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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 13, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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thank you. that is all from us. time for the news where you are. goodbye. hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. 45 people have died in south africa in unrest triggered by the jailing of former presidentjacob zuma. more shopping malls looted, businesses ransacked and riots on the streets in five days of violence in two provinces, the government admits the situation has �*got out of hand'. we cannot allow anyone to make a mockery of our democratic state. and we have been instructed law enforcement agencies to double their efforts. south africa's military has been deployed to help overstretched police, over 800 people have been arrested so far. in the us, presidentjoe biden is giving his first major speech on voting rights
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in philadelphia shortly. some republican states are trying to tighten rules including texas. that's prompted democrats in texas to leave the state. that's prompted democrats in texas to leave the state. they are determined to kill thisbill and this special session, which will end on august the 7th. and we will stay out until then in order to do that. in england we've seen a huge show of support for rashford that was defacing graffiti has now been covered in hudson messages. and working to see this incredible story. the moment parents were reunited with their son who was stolen at the age of two,. his father travelled half i age of two,. his father travelled halfi million km to try and find him. we start in south africa, where 45 people have died
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in violence that's escalated since the jailing of the former presidentjacob zuma last week. that includes 10 people dying in a stampede in soweto — nearjohannesburg. this is happening in kwazulu—natal — zuma's home provincce — and gauteng which includesjohannesburg. there's been looting, arson and assaults. this is outside a hyper—market in durban in kawzulu—natal. hundreds of people appear to be on a looting spree. then this is inside. shelves are being emptied. there's rubbish everywhere. and people are taking whatever they can — mattresses, fridges, televisions. this is also in durban. and to respond to the escalaion — the military was now been deployed to help police. private security's also involved. this was the scene overnight injohannesburg's city centre ambulances, bloodbanks and covid—i9 vacciation centres were all attacked during the evening and overnight. and the unrest continued into tuesday. almost 800 people have been arrested so far. we've had a number of
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government responses. south africa's defence minister has admitted the situation appears to have �*got out of hand' but says a state of emergency isn't needed. and here's the police minister. the current situation on the ground is under strong surveillance and we will ensure that it does not deteriorate any further. we cannot allow anyone to make a mockery of our democratic state and we have instructed enforcement agencies to double their efforts to stop the violence and to increase deployment on the ground. and this is how the different provinces are being impacted. 26 have died in kwazulu—natal province including a 15—year—old boy. in gauteng, the death toll is 19. ten died at a mall stampede during looting in soweto on monday. the violence and looting in soweto was extensive. atms were broken into, restaurants, bottle stores and clothing shops
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were all left ransacked. we also have these pictures from soweto of police arresting looting suspects. south africa's president cyril ramaphosa has called it some of the worst violence in the country since the early 1990s, that was before the end of the racist system of apartheid. and he gave this warning. what we are witnessing now opportunistic acts of criminalisty with groups of people instigating chaos merely as a cover of looting and theft. there is no grievance nor any political course that can justify the violence and the destruction that we have seen in _ parts of kwazulu— natal. the consequences of the looting is far reaching. there are concern about medicines and food shortages. there were huge queues outside this
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supermarket in durban. next lets hear the concerns of the un. the secretary—general urges protesters to demonstrate peacefully and to refrain from violence while respecting national and local measures to curb the spread of the covid—i9 pandemic. this all followed the jailing ofjacob zuma. he handed himself into the authorities before midnight on wednesday, just before a court deadline expired. here he is being driven from his home in kwazulu—natal to prison. he's been senteneced to 15 months for contempt of court — that was after he refused an order to answer corruption allegations. he denies allegations. while that may have been the catalyst — some analysts believe anger over unemployment and poverty are the real reasons this is happening. south africa's unemployment rate is among the highest in the world. according to the world bank — over a third of people are unemployed. in younger people that's even higher — 46.3% don't have a job.
