether this would be a quick way to get people into a nightclub or into a stadium or something like that of might be quicker than a flow test or a pcr test also do you think that process could be sped up so that it would be useful in that way? it could be. right now, the funding thatis could be. right now, the funding that is funding our effort, the us national institutes of health, we are... there's a definite motivation to try to have us achieve our final product as swiftly as possible, so we are putting a lot of effort into trying to get the most effective device that is essentially full proof out on the market as rapidly as we can —— foolproof. proof out on the market as rapidly as we can -- foolproof.— proof out on the market as rapidly as we can -- foolproof. foolproof is interesting — as we can -- foolproof. foolproof is interesting word, _ as we can -- foolproof. foolproof is interesting word, because - as we can -- foolproof. foolproof is interesting word, because there's i as we can -- foolproof. foolproof is interesting word, because there's a | interesting word, because there's a lot on social media to moment about
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the flow test and how reliable it is and whether it can be full did. are you saying the traces that we give out in our breath, you couldn't trick the breathalyser into thinking it was something else? weill. trick the breathalyser into thinking it was something else? well, what we are testin: it was something else? well, what we are testing for — it was something else? well, what we are testing for is _ it was something else? well, what we are testing for is essentially _ it was something else? well, what we are testing for is essentially found i are testing for is essentially found within the aerosol you are breathing out must�*ve essentially we are looking for is to capture and test for the presence of small—scale protein markers that are associated with the disease. the anticipation is that that should not be too readily easy to trick, since the market we are looking for is very specific. it is the virus that causes covid—19 stopwatches very quickly, one last quick question for you —— very quickly, one last question for you. you -- very quickly, one last question for you.— you -- very quickly, one last question for you. you -- very quickly, one last auestion for ou. ~ ., ., , , question for you. who would use this and what might _ question for you. who would use this and what might it _ question for you. who would use this and what might it be _
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question for you. who would use this and what might it be used _ question for you. who would use this and what might it be used for? i question for you. who would use this and what might it be used for? that. and what might it be used for? that is actually very _ and what might it be used for? t'isgt is actually very good question. when my team and i were developing the initial proposal application, one of the thing that is very close to my heart in particular is i've got a preschool age child who was going off to school, and so one of the things that we envisioned, especially me having small children, is a noninvasive test... and as you indicated, in the opening here, sticking a nasal swab up your nose is intimidating. i do not want to have to subject my four—year—old doctor to such a thing just to get back to school, so one of the things that we envision something like this... an easy test that even a preschool level child could be able to use without any undue intimidation.— to use without any undue intimidation. ~ .., , intimidation. well, it could be the future, couldn't _ intimidation. well, it could be the future, couldn't it? _ intimidation. well, it could be the future, couldn't it? it _ intimidation. well, it could be the future, couldn't it? it certainly i future, couldn't it? it certainly would be useful for covid and other
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diseases as well. ed demauro, thank you for coming on the programme. thank you for having me. what did happen in the white house the night of the 2020 election? donald trump's team were confident he had done enough in the final days of the campaign to ensure a second term. but as the hours ticked by on election night and fox called arizona for biden, it soon became clear things were unravelling. a new book, excerpts out today, from the washington postjournalists carol lennig and phil rucker suggest it was the former new york mayor and trump attorney rudy giuliani who convinced the president the reason he was losing was the result of electoral fraud. the book is called i alone can fix it: donald trump's catastrophic final year. i'm joined now by republican political strategist ron christie. good to see you, how are you? good evening to you. this could be the genesis of the big lie. let me show you the excerpt from the book. giuliani's grand plan...