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and here's the economist. nomsa maseko is in durban. first of all, update us on the violence. i know this time last night it was escalating again. this time last night— night it was escalating again. ti 3 time last night it was escalating and tonight people are still looting. it's been hours of people looting. it's been hours of people looting warehouses where businesses are keeping furniture refrigerators in all types of appliances. the looting which started this morning is still ongoing. it does appear to the police are struggling to keep the police are struggling to keep the situation in check. and also the deployment of the army at this stage is not to be seen in terms of the
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type of difference it is making. there is a lot of looting, there is also people guarding their own communities not waiting for the police or the army to protect their own businesses. a whole community are taking turns and shifts overnight to protect the businesses and their communities that they have. do and their communities that they have. , ., . and their communities that they have. ,., ., ., , and their communities that they have. ., ., , ., ., and their communities that they have. . ., , ., ., have. do we have any idea of who's doinu have. do we have any idea of who's doin: the have. do we have any idea of who's doing the looting _ have. do we have any idea of who's doing the looting and _ have. do we have any idea of who's doing the looting and whether- have. do we have any idea of who's doing the looting and whether they | doing the looting and whether they are coordinating their efforts? the secret service _ are coordinating their efforts? tue secret service minister are coordinating their efforts? tte secret service minister and are coordinating their efforts? ttj: secret service minister and the police minister whom we heard earlier said that there were investigating who were at the instigators of this. it had three days ago we heard from the same palouse two police minister who said that 12 people were identified as instigators and that the police were going to be moving in and arresting them. south africa is still waiting to find out when those people are going to be arrested. people want to know how this started and what the endgame is actually going to be. as
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it stands people are going to lose theirjobs because hundreds of shopping centres across two provinces have been attacked. for --eole provinces have been attacked. for people who don't know south africa well, just help us put this in context how out of the normal is what we are seeing in the past few days. what we are seeing in the past few da s. . , �* , what we are seeing in the past few da s. . , ~ , ., , days. the last time the army was de - lo ed days. the last time the army was deployed in _ days. the last time the army was deployed in south _ days. the last time the army was deployed in south africa - days. the last time the army was deployed in south africa because| days. the last time the army was l deployed in south africa because of instability was back in 2008 during the xenophobic attacks which sought more than 50 people die in just over three weeks when south africans are accused foreign nationals of taking jobs and south africans then retaliated and tried to drive foreigners out of the country. that led to quite a significant number of deaths. that was the last time here in south africa the army was deployed. the army being deployed this time around is also something that we have been seeing but it was hoped that last night when the president addressed the country he
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was going to declare a state of emergency for that which was obviously going to change the rules in terms of take away the human rights of people and make sure that people are staying at home to ensure that this kind of violence does not escalate. but as things stand, it looks like it's all going out of control. thank you very much. president biden is in philadelphia where he's expected to issue a strong appeal for sweeping voting rights legislation. this is currently stalled in congress because of republican opposition. around a dozen republican—controlled states have approved laws that either restrict voting, or change election rules, in response to republican then—president donald trump's baseless claims that voter fraud prevented him from winning the 2020 presidential election. president biden is trying to counter
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these laws with his legislation. republicans in the state of texas are trying to do just that — pass a law to tighten voting rules. but it looks like they won't have enough lawmakers present at their special session and this is why. democratic lawmakers from the texas legislature left texas en masse on monday so there won't be enough lawmakers present to hold a vote on republican election bills. chris turner is a democrat from the texas house of representatives, here he is on why he left the state. they are determined to kill this bill and the special session. which will end on august the 7th. and we will stay out until then in order to do that. we are going to use that time to plead with our friends and our colleagues and our leaders in the congress that the time is now, there is no more time. you must pass strong federal voter protection legislation and you must do it now. you must do it before august recess.
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0ur correspondent peter bowes is in washington. it's always helpful to get some assistance in understanding what's decided at a federal level and was decided at a federal level and was decided at a federal level on these matters —— state. decided at a federal level on these matters -- state.— decided at a federal level on these matters -- state. that's one of the issues at stake. _ matters -- state. that's one of the issues at stake. republicans - matters -- state. that's one of the issues at stake. republicans are i issues at stake. republicans are insisting that these issues in terms of voter rights and the specific regulations as they apply to voting, the practical purpose of voting going to the polling booth, they say that should be decided by the states. but the democrats in this case and let's hear what president biden has assayed within the hour. a lot of democrats are saying there needs to be federal legislation that would effect whose sharp what the states are doing. it's a matter of debate —— use. in which a body decides the practicalities of voting. we are talking about practicalities here, were talking about 2k hour polling stations, the
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powers of people that go into the polling stations as observers, that kind thing. of course the two parties are poles apart and what they believe is at stake with this issue, the integrity of the elections according to the republicans. according to the democrats it's the share right to vote and the ease which with people are allowed to vote. tit vote and the ease which with people are allowed to vote.— are allowed to vote. in which case, wh is it are allowed to vote. in which case, why is it the _ are allowed to vote. in which case, why is it the president _ are allowed to vote. in which case, why is it the president is _ are allowed to vote. in which case, why is it the president is going - are allowed to vote. in which case, why is it the president is going to l why is it the president is going to philadelphia to make a speech about these matters rather being in washington trying to get the votes assembled that he needs in congress? there is historic significance. philadelphia, the birthplace of american democracy, that's where the us constitution was signed, that's where the deprivation of independence was signed. in the minds of —— declaration. in between the state of philadelphia and the right to vote, the very foundation of this country. as opposed to staying in washington and trying to
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persuade people, persuade democrats and republicans that there is a need for a federal change of law. that wouldn't happen overnight, that wouldn't happen overnight, that wouldn't happen overnight, that wouldn't happen today. i think the president feels as if he could reach perhaps a larger audience. this is his first majorforay perhaps a larger audience. this is his first major foray into the subject area since becoming president. and perhaps rick reflects the extent to which he believes it is very important now. it's been two days since england lost the final of the european football championships to italy. and the fallout continues — not over the defeat — over the racist abuse that some players have received. and over claims, even from one england player, that the government could have done more to stand against racism. italy won the game on penalties. the three players who missed were marcus rashford, bukayo saka and jadon sancho. all three are black — all three received racist abuse online after the game —
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just as they have done through their careers. marcus rashford has released a statement, saying... many people have been condemning the abuse. including here she is speaking in the house of commons yesterday. t here she is speaking in the house of commons yesterday.— here she is speaking in the house of commons yesterday. i know that the whole house — commons yesterday. i know that the whole house will— commons yesterday. i know that the whole house willjoin _ commons yesterday. i know that the whole house willjoin me _ commons yesterday. i know that the whole house willjoin me in - whole house willjoin me in condemning the sickening racist abuse directed last night at oui’ our heroic england football team on social media. ms patel has been criticised for being hypocritcal. england footballer tyrone mings has retweeted ms patel, writing... what he is referring to there are comments that ms patel made injune after england players
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took the knee. the act of taking the knee has become a prominent symbol in sport and during anti—racist protests in recent years, and england players have been adopting the stance at the start of their matches. speaking to gb news, ms patel said "i just don't support people participating in that type of gesture politics". here is the former footballer fabrice muamba's take on that. she has a thought process regarding to the issue. it could've been handled differently. however she said what she had to say. without really thinking about what the effect of long—term now. so what you are dealing with them in as you have a current generation of young footballers who are very much outspoken, very unapologetic the way they approach certain things, they are not being disrespectful, but they will not tolerate things that might have happened in the past
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where probably the generation before would not say. ms patel has declined to comment on tyrone mings' tweet but others it's quite something that is if you take a couple of steps back you have a very prominent sportsmen and angle and play after which a tournament they have been the dominating national conversation within england giving their passage to the final and here he is directly and unequivocally challenging the home secretary on a specific, on this whole specific of taking the knee and whether or not it's a good idea as part of a campaign to try and eradicate racism from football and from society. she eradicate racism from football and from society-— from society. she has declined to comment but _ from society. she has declined to comment but others _ from society. she has declined to comment but others within - from society. she has declined to comment but others within the i comment but others within the conservative party had done. mp johnny mercer retreated adding
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that... here is another of priti patel couege here is another of priti patel college defending her. she is taking action in her role as home secretary to go after many of these racist groups. she has taken action against the extreme right wing groups that foment many of these things and she is acting as home secretary to tackle this, as indeed is the culture secretary. and as i say, through the 0nline harms bill, we are committed as government to legislating to tackle these social media platforms who frankly should be doing far more to clamp down on this sort of unacceptable racism and abuse online. it's part of a wider problem in terms of online abuse and we will legislate to punish those companies financially if they fail to act. the 0nline safety bill,
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which you heard stephen barclay mention there by its former name, the 0nline harms bill, is draft legislation that was published back in may after two years in the making. under it, social media firms will have to remove harmful content quickly or potentially face multi—billion—pound fines or criminal action. it covers a huge range of content, including hate speech, disinformation, terrorism and racist abuse. however, some critics say it will curb free speech. the formerfootballer anton ferdinand, who campaigns against racism in sport and has been the victim of abuse himself, says blaming social media alone won't fix the problem. i the people that run this country. are coming out and saying, moving —bboing a gesture to. the players have taken. they are not condemning that. so how can you not condemn that but they come out and say- is about the social media. sort your own house out first, you know? sort your own house - out first, you know? out first and maybe you can start talking
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about other people and talk about other organisations. i you cannot say one thing and not do the other, you know? _ it just screams hypocrisy. for more on exactly what social media platforms are being criticised for, here's the bbc�*s disinformation reporter, marianna spring. very offensive emojis that were being shared in a racist way it remained up even when reported through the mechanisms on the platforms and otherwise. and this is not something new. social media was actually boycotted by a number of sporting bodies and players just three months ago over fears that social media sites were not doing enough to deal with race abuse and harassment. there has been particular concerns in this case about instagram, which is owned by facebook and in a statement, facebook said it had... twitter also claimed that in the 2a hours after the match it had
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the shadow culture secretary, jo stevens, says the 0nline safety bill isn't tough enough to stop racism spreading on social media. children are not born racist. you know, they learn racism, they become racist. he will become racist through saving and hearing things around them, and if there are products of amplifying that, we need to make sure that that stops. as we've been hearing, concerns over racial abuse and how emirwasa emir was a phase. emirwas a phase. here emir was a phase. here it is on monday morning. here it is a day later. covered in messages of support. our reporter is there. this mirror was put up to him late last year because he spearheaded a campaign for the people on lower incomes to get free school meals during school holidays across the uk. it was
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also abuse that his team—mates received online. you could see the outpouring of love for them here. in fact all three of them we'd love brassard, sacca and sancho. this one here always our hero. just over here we've got these hearts here. rashford for prime minister. marcus, you are adored by everyone. they really sum up up the kind of messages here. they are not by any means the only people who have experienced racism in england. as one reflected on. t england. as one reflected on. i think the racist abuse that england. as one reflected on. t think the racist abuse that marcus experience is what it's like to be a black person in the uk i think there are values are completely mitigated by what we bring. as soon as he was doing well in football he was like great british icon. as soon as he made one mistake his was that is the perfect metaphor is what it's like to be black and british in modern—day times. to