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but the point is, ron, the president was open to it because, for months, he had talked about the only way he was going capable of losing this was due to fraud. ., . ., ., , , fraud. evening once again. this is what happens _ fraud. evening once again. this is what happens when _ fraud. evening once again. this is what happens when you - fraud. evening once again. this is what happens when you hear- fraud. evening once again. this is what happens when you hear the | fraud. evening once again. this is i what happens when you hear the fog of war, i would call this the fog of a presenter campaign for tobacco in 2004, many officials in the bush administration felt the president was going to lose. they felt president bush was not what you overcome senatorjohn kerry, but yet he did. here's the exact inverse of that situation. you have an overconfident president, overconfident president, overconfident aides, telling him you've got this, there's no reason thatjoe biden can beat you, but yet still you had a handful of seasoned aides who were saying, boy a second, this is not going to be nearly as easy as you think it is, it is going
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to be close, and i think the age that given the advice he was going to win handily of course were the ones misleading him in the end. the souls of these books coming out at the moment. we have got michael wolff's book, michael bender, and a lot of the detail is similar. and what is similar about these accounts as you have. he and there, the campaign manager, stephen miller, the senior policy adviser, and mark meadows, the chief of staff. they all thought this argument had been stolen from her was incoherent, it was irresponsible, but they did not challenge it, and one of the advisers says this in the book. giuliani... he was so hyper about this idea that they could just block it without any facts that the advisers closest to him could not talk him down.—
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advisers closest to him could not talk him down. that says a lot for the former _ talk him down. that says a lot for the former president _ talk him down. that says a lot for the former president of _ talk him down. that says a lot for the former president of the i talk him down. that says a lot for| the former president of the united states, christian. look, when i worked for the then converse meant john to sick, former governor of ohio, he always went into every 0hio, he always went into every election assume he was going to lose. ——john kasich. he did not take any of the rosey adviser to make scenarios —— rosey scenarios is advised told him. if you look at donald trump, a lot of people around him are lying to him and a lot of people around him who were telling him everything that the former president wanted to hear, and ultimately that led to his defeat. you cannot into an election, i've been through so many of these, christian, assuming euro to win but you've got to fight for every vote, you've got to fight for every vote, you've got to assume you're not going to prevail, hope you get over the top, and these books, whether you believe these anonymous sources or not, indicate and paint a picture of an overconfident president and an overconfident team surrounding him,
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giving him bad advice. fin overconfident team surrounding him, giving him bad advice.— giving him bad advice. on this articular giving him bad advice. on this particular night, _ giving him bad advice. on this particular night, the _ giving him bad advice. on this particular night, the chip i giving him bad advice. on this particular night, the chip of i giving him bad advice. on thisl particular night, the chip of the joint chiefs of staff, mark millie, gets a call from a retired miniature buddies reminds him of his apolitical role as chairman of the joint chiefs... —— tired military buddy. —— mark milley. that is extraordinary. the military was sufficiently concerned by what was sufficiently concerned by what was going on, according to this book, that they were called in the chair of the joint chiefs. and he was in a tight fix because he might have been in a position where he would have to stand against the commander—in—chief. it is would have to stand against the commander-in-chief._ commander-in-chief. it is very interesting. — commander-in-chief. it is very interesting, and _ commander-in-chief. it is very interesting, and i _ commander-in-chief. it is very interesting, and i always- commander-in-chief. it is very interesting, and i always look. commander-in-chief. it is very l interesting, and i always look at these sort of anonymous quotes with a grain of salt. my old chief of staff used to say, if you want to talk to the newspaper, you put your name and title behind it. let's talk about the assertion you put forward
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to don't ask us to bid his remark with the chief of the military received a phone call believing there could be some unrest in the united states government for what we always have, a peaceful transfer of power. itjust showed you this function we have seen for the last four years, the less a ministration, and why so many people here in america and around the world or at least looking for a bit more of stability and calm and more importantly they are looking for the rule of law and the way that this is supposed to function. titer? supposed to function. very interesting, _ supposed to function. very interesting, always - supposed to function. very interesting, always good i supposed to function. very| interesting, always good to supposed to function. very interesting, always good to get your perspective, ron. thanks for coming on. perspective, ron. thanks for coming on, , ., ., ., perspective, ron. thanks for coming on, , ., , perspective, ron. thanks for coming on. .,, stay with us on bbc news. still to come: seaweed — a floating nuisance or nutritious way to solve climate change? i'll be checking out seaweed spaghetti next. mps are calling for a ban on admissions to long—term
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institutional care for people with learning difficulties and autism. a report out today from the health and social care committee says that it's a matter of "national shame" that so many people are still being detained in secure units. it also concluded that this has prevented patients from being able to live fulfilled lives. former health secretaryjeremy hunt, who's chair of the health select committee, urged the new health secretary, sajid javid, to act on the report's findings. a little earlier, we heard from alexis quinn, who is now manager at the charity the restraint reduction network and has experience of being a patient in a treatment unit. she has autism and is a campaigner for people who have the condition. she explained what happened to her. like many autistic people and people with learning disabilities, i went through a crisis at home. i had a baby and my brother died at roughly the same time. that really kind of shook my routine and such like, and instead of getting care in the community, which is what autistic people need, where everything's familiar,
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where everything's routine and structured, what happened is that i was admitted to an inpatient unit, which is completely the antithesis of what's helpful. it's chaotic, it's noisy, it's sensory—driven, and i got stuck in there. now, this report highlights that people like me are often stuck in these units for an average of six years. and fortunately, after three and a half years of routine restraints, seclusion and long—term segregation, which is where i was kept in a room with only a mattress, i actually had to escape the country and flee to africa. that was the only way that i could get out of the terrible and inappropriate conditions which i was housed in. now, quite obviously, this isn't something that all autistic people and people with learning disabilities can do. there's 2,000 people still stuck in these units, and they desperately need some action from the government.