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to be black and british in modern-day times. to another important _ modern-day times. to another important uk _ modern-day times. to another important uk story. _ modern-day times. to another important uk story. the - modern-day times. to another - important uk story. the governments decision to cut the oversee aid budget has been backed by mps. the number of senior conservatives opposed the move but mps voted for the treasury plan to lock in the cuts for a number of years. the result they say it was a disaster. his more from our correspondent and it does contain some distressing images. britain has long given humanitarian aid like this to the worlds poorest people. but the government is cutting that aid. what was promised to be temporary is now become much longer term. all the prime minister says to save money. we are doing this in the midst of a terrible crisis when our public finances are under greater restraint than ever before in peacetime history. and every pound we spend in aid has to be borrowed.— aid has to be borrowed. millions less is already _ aid has to be borrowed. millions less is already been _ aid has to be borrowed. millions less is already been spent - aid has to be borrowed. millions less is already been spent on i less is already been spent on humanitarian crises in syria and
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yemen. part of a £4 billion cut this year to the aid budget. money that labour said made a real difference. it reduces conflict, it reduces disease — it reduces conflict, it reduces disease and people fled for the house — disease and people fled for the house. that is a false economy to pretend _ house. that is a false economy to pretend that this is some sort of cut that — pretend that this is some sort of cut that doesn't have consequences. for the _ cut that doesn't have consequences. for the first — cut that doesn't have consequences. for the first time mps had a chance to post on these cuts are to restore aid spending to previous levels next year or tie any future rise to the state of the government finance. a vote the government won despite a sizeable tory rebellion. the vote the government won despite a sizeable tory rebellion.— vote the government won despite a sizeable tory rebellion. the eyes to the riaht sizeable tory rebellion. the eyes to the right 333 _ sizeable tory rebellion. the eyes to the right 333 the _ sizeable tory rebellion. the eyes to the right 333 the noes _ sizeable tory rebellion. the eyes to the right 333 the noes for _ sizeable tory rebellion. the eyes to the right 333 the noes for the - sizeable tory rebellion. the eyes to the right 333 the noes for the pis i the right 333 the noes for the pis have a come of the eyes have it. so now to new tests will have to be passed before aid spending rises. the amount of long—term debt the owes must be falling and day—to—day government spending must no longer be reliant on borrowing. the prime minister believes these cuts reflect the priority of voters even if not
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all of his backbenchers who said these tests would not be passed for years. we these tests would not be passed for ears. ~ ., ., these tests would not be passed for ears. ~ . ., , ., , ., years. we made a promise to the oorest years. we made a promise to the poorest people — years. we made a promise to the poorest people in _ years. we made a promise to the poorest people in the _ years. we made a promise to the poorest people in the world. - years. we made a promise to the poorest people in the world. the | poorest people in the world. the government has broken that promise. this motion— government has broken that promise. this motion means that promise made be broken _ this motion means that promise made be broken for years to come. there is an unpleasant _ be broken for years to come. there is an unpleasant odour— be broken for years to come. there is an unpleasant odour wafting - be broken for years to come. tt:- is an unpleasant odour wafting out from under it my parties front door. this is not who we are, this is not what global britain is not what global britain is.— what global britain is not what global britain is. where do i come to choose between _ global britain is. where do i come to choose between money - global britain is. where do i come to choose between money and - global britain is. where do i come| to choose between money and lies global britain is. where do i come i to choose between money and lies i always _ to choose between money and lies i always choose — to choose between money and lies i always choose lives. _ to choose between money and lies i always choose lives. illtnlztr _ to choose between money and lies i always choose lives.— always choose lives. only rarely does house _ always choose lives. only rarely does house of _ always choose lives. only rarely does house of commons - always choose lives. only rarely| does house of commons debate always choose lives. only rarely - does house of commons debate matters of life and death but today's vote means the government cut in aid spending is no longer temporary but locked in for a number of years. that will have a direct impact on the lives of millions of people around the world. this the lives of millions of people around the world.— the lives of millions of people around the world. this vote is going to mean children _ around the world. this vote is going to mean children are _ around the world. this vote is going to mean children are getting - to mean children are getting vaccinations around the world put up half a million children whose lives could have been saved through uk age who will now die. were going to see 3 million children no longer in schools. ., , schools. the government will still s - end schools. the government will still send £10 schools. the government will still
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spend £10 billion _ schools. the government will still spend £10 billion on _ schools. the government will still spend £10 billion on a _ schools. the government will still spend £10 billion on a this - schools. the government will still spend £10 billion on a this year i schools. the government will still. spend £10 billion on a this year but it's cuts are now entrenched and backed by a majority of mps. talk of roger federer because he just announced he's not going to be going to the tokyo 0lympics because he's got a problem with his knee. he posted a statement on twitter he said... he goes on... lots of questions of course about how long federal it may be able to play on. he lost in the quarterfinals at wimbledon lodge is that he lost in straight sets in the final set he lost six love something that it never happened and before at wimbledon. he is knocking to be going to the tokyo 0lympics but still sounding like a man wants to rehabilitate and get back on court very soon. thanks for watching the first half of outside source. if you
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saw some of the difficulties at wembley with the euro with the crowd without a special report coming up on that. this looks promising, doesn't it? in fact, over the next few days we're expecting the temperatures to rise and that weekend looks promising. this weekend looks promising. unsettled pattern witht strea m this unsettled pattern with the jet stream very close up. this low pressure with the showers in the rain storms in the last 2a hours, all of that is shifting now and high pressure at this moment is heading in our direction and is going to settle things down. so, so far this month, we really have not had a prolonged spell of warm summer weather but that's exactly what is heading our way now and the fine weather certainly is going to last into the weekend. so the here and the now, is looking quite across many parts of the country and to the night
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clear spells for many western and central areas most of it will probably turn a bit cloudy out towards the east of london and anywhere from northern scotland down to the kent coast. not cold in the morning. 15 degrees in liverpool. here is the high pressure that's nosing its way in our direction but notice the north of it, there is a weak weather front coming in and that is going to bring thicker cloud and maybe a few spots of rain out towards the northwest of the uk, the western isles of scotland but the vast majority of that should have a fine day. 0n the immediate coast it may be on the fresh side in order to spots and norwich they're a bit further england they are at 19 but for london and cardiff talking about 2a or 25 degrees in the low 20s expected in northern ireland as well. here is our low—pressure really starting to take charge of the weather. shifting the weather fronts in the direction of iceland, so away from us. so a fine day on the way for thursday. probably a little bit of cloud building up during the course of the afternoon.
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fair waether cloud but some areas could have clear blue skies and portable some parts of scotland and even in the lowlands of scotland it will be a surprise or temperatures hit the mid—20s and certainly mid—20s expected in the south as well once again in cardiff. the high—pressure is with us on friday. it is with us on saturday and sunday as well. the light went and the clear skies and averages can only do one thing they will continue to rise, a gradual rise as we go through the week into the weekend. that cardiff sunshine all around with temperatures up to 27 degrees and the fine weather probably lasting into next week as well. bye— bye.
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hello, i'm ros atkins. this is 0utside source. 0ur lead story comes from south africa. 45 people have now died in unrest triggered by the chilling of them are presidentjacob zuma. businesses ransacked and now writing for five days across two provinces and the government says the situation has gotten out of hand. we cannot situation has gotten out of hand. : cannot allow anyone to make a mockery of our democratic state and we have instructed the residences to double their efforts. the we have instructed the residences to double their efforts.— double their efforts. the military has been deployed _ double their efforts. the military has been deployed to _ double their efforts. the military has been deployed to help - double their efforts. the military has been deployed to help the i double their efforts. the military - has been deployed to help the police and a hundred people have been arrested so far. in the us, president biden is but to make the
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case for sipping voting rights legislation in a speak you'll make in philadelphia. some republican controlled state are trying to tighten voting rules, including texas was approaching democrats to leave the state.— texas was approaching democrats to leave the state. they are determined to kill this bill— leave the state. they are determined to kill this bill in — leave the state. they are determined to kill this bill in this _ leave the state. they are determined to kill this bill in this regular- to kill this bill in this regular session _ to kill this bill in this regular session. which will end on august the 7th _ session. which will end on august the 7th we — session. which will end on august the 7th. we will stay out until then in order— the 7th. we will stay out until then in order to — the 7th. we will stay out until then in order to do that. find the 7th. we will stay out until then in order to do that.— in order to do that. and we look at the security _ in order to do that. and we look at the security breach _ in order to do that. and we look at the security breach at _ in order to do that. and we look at the security breach at wembley i the security breach at wembley stadium during the euro 2020 final and we'll see how fans got in the stadium and sometimes without tickets. wembley is the heart of english football. it was where the world cup was won in 1966, where this year germany was defeated in a major tournament at last, and where ticketless england fans forced their way in for the final of euro 2020. this is what happened.
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wembley is in north west london. from the tube station, there's a road commonly called wembley way. it leads to the stadium. it's often busy before games. this is ahead of england—germany two weeks ago. but this time, it was clear something was different, something wasn't right. let's start at 11:a5am in the morning, over eight hours before kick—off. people had already started to gather, and through the afternoon, wembley way continued to fill up. at 3:45pm, one fan, kosar noor, tweeted this photo of wembley way. 15 minutes later, apm, the bbc filmed the scene. you can see the atmosphere was shifting. there were thousands of fans, many drinking, plus the police watching on. soon, the police had acknowledged both that there was a problem. at 11:12pm, it put out a statement saying...
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and that the... "wembley area is extremely busy". at 5pm, david nickless, who works for the bbc but was attending the game as a fan, arrived. here's what he saw. the first thing i saw as i exited the station was a row of about 50 men urinating against a wall. wembley way itself was virtually impassable. the crowd was just too large, and the floor had become a sea of broken glass, cans, rubbish. some england fans weren't listening to the police advice, and some did have tickets, but they continued to arrive. at 5pm, three hours til kick—off, and here are fans still pouring out of wembley park station and heading to the game. by this point, wembley way looked like this. thousands of fans, far more than the number of police or the number of security guards. that's normalfor a big game, but it's a factor in understanding what was to follow, because soon
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the situation escalated. at 5:44pm, dominic king of the daily mail tweeted from the stadium... let's just remind ourselves of the lay—out of the stadium. here's the map again. at the end of wembley way is the stadium. there are large stairs leading to the concourse area surrounding the stadium. this is what that it looked like earlier in the day. you can see fans going up some steps to the concourse and then onto the stadium. and this picture shows how security guards were positioned at the entrance to the concourse, this in part was to check people's negative covid tests. but by 6pm, the situation was deteriorating. a barrier by the steps was breached. hundreds poured through. it was filmed by england fan gavin marshall, who gave us this account.