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ifi if i have a holiday at the perdition seaside — and i have been doing more and more of late — i, like many of you, spend most my time trying to avoid seaweed? but what if i am wrong? what if seaweed isn't a foe but a friend, a miracle plant that can be grown sustainably, effortlessly capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and form the basis of a diet that meets many of our nutritional needs? 0ne seaweed farm in wales is seeking to prove just that. —— at the british seaside. the car—y—mor polyculture vertical seaweed farm in st david's grows the algae along 400 metres of lines in the ocean — without requiring any input other than nutrients already in the sea. its founders say that makes it the most sustainable form of food production on the planet and wants other farmers to follow suit. so could this be the start of a seaweed renaissance?
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and will you soon be serving seaweed for dinner? francois beyers is a co—founder of the car—y—mor seaweed farm, in st david's on wales' pembrokeshire coast. there he is. is that your surfboard behind you there?— there he is. is that your surfboard behind you there? yes, christian, it is. richt, behind you there? yes, christian, it is- right. well. _ behind you there? yes, christian, it is- right. well. i— behind you there? yes, christian, it is. right, well, i do _ behind you there? yes, christian, it is. right, well, i do not— behind you there? yes, christian, it is. right, well, i do not know- behind you there? yes, christian, it is. right, well, i do not know if- is. right, well, i do not know if ou no is. right, well, i do not know if you go out _ is. right, well, i do not know if you go out planting _ is. right, well, i do not know if you go out planting seaweed i is. right, well, i do not know if| you go out planting seaweed on is. right, well, i do not know if- you go out planting seaweed on your surfboard, but maybe you can tell me for civil how quickly it grows? this is it. for civil how quickly it grows? this is it- where _ for civil how quickly it grows? this is it. where we _ for civil how quickly it grows? this is it. where we are _ for civil how quickly it grows? ti 3 is it. where we are situated in saint davids, the waters are so nutrient rich and with that, we have actually noticed that the seaweed is growing in inch and more per day. it is a fairly rapid growth that we've got here. is a fairly rapid growth that we've not here. ,., ., ,, is a fairly rapid growth that we've not here. ., ., , got here. right, so what you really need is lots _ got here. right, so what you really need is lots of _ got here. right, so what you really need is lots of people _ got here. right, so what you really need is lots of people to _ got here. right, so what you really need is lots of people to start i need is lots of people to start eating it. how big is the market? this is the thing. i think wales
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have been used to seaweed for centuries, and for some reason it's kind of dropped off the radar. but we are trying to do is to reintroduce this notjust as a dietary requirement but there's many other factors and products that we can create with it. but you're right, the market is quite small at this time, but with hopefully having publications as well as bbc news that we are now spreading the word, and hopefully we will get more people interested in it. irate and hopefully we will get more people interested in it. we will take a cut. _ people interested in it. we will take a cut, we'll— people interested in it. we will take a cut, we'll take - people interested in it. we will take a cut, we'll take a - people interested in it. we will take a cut, we'll take a i i people interested in it. we will take a cut, we'll take a i thinkl people interested in it. we will i take a cut, we'll take a i think the welsh did use to eat it. i've been talking to my watch producer today, and she tells me, she remembers something called labour cake, so they did use to eat it. do you know anything about that?— anything about that? that's right. the call anything about that? that's right. they call it _ anything about that? that's right. they call it lava _ anything about that? that's right. they call it lava cake, _ anything about that? that's right. they call it lava cake, lava - anything about that? that's right. they call it lava cake, lava bread, j they call it lava cake, lava bread, even though there is absolutely no