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they were met with a few wembley security staff and a very few police, two or three. they had to use quite a lot of force to try and control that crowd and stop them from coming through, but a number of people did break through. here's another angle, filmed by england fan sandeep sohoni. he was on the stadium's second floor looking down. we see stewards and police trying to hold back crowds. there are scuffles, fans falling over each other. some make it through. all of this was being captured by fans and journalists who were there. tariq panja is a new york times reporter. he was inside the stadium. at 6:06pm, he tweeted... this footage shows that moment. telegraph journalist ewan somerville was also watching. at 6:41pm, he tweeted...
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these chaotic scenes at wembley as several dozen fans ran and tried to storm the gates. huge crowds at the main entrance and others now trying to get over the step railings to bypass ticket checks. police helicopter has arrived. two minutes later, at 6:43pm, another fan, naphisabet tariang tweeted this photo, saying... "the match is yet to start. english fans are already fighting among themselves in wembley." what had started with a worsening situation on wembley had then turned into fans pushing through covid barricades, and now became a run for the stadium. this footage taken by itvjournalist michelle 0wen shows fans running up the steps towards the stadium, and the stewards are clearly outnumbered. the safety risk was clear to those caught up in it. at 7:44pm, this writer and arsenal fan tweeted once through the turnstiles.
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and in the hour before the game, the pressure started to be exerted on some of the stadium's hundreds of turnstiles. this footage shows how. some of the ticketless fans who'd broken through the covid checks now faced the final obstacle between them and getting in. and while the authorities say that they had more stewards than for previous euros games, evidently in some cases this wasn't enough. 0ne ticketholder told the times she had seen a steward taking cash to let people past the checks. "it was shocking," she said. all of this happening ahead of the biggest game for the england team since 1966, the biggest game since wembley was rebuilt. and at 8pm, the final kicked off. less than two minutes later, luke shaw had given england the lead. but while the crowd and the country went wild, wembley stadium was about to release a statement. at 8:08pm, it arrived.
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except that there were. and inside the stadium, those fans were finding places to watch the game. at 8:09pm, jacob steinberg of the guardian tweeting from inside the stadium... by 8:45pm, the first half was coming to an end. england were still 1—0 up, and wembley had released another statement. this time we were told... it stated... that, though, was far easier said than done. by 9pm, the teams were back out for the second half, and as italy applied more and more pressure on england, so some england fans applied
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pressure on the event. here's the new york times' tariq panja again. he says... the crush in that section was happening, in part, because fans without tickets heading where they wanted to watch the game, behind the italy goal. perhaps some with tickets were doing the same. either way, there were too many people. simon kuperfrom the financial times was also in the stadium. he tweeted this picture. he describes... "more people than seats" and the "whole gangway" "filled with standing insurgents .
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that, as football fans know, is a reference to the disaster at hillsborough stadium in 1989 when 96 people died in crush. now to be clear, there was no serious crush this time, but there was violence. and there were people in the stadium who shouldn't have been. with the clock approaching 11pm, the game had reached penalties. and with this save, gianluigi donnarumma became a hero and england had lost. but the work of the police was not done. at 2am, the metropolitan police put out a statement, saying it finally completed its work at wembley. that there were 49 arrests, and that 19 officers "were injured when they confronted volatile crowds. this is wholly unacceptable". and as the hope of sunday night's final turned into a rain—drenched monday, racism aimed at england's players was the focus, as was what happened at wembley. the football association announced a full review and said the people who broke into the stadium... it goes on...
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and while that work goes on, for some the damage is done. there were the fans who were intimidated and scared. michelle 0wen was at the match. she says... there's england's reputation. its team has been showered with praise, but for a watching world, profound issues were raised by what happened at wembley. india's world is one news reported... a reference to britain's colonial past. france's le figaro ran the headline "english football
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finds its old demons", a reference to years of hooliganism. to be clear, these issues aren't settled, they aren't agreed upon. there are many many articles pointing out the trouble came from a small minority, that they represent nothing more than themselves. but they are being raised. because of that, from a purely sporting perspective, england's bid to hosting the 2030 football world cup looks to have got a bit harder. here's the bbc�*s dan roan. they said that the stewarding - exceeded requirements, that they had more security officials - here than at any other event but i think the fear will be that mayhem of last night could've| beenjeopardised england's chances of being part - of a successful bid, a uk and irish bid, for the world cup. _ we'll see about the bid. but it is already clear that something that started being all about sport, about the achievements of two great
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teams, about a moment of national excitement, about some blessed relief from the pressures of covid, morphed into something else. and what could have been a famous sunday injuly had deteriorated into something far darker well before the players even stepped out onto the pitch. stay with us on 0utside source. still to come we turn to china where parents are reunited with their son who was stolen at the age of two after a search that lasted 2a years. in the uk, doctors' leaders have criticised the government's decision to relax covid restrictions in england next week, calling the move "irresponsible". in scotland, first minister nicola sturgeon has also announced that the country will move to its lowest level of covid restrictions from next week. although some legal measures will remain in place. so, we will continue to ease restrictions. we're not slamming on the brakes, but we will do so carefully. let me turn, then, to the detail of our decisions.
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from monday 19th ofjuly, all parts of scotland not currently there will move to level zero. however, this move will be made with certain modifications applied consistently across the country to ensure that we're not easing up faster than is sensible given the current situation that we face. full details of the changes are on our website, but i will highlight some key pointsjust now. in level zero, up to eight people from up to four households can meet indoors at home, compared to six people from three households in levels one and two. up to ten people from up to four households can meet in a public indoor space such as a pub or restaurant, and up to 15 people from up to 15 households can meet outdoors — whether in a private garden or public space. children under 12 already do not count towards the total number of people, and from monday they will not count towards the total number of households either. in level zero, up to 200 people can attend weddings and funerals. soft play centres can open, as they could at level one
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but not at level two, and for hospitality businesses, at level zero, unlike in level two, there's no requirement for customers to pre—book a two—hour slot to go to a pub or restaurant. however, customers will still be required to provide contact details to help test and protect, and they will still be required to wear face coverings except when seated. there will still be limits on the size of events this is 0utside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is — 45 people have died in south africa in unrest triggered by the jailing of former president jacob zuma. over 800 have been arrestd. this is the extraodinary story of the father in china who has been reunited with his son
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after a 24—year search that saw him travel more than 500,000 kilometres on a motorbike. this is the moment his search came to an end. guo xinzhen was reunited with his parents after a dna test threw up the match. in 1997, he was just two years old and was taken from the doorway in front of the family's home. this image was taken early on in the search, and you can see the father gwor gang tang holding up an image of his son. and he never gave up the search. here he is riding his motorbike from town to town with two banners carrying his son's photo. gwor gang tang broke bones, got through ten motorbikes, slept under bridges and begged for money after he spent his life savings in his quest to find his son. so remarkable and relentless were his efforts, a film was made of his story. this is the poster for its release in 2015. that brought a new level
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of fame for mr gwor, and he used it to help parents of other missing children in china. he helped reunite at least seven families, but he couldn't find his own boy. until now. hong kong film star andy lau, who starred in the film, reportedly worked forfree playing guo gangtang. he's said... i feel extremely happy and inspired today because brother guo's son has been reunited with his parents after 2a years. " "i hope everyone canjoin me in condemning human trafficking." chinese police released these images of the two suspects in the abduction of mr guo's son. they said that after spotting him playing alone outside his home in shandong province, the female suspect identified only by her surname tang grabbed him and took him to the bus station, where her partner, a mr hu, was waiting. the couple then took an intercity coach to neighbouring hen nan province and sold him there. mr guo's son was reportedly found still living in the province. now though the family is back together. here's the bbc�*s stephen mcdonell in beijing on how it happened.
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a 26—year—old teacher walked into a room to meet the parents who hadn't seen him for 2h years. his mother was crying uncontrollably. father, guo gangtang, he could barely speak. the police say they found the missing man using a dna match and that two people have already been arrested, accused of abducting the two—year—old and selling him in 1997. now, this is all part of a big campaign by the authorities here to use dna to try and make as many breakthroughs as they can on these missing person cases. because it has been such a huge problem. already, nearly 10,000 people have come forward for blood tests, and the authorities are saying, as a result of this, they have found 2609 missing children.
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they've arrested 372 suspects. in fact, one of those missing person cases, they are saying the person was missing for 61 years. but the extent of the child abduction, child trafficking problem in china is so huge that although they are having successes this year, the authorities, in reuniting with their families, there still remain tens of thousands of parents who don't know where their children are. child abduction has been a massive problem in china for many years. let's show you some pictures coming from philadelphia were president biden is speaking about voting rights. b. biden is speaking about voting riahts. �* ' ' biden is speaking about voting riahts. . " ., ., a ., rights. a 91 your woman in michigan voted early in _ rights. a 91 your woman in michigan voted early in person _ rights. a 91 your woman in michigan voted early in person in _ rights. a 91 your woman in michigan voted early in person in her- rights. a 91 your woman in michigan voted early in person in her 72nd i voted early in person in her 72nd consecutive election. you know what she said? she said this election was
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the most important vote that she ever had. a daughter who voted in memory of her dad who died of covid—19 so others would not have the experience of pain and darkness and loss that she was going through. patients out there, and the parents. the parents who voted for school that children will learn in, sons and daughters voting for the planet they are going to live on. young people just turning 18 and everyone who for the first time in their lives thought they could truly make a difference. america, america and americans of every background well. they voted for good jobs and higher wages. they voted for racial equity and justice. they voted to make health care a right and not a privilege. and the reason that americans went to vote and the links they went to vote, to be able to
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vote in this past election were absolutely extraordinary. in fact, the fact that so many election officials across the country made it easier and safer for them officials across the country made it easier and saferfor them be officials across the country made it easier and safer for them be able to vote in the middle of a pandemic is remarkable. as a result, in 2020 mobile voted in america than ever in the history of america in the middle of a once in a century pandemic. applause. all told, more than 150 americans of every age, of every race and every background exercised their right to vote. they voted early, they voted absentee, they voted in person, they voted by mail, they voted by dropbox, and then they got their families and friends to vote. election officials, the entire
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electoral system withstood unrelenting political attacks, physical threats, intimidation and pressure. they did so with unyielding courage and faith in our democracy. with a recount after recount after recount, court case after court case, the 2020 election was the most scrutinised election everin was the most scrutinised election ever in american history. challenge after challenge brought to local and state election officials, state legislatures, state and federal courts, even to the united states supreme court, not once but twice. more than 80 judges, including those appointed by my predecessor, heard the arguments. in either case, neither cause nor evidence was found to undermine the national achievement of administering the historic election in the face of such extraordinary challenges.