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prejudicing anywhere, but that used to be a very sustainable breakfast, miners used to have in the mornings fight up with bacon —— no bread in there anywhere. also died off with coal mining at the same time. i think also things such as the fast food industry and the need for things to be much quicker as cause this to sort of become a little bit of a history rather than something that's continued on in wales. right, but ou're that's continued on in wales. right, but you're turning _ that's continued on in wales. right, but you're turning it _ that's continued on in wales. right, but you're turning it not _ that's continued on in wales. right, but you're turning it not to - that's continued on in wales. right, but you're turning it not to kick i but you're turning it not to kick but you're turning it not to kick but into spaghetti. irate but you're turning it not to kick but into spaghetti.— but you're turning it not to kick but into spaghetti. we are! we do not have to _ but into spaghetti. we are! we do not have to turn _ but into spaghetti. we are! we do not have to turn it _ but into spaghetti. we are! we do not have to turn it into _ but into spaghetti. we are! we do not have to turn it into spaghetti, | not have to turn it into spaghetti, it is already spaghetti. there is over 600 different species of seaweed that grow just over 600 different species of seaweed that growjust on the uk coast, one of which is actually see spaghetti. i've got some right here. this is dried see spaghetti. find this is dried see spaghetti. and what do you _ this is dried see spaghetti. and what do you do _ this is dried see spaghetti. and what do you do with that? you | this is dried see spaghetti. and i what do you do with that? you can't re - lace what do you do with that? you can't replace your — what do you do with that? you can't replace your normal _ what do you do with that? you can't replace your normal spaghetti i what do you do with that? you can't replace your normal spaghetti with l replace your normal spaghetti with that. . , replace your normal spaghetti with that. . �*
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replace your normal spaghetti with that. ., ~ , ., that. oh, really? a seaweed carbonara? _ that. oh, really? a seaweed carbonara? absolutely! i that. oh, really? a seaweed carbonara? absolutely! we. that. oh, really? a seaweed i carbonara? absolutely! we had a lovely crab _ carbonara? absolutely! we had a lovely crab linguine _ carbonara? absolutely! we had a lovely crab linguine with - carbonara? absolutely! we had a lovely crab linguine with see i lovely crab linguine with see spaghetti and it taste absolute brilliant —— brilliant. -- brilliant. and why is it so good for us? seaweed _ -- brilliant. and why is it so good for us? seaweed in _ -- brilliant. and why is it so good for us? seaweed in itself - -- brilliant. and why is it so good for us? seaweed in itself has i -- brilliant. and why is it so good for us? seaweed in itself hasjust| for us? seaweed in itself has 'ust not for us? seaweed in itself has 'ust got phenomenali for us? seaweed in itself has 'ust got phenomenal amounts i for us? seaweed in itself has 'ust got phenomenal amounts ofi for us? seaweed in itself hasjust i got phenomenal amounts of goodness about it, apart from the obvious of sequestering c02 and fighting climate change in that way, as a food,it climate change in that way, as a food, it is packed with protein, vitamins c and calcium. also it's got loads of iodine, which is as a uk nation again, it is very deficient in our diets. i was listening — deficient in our diets. i was listening the _ deficient in our diets. i was listening the other - deficient in our diets. i was listening the other day i deficient in our diets. i was listening the other day to l deficient in our diets. i was listening the other day to a i deficient in our diets. i was - listening the other day to a council on the south coast of england who were going to help and what they... and that also sucks carbon out of the atmosphere full of and what they are doing is growing that and taking money from people who want to offset
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their carbon emissions, so is that a business model that you could see you and others on the west coast replicating? it you and others on the west coast replicating?— replicating? it is a very difficult sub'ects replicating? it is a very difficult subjects -- _ replicating? it is a very difficult subjects -- welsh _ replicating? it is a very difficult subjects -- welsh coast. - replicating? it is a very difficult - subjects -- welsh coast. everybody subjects —— welsh coast. everybody wants to offset carbon in one way, and arguably seaweed is the way forward for the bit sequesters c02 five times more than any land—based plans. but there's a lot of research of these be done in that area to really make sure that we do this the right way. what we're doing, are only a tiny little farm down here in west wales. the dream for us is to make it a template farm, so these farms can be up and down the uk. if that does happen, yes, i do believe that does happen, yes, i do believe that this could be a business model they could follow, to sequester c02, but you have to do this on a very large scale to actually make a decent impact on the c02. francois,