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audits, recounts were conducted. in arizona and wisconsin, and georgia it was recounted three times. it's clear for those who challenge the results and question the integrity of the election. no other election has ever been held under such scrutiny, such high standards. the big lot is just that, scrutiny, such high standards. the big lot isjust that, a big lie! applause. the 2020 election, not hyperbole to suggest the most examined and the fullest expression of the will of the people in the history of this nation. this should be celebrated. an example of america at its best,
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but instead we continue to see an example of human nature at its worst. something darker and more sinister. in america, if you lose, you accept the results. you follow the constitution, you try again, you don't call facts fake and then try to bring down the american experimentjust because you were unhappy! that's not statesmanship! applause. that's not statesmanship! that is selfishness. that is not democracy, is a denial of the right to vote. tt is a denial of the right to vote. tit suppresses and subjugates the denial of full and free and fair elections is the most un—american thing any of us can imagine, the most undemocratic to unpatriotic and sadly not unprecedented. from
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denying insular people full of citizenship until the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments after the civil war to deny women the right to vote until the 19 minute 100 years ago, to poll taxes and literacy tests and the ku klux klan campaigns of violence and terror that lasted into the 1950s and 60s come to the supreme court decision in 2013 and then againjust two supreme court decision in 2013 and then again just two weeks ago, a decision that weekend the landmark voting rights act. to the willful attacks, election attacks in 2020 and then to a whole other level of threat, the violence in a deadly insurrection on the capitol on january the 6th. ijust got back from europe with the meaning of the g7 and nato. they wonder, not a joke, they wonder and they asked me
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is it going to be ok? the citadel of democracy in the world, is it going to be ok? time and again, we have weathered threats to the right to vote in free and fair elections and each time we have found a way to overcome. and thus we must do today. the vice president harris and i have spent our careers doing this work, and i have asked her to leave and be people together to protect the right to vote in our democracy. i have asked her to lead. it starts with continuing the fight to pass hr one, the for the people act.— that bill... that bill will help in voter suppression _ that bill... that bill will help in voter suppression in _ that bill... that bill will help in voter suppression in the i that bill... that bill will help in | voter suppression in the states. that bill... that bill will help in i voter suppression in the states. get dark money out of politics, give voice to the people at the grassroots level, create a fair
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district map and in partisan political gerrymandering. last month, republicans opposed even debating, even considering the for the people act. senate democrats stood united to protect our democracy and the sanctity of the vote. we must pack the for the people act. it's a national imperative. we must also fight for thejohn imperative. we must also fight for the john lewis imperative. we must also fight for thejohn lewis voting rights expansion act to restore and expand... expansion act to restore and expand- - -— expand... applause. to restore _ expand... applause. to restore and - expand... applause. | to restore and expand expand... applause. - to restore and expand voting protections and prevent voter suppression. all the and men here and there are bunch of you, you knew john, many of you. just weeks ago, the supreme court yet again we can the supreme court yet again we can the voting rights act and upheld
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what justice the voting rights act and upheld whatjustice elena kagan called a significant race—based disparity in voting opportunities. the court's decision as harmful as it is does not limit the congress's ability to repair the damage done. that's the important point. it puts the burden back on congress to restore the voting rights act to its intended strength. as soon as congress passes the for the people act and thejohn lewis voting rights advancement act, i will sign and let the whole world see it! that will be unimportant moment! and the world will be —— the world is wondering... moment! and the world will be -- the world is wondering. . ._ world is wondering... applause. the world is _ world is wondering... applause. the world is wondering... - world is wondering... applause. the world is wondering... and i world is wondering... applause. i the world is wondering... and white knows what i'm talking about, for
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real. —— dwight knows. the world is wondering what is america going to do. we also have to be clear eyed about the obstruction we face. legislation is one tool but not the only tool. and it's not the only measure of our obligation to defend democracy today. for example, attorney general merrick garland announced the united states department ofjustice is going to be using its authority to challenge the onslaught of state laws undermining voting rights in old and new ways. applause. the focus will be on dismantling racism and instrumental weight loss like the recent challenge to georgia's vicious anti—voting law. the department ofjustice will do so with eight voting rights division that my request is doubling its size and enforcement scope. the civil rights groups... civil rights groups
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and other organisations announced their plans to stay vigilant and challenge these odious laws in the courts. in texas, for example, republican—led state legislatures want to allow partisan poll watchers to intimidate voters and imperil and imperil impartial vote workers. they want voters to be in a position where they wonder who is watching them and intimidating them and to wait longer to vote and to drive a help —— excuse me. a long way to get the boat. they want to make it so hard in inconvenient that they hope the people don't vote at all. that's what this is about. this year alone, 17 states have enacted and notjust repost but enacted 28 new laws to make it harder for americans to vote. not to mention, catch this, nearly 400 additional bills
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