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it's been good _ decent impact on the c02. francois, it's been good speaking _ decent impact on the c02. francois, it's been good speaking to _ decent impact on the c02. francois, it's been good speaking to you. - it's been good speaking to you. enjoy your seaweed spaghetti this evening. i might stick to the plastic variety for now. but i might be persuaded! see you soon. hello. well, thanks for tuning into our weather for the week ahead. now, so far, this month we haven't really had a prolonged spell of sunny weather. now that's about to change. the unsettled weather brought by the jet stream, which you can see here, has been over us quite some time. hasn't particularly brought any chilly weather, but it has just been very changeable from day to day — recent rainstorms in the south of the country and the flash flooding. well, all of this now is giving way to a large area of high pressure which is currently building over the azores. you can see here right now and we're very certain that it is heading our way and that's going to bring increasingly warm weather to the uk over the coming days, which will last into the weekend and beyond. so some good news there if you're a warm weather worshipper. now, the forecast for
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the here and now, then. so through the early hours, we've got clear skies across central and western areas of the uk, out towards the east, it's a little bit more cloudy, so that means overcast skies for some of us from newcastle to norwich and possibly london early on wednesday morning. but the promised high pressure is building in our direction. you can see it here. just to north of it and riding around it is this weak weatherfront, though, and that's going to keep things a little more cloudy and cooler for some north—western parts of the country during the course of wednesday. so for the north of northern ireland, the western isles of scotland, perhaps a little cloudy, maybe a few spits and spots of rain in the western isles there, around stornoway at 17, i think, but for many of us it's well into the 20s, and in fact hitting the mid 20s in central and southern england on wednesday. so the high pressure noses in, you can see across the uk, keeping the weather fronts at bay by this stage and actually sending them closer to iceland than to us. so let's have a look at the details, then, for thursday. you can see a little bit
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of cloud in the morning. perhaps a bit of a breeze around the north sea coasts, so the immediate coast itself may be a little on the fresh side, but certainly you go further inland and those temperatures will be quite a bit higher, up to around 25 expected in cardiff, whereas in norwich closer to 20 degrees celsius. now, end of the week, the high pressure is going to be right on top of us and quite often when these high pressures establish themselves across this part of the continent, they tend to hang around for a while. the skies will clear and it'll get warmer and warmer. you can see that steady climb in the temperatures as we head into the weekend. a cracking weekend on the way for cardiff. look at that, 27 celsius and lots of sunshine on the way. hardly a cloud in the sky. but how long is that area of high pressure going to last? well, early next week we're pretty certain it's still going to be around, lots of fine weather, light winds as well, so temperatures will be every bit as high, but a little bit later on in the week, so let's say tuesday into wednesday,
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we'll start to see an area of low pressure approaching us from the south—west, because eventually the high pressure will have to give way to other weather, but how soon this happens is a little bit uncertain. if this low does head our way, and it could go a bit further north, it could stay a little bit further south, it may bring some thunderstorms and temporarily, just before its arrival, it might actually shunt some warm weather from the continent in our direction. it could actually turn quite hot, so let's summarise all of that in the outlook. it is still going to stay warm, for a while at least, with that high pressure sitting on top of us. eventually the high pressure will give way sometime next week. possibly turning hot for a short time with some thunderstorms. that's the latest from me. bye— bye.
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tonight at ten — covid restrictions will be eased in scotland from next week — but more cautiously than england. face masks will remain mandatory — social distancing will be relaxed but not scrapped. we shouldn't lift important restrictions to make our lives easier and then expect the public to take responsibility for doing the right thing anyway. in england, face coverings will no longer be a legal requirement — but tonight transport for london has announced commuters will still have to wear them. we'll be asking, if it's enforceable? also on the programme... how the pandemic has brought about a rise in the number of victims of stalking. an extraordinary escape — the former nissan boss describes how he fled house arrest injapan in a box on a private plane.
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the 30 minutes waiting in the box in the plane,

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